The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00360

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Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
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Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
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P9
No. 2
MIAMI. FLORIDA. FRIDAY. JANUARY 10. 19.1B
Price Five Cent*
Jewish News
F Around the
World
Jewish Uii-tnc ; Mm Swear Oil
Card I'lining ill Synanouiir
After Holdup
Glen Cove, Long Island (WNS)
There will lie no more rani play-
ing in th' vi try loom of Congre-
gation Tifereth Israel. Eleven
^^^H business all members
at the congregation, were enjoying
a pokei' game ill the synagogue
when two bandits took a hand in
the game by shouting "hands up."
Bg the players to disrobe in
^Ho prevent them from escap-
Se gunmen robbed the play-
I their watches and several
~M dollars in cash. The ban-
Heaped and the Jewish busi-
~ftieii took an oath never to
Srds in the synagogue again.
Ladies to Hold
Benefit Dinner
Famous Orator Bureau Drive
To Speak Here On for Members
THE WORLD'S
WINDOW
The first of a series of congre-
gational dinners will be held by
Ih. .Miami Jewish Orthodox Con-
gregation under the sponsorship of
its Ladies' Auxiliary next Sunday
evening, January 12th, at 6:80
o'clock in the clubrooms of the
| Young Men's Hebrew Association,
when a chicken dinner will be
served. Charges will be only $1
i per plate. A gala program of en-
j tertainment will be presented dur-
ing the evening. The proceeds of
this event will be used for the Tal-
mud Torah of the congregation. In
charge of arrangements are Mes-
dames I. Rosengarten, Max Wein-
berger, Morris Rappaport, Moe
j Pallott, N. Adelman, H. Shulman,
11. Integer, N. Blumberg, A. N.
Bass, J. L. Shochet. Reservations
may be made with any member of
i the committee.
en Rescue 24 Torah Scrolls
Fire Destroys Brooklyn
Synagogue
thei
York (WNS)At the risk
r lives, firemen fighting
pur-aJarm fire which destroyed
Jie interior of Congregation Etc
Shaim Maka/.iko llorav, in the
Jrownsville section of Brooklyn,
arried to safety 24 Torah Scrolls.
Under instructions from Deputy
Chief O'llanion, the firemen bat-
tled thi i-ii a wall ol' flame and
dense clouds of smoke and brought
le Torah Scrolls stored in the
bgue's basement and then
pack into the interior of the
)guc t rescue l'.l other
A valuable collection of
Jewiah manuscripts was destroyed.
The Synagogue, one of the oldest
in Brooklyn, is a total wreck. Only
the trails are now standing. The
damage ;- ,-i.mated at 50,000.
to a.
the
the
Me
be
whic
pror
to
jher Butchers
Organize Here
the first time in the history
mi Beach, butchers engaged
sale of kosher meats and
formed the Miami Beach
Butchers' Association at a
held last week.
of the first acts of the or-
|tion was the adoption of
ion agreeing to permit Rab-
d I. Rosenbloom or any rep-
tives that he may desig-
inspect stores, ice boxes
emiscs of their establish-
at all times to insure strict
. The organization pledged
pn the establishment of kash-
all times.
[purposes of the organization
forth by its chairman, Mr.
Romer, and its secretary,
Ascher, in addition to in-
kashrus, are the promotion
jtter trade conditions, fair
lent of the general public,
[sanitation of premises and
bbuilding of the morale of
shcr butcher business.
tings of the organization will
Id from time to time, at
various rabbis and other
Bnt speakers will be invited
irer addresses.
Y. M. H. A. to Hold
"Night of Stars"
Stars of radio, screen and stage
will aid the building fund of the
Miami Young Men's Hebrew Asso-
ciation, according to an announce-
ment by Boris Schlachman, execu-
tive director.
Nick Kenny, radio editor for
Hearst publications, is actively en-
deavoring to make the "Night of
Stars" at the Olympia Theatre at
midnight Sunday evening, January
l!th, one of the outstanding events
ever shown in the South. Such
entertainers as Belle Baker, Mil-
ton Berle, Lou Holtz, Georgie
Price, Ben Bernie, the entile Karl
Carrol] Show, the cast of Ira's
Supper Club, Sammie Walsh, the
star performers at the Town Ca-
sino and the cast of the Follies, the
Royal Palm Club and Club Bag-
dad are only part of the show that
will be presented during the eve-
ning.
An encouraging feature was the
spontaneous response by these
stars when the need of a commu-
nity centre for local Jewish boys
and girls was urged upon them.
In charge of arrangements are
Boris Schlachman, Al Rosenfeld,
Al Berkowitz, Nat Blumberg, Phil-
ip Berkowitz, Al Reisman and Pe-
ter Silverman. Tickets may be
purchased from $1 to $10 at the
Olympia Theatre or from any
member of the committee.
Recently returned to the United
States from Europe and Asia, dur-
ing which time he attended the
World Zionist Conference at Lu-
cerne, and visited Palestine, Rabbi
Dr. Stephen S. Wise will arrive
in Miami to deliver an address on
"The World Jewish Scene" at Tem-
ple Israel, 187 X. E. Nineteenth
St., Wednesday evening, January
15th, at 8 o'clock.
Dr. Wise, who has been unani-
mously acclaimed as one of the
world's greatest orators and cham-
pion of human rights, has been a
figure not only in the Jewish
world, but in national affairs as
well. He was the founder of the
American Jewish Congress, a lead-
er in World Zionist'work, active in
relief work of Jews and non-Jews
and a leader for amelioration of
labor conditions throughout the
world.
As we go to press an important
meeting of the Jewish Welfare Bu-
reau memebership drive committee
is being held at Hotel Evans,
-Miami Beach. At this meeting
members of the "Big Gifts" com-
mittee are planning to canvass
both residents as well as tourists
who should contribute large sums
to the work of the Jewish Welfare
Bureau.
This year the drive is in charge
of Sholem Lodge, B'nai B'rith, with
Mr. Klry Stone as chairman, Mr.
M. J. Kopelowitz as secretary, Mr.
[ Isaac Levin, president of the lodge,
and other officers and memebers
assisting. The large contributors
will be solicited until January 20,
when a large dinner will be held,
at which all committee members
will meet for the purpose of be-
ginning the general membership
campaign. The campaign will last
until January 27th, when it is
hoped the goal will be reached and
the quota set will be filled. Daily
meetings will be held at the Pala-
tial Kosher Restaurant
Manifesto"
By I.ID WIG LEWISOHN
This column is copyrighted by
the Seven Arts Feature Syndi-
cate. Reproduction in whole or
in part strictly forbidden. Any
infringement on this copyright
will be prosecuted.
Zionists Form
Miami District
Sholem Lodge
Will Install
All members of Sholem Lodge,
B'nai B'rith, are urged to attend
the social meeting and installation
of officers to be held Tuesday eve-
ning, January 14th, at Beth Da-
vid Auditorium, beginning at 8
o'clock, when a program of mu-
sical entertainment will be pre-
sented. The formal ceremonies
for the installation will be in
charge of Sam A. Goldstein of
West Palm Beach, Florida repre-
sentative on the District Grand
Lodge Extension Board. Dr. A. E.
Rosenthal is in charge of the mu-
sical program. Refreshments will
be served.
RABBI STEPHEN S. WISH
Dr. Wise lias never hesitated to
champion the cause of the op-
pressed and has become a power-
ful political figure in national cam-
paigns. He has been known as a
close friend of presidents and oth-
er national leaders.
Dr. Wise will give a vivid de-
scription of the world Jewish
scenes, not only as they affect
Jews, but as they fit into the ag-
gravated condition of world affairs
generally.
At 12:30 the same day there will
be a luncheon in honor of Dr. Wise
to which all interested in the work
of Dr. Wise for Palestine, the
American Jewish Congress and
other of his activities are urged to
attend. The luncheon will be held
at the Family Jacobs Alamac Ho-
tel, Miami Beach. Reservations
may be made by calling the hotel.
At the evening address Mr. Her-
bert U. Feibelman will preside and
Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan will intro-
duce the speaker.
In charge of arrangements are
Messrs. Sam Simonhoff, who is
general chairman of the reception
and arrangements committee; Day
J. Apte, M. Victor Miller, Paul H.
Marks, Harry I. Lipton, Isaac Lev-
in, Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan, Herbert
U. Feibelman, Mrs. Morris Plant,
Mrs. Louis Zeientz, Mrs. Sidney L.
VV'eintraub, Mrs. Morris Rubin and
Mrs. Mark Max.
Tickets of admission are only
$1 and may be obtained at Temple
Israel or at stores where posteri
are displayed.
Quite a large gathering attended
the organization meeting of lb.'
Zionist District of Greater .Miami
lasl Sunday night at Beth David
Talmud Torah Hall and listened
to a stirring address by Rabbi Mor.
ton M. Berman of New York or.
conditions in World Jewry. Mr.
Harry I. Lipton presided. Rabbi
Max Shapiro presented the report
of the nominating committee and
additional nominations were made
by the audience. Rabbi Jacob H.
Kaplan (introduced .the principal
speaker of the evening. Condi
tions in Palestine were described by-
Mr. Lipton, who visited there re-
cently.
Mr. Harry I. Lipton, prominent
attorney, was elected president;
Isaac Levin, first vice-president;
A. Rauzin, second vice-president;
Leo Robinson, treasurer, and Boris
Schlachman, secretary. Chosen to
the board of directors were Messrs.
Nathan Adelman, Abe Aronovitz,
Leonard Barr, Jacob Becker, Dr.
Charles Beckwitt, Isidor Cohen, Dr.
Max Dobrin, M. B. Frank, Joseph
Greenberg, George Goldberg, Louis
Gordon, N. J. Kopelowitz, Moses
Krieger, Philip Liberman, M. L.
i Marcus, Al Mechlowitz, Harry
| Markowitz, Stanley C. Myers, Har-
|ry Nadelweiss, Morris Plant, Max
Rappaport, Joseph M. Rose, Dr. A.
E. Rosenthal, Morris Rubin, J.
Louis Shochet, Hugo Shonberg and
Harry Simonhoff. Rabbis Dr. Ja-
cob H. Kaplan, Max Shapiro, Da-
vid I. Rosenbloom and Julius
Washer were unanimously elected
honorary vice-presidents of the dis-
trict.
Following the election of offi-
cers various resolutions were
adopted. More than fifty mem-
bers joined and paid their annual
dues during the evening. A se-
ries of cultural affairs on Zionism
will be held during the winter sea-
son, plans of which will be an-
nounced shortly.
(Continued from last week)
What does the heretic get in Rus-
sia? We have evil and injustice
here, God knows. But here are left
margins of liberty that the young,
the generous, the revolutionary
may broaden. They will not do so
in the name of a polity that has
slain the very concept of liberty
and equal justice. Fighting free
institutions in the name of servile
state variety A, they may help to
bring upon us the servile state va-
riety B. They are as frivolous as
they are witless.
It is I who refuse "to shut the
gates of mercy on mankind." But
sodden sentimentalists are always
hard-hearted. Share-croppers in
the South? What right have you
to whimper over themyou who
defend the "liquidation" of intel-
lectuals, kulaks, social revolution-
arieshundreds and hundreds of
thousands of men and women? Ah,
.they were bourgeois? And what
are you. the majority of you, but
the sons and daughters of those
able decent and productive people
.bat are known as middle class?
Who are you as Jews to identity
,\ .urselves with a pagan authon-
ariail servile state and glory in
: murder of men? Yes, yes, the
share-croppers are workers. The
worker, like the noble savage of
Rousseau, is now the angel image
of the romanticised Utopian escap-
isls from that duty and station in
life to which God has called them.
Will, I too, want justice for the
workers. But if there must be in-
justice in the world, it is better for
civilization including the workers,
that the conquest of that injustice
be slow than that we all, including
the workers, be shut up in the pen-
itentiary of a servile state and that
all free minds and all free men be
crushed as "wreckers" or counter-
revolutionaries. The worship of
the workers and the callousness to
their own on the part of many of
the sons and daughters of the Jew-
ish bourgeoisie is for a sentimen-
tal masochistic escape-mechanism
as witless as it is odious.
*
Jews in Russia? They are per-
mitted to assimilate. Quite true.
It has all happened before. Sin-
cere Jewish assimilationists are
therefore temporarily not discon-
tented in Russia. I don't have to
go to Russia to understand that.
But Dr. Hans Kohn, expert on Rus-
sia, Slavic and other tongues and
politics, writes soberly enough:
"The Soviet order means a com-
plete break with the past, an up-
rooting of individuals and groups
from their traditions and wonted
patterns of life, an effort to re-
shape them as members of a new
rational civilization meant to be
common to all men, and hence de-
void of all emotional attachments
(Continued on Page 8)


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Bci Office Bm 0ra
Ft* mmiMM tilitiM :-i...
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Florida's Finest
American-Jewish j
Dinner"
ST. REGIS |
restaurant;
446 COLLIN/ AVE.
MIA/A1
BEACH
'KAVfcNU6
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BRIGHT LIGHTS
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inic*u with Mr.
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ARNOLD VOLPE. Conductor
Monday Evenine. January 13th. at 8:45
Soloist
M I 8 C HA ELM A N
i liptiin.io. $:.it
St(k Tick*t.$1.6.-,. $2.20
Ticket- at Philpitts. 40 S. E. First St.f:-.0-_ :-flJ78
And Burdine3 Mezzanine. Lincoln Ro^d
DR. STEPHEN S. WISE
B*t Kno*n f'ujpii Loetarer in th Caaatr
Temple Israel. 187 Northeast 19th Street
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY loth. 19%. at P. M.
Admi-iion S1.00
Ba+ject: THE wori.o 1EWI8H 8CEXE
f.r Ann.- faia
-ir.-. < h.r-.r.fl
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FEDER\L
Savings^
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LOAN
Federal Savings
I and LOAN ASSOCIATION of MIAMI
GROUND FLOORCONGRESS BLDG.
Safetv of Your Savings Insured I'd to S5.000
T.r.. in QAM Itt.'^t fr*tr*m" :S P. M. Mon A n.. TiM V. M. hoi
$1
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MOPPIS
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OPENS A
SAVINGS ACCOUNT
At the
MORRIS PLAN
4 W. rialr 8t- Vlncnt R. BHc. 1|.t.


Friday, January 10, 1936
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page Three
4*Jewish ficndiian
News Tower Bldg.
621 S. W. 15th Avenue
I LOKJ1M S ON'LY ,'EWISH WEEKLY
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY
by the
JEWISH FLORIDIAN PUBLISHING CO.
P. O. Box 2T3
Miami, Fla.
EDITORIAL OFFICES:
Phone 2-5304
Fhone 2-1 IKS
J. LOUIS SHOCHET, Editor
FRED K. SHOCHET. Circulation Manager
CANTOR BORIS SCHLACHMAN
Field Representative
Entered as second class matter July 4, 1930. at the Post Office at Miami, Florida,
under the Act of March 3. 1879.
ST. PETERSBURG
RABBI A. S. KLEINFELD
Representative
WEST PALM BEACH
S. SCHUTZER
Representative
ORLANDO
IRENE BRAVERMAN
Representative
TAMPA
MRS. M. H. KISLER
Representative
SUBSCRIPTION
Six Months _....................................................................-.........................................-.......-ii-JS
One Year .........................................................................................................................................
FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1936
Vol. 9No. 2
What Is News?
ish Lite in Modern Times," says:
"The great diversity that charac-
terizes modern Jewry is the nat-
ural result of its dispersion
throughout the globe This dif-
ferentiation is produced by the in-
fluence of their several environ-
ments, which vary from one anoth-
er in physical, political and intel-
lectual conditions, and effect cor-
responding variations among their
Jewish denizens. But the Jews of
any particular country, although '
exposed to the same general in-
fluences, are not molded into tin-
same general pattern."
The differences are expressed
in many ways. There are those
who do not believe in organized re-
ligion, both among Jews and
Christians. They believed in or-
ganized religion, as it seems to
me, when organized religion be-
lieved in rugged individualism, and
labor was unorganized. But when
labor is organized, and religion is
preaching equality of opportunity
for all men, including labor and
white collar worker, then some of
these do no longer believe in or-
ganized religion.
But aside from this "philosoph-
ic" point of view, there are Ortho-
dox, Conservative and Reform
lews; theie are Zionists, Anti-
Zionists and non-Zionist"' there
are Sephardim and Asnkenazic
Jews; there are l'oale-Zionists and
Misrachists; there are self-hating
and self-respecting Jews; there are
national and cosmopolitan Jews;
there are Jews suffering because
n!' righteousness and those suffer-
ing because of sins. There are
Charity Jews and Religious Jews.
There are practical Jews and .saint-
ly .lews.
Everyone thinks he is right.
What do you think?
Can Jews ever become unified
in any way. for any purpose, on
any platform?
Suppose we say it is Judaism
that holds Jews together, thsit
Creates B semblance of unity among
all Jews. The non-Jews often talk
as if we were all alike, just plain
PLAIN TALK
By AL SEGAL
"Story of Two Temples"
Remarkable it is how news values meriting bold head-
lines in the metropolitan dailies dwindle to but a few lines
hidden away in the dailies in this area. Particularly is this
true when matters affecting Jews are involved.
Last Friday night President Roosevelt in a speech to
Congress listened to by millions, dwelt rather forcibly on
the lack of religious toleration in European countries ruled
by dictators and prided himself on the fact that in these
United States we believed in equality, religious freedom,
etc It was a rather pointed hint to Hitler and his cohorts
to which they replied the next day in rather uncomplimentary
terms.
To our astonishment, one of our local dailies made no
mention whatever of this portion of the president's message,
and the other two simply printed it as a portion of the gen-
eral address. In metropolitan dailies elsewhere much notice
was taken of this portion of the address.
And yet one of our dailies the next day printed a
rather lengthy interview with a German merchant, accom-
panied by a photograph of this gentleman and his wife, and
rather plainly permitted Hitler propaganda to be dissemi-
nated in this fair city of Miami. In the interview which our
local daily thought was of sufficient importance to give it
a rather prominent spot, the oft-repeated falsehood that "the
subversive elements in Germany were being put in their
places," etc., etc., was printed rather boldly and with no
attempt on the part of the editor to edit it.
Perhaps the gentlemen in charge of this publication will
realize that there are two sides to every story perhaps,! ,.ah und nanded it to Moses, and
too, they will feel that in the spirit of fair play and common Moses handed it to Israel. Nay,
more, he will tell you that every
bit of commentary and explana-
tion of the Torah was already
known to Moses. If he is a mod-
Jews. What have you to say?
Suppose we do say that Judaism
is the bond of union among Jews.
The question then arises, What
is Judaism?
Here we should find as many
answers as there are groups and
sub-groups among Jews of all
lands.
If the Jew is really orthodox he
will tell you that he believes, as
we all did, that God wrote the To-
decency it would be far better that such interviews never
were printed ... we wonder what the Jewish advertisers will
say.
It appears that news values do change yes. perhaps
when viewed through dark colored glasses of prejudice, hate ,.,- orthodox, as Maimonidea was
and tin -Americanism such as one expects of Hitler cohorts IM nja ,iayi ne wuj give excellent
and Hitler sympathizers.
Something should be done to direct the attention of our
local dailies to prevent a recurrence of these happenings.
Boruch Habo!
In these days when momentous matters affecting Jews
throughout the civilized world are being decided daily, it is
a pleasure to welcome to our midst Jews of courage, of vision
and of determination. It is, therefore, that we extend the
traditional "Boruch Habo" to Rabbi Dr. Stephen S. Wise on
his arrival in Miami.
Though he will be with us for but a few short days, his'rious books of the Bible; he will
stay here should encourage the wavering and vacillating Jew give a different explanation of the
and put real vision into those who need it. origin of Judaism, and the fune-
We sincerely hope that the message of Dr. Wise will be tion of beliefs in modern life; and
the means of revitalizing Jewish hope and faith in this area.
No matter what shade of Jewry we belong to, our problems
are but one.
And so, once again, we say "Boruch Habo."
philosophic explanation of his be-
lief, as well he might do, for every
bit of explanation and interpreta-
tion is in the spirit of Moses, and
so the Torah, like the Constitution
of the United States, is the fun-
damental law on which all inter-
pretations are based.
If the Jew is a Reform Jew he
will have an entirely different out-
look on the meaning of Judaism.
He will examine critically the va-
Think, Work
And Smile
By JACOB H. KAPLAN, Ph. D.
Last week I began a series of
articles on Jewish Problems, which
are discussed in my high school
class, and prepared by the Hebrew
Union College.
Last week I asked the question,
"Who Is a Jew?"
Let us see why so many differ-
ences among Jews, and what is Ju-
daism.
Israel Cohen, in his book, "Jew-
yet the Reform Jew insists that
he is a product of Jewish forces
and life and culture, and that he
belongs to the same great group
of men and women known as Jews,
and that he believes in the same-
religion known as Judaism.
In between these two extremes
we find all shades of belief and
viewpoint, from Ethical Jews, pro-
phetic Jews, religious Jews, to
(Continued on Page 4)
Hear Mr. Segal: What, in your
opinion, is the future of Reform
Judaism? Or has it a future?
B. T. E.
*
Well, to answer this I have the
true story of two temples in a
certain American city.
The one temple might be called
one of the landmarks of Reform
Judaism, which is to say that it
was almost as old as Reform Ju-
daism itself. It hail noble tradi-
tions which have to do with sainted
great-grandfathers, and in the city
in which it abides it was esteemed
as a hoary, venerable institution.
About it hovered the fragrance
of aristocratic memory, for in the
old days to belong to Anshe Gibo-
rim Temple (which was not its
name! carried the same signifi-
cance as to belong to the best
country club does today.
Aye, it stood like some enfee-
bled old man looking backward at
his gorgeous youth. At times the
old gentleman withdraws his rapt
.yes from the happy past to look,
bewildered, at the present: What
has become of his children? He
remembers they were gathered
about him a little while ago .
yesterday or the clay before. Now
i they're all gone, all gone.
So it was with this temple. On
confirmation days particularly, the
ghosts of the sainted pioneers
must have wondered what had be-
come of their children. The chil-
dren who were being blessed by
the rabbi were not of their descend-
ants, they carried strange names.
In the hearts of the- members
the temple was a sentimental thing
that had to do with dead kinsmen
who had founded it; they paid their
clues faithfully as one pays the
sexton of a cemetery for the up-
keep of parents' graves; they kept
hereditary pews as one guards an
antique sofa in which a beloved
grandmother liked to sit.
Their Judaism was an aspiration
that concerned itself chiefly with
drives for social agencies and knew
or cared little about any poetic
beauty to be derived from observ-
ance of the things of the faith.
* a /
The other temple (in the same
city) was of newer origin. Its
members were for the most part
fresh from Orthodoxy. Still sang
In their hearts the familiar voices
of cantors and if it came to that
many of them could recite the en-
tire morning prayer of the Ortho-
dox service by heart.
They knew the proper number
of rounds to wind around their
arms in the laying of the t'fiilim,
though years and years had passed
since the last time they had taken
tlu- phylacteries.
Their Judaism was a cherished
possession they had brought up
' from their childhood. It had to do
with candle lights on Sabbath eve,
with mothers' hands blessing them,
with Sabbath haves exhaling fra-
grance, with seders and gleaming
, Chanuka lamps.
They made a happy synthesis of
the spirit of the old and the ra-
tionalism of Reform. Some of
them were irreconcilables in the
matter of wearing hats in temple;
their hats stood defiant on their
heads.
There were amusing reports: On
Yom Kippur, when the long day
verged toward noon, men left the
temple to go to some Orthodox syn-
agogue where they borrowed a ta-
lith and gave themselves to the
lull holiness of the occasion; or
they went to the synagogue- to be
near their fathers as of old. Juda-
ism was still a loud summoning in
their hearts.
Then hard times came and men
who had been the pillars of this
temple fell into the depression;
and it came to a moment when it
.seemed that this congregation must
perish for lack of sustenance: An
unhappy end that was befalling
many another thing that was holy.
Thus it came to pass that the
older people took steps to save
Ibis congregation by taking it over
and making it part of itself and
endowing it with its great and good
name and with its venerable tra-
ditions. Everybody said that this
was a very fine thing to do: One
Jewish house was saving the other!
But, as it turns out, the older
temple is the one that has been
saved. From the warmth of the
younger congregation (which it
had embraced in saving grace) the
older temple has derived life and
vigor.
No wealth did the younger con-
gregation bring to the old, but the
riches of Jews who bring the love-
lier things of Orthodoxy, to whom
being Jewish is more than being
a solicitor for social agencies,
whose Jewish identity is more than
an affliction suffered on account
of a German dictator.
These new members (who came
out of Orthodoxy) have become
leaders of the old temple's activ-
ities; its aging bones throb with
new eagerness and it wants to go
places, as they say. Still grand
with noble tradition stands this
temple, but its eyes are not turned
'to backward-looking; its senti-
ments no longer have to do alto-
gether with veneration of dead pio-
neers in whose memory one kept
em paying dues.
1 am told that not long ago this
, temple had a social session to cel-
ebrate a religious festival. One
who was interested in religious and
social statistics made a count in
order to arrive at an answer to a
question: How many of those pres-
ent at this religious festival were
; of the old membership of this tem-
ple-, how many of the new?
He found only two of the hered-
itary members of the temple; the
remainder of the 350 were of the
new who had come in (quite fresh
from Orthodoxy) when the tem-
ples were merged.
It seemed the men from Ortho-
doxy were saving this landmark of
Reform.
All this, as I hear, is typical of
saving changes that are going on
in Reform Judaism everywhere.
Re-form Judaism, it appears, is be-
ing rescued by arms that still bear
the markings of phylactery straps
that were wound around them for
the Orthodox service of the morn-
ing in their youth. Its spirit is
being revived the outgivings of
hearts that still carry the Ortho-
dox prayers with their proper in-
tonations. Its stiffening body is
invigorated by blood that has
coursed swiftly to the inspirations
of the seder drama.
The future of Reform Judaism
seems to be in the hands of Jews
of Orthodox origin who in the past
few years have been taking the
active leadership of temples.
(Copyright, 1936, by Seven Arts
Feature Syndicate)



THZ
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. January 10.


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Friday, January 10, 1936
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page Five
Jacksonville News
The regular monthly meeting of
the Daughters of Israel was held
Monday afternoon in the audito-
rium of the Jewish Center. This
meeting had been scheduled to
take place last Thursday, but had
been portponed to Monday, due to
proximity to holidays.
Mrs. Joseph Hackel presided
over the meeting. Mrs. Dave Torn
entertained the assemblage with
beautiful vocal selections. She
was accompanied at the piano by
Mrs. Archie Puldy.
Entertaining the children regis-
tered by the Ladies' Hebrew Shel-
tering Aid Society and Home for
the Aged, the following commit-
tee, Mrs. F. Soforenko, Mrs. S. Las-
urow, Mrs. Sam Bryan, Mrs. Louis
Wolfson, Mrs. H. Talisman, Mrs.
J. Bartley, Mrs. S. L. Blattncr,
Mrs. M. L. Hollins and Mrs. H.
Rosenvaig, arranged a theatre
party Monday etfternoon in the
Florida Theatre.
Assisting the committee in car-
ing for the children were Mrs. A.
Kristle, Mrs. D. H. Lasarow, Mrs.
B. B. Yoffee, Mrs. N. Leitman and
Mrs. S. Harris.
In order to give an enthusiastic
start to the new year the Temple
Sisterhood held its January meet-
ing in the form of a luncheon at
1 o'clock Tuesday, January 7th, in
the Temple Home. The luncheon
was in charge of Mrs. J. M. Glick-
stein.
Guests were received by Mrs.
Leon Greenbaum and her hospital-
ity committee. Tables were ar-
ranged by Mrs. M. J. Greenblatt,
chairman of the house committee,
and decorated by the flower com-
mittee.
The main attraction of this
luncheon meeting was an all artist
program arranged by the program
chairman. For the musical part
of the entertainment, Mrs. Ches-
ter Bedell, soprano, offered a group
of lovely songs, and Mrs. Peyton
J. Watson played a group of piano
solos.
In addition to the delightful mu-
sical program, Justine Rehnborg
gave a group of readings. A busi-
ness session followed.
The January meeting of the
Senior Hadassah Chapter was held
Wednesday afternoon in the Jew-
ish Center, with Mrs. Ben Stein
presiding.
Plans for the regional conven-
tion, to take place in Jacksonville
February 10th and 11th, were dis-
cussed and other matters of im-
portance were brought up for at-
tention.
An entertaining program was
presented and a social hour was
enjoyed after the meeting and pro-
gram, during which the hostesses
for the day served dainty refresh-
ments.
STATEWIDE NEWS
Orlando Notes
Mrs. I. Rosenbaum and daugh-
ters, Hannah and Caroline, enter-
tained informally Saturday after-
noon complimenting Mrs. H. Brasii
and Miss Ruth Brash of Tampa. The
former is a civic worker, and the
latter in Orlando to attend the F.
E. A. convention. They returned
to Tampa.
Mrs. M. Greenberg of Hartford,
Conn., is visiting her son and
daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Ben
Greenberg, for the winter.
Misses Ruth Esther Rosen,
Elaine Klepper, Irene and Maxine
Braverman, students of Florida
State College for Women at Tal-
lahassee, returned to school Mon-
day after spending the holidays in
Orlando with their parents.
Mrs. H. Jacob of Detroit, Mich.,
is spending the winter with her
son and daughter, Mr. and Mrs.
Louis Jacob.
West Palm Beach
Notes
Sisterhood Beth VA gave a bene-
fit card party Sunday night at the
Monterey Hotel with Mrs. Louis
Schutzer as hostess. Bridge and
other games were enjoyed. High
score prizes were awarded and rs-
freshments were served.
One of the most enjoyable af-
fairs given was the New Year's
dinner dance at the Orange Court
Hotel. Fifty couples attended.
One of the main features was a
floor show, in addition to many
novelties introduced during the
evening.
Messrs. Abe. Kaminoff, Morton
Levy, Martin Segal, Joel Baker,
Myer Sigal, students at the Uni-
versity of Florida at Gainesville,
returned to school this week after
spending the holidays with their
parents.
Mrs. H. Fred of Chicago is the
house guest of Mrs. J. Rosen.
Mr. Sam Arstein is visiting in
Talladega, Ala.
Miss Lucille Baker returned
from a visit yesterday in Daytona
Beach.
Under the leadership of Charles
Wax, the Young Men's Jewish Pro-
gressive Club was organized at the
Hotel Monterey Monday night. Of-
ficers elected are: Charles Kapner,
president; Max Auerbach, vice-
president; Milton Finkelstein, sec-
retary; Harry Moss, treasurer, and
Albert Moss, sergeant-at-arnis.
Mr. Wax was appointed honorary
adviser.
The club is to be an independ-
ent Jewish organization for worK
of a local scope.
Mr. and Mrs. M. Rubin and Mrs.
Max Moss of Miami visited rel-
atives and friends Wednesday.
Congregation and Sisterhood of
Beth El met in joint session Tues-
day evening at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Sam Scher. Matters of
congregational interest and plans
for the winter season were dis-
cussed. A social hour followed.
Mr. and Mrs. George J. Baruch
announced the engagement of
their daughter, Miss Janet Erma
Baruch, to Benjamin L. Lichten-
stein, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry
E. Lichtenstein.
Miss Baruch attended Columbia
University.
Mr. Lichtenstein is a grandson
of the late Leopold Furchgott, who
founded the Kohn-Furchgott Com-
pany of Jacksonville, Fla.
Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood
held open house Tuesday evening
in Schwartzberg Hall with Mrs.
M. Haimowitz and Mrs. Barney
Blicher as hostesses. A short bus-
iness meeting was held.
Mrs. Halpern delivered a wel-
coming address, after which Mrs.
Carl N. Herman presented a pro-
gram of entertainment. Soprano
solos by Mrs. George Gamble, ac-
companied by Mrs. Robert D. At-
kisson; a violin solo, played by
George Slaton, with Mrs. Atkisson
at the piano; a talk on the activ-
ities of the Sisterhood during the
past year, by the secretary, Mrs.
Louis Vangilder, and the singing
of "America" by all.
A card party Sunday night at
8 at Schwartzberg Hall, with Mrs.
Vangilder and Mrs. M. Weiner-
man of Delray, hostesses; a card
party next Tuesday afternoon at
2 o'clock at the home of Mrs. H.
St. Petersburg
Notes
Cong. B'nai Israel, A. S. Klein-
feld, rabbi, holds Friday services
at 8 p. m. The rabbi's sermon
will be "How to Combat Anti-
Semitism." Saturday morning
services begin at 9 o'clock.
Mr. and Mrs. Hyman M. Jacobs
entertained Mr. J. Adler (B. Kov-
ner) and his wife and son with a
reception in his honor. Guests
were Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Miller,
Mr. and Mrs. David Miller, Mr.
and Mrs. Helfenstein, Mr. and Mrs.
Sam Shapiro, Mr. Sam Rosen, Mr.
and Mrs. Dave Rothblatt and
Rabbi Kleinfeld.
Among the visitors here for the
winter are Mr. and Mrs. Agee, Mr.
and Mrs. Fein and Miss Edna
Morrison of Pittsburgh, Pa., visit-
ing Mr. and Mrs. David Loebel of
this city.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Herman en-
tertained their many visiting
friends with a card party Sunday-
night. The honored guest was Mrs.
Ethel Feinberg.
Tampa Notes
Announcement of the engage-
ment of Miss Shirley Aronovitz,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Herman
Aronovitz, to Mr. Max Weinstein
of Atlanta, Ga., was made at a
reception held New Year's eve at
their residence. The marriage will
take place the early part of the
summer. Only members of the
families and relatives attended the
party.
Miss Aronovitz was born and
reared in Tampa, and was grad-
uated from the Hillsboro High
school.
Mr. Weinstein, son of Mr. and
Mrs. L. Weinstein of Atlanta, is
a native of that city, and engaged
in business there.
Mr. Morrice S. Uman, young
Tampa attorney, recently an-
nounced his candidacy for the leg-
islature on a platform which in-
cluded an honest and proper re-
apportionment for South Florida
in the legislature.
Mr. Ben Schwartz of Gainesville
University visited the Abrams fam-
ily over the New Year's vacation.
Miss Shirley Aronovitz, whose
engagement to Mr. Max Weinstein
was recently announced, was guest
of honor Thursday night at a buf-
fet supper given by her aunt and
uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Manuel Aron-
ovitz.
Mrs. Aronovitz was assisted in
entertaining by her sister-in-law,
Mrs. L. Fondianu. Guests includ-
ed only members of the family and
out-of-town guests.
Bluniberg, 412 Forty-second st.,
and a dance in Palm Beach on a
date to be announced later, to be
sponsored by Mr. Jack Fein and
members of her committee, were
announced.
The Young Judea held a regu-
lar meeting Wednesday night at
the home of Miss Florence Schut-
zer. Various business matters
were discussed. Charles Kapner
presided. A social hour followed.
Palm Beach Lodge No. 1140,
B'nai B'rith will meet Monday eve-
ning in their permanent meeting
place at the Monterey Hotel. Chas.
Wax, president of the lodge, urges
all members to attend. Many mat-
ters of importance are to be acted
on. A social hour will follow.
Mrs. Josephine Houston, super-
intendent of the Tampa Day Nurs-
ery, spoke on "Social Problems
as Related to the Day Nursery"
I at the regular monthly meeting of
the Tampa Section, National Coun-
cil of Jewish Women, Wednesday
afternoon in the schoolrooms of
Rodoph Sholom Temple.
Members and their friends are
invited to attend the class on con-
temporary Jewish affairs, spon-
sored by the council and conducted
by Rabbi David Zielonka Wednes-
day afternoon, January 15th, at
4 o'clock at the Y. M. H. A.
Tickets for the lecture by Dr.
Stephen S. Wise, January 16th, in
municipal auditorium have been
placed on sale at the Tampa Gas
Co. office. Admission will be 50c
and 75c. The lecture and dinner
that night at the Tampa Terrace
Hotel in honor of Dr. and Mrs.
Wise will be open to the public.
Mr. Jackie Liebman returned to
the St. Petersburg Military Acad-
emy after spending the holidays
with his parents.
The Future
Of Miami
By I. ROTH
Who has visited Miami Beach each
year for hia health and this year
has acquired a home for him-
self.
In 1562 Jean Ribaut, with n
band of French Huguenots fleeing
from persecution, made a landing
on Anastasia Island at St. Augus-
tine, explored the coast as far
north as the mouth of the St.
Johns River and claimed the land
for France. Kibaut and his brave
band were seeking a home in which
the bounties of nature would am-
ply supply their needs. They
found what they were seeking. Ri-
baut sent a message back to
France saying: "This is the fair-
est, fruitfullest, pleasantest land
of all the world." His 400-year-
old message is still an appropriate
description.
Miami, Florida's wonder city, has
a great destiny. Its natural won-
ders I need not extoll. They are
loo strikingly obvious. Its growth
is an amazing phenomena. Forty
years ago it was but a trading
post. In l'JOO it had a population
of 1,681 people; in 1915 it had
15,000; in 1925 the population had
jumped to 71,419, and in 1934 it
was 127,600. Such development
does not stop arbitrarily. It was
founded upon solid influences that
are at work as much today as they
were in the past. Miami can very
confidently look forward to a sus-
tained continuance of this growth
with its accompanying benefits to
all. It is my own settled conviction
that Miami's development will be
accelerated in the future as com-
pared to its astounding growth in
the past. This will be due to a
number of factors which did not
previously exist. These include the
progress made in aviation trans-
portation.
As time is eliminated, and it in-
evitably will be, from the existing
travel schedules the effect of be-
ing close to the rest of the coun-
try is incalculable. The marvels
of the air of the future will mean
the greater fortune of Florida and
particularly Miami. So much for
Florida as a playground and resort
for America.
But Florida will perform a still
greater function in American life.
That is as seaport and commer-
cial center for future Latin Amer-
ican trade. This is its natural po-
sition. As greater "Clipper Ships"
of the air begin to carry huge loads
of freight, passengers and mail in
a matter of few hours to all of
Central and South America (and
soon this will not be a dream)
Miami will grow into on of the
great ports of the world. Exports
to Central and South America in
1933 were about $146,000,000, in
1934 close to $200,000,000. South
and Central America, with the
West Indies and Mexico, has a pop-
ulation of about 120 million peo-
ple, growing fast, developing con-
stantly. Their future is great and
it will be Miami that will be in the
forefront of traffic and commerc*
with the great lands of the south-
ern continent. This is not an idle
vision of the future. Miami should
have, under federal auspices, a
Latin American Bureau or "Casa"
to prepare for and participate in
the development of relations with
Latin America.
Our nation is by habit a travel-
ing people. Our foreign tourists
spend nearly eight hundred (800)
million dollars yearly in foreign
lands. Miami Beach is as wonder-
ful a resort as can be found any-
where. With foreign conditions
unsettled, with fluctuating curren-
cies, and with Miami Beach as a
Counter-attraction a host of people
who would be foreign bound should
| be heading for Miami. They, with
I Miami as the apex of Latin Amer-
, ican trade, shoul'J make Miami's
future a bright and wonderful one.


Page Six
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Friday, January 10, 193G
BULLETIN
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of .Miami
137 N. E. 19th St.
DR. JACOB H. KAPLAN
Rabbi
RELIGIOUS SERVICES
Services Friday evening at 8:15
o'clock. Dr. Kaplan will give the
fourth lecture on the Ideals of the
Prayer Book, dealing with the cen-
tral theme, the Shma, and the two
ding and following benedic-
tion.-.
The course in "What We Jews
Believe," hi I Saturday morning
from 'J to 11 in the rabbi's study.
should attract a number of men
and women in the congregation. We
y cordially invite everyone to
;,, nd tl ese lectures.
"Modern Jewish Problems" pre-
6i nted on Sunday morning from 10
to 11:30, is a course given to the
third class in the high school de-
nent, to which the mei
are also most welcome.
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
b______________________
' I i ning prayer was given by
Stein. Services were read
by Dorothy Ann Levin, and the
closing prayer by Leonard Lewis.
Dr. Kaplan addressed the children,
explaining the beautiful story of
Joseph and his brethren. Best col-
lection, Intermediate class 1;
highest attendance, High School
i 1.
GENERAL
Don't forget Dr. Stephen v. e'
lecture Wednesday evening, Jan-
loth, 1936, at the Temple at
h o'clockan opportunity that pre-
itself only once in -
Last Friday evening the congre-
gation had the pleasure of listen-
ing to Rabbi Morton M. Berma.t,
associate field director of Dr.
Stephen S. Wise, who gave a most
delightful and eloquent talk on the
ng of Palestine in modern
Jewish lit''-.
lay evening, January 14th.
cond meeting of the enlarged
committee on the National Con-
ference of Jews and Christians for
better human relations, will meet
at the Columbus Hotel. While
only a very limited number of
Jewish people have been invited to
attend this meeting, it is hoped
that this organization will enlarge
its membership, and every Jew,
whether on the committee or not,
should deem it a privilege to give
thought and attention to this vital
problem, and encourage those who
do af'
SISTERHOOD
o______________________________o
The monthly meeting was held
.Monday, January 6th, at Kaplan
Hall. A most enjoyable and in-
cing program was presented.
Dr. -Jacob H. Kaplan gave an in-
spiring talk. Mrs. Carolyn Ull-
man, child psychologist, spoke on
(ism.
A luncheon, bridge and fashion
show was given on Tuesday, with
Scar.-, Roebuck & Co. as hosts.
Mrs. Samuel Katz and Mrs. R. M.
were in charge. Mrs. Fei-
belman had charge of the fashion
show, Miss Joan Feibelman, Miss
Alice Apte, Mrs. Sylvia Cavanaugh
and Mrs. Louis ZeientZ acting as
models. This wa- enthusiastically
received.
Mis. I. L. Rosendorf outlined the
plan for the tri-state conference of
the National Federation of Temple
Sisterhoods, to be held here in
March.
The annual birthday luncheon of
the Sisterhood will be held the
first Monday in February. Fu'l
details later. Keep this date in
reserve for a very beautiful affair
February 3rd, 1986.
Society
"Is there Life on the Planets?"
was the subject discussed at the
meeting of the Group last Satur-
day afternoon. Charles H. Lee,
well known in Miami for his nu-
merous lectures at the Collins Park
Observatory, spoke at length on
the solar system and the possibil-
ity of life on other planets. Next
Saturday, January 11th, the Group
meets again on the lawn of the
home of Dr. Abraham Wolfson,
1051 Collins ave., Miami Beach,
Fla. Mr. Herman Ceiger, high
school teacher of New York, will
speak on Goethe.

A board meeting of the Junior
Council of Jewish Women will be
held at the home of Mis. B. Wer-
nikoff, 186 S. W. Ninth ave., Tues-
day evening, January 14th. Plans
will be discussed for a dance, to
be held February 2nd. The Jun-
ior Council has donated funds for
the milk fund to the Jewish Wel-
fare Bureau. Plans will be com-
pleted for the trip to Cuba, which
will take place in March.
*
Mrs. Sydney L. Weintraub. pres-
ident of Miami section, Nations.
Council of Jewish Women, was
elected a delegate to the peace
conference of outstanding women's
organizations in Washington, D.
('., on January 21, at a meeting
last Friday in the Royal Palm
Club. Mrs. Harry Barnhard, peace
chairman, was elected alternate.
Mr-. Marian Miller, executive-
secretary of the national council,
will be guest of honor at the next
meeting of the Miami section on
February 5. A fashion show will
n at the home : Mrs. Louis
: February
121 Thi
i tained at
, v -. Olin at her home
at 12:30 li. m. Tuesday.
; book review group met with
Dr. and Mrs. Edward Lear, 1757
I ,; ii avi.. Mian,: Beach, Tues-
day evening, when Dr. Lear re-
viewed "The Forty Hay- of Musa
by Werfel.
The public speaking and parlia-
mentary law class will meet at 2
p. m. today with Mrs. Morris Al-
pert, 1510 Drexel ave., Miami
Beach.
Mrs. Lewis Rothlein, member-
ship chairman, reported a mem-
bership of 155.
*
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Kpstein
and daughter, Ann Engler, accom-
panied by Mrs. Epstein's mother,
Mrs. Anna Engler, returned from
a two weeks' visit in Goldsboro, N.
C, with Mr. Epstein's parents.
were guests at the eightieth
birthday anniversary of Mr. lip-
stein's grandfather, Michael Sher-
man. They also visited with Mr.
in'8 brother and sister-in-law,
Dr. and Mrs. Henry George Ep-
stein, and with Mr. and Mrs. E. R.
Shirely.
* w *
Mr. and Mrs. J. Nehani of
Miami Beach announce the en.
ment of their daughter, Florence
Goodman, to Ira D. Mackler of
Ni w York City.
Miss Goodman is a graduate of
the Miami Senior High school and
a member of Junior Council.
Mr. Mackler is president of the
Prudence Discount Corporation.
* *
Miss Alice Ante had as her guest
Miss Ruth Kahn of Kaston, I'a.
*
Dr. A. M. I.ivy, an annual vis-
itor from Brooklyn, is at 1301 Col-
lins ave. for the winter.
* *
Mole than 300 guests attended
the installation of Emunah chap-
ter, Order of the Eastern Star,
which took place recently in Scot-
tish Rite Temple with the worthy
grand patron of grand chapter of
Florida. Fred E. Mank, officiat-
ing.
Joe Kwart sang several num-
I iil with Mrs. Thompson at the
piano. Mrs. Isador Fine was pre-
sented a diamond pin in apprecia-
tion of her work by Miss Bertha
Mendclson, William Friedman,
junior past patron, was presented
a pin by Mr. Fine, past patron.
Officers installed were Mrs.
Jack Schwartz, worthy matron; Is-
ador Fine, worthy patron; Mrs.
Sidney Palmer, associate matron;
Albert E. Pallet, associate patron;
Mary Barber. i Mrs.
J. Greenberg, treasurer; Mrs.
les Beckwitt, conductress;
Mrs. 1. I.. Reisman, associate con-
. --, Mrs. J. Albert, chaplain;
Mrs. M. Scheinberg, marshal; Mis.
II. Rabin, organist; Mrs. Victor
Eskenazi, Adah; Miss Ida Schwartz,
Ruth: Mrs. Phil Somberg, Esther;
Mrs. B. Anthony, Martha; Mrs.
Morris Kalcr, Electa; Mrs. Morris
Harkins, warder; Sydney Palmer,
sentinel.
* *
Mrs. Ben Hirschfield of this city
left Saturday for Philadelphia for
the bedside of her sister, Mrs. S.
Reinheimer, who died there last
week.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Katz, Mrs. Birtuch,
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Phillips, Mrs.
B. Parsons, Mrs. Florence Dillard.
*
The Ladies' Auxiliary of the
Jewish Welfare Bureau will give
:, dessert 'midge at 1 p. m. on Jan-
uary 14th at the home of Mrs. M.
I.. Cowen, 2120 S. W. Sixth st. As-
sisting hostesses will be Mrs. 11.
Bulbin and Mrs. H. Kevins. The
auxiliary will meet at 2 p. m. on
January 20th at the Mark Store,
with Mrs. M. Dubler as hospitality
chairman.
Mrs. I.. HartZ, as.-i-ted by Mrs.
Sol Rotfort, will direct a card
party of the auxiliary at 8 p. m.
at the Evans Hotel, Miami Beach,
on January 22nd.
AHERN FUNERAL HOME
FRANCIS AHERN, Pres.
1349 West Flagler Street
Telephone 2-2211
AMBULANCE SERVICE
Mrs. S. Yavelow, her son,
Dr. I. Yavelow of Mt. Yernon, N.
Y., and Miss Rose Bornstein are
visiting Mr. and Mrs. Jack Hirsch.
Nat and Irving Eastman enter-
tained recently at their home,
"The House of Tomorrow," 595'J
LaGorce drive. Among those pres-
ent were: Mr. and Mrs. William A.
Hyman, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Quin-
lan, Mr. and Mrs. Alex Cohen, -Mr.
and Mrs. Aubey Keoskie. Mr. and
Mrs. Marvin Bronner, Mr. and Mrs.
Mortimer Burton, Mr. and Mrs.
Xat Grubel, Mr. and Mrs. Harry
I.ipton, Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Cassel,
Miss Frances Sebel, J. Gottlieb,
Frederick Yosburg, Mrs. J. Vos-
burg, Miss Friedlandcr, Mrs. J.
Stark Warner, David Murray,
Charles B. McClellan, John Prete,
Try the
KOSF.DAI.E DELICATESSEN
And Restaurant
I,,, the finest in Real Home Cooked
Jewish Food Daily
170 N. W. FIFTH STREET
CHOICE DELICATESSEN
"Everything: Thai's Good"
BISCAYNE-COLLINS
HOTEL
Biscayne St. at Collins Ave.
MIAMI BEACH
Now Under
Madorsky Management
REASONABLE RATES
The Finest Strictly Kosher
Cuisine
Our Dining Room Open to the
Public at All Times
IIISCAYNE
CARPET CLEANERS
Work Called for and Delivered
Day or Night Service
2975 S. W. Eighth Street
Ph. 2-121<>3-1074
ROBBINS ROOFING & SHEET
METAL WORKS
Responsible Roofers Since 1919
Inspections and Estimates Free.
222 N. W. 26. h St. Phone 2-3705
^IIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIILMIIIIIIIIIIIIII'MIIIIMIIIIL
'o-
1208 S. W. EIGHTH ST. PHONE 2-4546 =
The Best in Groceries, Meats, Fruits and Vegetables E
'iiiiiimiiiimiiiimim......iiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiliiiiiiiiillliliiiiiniiilllliiilllllllliiliir-
White Oak Leather
HALF SOLES ..........50c
LADIES' HEELS......15c
Atlantic Shoe Shop
M0 N. E. First Arenue
Opp. Cortes Hotel
ASK YOUR RABBI!
Inquire of Yout Doctor!
When You Need a Mohel
They Will Be Sure to
Recommend
RABBI B. D. MINDEL
Recognized as (ireater Miami's
Leading .Mohel
Phones 2-87603-2270
OUR LARGE VOLUME OF
WORK MAKES POSSIBLE A
SAVINGS FOR YOU
WRIGLEY
Art-Engraving
21 S. W. 5th Ave.
Phone 2-3947


Friday, January 10, 1936
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page Seven
Society
Miss Rose Blank entertained re-
cently with a party at her home
honoring; Miss Lucille Snowe and
Miss Sophie Besvenick, students of
Florida State College for Women,
who spent the holidays in Miami.
The guests were Miss Ruth
Kaufman, Miss Gierry Weinstein,
Miss Martha Neham, Miss Sara
Sutton, Miss Ruth Bushell, Her-
bert Kay, Albert Geiter, Freddie
Wechsler, Sam Nelson, Marshall
Goldblatt, Paul Snyder Arnold
Newman and Allan Blumberg.
Come to
HERMAN'S
BAR
In the Arcade of the
HOTEL EVANS
10th St. and Collins
Ave.
Entertainment by Noted Artists
The Finest Wines and Liquors
CHAMPAGNE COCKTAILS
Between 4 and 6 P. M.
JEAN Suggests!
A VISIT TO
MIAMI BEACH
BELMONT RESTAURANT
301 23rd St.
(Near Liberty Avc.)
FRENCH-ITALIAN CUISINE
Luncheon 75c
Dinner (1.00
TRY OUR CHARCOAL NEW YORK
SIRLOIN STEAK DINNER. $1.50
A LA CARTE SERVICE
Under the personal supervision of
Arthur Varca. formerly of the
Maidstonc and Devon Club of East
Hampton, Long- Island, N. Y.
Rabbi Julius Washer of the
Miami Jewish Orthodox Congrega-
tion will be the guest speaker at
the regular monthly meeting of the
Ladies' Auxiliary of the Jewish
Welfare Bureau Monday, January
20th, at the Mark Store auditorium.
Mrs. Herbert U. Feibelman will
sing and will be accompanied by
Miss Freda Miller. Mrs. Lena Dub-
ler will be in charge of the social
hour. Members and friends are
urged to attend.
*
Mrs. Morris Cowen will enter-
tain at a benefit bridge for the
Jewish Welfare Bureau at her
home next Tuesday afternoon, Jan.
uary 14th, at 1 o'clock. Prizes
will be awarded for high scores and
refreshments will be served. The
public is urged to attend. Co-
hostesses for this event are Mes-
dames Henry Bulbin and Harry
Nevins.
*
Wednesday evening, January 22,
Mrs. L. J. Hartz and Mrs. Sol Rot-
fort will be co-hostesses at a bene-
fit bridge for the Jewish Welfare
Bureau at the Evans Hotel. Prizes
will be awarded for high scores
and refreshments will be served,
The public is urged to attend.
*
The Chesed She] Fines Sister-
hood is sponsoring a benefit card
party at the Belvedere Hotel, 843
Euclidave., Miami Beach, Sunday
evening, January 12th, at 8:30,
when prizes will be awarded for
high score and refreshments will
be served. Mrs. D. Wechsler is
chairman of the committee in
charge, assisted by Mesdames M.
Rippa, M. Blutstein, A. Bernstein
and Isidor Cohen. Members and
friends are urged to attened.

An important meeting of Beth
David Sisterhood will be held at
the Beth David Talmud Torah Hall
Monday, January 13th, at 2 o'clock,
which all members are urged to
attend.
* W
A gala evening of entertainment
is promised at the congregational
dinner being sponsored by Beth
David Sisterhood Sunday evening,
January 20th, at Beth David Tal-
! mud Torah, beginning at 0 o'clock.
Mrs. J. Engler and Mrs. L. J.
Hartz are co-chairmen of the ar-
! rangements committee. The event
will be called the "Major Bowes
dinner" in view of the fact that t
will be Miami Day on his program.
Reservations may be made with
any member of the committee.

A meeting of members of the
Purim ball committee of Beth Da-
vid Sisterhood *:11 be held Tues-
day evening, January 14th, at 8
o'clock, at the home of Mrs. Sol
Rotfort, when plans for this an-
nual event will be made.
An important meeting of the
Miami chapter of Senior Hadassah
will be held Monday, January 13th,
at the Royal Palm Club at 2:30
p. m. The main speaker will be
Mrs. Harry I. Lipton, who recently
returned from a visit to Palestine.
Mrs. H. Marcus will entertain with
a skit, "A Day in the Life of a
President." A musical program
will be presented during the after-
noon. Members and friends are
urged to attend.
The Rambling
Reporter
By JEAN S. EPSTEIN
WITH due apologies to Dorothy
Dey and Walter Winchell. I
delicate my first column in the
Jewish Floridian to both of them,
and promise not to beg, borrow or
steal.
Being a Northerner and only a
short time in the fair city of
Miami, may I suggest thai the city
officials do something about the
poor broken down palm trees that
one hears so much about in the
North. They look rather sick, if
yon ask me.
It seems as though the leading
hotels are niving dinner parties
for one celebrity or another .
The AI a mac is entertaining at din-
ner Sunday night honoring -Mr. and
Mrs. Mischa Elman, appearing
with the Miami Symphony Orches-
tra next week. Mayor Louis Sned-
ittar. Dr. and Mrs. B. F. Ashe. Mr.
and Mrs. A. Volpe, conductor of
the Miami Symphony; Mrs. FranK-
lin Harris. Miss Bertha Foster and
.Manu-Zucca. The A la mac will be
the scene of a luncheon honoring
Rabbi Stephen S. Wise of New
York January Kith, 1936 Ho-
tel Evans entertained last night
at dinner for Mr. and Mrs. Ben
Bernie, I.on iioltz. Georgie Price
and Milton A"^r, the well known
song writer
Mr. Sanuit-i Kulok, well known
clothier of New York, entertained
a party at Herman's Bar in the
Evans Hotel, the oiher night, and
Ed Singer, one of the original
Avon Comedy Four, sang several
songs. He could put a few of our
radio stars to shame They
were having a great time ... I
was envious -nun:; iii my little
corner sipping one of Herman's
8p>cials, which 1 highly recom-
mend. It was delicious Com-
pliments to Mr. Thornureen. man-
ager of the Blackstone Bar, for the
lovely Joyce and Smallwood. with
a' repertoire of a thousand and one
songs. Their slogan. You name it
and we'll sing it. Page Samuel
(ioldwyn For a real handsome
young leading man you should
sign up Tommy Clarke, manager
of the Paddock Grill, the best look-
ing man I've seen in town ... I
wonder what attracts all the good
looking women to the Five o'clock
flubis it the liquor or the hand-
some bartender? The most
gorgeous looking woman in Miami
Beach is the wife of Bill Masur,
owner of Bill's Waffle Shop on
Washington ave. Nice people.
Jack Rice, publicity manager of
the Miami Beach Kennel Club:
Walter Jacobs of the Alamac, Mr.
Diener of the Morris Bros. Drug
Department Store For the i
best chops in town may I suggest
Curley's and Villa Nova, on Ocean |
Drive? For the best Italian
and French food, Belmont Restau-
rant. Mr. Arthur Varca, the own-
er, is well known from the Maid-
stone and Devon Club of East
Hampton, Long Island One of
the best dressed men in Miami
Beach today is Philip Berle, the
very nice brother of the famous
Milt Harry Feinberg of Mo-
rey's Hof Brau Haus, still has in
his possession a whistle given him
Society
Celebrating their initial broad-
cast in Miami, Mr. and Mrs. Ben
Bernie were hosts at a dinner party
in the Hotel Kvans last night, when
they entertained Belle Baker, their
guest artist last week, and Lou
lloltz, their guest artist on the
next program. Others attending
were Countess Wesley and daugh-
ter. Milton Egger, noted song
writer; Harold Weiler, who han-
dles continuity for Ben Berenie,
and other prominent guest artists.
The beautiful dining room was spe-
cially decorated for this event.
* *
What was one of the most suc-
cessful seasons in their history and
in thf history of horse racing in
Greater Miami will be dosed next
week by Tropical Park, when the
curtain will ring down for the
early tall meet. Officials of the
track, horsemen and turf fans have
been exceptionally pleased by the
excellent cards of racing that have
been presented during the pres-
ent meet. One of the features that
pleased the pari-mutuel fans was
the American totalizator which was
in daily operation and gave them
the betting odds every moment un-
til the race began and the finals
within a tew minutes after the
race was over. The finest card
of the season will he presented
th closing day of the early meet
next Wednesday, January 16th.
don't you ask him to play the
part?" asked Kommer. "I'll in-
troduce you to him" And he
took Reinhardt over to the table
and introduced him toBernard
M. Baruch There's an amus-
ing story connected with the ap-
pearance of Miss Henrietta Szold
in the current number of thw
Hearst Metrotone Newsreel .
The film had to be taken three
times The first time Mrs. Ed-
ward Jacobs. Hadassah president,
who has addressed millions of peo-
ple, got stage fright The sec-
ond time Miss Szold ended her re-
marks by saying "Is that enough?"
not realizing that the question was
being recorded on the sound track
. The third time everything
clicked.
Did You Know That?
Dr. I. C. Rubin, one of the
world's leading gynecologists, is a
brother-in-law of Dr. Mordecai M.
Kaplan Dr. Ben Keitman, the
newly crowned king of the hoboes,
is a member in good standing of
the American Sociological Society
. Myron Weiss, only Jewish ed-
itor of Time Magazine, is ready-
ing an epochal history of medicine
. Yehudi Menuhin and Mlacha
Elman are not on speaking terms
. George Gershwin has a real
talent for oil painting An Ed-
die Cantor joke book is being ed-
ited by the Columbia Broadcasting
System Al Jolson's mammy
can now call him "hizzoner" be-
cause he is the new "mayor" of
Kncino, a movie residential colony
. The Nancy Cardozo whose
poem appears in the January is-
sue of Scribner's Magazine is a
niece of Supreme Court Justice
Cardozo Movie Director Josef
von Sternberg used to answer to
the name of Joe Stern.
I FREDDIE THORNGREEN
THE BLACKSTONE BAR
and
PATIO
Invite You to the
COCKTAIL-DANSANT
EVERY AFTERNOON AT 4:30
Featuring
ANDY ANDERSON and
THE FOUR BLAIKSTONES
ALSO
Joyce and Smallwood
SONGS IN SEVEN LANGUAGES
Grill 0|.en from 8:30 to Cloainir.
Featuring Broiled Steak Sandwiches
NO COVER NO MINIMUM
BLACKSTONE HOTEL
In the days when Reinhardt was
looking for a "Moses" for "The
Eternal Road" he had dinner at
Voisin's. the fashionable tatery,
and saw a very impressive gentle-
man, a six-footer with gray hair
and a melodious voice ... To Dr.
Kommer, who was with him, Rein-
hardt said that this was the Moses
he had been looking for "Why
by the late "Teddy" Roosevelt; ask
to see it when you drop in for a
delicious dinner at his new place
at 634 Collins ave. Mr. Feinberg
is well known as the owner of the
Larchmont Casino of Larchmont,
N. Y.
So until next week, don't get too
sunburned.
Spend the Cocktail Hour
From 4 to 6 in our Open Patio
Morey's
Hof Brau
H
aus
634 Collins
Ave.
Hungarian-American Cuisine
Full Course De Luxe Dinner
75c and $1.00
Under the personal supervisio l
of Harry S. Feinberg, formerly
of Larchmont Casino, Larch-
mont, N. Y.
Breakfast Luncheon Dinner


Page Eight
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Friday, January 10, 1936
Biscayne Track
Attracts Many
Come right out, folks, to the Bia-
cayne Kennel Club, Miami's oldest
and beat greyhound racing track,
ami scr the racing greyhounds that
have ever been quartered at any
greyhound track in the world. JTes,
sir, that's what they have out at
ih. big le oval.
During th( pas) week My Daddy,
the gi eat track champion,
e, stepped out and
record for the five-six-
te nths mile course. The wei
Laddie, a brother of
Hj iddy, : a new i ecord f r
ile trek, but ii lias
iky on several k i
- i intE the past week, when
. Brown Sugar and
... i havev all been run-
ning the quarter in the new track
reo time twenty-four si conds
\ in the past, General Manager
Joe li. Adams is offering the grey-
hound racing fans .!' Greater
Miami and tho northern visitors
nol .- :'. the bi -i. and win n you
warn in see the '.ops in their field
just go on out to the Biscayne and
enjoy an evening of the sport of
" Starting this Saturday night, the
spectacular hurdle races will again
be inaugurated at the Biscayne.
Christmas night the quinielas were
inaugurated for the 1985-36 season,
and the top quiniela for the eve-
ning was $79.60 for two-dollar
>,. I s. BUSSI 1 nil direct to the
rack from the Venetian Arcade
very night, starting at 6:80, and
(lie tare is ten .cuts.
THE WORLDS
WINDOW
(i'. nlinued from Page l1
to the peculiar past of any group."
in brief: in S iet R 1
lation, voluntary ai I nf< I,
1 bj wo k to the point of 1
tinction of Ru tan Je ry. I o you
11 le, a de> out Jew a d Z 1
ejoi.-e in that prospei I'.' Is
i at you con option of a new free-
111 '.' Then slow poison is a rem-
edy for illness. When tin man is
dead his troubles are ever. How
t rue!
Finally: I will not, as my friend,
Philip Rubin, urges me to do, de-
clare my allegiance to any single
political or economic technique. It
is not my province. My province
H A N S 0 N Ii 0 0 F I N G CO.
Ealabl iKtl Since 1914
ROOFING AND SII :et METAL CONTRACTOR
: !'......eij
328 X. K. 13th St. I'hones 2-1;S312-6 >S2
is that of the permanent values of
the human spirit. If a group of
economists <>.' tha stature of, say,
Franz 0] ; enheime ', wer3 i advise
any of the measures Rubin men-
tions and ti Coin___a were to
> them in law, I should not
question that, so long as the per-
il ancnt values (liberty, the right
of heresy, strong decks upon a
power) were not impinged on. I
"want" no special kind of social
order. I am no Utopian. All the
"new" orders of this age have in-
creased the sum of human suffer-
ing. They have increased human
unfreedom, They have plunged
man down dark abysses. Let us
with sober aul umn-tinge
of exorbitant hope seek to amelior-
ate the domestic societies of the
West. Let us fight at least to
preserve the small share of free-
dom that we have.
Rubin humorously compares me
to Martin Buber. I hope he is
Strictly kosher
DINING
ROOM
as^aM lllll I..... I
361 Collins Ave.
(At llh St.)
MIAMI BEACH
BANQUET DINNER $1.00
Under same management as
Kraemer's Strictly Kosher Hotel
and Mineral Baths Mt. Clemens,
Mich.
MUSA ISLE
Seminole Indian Village
OPEN DAILY AND SUNDAY
Cr. "ilh BI. nd 2.".th Ave.. N. W.
GATOR WRESTLING HOURLY
right. For, like the Rambam him-
self, Buber will be remembered
centuries to come when the polit-
ical and economic tinkerers, tyrant
and tool, persecutor and fanatic
will have fallen into an indistin-
guishable oblivion.
(Copyright, 1935, by Seven Arts
Feature Syndicate)
Auto/Radio
' mSALESzSEWKE
.'
* Philco
* Dates
RCA Victor
* Motorola
Auto and House
RADIOS
EASY TERMS
-in.til Down Payments
We Mean You
MTiiiimuiitit'irmtiiimimiiu
'inmnii .
Mr. and Mrs. Customer:
Need we, the Jewish kosher butchers of Miami
Beach, tell you those things you know? That you
can't get finer quality, more reasonable prices, bet-
ter and more courteous service than you get at our
stores.
Need we point out to you that comparing prices
and quality, the beef, veal, lamb, poultry that you
purchase from us can't be matched anywhere in
the country yes, and even in this area at non-
kosher butchers.
;: S

w qoiMq to oe cm
CRIPPLE AT 10 ?

-

Brand new eyes are
usually perfect eyes.
Yet, two out of every
ten children in grade
school, four out of ten
in college and six out
of ten people over 40
are suffering from
impaired vision.
Poor lighting is help-
ing to make us a na-
tion of eye cripples.
It's high time that
these facts stirred us
to action.

We feel that a thorough study on the part of
those of our Jewish residents and tourists who do
not patronize kosher butchers will convince them
that they are the losers both in price and
quality.
As to Kashrua ... let it suffice that it has been
a pleasure on our part to have sent the following
letter to Rabbi David I. Rosenbloom of Beth Ja-
cob Congregation. Miami Beach:
Rabbi David I. Rosenbloom,
Miami Beach. Fla.
At a meeting of the undersigned, all engaged
in the kosher business in Miami Beach, it was unan-
imously agreed to permit you and any representa-
tive you may designate to inspect our premises at
any and all times to satisfy yourself that all meats
and poultry handled by us are strictly kosher.
Because of economic conditions now'existing
we regret that we are unable to pay for any super-
vision or inspection.
You can rest assured that it is to our interest
to maintain Kashrua at all times, and this we pledge
to do.
e ''





Start with your own home. Have
the lighting checked with a Sight
Meter and make it safe for seeing
and health. Call our nearest office
for this free service.
SEE THESE NEW SIGHT-SAVING LAMPS IN OUR
SHOWROOMS OR AT YOUB DEALERS
TABLE LAMPS
As low as $3.95 and
terms as low as 41c
down. 59c a month.
No carrying charges!
YOUR EYE SPECIALIST CAN TELL YOU HOW MUCH LIGHT YOU NEED
FOR YOUB EYES. LIGHT IS NOT A SUBSTITUTE FOR HIS SERVICES.
FLOOR LAMPS
As low at S5.35 and
terms as low as 55c
down. 80c a month.
No carrying charges!
BLEEMBR & ASCHER. at Sunny Food Centre.
HARRY CARVER, at Samet's Kosher Market.
J. KAUFMAN, at South Beach Kosher Market.
CHARLES GROSS, at Merlin's Kosher Market.
JOE REISMAN. at Miami Beach Kosher Market.
S. OLENOFF. at Honigman's Kosher Market.
W.M. MALTER. at Schiff's Kosher Market.
PHILLIP ROMER. at Sunshine Kosher Market.

IT'S GOOD IT'S KOSHER
ITS ECONOMICAL
YOUR YOUR OWN SAKE PATRONIZE
YOUR KOSHER BUTCHER
.
B -'-


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PAGE 1

wJewislh IFIIondliiai m %% CQMBMNG lr/fve Jhewii&lh lUinhlty P9 No. 2 MIAMI. FLORIDA. FRIDAY. JANUARY 10. 19.1B Price Five Cent* Jewish News F Around the World Jewish Uii-tnc —; Mm Swear Oil Card I'lining ill Synanouiir After Holdup Glen Cove, Long Island (WNS) There will lie no more rani playing in th' vi %  try loom of Congregation Tifereth Israel. Eleven ^^^H business all members at the congregation, were enjoying a pokei' game ill the synagogue when two bandits took a hand in the game by shouting "hands up." Bg the players to disrobe in ^Ho prevent them from escapSe gunmen robbed the playI their watches and several ~M dollars in cash. The banHeaped and the Jewish busi~ftieii took an oath never to Srds in the synagogue again. Ladies to Hold Benefit Dinner Famous Orator Bureau Drive To Speak Here On for Members THE WORLD'S WINDOW The first of a series of congregational dinners will be held by Ih. .Miami Jewish Orthodox Congregation under the sponsorship of its Ladies' Auxiliary next Sunday evening, January 12th, at 6:80 o'clock in the clubrooms of the | Young Men's Hebrew Association, when a chicken dinner will be served. Charges will be only $1 i per plate. A gala program of enj tertainment will be presented during the evening. The proceeds of this event will be used for the Talmud Torah of the congregation. In charge of arrangements are Mesdames I. Rosengarten, Max Weinberger, Morris Rappaport, Moe j Pallott, N. Adelman, H. Shulman, 11. Integer, N. Blumberg, A. N. Bass, J. L. Shochet. Reservations may be made with any member of i the committee. en Rescue 24 Torah Scrolls Fire Destroys Brooklyn Synagogue thei York (WNS)—At the risk %  r lives, firemen fighting • pur-aJarm fire which destroyed Jie interior of Congregation Etc Shaim Maka/.iko llorav, in the Jrownsville section of Brooklyn, arried to safety 24 Torah Scrolls. Under instructions from Deputy Chief O'llanion, the firemen battled thi i-ii a wall ol' flame and dense clouds of smoke and brought le Torah Scrolls stored in the bgue's basement and then pack into the interior of the )guc t rescue l'.l other A valuable collection of Jewiah manuscripts was destroyed. The Synagogue, one of the oldest in Brooklyn, is a total wreck. Only the trails are now standing. The damage ;,-i.mated at §50,000. to a. the the Me be whic pror to jher Butchers Organize Here the first time in the history mi Beach, butchers engaged sale of kosher meats and formed the Miami Beach Butchers' Association at a held last week. of the first acts of the or|tion was the adoption of • ion agreeing to permit Rabd I. Rosenbloom or any reptives that he may desiginspect stores, ice boxes emiscs of their establishat all times to insure strict The organization pledged pn the establishment of kashall times. [purposes of the organization forth by its chairman, Mr. Romer, and its secretary, Ascher, in addition to inkashrus, are the promotion jtter trade conditions, fair lent of the general public, [sanitation of premises and bbuilding of the morale of shcr butcher business. tings of the organization will Id from time to time, at various rabbis and other Bnt speakers will be invited irer addresses. Y. M. H. A. to Hold "Night of Stars" Stars of radio, screen and stage will aid the building fund of the Miami Young Men's Hebrew Association, according to an announcement by Boris Schlachman, executive director. Nick Kenny, radio editor for Hearst publications, is actively endeavoring to make the "Night of Stars" at the Olympia Theatre at midnight Sunday evening, January l!th, one of the outstanding events ever shown in the South. Such entertainers as Belle Baker, Milton Berle, Lou Holtz, Georgie Price, Ben Bernie, the entile Karl Carrol] Show, the cast of Ira's Supper Club, Sammie Walsh, the star performers at the Town Casino and the cast of the Follies, the Royal Palm Club and Club Bagdad are only part of the show that will be presented during the evening. An encouraging feature was the spontaneous response by these stars when the need of a community centre for local Jewish boys and girls was urged upon them. In charge of arrangements are Boris Schlachman, Al Rosenfeld, Al Berkowitz, Nat Blumberg, Philip Berkowitz, Al Reisman and Peter Silverman. Tickets may be purchased from $1 to $10 at the Olympia Theatre or from any member of the committee. Recently returned to the United States from Europe and Asia, during which time he attended the World Zionist Conference at Lucerne, and visited Palestine, Rabbi Dr. Stephen S. Wise will arrive in Miami to deliver an address on "The World Jewish Scene" at Temple Israel, 187 X. E. Nineteenth St., Wednesday evening, January 15th, at 8 o'clock. Dr. Wise, who has been unanimously acclaimed as one of the world's greatest orators and champion of human rights, has been a figure not only in the Jewish world, but in national affairs as well. He was the founder of the American Jewish Congress, a leader in World Zionist'work, active in relief work of Jews and non-Jews and a leader for amelioration of labor conditions throughout the world. As we go to press an important meeting of the Jewish Welfare Bureau memebership drive committee is being held at Hotel Evans, -Miami Beach. At this meeting members of the "Big Gifts" committee are planning to canvass both residents as well as tourists who should contribute large sums to the work of the Jewish Welfare Bureau. This year the drive is in charge of Sholem Lodge, B'nai B'rith, with Mr. Klry Stone as chairman, Mr. M. J. Kopelowitz as secretary, Mr. [ Isaac Levin, president of the lodge, and other officers and memebers assisting. The large contributors will be solicited until January 20, when a large dinner will be held, at which all committee members will meet for the purpose of beginning the general membership campaign. The campaign will last until January 27th, when it is hoped the goal will be reached and the quota set will be filled. Daily meetings will be held at the Palatial Kosher Restaurant •Manifesto" By I.ID WIG LEWISOHN This column is copyrighted by the Seven Arts Feature Syndicate. Reproduction in whole or in part strictly forbidden. Any infringement on this copyright will be prosecuted. Zionists Form Miami District Sholem Lodge Will Install All members of Sholem Lodge, B'nai B'rith, are urged to attend the social meeting and installation of officers to be held Tuesday evening, January 14th, at Beth David Auditorium, beginning at 8 o'clock, when a program of musical entertainment will be presented. The formal ceremonies for the installation will be in charge of Sam A. Goldstein of West Palm Beach, Florida representative on the District Grand Lodge Extension Board. Dr. A. E. Rosenthal is in charge of the musical program. Refreshments will be served. RABBI STEPHEN S. WISH Dr. Wise lias never hesitated to champion the cause of the oppressed and has become a powerful political figure in national campaigns. He has been known as a close friend of presidents and other national leaders. Dr. Wise will give a vivid description of the world Jewish scenes, not only as they affect Jews, but as they fit into the aggravated condition of world affairs generally. At 12:30 the same day there will be a luncheon in honor of Dr. Wise to which all interested in the work of Dr. Wise for Palestine, the American Jewish Congress and other of his activities are urged to attend. The luncheon will be held at the Family Jacobs Alamac Hotel, Miami Beach. Reservations may be made by calling the hotel. At the evening address Mr. Herbert U. Feibelman will preside and Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan will introduce the speaker. In charge of arrangements are Messrs. Sam Simonhoff, who is general chairman of the reception and arrangements committee; Day J. Apte, M. Victor Miller, Paul H. Marks, Harry I. Lipton, Isaac Levin, Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan, Herbert U. Feibelman, Mrs. Morris Plant, Mrs. Louis Zeientz, Mrs. Sidney L. VV'eintraub, Mrs. Morris Rubin and Mrs. Mark Max. Tickets of admission are only $1 and may be obtained at Temple Israel or at stores where posteri are displayed. Quite a large gathering attended the organization meeting of lb.' Zionist District of Greater .Miami lasl Sunday night at Beth David Talmud Torah Hall and listened to a stirring address by Rabbi Mor. ton M. Berman of New York or. conditions in World Jewry. Mr. Harry I. Lipton presided. Rabbi Max Shapiro presented the report of the nominating committee and additional nominations were made by the audience. Rabbi Jacob H. Kaplan (introduced .the principal speaker of the evening. Condi tions in Palestine were described byMr. Lipton, who visited there recently. Mr. Harry I. Lipton, prominent attorney, was elected president; Isaac Levin, first vice-president; A. Rauzin, second vice-president; Leo Robinson, treasurer, and Boris Schlachman, secretary. Chosen to the board of directors were Messrs. Nathan Adelman, Abe Aronovitz, Leonard Barr, Jacob Becker, Dr. Charles Beckwitt, Isidor Cohen, Dr. Max Dobrin, M. B. Frank, Joseph Greenberg, George Goldberg, Louis Gordon, N. J. Kopelowitz, Moses Krieger, Philip Liberman, M. L. i Marcus, Al Mechlowitz, Harry | Markowitz, Stanley C. Myers, Har|ry Nadelweiss, Morris Plant, Max Rappaport, Joseph M. Rose, Dr. A. E. Rosenthal, Morris Rubin, J. Louis Shochet, Hugo Shonberg and Harry Simonhoff. Rabbis Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan, Max Shapiro, David I. Rosenbloom and Julius Washer were unanimously elected honorary vice-presidents of the district. Following the election of officers various resolutions were adopted. More than fifty members joined and paid their annual dues during the evening. A series of cultural affairs on Zionism will be held during the winter season, plans of which will be announced shortly. (Continued from last week) What does the heretic get in Russia? We have evil and injustice here, God knows. But here are left margins of liberty that the young, the generous, the revolutionary may broaden. They will not do so in the name of a polity that has slain the very concept of liberty and equal justice. Fighting free institutions in the name of servile state variety A, they may help to bring upon us the servile state variety B. They are as frivolous as they are witless. It is I who refuse "to shut the gates of mercy on mankind." But sodden sentimentalists are always hard-hearted. Share-croppers in the South? What right have you to whimper over them—you who defend the "liquidation" of intellectuals, kulaks, social revolutionaries—hundreds and hundreds of thousands of men and women? Ah, .they were bourgeois? And what are you. the majority of you, but the sons and daughters of those able decent and productive people .bat are known as middle class? Who are you as Jews to identity ,\ .urselves with a pagan authonariail servile state and glory in : murder of men? Yes, yes, the share-croppers are workers. The worker, like the noble savage of Rousseau, is now the angel image of the romanticised Utopian escapisls from that duty and station in • life to which God has called them. Will, I too, want justice for the workers. But if there must be injustice in the world, it is better for civilization including the workers, that the conquest of that injustice be slow than that we all, including the workers, be shut up in the penitentiary of a servile state and that all free minds and all free men be crushed as "wreckers" or counterrevolutionaries. The worship of the workers and the callousness to their own on the part of many of the sons and daughters of the Jewish bourgeoisie is for a sentimental masochistic escape-mechanism as witless as it is odious. • • Jews in Russia? They are permitted to assimilate. Quite true. It has all happened before. Sincere Jewish assimilationists are therefore temporarily not discontented in Russia. I don't have to go to Russia to understand that. But Dr. Hans Kohn, expert on Russia, Slavic and other tongues and politics, writes soberly enough: "The Soviet order means a complete break with the past, an uprooting of individuals and groups from their traditions and wonted patterns of life, an effort to reshape them as members of a new rational civilization meant to be common to all men, and hence devoid of all emotional attachments (Continued on Page 8)



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T ft** T-. THE JFT=H wuamuM %  :x • v. %  -. i %  ei SOCIETY > A .^T"--*-r.**-..::* c* ;.. .-ta-la-Miy-_ k*i .v %  i :-• %  • %  %  %  %  :' 3 I I %  -.-..:.i 1 -i-.--i.i-. •.—... i_--x: t --..-. ;;*icer. Aa opes : .* ...... J -' : I i : %  : %  %  Mr i -: -:. %  %  •> %  -.-.%  I B i MIAMI PLAYHOUSE > N.rt* ftr.tr Drr at Jr< %  >**"Bmn Miaooy. Ju. a • —!*-.•* < %  Fn; • BLAM'HE RING DAISY ATHERTON lak :** M n.nnn ft c p oiw t j ~ otro Co >£-i.-. — % %  %  i-1 .; ; • -" %  -' %  --'%  %  %  Z*BSOt ... •%  ; %  %  -. i .--• %  ; ; •.. %  -• ... %  .-• In. B EVER1 MGH1 Al LIOHT -.%  • :.--; .-:; f -. f %  --%  I DAISY MATMr Pn* II.M u ru fim lu Bci Office BM 0ra Ft* mmiMM t ili ti M :-i... V bervinc/ V I Florida's Finest American-Jewish j Dinner" ST. REGIS | RESTAURANT; 446 COLLIN/ AVE. MIA/A1 BEACH K A VfcNU6 -.-MM ;.-,. 12-n /'*• f. Brwni—Ann Dvarak Haai Gargaa BRIGHT LIGHTS %  .. %  %  .-. -. Btl -. \ %  i .; ; • ---%  %  %  -• • ; B'naj B inic*u with Mr. I Birershy of Miami Symphony Orchestra ARNOLD VOLPE. Conductor Monday Evenine. January 13th. at 8:45 Soloist M I 8 C H A ELM A N %  i lipti—— in.io. $:.it St(k Tick*t.—$1.6.-,. $2.20 Ticketat Philpitts. 40 S. E. First St.—f:-. 0 -_ :-flJ78 And Burdine 3 Mezzanine. Lincoln Ro^d DR. STEPHEN S. WISE B*t Kno*n f'ujpii Loetarer in th Caaatr Temple Israel. 187 Northeast 19th Street WEDNESDAY, JANUARY loth. 19%. at P. M. Admi-iion S1.00 Ba+ject: THE WORI.O 1EWI8H 8CEXE f.r Ann.f aia -ir.-. < h.r-.r.fl T L'. >*. 0.rntnt FEDER\L SAVINGS^ • %  • '-. j LOAN FEDERAL SAVINGS I and LOAN ASSOCIATION of MIAMI GROUND FLOOR—CONGRESS BLDG. Safetv of Your Savings Insured I'D to S5.000 T.r.. in QAM %  I tt.'^t fr*tr*m" :S P. M. Mon A n.. TiM V. M. hoi $1 .00 MOPPIS k PLAM J OPENS A SAVINGS ACCOUNT At the MORRIS PLAN 4 W. rialr 8tVlncnt R. BHc. 1|.T.


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Page Six THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Friday, January 10, 193G BULLETIN TEMPLE ISRAEL Of .Miami 137 N. E. 19th St. DR. JACOB H. KAPLAN Rabbi RELIGIOUS SERVICES Services Friday evening at 8:15 o'clock. Dr. Kaplan will give the fourth lecture on the Ideals of the Prayer Book, dealing with the central theme, the Shma, and the two %  ding and following benediction.-. The course in "What We Jews Believe," hi I Saturday morning from 'J to 11 in the rabbi's study. should attract a number of men and women in the congregation. We y cordially invite everyone to ;,••, nd tl ese lectures. "Modern Jewish Problems" pre6i nted on Sunday morning from 10 to 11:30, is a course given to the third class in the high school denent, to which the mei are also most welcome. RELIGIOUS SCHOOL b I i ning prayer was given by Stein. Services were read by Dorothy Ann Levin, and the closing prayer by Leonard Lewis. Dr. Kaplan addressed the children, explaining the beautiful story of Joseph and his brethren. Best collection, Intermediate class 1; highest attendance, High School i 1. GENERAL Don't forget Dr. Stephen v. e' lecture Wednesday evening, Janloth, 1936, at the Temple at h o'clock—an opportunity that preitself only once in Last Friday evening the congregation had the pleasure of listening to Rabbi Morton M. Berma.t, associate field director of Dr. Stephen S. Wise, who gave a most delightful and eloquent talk on the ng of Palestine in modern Jewish lit''-. lay evening, January 14th. cond meeting of the enlarged committee on the National Conference of Jews and Christians for better human relations, will meet at the Columbus Hotel. While only a very limited number of Jewish people have been invited to attend this meeting, it is hoped that this organization will enlarge its membership, and every Jew, whether on the committee or not, should deem it a privilege to give thought and attention to this vital problem, and encourage those who do af' SISTERHOOD o o The monthly meeting was held .Monday, January 6th, at Kaplan Hall. A most enjoyable and incing program was presented. Dr. -Jacob H. Kaplan gave an inspiring talk. Mrs. Carolyn Ullman, child psychologist, spoke on (ism. A luncheon, bridge and fashion show was given on Tuesday, with Scar.-, Roebuck & Co. as hosts. Mrs. Samuel Katz and Mrs. R. M. were in charge. Mrs. Feibelman had charge of the fashion show, Miss Joan Feibelman, Miss Alice Apte, Mrs. Sylvia Cavanaugh and Mrs. Louis ZeientZ acting as models. This waenthusiastically received. Mis. I. L. Rosendorf outlined the plan for the tri-state conference of the National Federation of Temple Sisterhoods, to be held here in March. The annual birthday luncheon of the Sisterhood will be held the first Monday in February. Fu'l details later. Keep this date in reserve for a very beautiful affair —February 3rd, 1986. Society "Is there Life on the Planets?" was the subject discussed at the meeting of the Group last Saturday afternoon. Charles H. Lee, well known in Miami for his numerous lectures at the Collins Park Observatory, spoke at length on the solar system and the possibility of life on other planets. Next Saturday, January 11th, the Group meets again on the lawn of the home of Dr. Abraham Wolfson, 1051 Collins ave., Miami Beach, Fla. Mr. Herman Ceiger, high school teacher of New York, will speak on Goethe. • • A board meeting of the Junior Council of Jewish Women will be held at the home of Mis. B. Wernikoff, 186 S. W. Ninth ave., Tuesday evening, January 14th. Plans will be discussed for a dance, to be held February 2nd. The Junior Council has donated funds for the milk fund to the Jewish Welfare Bureau. Plans will be completed for the trip to Cuba, which will take place in March. • Mrs. Sydney L. Weintraub. president of Miami section, Nations. Council of Jewish Women, was elected a delegate to the peace conference of outstanding women's organizations in Washington, D. ('., on January 21, at a meeting last Friday in the Royal Palm Club. Mrs. Harry Barnhard, peace chairman, was elected alternate. Mr-. Marian Miller, executivesecretary of the national council, will be guest of honor at the next meeting of the Miami section on February 5. A fashion show will n at the home : Mrs. Louis : February 121 Thi i tained at v -. Olin at her home at 12:30 li. m. Tuesday. •; book review group met with Dr. and Mrs. Edward Lear, 1757 I ,; ii avi.. Mian,: Beach, Tuesday evening, when Dr. Lear reviewed "The Forty Hayof Musa %  • by Werfel. The public speaking and parliamentary law class will meet at 2 p. m. today with Mrs. Morris Alpert, 1510 Drexel ave., Miami Beach. Mrs. Lewis Rothlein, membership chairman, reported a membership of 155. • • Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Kpstein and daughter, Ann Engler, accompanied by Mrs. Epstein's mother, Mrs. Anna Engler, returned from a two weeks' visit in Goldsboro, N. C, with Mr. Epstein's parents. were guests at the eightieth birthday anniversary of Mr. lipstein's grandfather, Michael Sherman. They also visited with Mr. in'8 brother and sister-in-law, Dr. and Mrs. Henry George Epstein, and with Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Shirely. w Mr. and Mrs. J. Nehani of Miami Beach announce the en. ment of their daughter, Florence Goodman, to Ira D. Mackler of Ni w York City. Miss Goodman is a graduate of the Miami Senior High school and a member of Junior Council. Mr. Mackler is president of the Prudence Discount Corporation. Miss Alice Ante had as her guest Miss Ruth Kahn of Kaston, I'a. • • Dr. A. M. I.ivy, an annual visitor from Brooklyn, is at 1301 Collins ave. for the winter. Mole than 300 guests attended the installation of Emunah chapter, Order of the Eastern Star, which took place recently in Scottish Rite Temple with the worthy grand patron of grand chapter of Florida. Fred E. Mank, officiating. Joe Kwart sang several numI iil with Mrs. Thompson at the piano. Mrs. Isador Fine was presented a diamond pin in appreciation of her work by Miss Bertha Mendclson, William Friedman, junior past patron, was presented a pin by Mr. Fine, past patron. Officers installed were Mrs. Jack Schwartz, worthy matron; Isador Fine, worthy patron; Mrs. Sidney Palmer, associate matron; Albert E. Pallet, associate patron; Mary Barber. i Mrs. J. Greenberg, treasurer; Mrs. les Beckwitt, conductress; Mrs. 1. I.. Reisman, associate con. --, Mrs. J. Albert, chaplain; Mrs. M. Scheinberg, marshal; Mis. II. Rabin, organist; Mrs. Victor Eskenazi, Adah; Miss Ida Schwartz, Ruth: Mrs. Phil Somberg, Esther; Mrs. B. Anthony, Martha; Mrs. Morris Kalcr, Electa; Mrs. Morris Harkins, warder; Sydney Palmer, sentinel. Mrs. Ben Hirschfield of this city left Saturday for Philadelphia for the bedside of her sister, Mrs. S. Reinheimer, who died there last week. Mr. and Mrs. J. Katz, Mrs. Birtuch, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Phillips, Mrs. B. Parsons, Mrs. Florence Dillard. • The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Jewish Welfare Bureau will give :, dessert 'midge at 1 p. m. on January 14th at the home of Mrs. M. I.. Cowen, 2120 S. W. Sixth st. Assisting hostesses will be Mrs. 11. Bulbin and Mrs. H. Kevins. The auxiliary will meet at 2 p. m. on January 20th at the Mark Store, with Mrs. M. Dubler as hospitality chairman. Mrs. I.. HartZ, as.-i-ted by Mrs. Sol Rotfort, will direct a card party of the auxiliary at 8 p. m. at the Evans Hotel, Miami Beach, on January 22nd. AHERN FUNERAL HOME FRANCIS AHERN, Pres. 1349 West Flagler Street Telephone 2-2211 AMBULANCE SERVICE Mrs. S. Yavelow, her son, Dr. I. Yavelow of Mt. Yernon, N. Y., and Miss Rose Bornstein are visiting Mr. and Mrs. Jack Hirsch. Nat and Irving Eastman entertained recently at their home, "The House of Tomorrow," 595'J LaGorce drive. Among those present were: Mr. and Mrs. William A. Hyman, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Quinlan, Mr. and Mrs. Alex Cohen, -Mr. and Mrs. Aubey Keoskie. Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Bronner, Mr. and Mrs. Mortimer Burton, Mr. and Mrs. Xat Grubel, Mr. and Mrs. Harry I.ipton, Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Cassel, Miss Frances Sebel, J. Gottlieb, Frederick Yosburg, Mrs. J. Vosburg, Miss Friedlandcr, Mrs. J. Stark Warner, David Murray, Charles B. McClellan, John Prete, Try the KOSF.DAI.E DELICATESSEN And Restaurant I,,, the finest in Real Home Cooked Jewish Food Daily 170 N. W. FIFTH STREET CHOICE DELICATESSEN "Everything: Thai's Good" BISCAYNE-COLLINS HOTEL Biscayne St. at Collins Ave. MIAMI BEACH Now Under Madorsky Management REASONABLE RATES The Finest Strictly Kosher Cuisine Our Dining Room Open to the Public at All Times IIISCAYNE CARPET CLEANERS Work Called for and Delivered Day or Night Service 2975 S. W. Eighth Street Ph. 2-121<>—3-1074 ROBBINS ROOFING & SHEET METAL WORKS Responsible Roofers Since 1919 Inspections and Estimates Free. 222 N. W. 26. h St. Phone 2-3705 ^IIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIILMIIIIIIIIIIIIII'MIIIIMIIIIL '•o1208 S. W. EIGHTH ST. PHONE 2-4546 = The Best in Groceries, Meats, Fruits and Vegetables E 'iiiiiimiiiimiiiimim iiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiliiiiiiiiillliliiiiiniiilllliiilllllllliiliirWhite Oak Leather HALF SOLES 50c LADIES' HEELS 15c Atlantic Shoe Shop M0 N. E. First Arenue Opp. Cortes Hotel ASK YOUR RABBI! Inquire of Yout Doctor! When You Need a Mohel They Will Be Sure to Recommend RABBI B. D. MINDEL Recognized as (ireater Miami's Leading .Mohel Phones 2-8760—3-2270 OUR LARGE VOLUME OF WORK MAKES POSSIBLE A SAVINGS FOR YOU WRIGLEY Art-Engraving 21 S. W. 5th Ave. Phone 2-3947



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Page Eight THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Friday, January 10, 1936 Biscayne Track Attracts Many Come right out, folks, to the Biacayne Kennel Club, Miami's oldest and beat greyhound racing track, ami scr the racing greyhounds that have ever been quartered at any greyhound track in the world. JTes, sir, that's what they have out at ih. big le oval. During th( pas) week My Daddy, the gi eat track champion, e, stepped out and record for the five-sixte nths mile course. The wei %  Laddie, a brother of Hj iddy, : a new i ecord f r ile trek, but ii lias iky on several K I i intE the past week, when Brown Sugar and ... i havev all been running the quarter in the new track reo time twenty-four si conds \ in the past, General Manager Joe li. Adams is offering the greyhound racing fans %  !' Greater Miami and tho northern visitors nol .%  :'. the bi -i. and win n you warn in see the '.ops in their field just go on out to the Biscayne and enjoy an evening of the sport of ",. I s. BUSSI 1 nil direct to the rack from the Venetian Arcade %  very night, starting at 6:80, and (lie tare is ten .cuts. THE WORLDS WINDOW (i'. nlinued from Page l1 to the peculiar past of any group." in brief: in S iet R 1 lation, voluntary ai I nf< I, 1 BJ wo k to the point of 1 tinction of Ru tan Je ry. I o you 11 le, a de> out Jew a d Z 1 ejoi.-e in that prospei I'.' Is i at you con option of a new free111 '.' Then slow poison is a remedy for illness. When tin man is dead his troubles are ever. How t rue Finally: I will not, as my friend, Philip Rubin, urges me to do, declare my allegiance to any single political or economic technique. It is not my province. My province H A N S 0 N Ii 0 0 F I N G CO. Ealabl • iKtl Since 1914 ROOFING AND SII :ET METAL CONTRACTOR : • !' e ij 328 X. K. 13th St. I'hones 2-1; S31—2-6 >S2 is that of the permanent values of the human spirit. If a group of economists <>.' tha stature of, say, Franz 0] ; enheime ', wer3 i advise any of the measures Rubin mentions and ti • Coin a were to >• them in law, I should not question that, so long as the peril ancnt values (liberty, the right of heresy, strong decks upon a power) were not impinged on. I "want" no special kind of social order. I am no Utopian. All the "new" orders of this age have increased the sum of human suffering. They have increased human unfreedom, They have plunged man down dark abysses. Let us with sober aul umn-tinge of exorbitant hope seek to ameliorate the domestic societies of the West. Let us fight at least to preserve the small share of freedom that we have. Rubin humorously compares me to Martin Buber. I hope he is STRICTLY KOSHER DINING ROOM as^aM lllll I I 361 Collins Ave. (At llh St.) MIAMI BEACH BANQUET DINNER $1.00 Under same management as Kraemer's Strictly Kosher Hotel and Mineral Baths Mt. Clemens, Mich. MUSA ISLE Seminole Indian Village OPEN DAILY AND SUNDAY Cr. "ilh BI. nd 2.".th Ave.. N. W. GATOR WRESTLING HOURLY right. For, like the Rambam himself, Buber will be remembered centuries to come when the political and economic tinkerers, tyrant and tool, persecutor and fanatic will have fallen into an indistinguishable oblivion. (Copyright, 1935, by Seven Arts Feature Syndicate) AUTO/RADIO MSALESZSEWKE .' Philco Dates RCA Victor Motorola Auto and House RADIOS EASY TERMS -in.til Down Payments We Mean You MTiiiimuiitit'irmtiiimimiiu 'inmnii Mr. and Mrs. Customer: Need we, the Jewish kosher butchers of Miami Beach, tell you those things you know? That you can't get finer quality, more reasonable prices, better and more courteous service than you get at our stores. Need we point out to you that comparing prices and quality, the beef, veal, lamb, poultry that you purchase from us can't be matched anywhere in the country yes, and even in this area at nonkosher butchers. ; : S w qoiMq to oe cm CRIPPLE AT 10 ? • Brand new eyes are usually perfect eyes. Yet, two out of every ten children in grade school, four out of ten in college and six out of ten people over 40 are suffering from impaired vision. Poor lighting is helping to make us a nation of eye cripples. It's high time that these facts stirred us to action. We feel that a thorough study on the part of those of our Jewish residents and tourists who do not patronize kosher butchers will convince them that they are the losers both in price and quality. As to Kashrua ... let it suffice that it has been a pleasure on our part to have sent the following letter to Rabbi David I. Rosenbloom of Beth Jacob Congregation. Miami Beach: Rabbi David I. Rosenbloom, Miami Beach. Fla. At a meeting of the undersigned, all engaged in the kosher business in Miami Beach, it was unanimously agreed to permit you and any representative you may designate to inspect our premises at any and all times to satisfy yourself that all meats and poultry handled by us are strictly kosher. Because of economic conditions now'existing we regret that we are unable to pay for any supervision or inspection. You can rest assured that it is to our interest to maintain Kashrua at all times, and this we pledge to do. e %  % % %  Start with your own home. Have the lighting checked with a Sight Meter and make it safe for seeing and health. Call our nearest office for this free service. SEE THESE NEW SIGHT-SAVING LAMPS IN OUR SHOWROOMS OR AT YOUB DEALERS TABLE LAMPS As low as $3.95 and terms as low as 41c down. 59c a month. No carrying charges! YOUR EYE SPECIALIST CAN TELL YOU HOW MUCH LIGHT YOU NEED FOR YOUB EYES. LIGHT IS NOT A SUBSTITUTE FOR HIS SERVICES. FLOOR LAMPS As low at S5.35 and terms as low as 55c down. 80c a month. No carrying charges! BLEEMBR & ASCHER. at Sunny Food Centre. HARRY CARVER, at Samet's Kosher Market. J. KAUFMAN, at South Beach Kosher Market. CHARLES GROSS, at Merlin's Kosher Market. JOE REISMAN. at Miami Beach Kosher Market. S. OLENOFF. at Honigman's Kosher Market. W.M. MALTER. at Schiff's Kosher Market. PHILLIP ROMER. at Sunshine Kosher Market. • IT'S GOOD IT'S KOSHER ITS ECONOMICAL YOUR YOUR OWN SAKE PATRONIZE YOUR KOSHER BUTCHER B -'



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Friday, January 10, 1936 THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page Seven Society Miss Rose Blank entertained recently with a party at her home honoring; Miss Lucille Snowe and Miss Sophie Besvenick, students of Florida State College for Women, who spent the holidays in Miami. The guests were Miss Ruth Kaufman, Miss Gierry Weinstein, Miss Martha Neham, Miss Sara Sutton, Miss Ruth Bushell, Herbert Kay, Albert Geiter, Freddie Wechsler, Sam Nelson, Marshall Goldblatt, Paul Snyder Arnold Newman and Allan Blumberg. Come to HERMAN'S BAR In the Arcade of the HOTEL EVANS 10th St. and Collins Ave. Entertainment by Noted Artists The Finest Wines and Liquors CHAMPAGNE COCKTAILS Between 4 and 6 P. M. JEAN Suggests! A VISIT TO MIAMI BEACH BELMONT RESTAURANT 301 23rd St. (Near Liberty Avc.) FRENCH-ITALIAN CUISINE Luncheon 75c Dinner (1.00 TRY OUR CHARCOAL NEW YORK SIRLOIN STEAK DINNER. $1.50 A LA CARTE SERVICE Under the personal supervision of Arthur Varca. formerly of the Maidstonc and Devon Club of East Hampton, LongIsland, N. Y. Rabbi Julius Washer of the Miami Jewish Orthodox Congregation will be the guest speaker at the regular monthly meeting of the Ladies' Auxiliary of the Jewish Welfare Bureau Monday, January 20th, at the Mark Store auditorium. Mrs. Herbert U. Feibelman will sing and will be accompanied by Miss Freda Miller. Mrs. Lena Dubler will be in charge of the social hour. Members and friends are urged to attend. • Mrs. Morris Cowen will entertain at a benefit bridge for the Jewish Welfare Bureau at her home next Tuesday afternoon, Jan. uary 14th, at 1 o'clock. Prizes will be awarded for high scores and refreshments will be served. The public is urged to attend. Cohostesses for this event are Mesdames Henry Bulbin and Harry Nevins. • • Wednesday evening, January 22, Mrs. L. J. Hartz and Mrs. Sol Rotfort will be co-hostesses at a benefit bridge for the Jewish Welfare Bureau at the Evans Hotel. Prizes will be awarded for high scores and refreshments will be served, The public is urged to attend. • The Chesed She] Fines Sisterhood is sponsoring a benefit card party at the Belvedere Hotel, 843 Euclidave., Miami Beach, Sunday evening, January 12th, at 8:30, when prizes will be awarded for high score and refreshments will be served. Mrs. D. Wechsler is chairman of the committee in charge, assisted by Mesdames M. Rippa, M. Blutstein, A. Bernstein and Isidor Cohen. Members and friends are urged to attened. • • An important meeting of Beth David Sisterhood will be held at the Beth David Talmud Torah Hall Monday, January 13th, at 2 o'clock, which all members are urged to attend. W • A gala evening of entertainment is promised at the congregational dinner being sponsored by Beth David Sisterhood Sunday evening, January 20th, at Beth David Tal! mud Torah, beginning at 0 o'clock. Mrs. J. Engler and Mrs. L. J. Hartz are co-chairmen of the ar! rangements committee. The event will be called the "Major Bowes dinner" in view of the fact that t will be Miami Day on his program. Reservations may be made with any member of the committee. • • A meeting of members of the Purim ball committee of Beth David Sisterhood *:11 be held Tuesday evening, January 14th, at 8 o'clock, at the home of Mrs. Sol Rotfort, when plans for this annual event will be made. An important meeting of the Miami chapter of Senior Hadassah will be held Monday, January 13th, at the Royal Palm Club at 2:30 p. m. The main speaker will be Mrs. Harry I. Lipton, who recently returned from a visit to Palestine. Mrs. H. Marcus will entertain with a skit, "A Day in the Life of a President." A musical program will be presented during the afternoon. Members and friends are urged to attend. The Rambling Reporter By JEAN S. EPSTEIN W ITH due apologies to Dorothy Dey and Walter Winchell. I delicate my first column in the Jewish Floridian to both of them, and promise not to beg, borrow or steal. Being a Northerner and only a short time in the fair city of Miami, may I suggest thai the city officials do something about the poor broken down palm trees that one hears so much about in the North. They look rather sick, if yon ask me. It seems as though the leading hotels are niving dinner parties for one celebrity or another The AI a mac is entertaining at dinner Sunday night honoring -Mr. and Mrs. Mischa Elman, appearing with the Miami Symphony Orchestra next week. Mayor Louis Snedittar. Dr. and Mrs. B. F. Ashe. Mr. and Mrs. A. Volpe, conductor of the Miami Symphony; Mrs. FranKlin Harris. Miss Bertha Foster and .Manu-Zucca. The A la mac will be the scene of a luncheon honoring Rabbi Stephen S. Wise of New York January Kith, 1936 Hotel Evans entertained last night at dinner for Mr. and Mrs. Ben Bernie, I.on iioltz. Georgie Price and Milton A"^r, the well known song writer Mr. Sanuit-i Kulok, well known clothier of New York, entertained a party at Herman's Bar in the Evans Hotel, the oiher night, and Ed Singer, one of the original Avon Comedy Four, sang several songs. He could put a few of our radio stars to shame They were having a great time ... I was envious -nun:; iii my little corner sipping one of Herman's 8p>cials, which 1 highly recommend. It was delicious Compliments to Mr. Thornureen. manager of the Blackstone Bar, for the lovely Joyce and Smallwood. with a' repertoire of a thousand and one songs. Their slogan. You name it and we'll sing it. Page Samuel (ioldwyn For a real handsome young leading man you should sign up Tommy Clarke, manager of the Paddock Grill, the best looking man I've seen in town ... I wonder what attracts all the good looking women to the Five o'clock flub—is it the liquor or the handsome bartender? The most gorgeous looking woman in Miami Beach is the wife of Bill Masur, owner of Bill's Waffle Shop on Washington ave. Nice people. Jack Rice, publicity manager of the Miami Beach Kennel Club: Walter Jacobs of the Alamac, Mr. Diener of the Morris Bros. Drug Department Store For the i best chops in town may I suggest Curley's and Villa Nova, on Ocean | Drive? For the best Italian and French food, Belmont Restaurant. Mr. Arthur Varca, the owner, is well known from the Maidstone and Devon Club of East Hampton, Long Island One of the best dressed men in Miami Beach today is Philip Berle, the very nice brother of the famous Milt Harry Feinberg of Morey's Hof Brau Haus, still has in his possession a whistle given him Society Celebrating their initial broadcast in Miami, Mr. and Mrs. Ben Bernie were hosts at a dinner party in the Hotel Kvans last night, when they entertained Belle Baker, their guest artist last week, and Lou lloltz, their guest artist on the next program. Others attending were Countess Wesley and daughter. Milton Egger, noted song writer; Harold Weiler, who handles continuity for Ben Berenie, and other prominent guest artists. The beautiful dining room was specially decorated for this event. What was one of the most successful seasons in their history and in thf history of horse racing in Greater Miami will be dosed next week by Tropical Park, when the curtain will ring down for the early tall meet. Officials of the track, horsemen and turf fans have been exceptionally pleased by the excellent cards of racing that have been presented during the present meet. One of the features that pleased the pari-mutuel fans was the American totalizator which was in daily operation and gave them the betting odds every moment until the race began and the finals within a tew minutes after the race was over. The finest card of the season will he presented th closing day of the early meet next Wednesday, January 16th. don't you ask him to play the part?" asked Kommer. "I'll introduce you to him" And he took Reinhardt over to the table and introduced him to—Bernard M. Baruch There's an amusing story connected with the appearance of Miss Henrietta Szold in the current number of thw Hearst Metrotone Newsreel The film had to be taken three times The first time Mrs. Edward Jacobs. Hadassah president, who has addressed millions of people, got stage fright The second time Miss Szold ended her remarks by saying "Is that enough?" not realizing that the question was being recorded on the sound track The third time everything clicked. Did You Know That? Dr. I. C. Rubin, one of the world's leading gynecologists, is a brother-in-law of Dr. Mordecai M. Kaplan Dr. Ben Keitman, the newly crowned king of the hoboes, is a member in good standing of the American Sociological Society Myron Weiss, only Jewish editor of Time Magazine, is readying an epochal history of medicine Yehudi Menuhin and Mlacha Elman are not on speaking terms George Gershwin has a real talent for oil painting An Eddie Cantor joke book is being edited by the Columbia Broadcasting System Al Jolson's mammy can now call him "hizzoner" because he is the new "mayor" of Kncino, a movie residential colony The Nancy Cardozo whose poem appears in the January issue of Scribner's Magazine is a niece of Supreme Court Justice Cardozo Movie Director Josef von Sternberg used to answer to the name of Joe Stern. I FREDDIE THORNGREEN THE BLACKSTONE BAR and PATIO Invite You to the COCKTAIL-DANSANT EVERY AFTERNOON AT 4:30 Featuring ANDY ANDERSON and THE FOUR BLAIKSTONES ALSO Joyce and Smallwood SONGS IN SEVEN LANGUAGES Grill 0|.en from 8:30 to Cloainir. Featuring Broiled Steak Sandwiches NO COVER NO MINIMUM BLACKSTONE HOTEL In the days when Reinhardt was looking for a "Moses" for "The Eternal Road" he had dinner at Voisin's. the fashionable tatery, and saw a very impressive gentleman, a six-footer with gray hair and a melodious voice ... To Dr. Kommer, who was with him, Reinhardt said that this was the Moses he had been looking for "Why by the late "Teddy" Roosevelt; ask to see it when you drop in for a delicious dinner at his new place at 634 Collins ave. Mr. Feinberg is well known as the owner of the Larchmont Casino of Larchmont, N. Y. So until next week, don't get too sunburned. Spend the Cocktail Hour From 4 to 6 in our Open Patio Morey's Hof Brau H aus 634 Collins Ave. Hungarian-American Cuisine Full Course De Luxe Dinner 75c and $1.00 Under the personal supervisio l of Harry S. Feinberg, formerly of Larchmont Casino, Larchmont, N. Y. Breakfast Luncheon Dinner



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Friday, January 10, 1936 THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page Five Jacksonville News The regular monthly meeting of the Daughters of Israel was held Monday afternoon in the auditorium of the Jewish Center. This meeting had been scheduled to take place last Thursday, but had been portponed to Monday, due to proximity to holidays. Mrs. Joseph Hackel presided over the meeting. Mrs. Dave Torn entertained the assemblage with beautiful vocal selections. She was accompanied at the piano by Mrs. Archie Puldy. Entertaining the children registered by the Ladies' Hebrew Sheltering Aid Society and Home for the Aged, the following committee, Mrs. F. Soforenko, Mrs. S. Lasurow, Mrs. Sam Bryan, Mrs. Louis Wolfson, Mrs. H. Talisman, Mrs. J. Bartley, Mrs. S. L. Blattncr, Mrs. M. L. Hollins and Mrs. H. Rosenvaig, arranged a theatre party Monday etfternoon in the Florida Theatre. Assisting the committee in caring for the children were Mrs. A. Kristle, Mrs. D. H. Lasarow, Mrs. B. B. Yoffee, Mrs. N. Leitman and Mrs. S. Harris. In order to give an enthusiastic start to the new year the Temple Sisterhood held its January meeting in the form of a luncheon at 1 o'clock Tuesday, January 7th, in the Temple Home. The luncheon was in charge of Mrs. J. M. Glickstein. Guests were received by Mrs. Leon Greenbaum and her hospitality committee. Tables were arranged by Mrs. M. J. Greenblatt, chairman of the house committee, and decorated by the flower committee. The main attraction of this luncheon meeting was an all artist program arranged by the program chairman. For the musical part of the entertainment, Mrs. Chester Bedell, soprano, offered a group of lovely songs, and Mrs. Peyton J. Watson played a group of piano solos. In addition to the delightful musical program, Justine Rehnborg gave a group of readings. A business session followed. The January meeting of the Senior Hadassah Chapter was held Wednesday afternoon in the Jewish Center, with Mrs. Ben Stein presiding. Plans for the regional convention, to take place in Jacksonville February 10th and 11th, were discussed and other matters of importance were brought up for attention. An entertaining program was presented and a social hour was enjoyed after the meeting and program, during which the hostesses for the day served dainty refreshments. STATEWIDE NEWS Orlando Notes Mrs. I. Rosenbaum and daughters, Hannah and Caroline, entertained informally Saturday afternoon complimenting Mrs. H. Brasii and Miss Ruth Brash of Tampa. The former is a civic worker, and the latter in Orlando to attend the F. E. A. convention. They returned to Tampa. Mrs. M. Greenberg of Hartford, Conn., is visiting her son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Ben Greenberg, for the winter. Misses Ruth Esther Rosen, Elaine Klepper, Irene and Maxine Braverman, students of Florida State College for Women at Tallahassee, returned to school Monday after spending the holidays in Orlando with their parents. Mrs. H. Jacob of Detroit, Mich., is spending the winter with her son and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Jacob. West Palm Beach Notes Sisterhood Beth VA gave a benefit card party Sunday night at the Monterey Hotel with Mrs. Louis Schutzer as hostess. Bridge and other games were enjoyed. High score prizes were awarded and rsfreshments were served. One of the most enjoyable affairs given was the New Year's dinner dance at the Orange Court Hotel. Fifty couples attended. One of the main features was a floor show, in addition to many novelties introduced during the evening. Messrs. Abe. Kaminoff, Morton Levy, Martin Segal, Joel Baker, Myer Sigal, students at the University of Florida at Gainesville, returned to school this week after spending the holidays with their parents. Mrs. H. Fred of Chicago is the house guest of Mrs. J. Rosen. Mr. Sam Arstein is visiting in Talladega, Ala. Miss Lucille Baker returned from a visit yesterday in Daytona Beach. Under the leadership of Charles Wax, the Young Men's Jewish Progressive Club was organized at the Hotel Monterey Monday night. Officers elected are: Charles Kapner, president; Max Auerbach, vicepresident; Milton Finkelstein, secretary; Harry Moss, treasurer, and Albert Moss, sergeant-at-arnis. Mr. Wax was appointed honorary adviser. The club is to be an independent Jewish organization for worK of a local scope. Mr. and Mrs. M. Rubin and Mrs. Max Moss of Miami visited relatives and friends Wednesday. Congregation and Sisterhood of Beth El met in joint session Tuesday evening at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Scher. Matters of congregational interest and plans for the winter season were discussed. A social hour followed. Mr. and Mrs. George J. Baruch announced the engagement of their daughter, Miss Janet Erma Baruch, to Benjamin L. Lichtenstein, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Lichtenstein. Miss Baruch attended Columbia University. Mr. Lichtenstein is a grandson of the late Leopold Furchgott, who founded the Kohn-Furchgott Company of Jacksonville, Fla. Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood held open house Tuesday evening in Schwartzberg Hall with Mrs. M. Haimowitz and Mrs. Barney Blicher as hostesses. A short business meeting was held. Mrs. Halpern delivered a welcoming address, after which Mrs. Carl N. Herman presented a program of entertainment. Soprano solos by Mrs. George Gamble, accompanied by Mrs. Robert D. Atkisson; a violin solo, played by George Slaton, with Mrs. Atkisson at the piano; a talk on the activities of the Sisterhood during the past year, by the secretary, Mrs. Louis Vangilder, and the singing of "America" by all. A card party Sunday night at 8 at Schwartzberg Hall, with Mrs. Vangilder and Mrs. M. Weinerman of Delray, hostesses; a card party next Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the home of Mrs. H. St. Petersburg Notes Cong. B'nai Israel, A. S. Kleinfeld, rabbi, holds Friday services at 8 p. m. The rabbi's sermon will be "How to Combat AntiSemitism." Saturday morning services begin at 9 o'clock. Mr. and Mrs. Hyman M. Jacobs entertained Mr. J. Adler (B. Kovner) and his wife and son with a reception in his honor. Guests were Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Miller, Mr. and Mrs. David Miller, Mr. and Mrs. Helfenstein, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Shapiro, Mr. Sam Rosen, Mr. and Mrs. Dave Rothblatt and Rabbi Kleinfeld. Among the visitors here for the winter are Mr. and Mrs. Agee, Mr. and Mrs. Fein and Miss Edna Morrison of Pittsburgh, Pa., visiting Mr. and Mrs. David Loebel of this city. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Herman entertained their many visiting friends with a card party Sundaynight. The honored guest was Mrs. Ethel Feinberg. Tampa Notes Announcement of the engagement of Miss Shirley Aronovitz, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Herman Aronovitz, to Mr. Max Weinstein of Atlanta, Ga., was made at a reception held New Year's eve at their residence. The marriage will take place the early part of the summer. Only members of the families and relatives attended the party. Miss Aronovitz was born and reared in Tampa, and was graduated from the Hillsboro High school. Mr. Weinstein, son of Mr. and Mrs. L. Weinstein of Atlanta, is a native of that city, and engaged in business there. Mr. Morrice S. Uman, young Tampa attorney, recently announced his candidacy for the legislature on a platform which included an honest and proper reapportionment for South Florida in the legislature. Mr. Ben Schwartz of Gainesville University visited the Abrams family over the New Year's vacation. Miss Shirley Aronovitz, whose engagement to Mr. Max Weinstein was recently announced, was guest of honor Thursday night at a buffet supper given by her aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Manuel Aronovitz. Mrs. Aronovitz was assisted in entertaining by her sister-in-law, Mrs. L. Fondianu. Guests included only members of the family and out-of-town guests. Bluniberg, 412 Forty-second st., and a dance in Palm Beach on a date to be announced later, to be sponsored by Mr. Jack Fein and members of her committee, were announced. The Young Judea held a regular meeting Wednesday night at the home of Miss Florence Schutzer. Various business matters were discussed. Charles Kapner presided. A social hour followed. Palm Beach Lodge No. 1140, B'nai B'rith will meet Monday evening in their permanent meeting place at the Monterey Hotel. Chas. Wax, president of the lodge, urges all members to attend. Many matters of importance are to be acted on. A social hour will follow. Mrs. Josephine Houston, superintendent of the Tampa Day Nursery, spoke on "Social Problems as Related to the Day Nursery" I at the regular monthly meeting of the Tampa Section, National Council of Jewish Women, Wednesday afternoon in the schoolrooms of Rodoph Sholom Temple. Members and their friends are invited to attend the class on contemporary Jewish affairs, sponsored by the council and conducted by Rabbi David Zielonka Wednesday afternoon, January 15th, at 4 o'clock at the Y. M. H. A. Tickets for the lecture by Dr. Stephen S. Wise, January 16th, in municipal auditorium have been placed on sale at the Tampa Gas Co. office. Admission will be 50c and 75c. The lecture and dinner that night at the Tampa Terrace Hotel in honor of Dr. and Mrs. Wise will be open to the public. Mr. Jackie Liebman returned to the St. Petersburg Military Academy after spending the holidays with his parents. The Future Of Miami By I. ROTH Who has visited Miami Beach each year for hia health and this year has acquired a home for himself. In 1562 Jean Ribaut, with n band of French Huguenots fleeing from persecution, made a landing on Anastasia Island at St. Augustine, explored the coast as far north as the mouth of the St. Johns River and claimed the land for France. Kibaut and his brave band were seeking a home in which the bounties of nature would amply supply their needs. They found what they were seeking. Ribaut sent a message back to France saying: "This is the fairest, fruitfullest, pleasantest land of all the world." His 400-yearold message is still an appropriate description. Miami, Florida's wonder city, has a great destiny. Its natural wonders I need not extoll. They are loo strikingly obvious. Its growth is an amazing phenomena. Forty years ago it was but a trading post. In l'JOO it had a population of 1,681 people; in 1915 it had 15,000; in 1925 the population had jumped to 71,419, and in 1934 it was 127,600. Such development does not stop arbitrarily. It was founded upon solid influences that are at work as much today as they were in the past. Miami can very confidently look forward to a sustained continuance of this growth with its accompanying benefits to all. It is my own settled conviction that Miami's development will be accelerated in the future as compared to its astounding growth in the past. This will be due to a number of factors which did not previously exist. These include the progress made in aviation transportation. As time is eliminated, and it inevitably will be, from the existing travel schedules the effect of being close to the rest of the country is incalculable. The marvels of the air of the future will mean the greater fortune of Florida and particularly Miami. So much for Florida as a playground and resort for America. But Florida will perform a still greater function in American life. That is as seaport and commercial center for future Latin American trade. This is its natural position. As greater "Clipper Ships" of the air begin to carry huge loads of freight, passengers and mail in a matter of few hours to all of Central and South America (and soon this will not be a dream) Miami will grow into on of the great ports of the world. Exports to Central and South America in 1933 were about $146,000,000, in 1934 close to $200,000,000. South and Central America, with the West Indies and Mexico, has a population of about 120 million people, growing fast, developing constantly. Their future is great and it will be Miami that will be in the forefront of traffic and commerc* with the great lands of the southern continent. This is not an idle vision of the future. Miami should have, under federal auspices, a Latin American Bureau or "Casa" to prepare for and participate in the development of relations with Latin America. Our nation is by habit a traveling people. Our foreign tourists spend nearly eight hundred (800) million dollars yearly in foreign lands. Miami Beach is as wonderful a resort as can be found anywhere. With foreign conditions unsettled, with fluctuating currencies, and with Miami Beach as a Counter-attraction a host of people who would be foreign bound should | be heading for Miami. They, with I Miami as the apex of Latin Amer, ican trade, shoul'J make Miami's future a bright and wonderful one.



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THZ ~r;^ r-_ -,. January 10. NOTE%  Think, Work And Smile ft* I %  ... %  %  i i %  %  %  .. ... -: I if %  ... I .. %  %  If I :'•.• %  %  oaj •.-;-.. %  • %  f A up*. V, ....-. i. iof B i %  %  %  its I .-;'-— :vr, about 2 %  %  •. I %  %  i %  • • %  Brewery i : %  %  %  %  n Irr. .Paleati the tsta.1 t tat the pro' ra KM umoalT. be nuur%  ft Ii-*i ? What %  ar.. .Sa^e Time. Milts and Money -f. •hnf. -triit Wtj u M.*. Beaefc H? tfc* VENETIAN CAUSEWAY MIAMI BRIfX.E COMPANY SSfads M:ani I W. Sceaad .-. • e. Mind Beach Lincoln Road ;. P mk'mgttm Are. FOR I1C.O0 25 A MONTH V. j Car. N OWN A FORD With COM] LOW f>. n Pavment H arguixstion fee, froai any of its c • %  %  .-"THOROUGHBRED RACING AT ITS BEST WINTER MEETING. DEC. 16 THROUGH JAN. 15 w ra tae Mot Modera Ttaii*atar ia AJBCT WE INVITE THE NATION'S TURF PATRONS TO Homelikt Inciting the Turfmen's Rendezvous Modern Pleasant MIAMI'S MOST POM LAR RACE COURSE Pott Time 2 P. M. Seven Races Dailv. Clubhouse West of the Btftmare Tower Grandstand $1.00 $2.50 "Jacksonville's Leading Hotel" THE SEMINOLE JACKSONVILLE, FLA. CHAS. B. GRIXER. Manager A human, home-like institution where you will find your individual comfort and entertainment a matter of great importance. A steel fireproof building located in the heart of the city. Every Room with Combination Tub and Shower Bath. Radio. Electric Ceiling Fan, Slat Door for Summer Ventilation. Comfortable Beds with Mattresses of Inner Spring Construction and Individual Ret ding Lamps. RATES ri HHU wiik PriT.t. g, tt in Will M RHH with PrWau Balk *.S*—Sinck ** Roaaaa .iih Prl.aw Balk I-**—Slnaja : ROOM with Pri.al. Balk 1H Mm;, !• Sampl. RMBU witk Prl.ata Bath 4.—IH|I ( %  LIGHT INCREASE FOR DOIBLR OCCUPANCY



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Friday, January 10, 1936 THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page Three 4*Jewish ficndiian News Tower Bldg. 621 S. W. 15th Avenue I LOKJ1M S ON'LY ,'EWISH WEEKLY PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY by the JEWISH FLORIDIAN PUBLISHING CO. P. O. Box 2T3 Miami, Fla. EDITORIAL OFFICES: Phone 2-5304 Fhone 2-1 IKS J. LOUIS SHOCHET, Editor FRED K. SHOCHET. Circulation Manager CANTOR BORIS SCHLACHMAN Field Representative Entered as second class matter July 4, 1930. at the Post Office at Miami, Florida, under the Act of March 3. 1879. ST. PETERSBURG RABBI A. S. KLEINFELD Representative WEST PALM BEACH S. SCHUTZER Representative ORLANDO IRENE BRAVERMAN Representative TAMPA MRS. M. H. KISLER Representative SUBSCRIPTION Six Months —-ii-JS One Year %  • FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1936 Vol. 9— No. 2 What Is News? ish Lite in Modern Times," says: "The great diversity that characterizes modern Jewry is the natural result of its dispersion throughout the globe • This differentiation is produced by the influence of their several environments, which vary from one another in physical, political and intellectual conditions, and effect corresponding variations among their Jewish denizens. But the Jews of any particular country, although exposed to the same general influences, are not molded into tinsame general pattern." The differences are expressed in many ways. There are those who do not believe in organized religion, both among Jews and Christians. They believed in organized religion, as it seems to me, when organized religion believed in rugged individualism, and labor was unorganized. But when labor is organized, and religion is preaching equality of opportunity for all men, including labor and white collar worker, then some of these do no longer believe in organized religion. But aside from this "philosophic" point of view, there are Orthodox, Conservative and Reform •lews; theie are Zionists, AntiZionists and non-Zionist"' there are Sephardim and Asnkenazic Jews; there are l'oale-Zionists and Misrachists; there are self-hating and self-respecting Jews; there are national and cosmopolitan Jews; there are Jews suffering because n!' righteousness and those suffering because of sins. There are Charity Jews and Religious Jews. There are practical Jews and .saintly .lews. Everyone thinks he is right. What do you think? Can Jews ever become unified in any way. for any purpose, on any platform? Suppose we say it is Judaism that holds Jews together, thsit Creates B semblance of unity among all Jews. The non-Jews often talk as if we were all alike, just plain PLAIN TALK By AL SEGAL "Story of Two Temples" Remarkable it is how news values meriting bold headlines in the metropolitan dailies dwindle to but a few lines hidden away in the dailies in this area. Particularly is this true when matters affecting Jews are involved. Last Friday night President Roosevelt in a speech to Congress listened to by millions, dwelt rather forcibly on the lack of religious toleration in European countries ruled by dictators and prided himself on the fact that in these United States we believed in equality, religious freedom, etc It was a rather pointed hint to Hitler and his cohorts to which they replied the next day in rather uncomplimentary terms. To our astonishment, one of our local dailies made no mention whatever of this portion of the president's message, and the other two simply printed it as a portion of the general address. In metropolitan dailies elsewhere much notice was taken of this portion of the address. And yet one of our dailies the next day printed a rather lengthy interview with a German merchant, accompanied by a photograph of this gentleman and his wife, and rather plainly permitted Hitler propaganda to be disseminated in this fair city of Miami. In the interview which our local daily thought was of sufficient importance to give it a rather prominent spot, the oft-repeated falsehood that "the subversive elements in Germany were being put in their places," etc., etc., was printed rather boldly and with no attempt on the part of the editor to edit it. Perhaps the gentlemen in charge of this publication will realize that there are two sides to every story perhaps, ,. ah und nan ded it to Moses, and too, they will feel that in the spirit of fair play and common Moses handed it to Israel. Nay, more, he will tell you that every bit of commentary and explanation of the Torah was already known to Moses. If he is a modJews. What have you to say? Suppose we do say that Judaism is the bond of union among Jews. The question then arises, What is Judaism? Here we should find as many answers as there are groups and sub-groups among Jews of all lands. If the Jew is really orthodox he will tell you that he believes, as we all did, that God wrote the Todecency it would be far better that such interviews never were printed ... we wonder what the Jewish advertisers will say. It appears that news values do change yes. perhaps when viewed through dark colored glasses of prejudice, hate ,.,-„ orthodox, as Maimonidea was and tin -Americanism such as one expects of Hitler cohorts IM n j a ,i a y i ne w uj give excellent and Hitler sympathizers. Something should be done to direct the attention of our local dailies to prevent a recurrence of these happenings. Boruch Habo! In these days when momentous matters affecting Jews throughout the civilized world are being decided daily, it is a pleasure to welcome to our midst Jews of courage, of vision and of determination. It is, therefore, that we extend the traditional "Boruch Habo" to Rabbi Dr. Stephen S. Wise on his arrival in Miami. Though he will be with us for but a few short days, his'rious books of the Bible; he will stay here should encourage the wavering and vacillating Jew give a different explanation of the and put real vision into those who need it. origin of Judaism, and the funeWe sincerely hope that the message of Dr. Wise will be tion of beliefs in modern life; and the means of revitalizing Jewish hope and faith in this area. No matter what shade of Jewry we belong to, our problems are but one. And so, once again, we say "Boruch Habo." philosophic explanation of his belief, as well he might do, for every bit of explanation and interpretation is in the spirit of Moses, and so the Torah, like the Constitution of the United States, is the fundamental law on which all interpretations are based. If the Jew is a Reform Jew he will have an entirely different outlook on the meaning of Judaism. He will examine critically the vaThink, Work And Smile By JACOB H. KAPLAN, Ph. D. Last week I began a series of articles on Jewish Problems, which are discussed in my high school class, and prepared by the Hebrew Union College. Last week I asked the question, "Who Is a Jew?" Let us see why so many differences among Jews, and what is Judaism. Israel Cohen, in his book, "Jewyet the Reform Jew insists that he is a product of Jewish forces and life and culture, and that he belongs to the same great group of men and women known as Jews, and that he believes in the samereligion known as Judaism. In between these two extremes we find all shades of belief and viewpoint, from Ethical Jews, prophetic Jews, religious Jews, to (Continued on Page 4) Hear Mr. Segal: What, in your opinion, is the future of Reform Judaism? Or has it a future?— B. T. E. • Well, to answer this I have the true story of two temples in a certain American city. The one temple might be called one of the landmarks of Reform Judaism, which is to say that it was almost as old as Reform Judaism itself. It hail noble traditions which have to do with sainted great-grandfathers, and in the city in which it abides it was esteemed as a hoary, venerable institution. About it hovered the fragrance of aristocratic memory, for in the old days to belong to Anshe Giborim Temple (which was not its name! carried the same significance as to belong to the best country club does today. Aye, it stood like some enfeebled old man looking backward at his gorgeous youth. At times the old gentleman withdraws his rapt .yes from the happy past to look, bewildered, at the present: What has become of his children? He remembers they were gathered about him a little while ago yesterday or the clay before. Now i they're all gone, all gone. So it was with this temple. On confirmation days particularly, the ghosts of the sainted pioneers must have wondered what had become of their children. The children who were being blessed by the rabbi were not of their descendants, they carried strange names. In the hearts of themembers the temple was a sentimental thing that had to do with dead kinsmen who had founded it; they paid their clues faithfully as one pays the sexton of a cemetery for the upkeep of parents' graves; they kept hereditary pews as one guards an antique sofa in which a beloved grandmother liked to sit. Their Judaism was an aspiration that concerned itself chiefly with drives for social agencies and knew or cared little about any poetic beauty to be derived from observance of the things of the faith. a •/ The other temple (in the same city) was of newer origin. Its members were for the most part fresh from Orthodoxy. Still sang In their hearts the familiar voices of cantors and if it came to that many of them could recite the entire morning prayer of the Orthodox service by heart. They knew the proper number of rounds to wind around their arms in the laying of the t'fiilim, though years and years had passed since the last time they had taken tluphylacteries. Their Judaism was a cherished possession they had brought up from their childhood. It had to do with candle lights on Sabbath eve, with mothers' hands blessing them, with Sabbath haves exhaling fragrance, with seders and gleaming Chanuka lamps. They made a happy synthesis of the spirit of the old and the rationalism of Reform. Some of them were irreconcilables in the matter of wearing hats in temple; their hats stood defiant on their heads. There were amusing reports: On Yom Kippur, when the long day verged toward noon, men left the temple to go to some Orthodox synagogue where they borrowed a talith and gave themselves to the lull holiness of the occasion; or they went to the synagogueto be near their fathers as of old. Judaism was still a loud summoning in their hearts. Then hard times came and men who had been the pillars of this temple fell into the depression; and it came to a moment when it .seemed that this congregation must perish for lack of sustenance: An unhappy end that was befalling many another thing that was holy. Thus it came to pass that the older people took steps to save Ibis congregation by taking it over and making it part of itself and endowing it with its great and good name and with its venerable traditions. Everybody said that this was a very fine thing to do: One Jewish house was saving the other! But, as it turns out, the older temple is the one that has been saved. From the warmth of the younger congregation (which it had embraced in saving grace) the older temple has derived life and vigor. No wealth did the younger congregation bring to the old, but the riches of Jews who bring the lovelier things of Orthodoxy, to whom being Jewish is more than being a solicitor for social agencies, whose Jewish identity is more than an affliction suffered on account of a German dictator. These new members (who came out of Orthodoxy) have become leaders of the old temple's activities; its aging bones throb with new eagerness and it wants to go places, as they say. Still grand with noble tradition stands this temple, but its eyes are not turned 'to backward-looking; its sentiments no longer have to do altogether with veneration of dead pioneers in whose memory one kept em paying dues. 1 am told that not long ago this temple had a social session to celebrate a religious festival. One who was interested in religious and social statistics made a count in order to arrive at an answer to a question: How many of those present at this religious festival were ; of the old membership of this temple-, how many of the new? He found only two of the hereditary members of the temple; the remainder of the 350 were of the new who had come in (quite fresh from Orthodoxy) when the temples were merged. It seemed the men from Orthodoxy were saving this landmark of Reform. All this, as I hear, is typical of saving changes that are going on in Reform Judaism everywhere. Re-form Judaism, it appears, is being rescued by arms that still bear the markings of phylactery straps that were wound around them for the Orthodox service of the morning in their youth. Its spirit is being revived the outgivings of hearts that still carry the Orthodox prayers with their proper intonations. Its stiffening body is invigorated by blood that has coursed swiftly to the inspirations of the seder drama. The future of Reform Judaism seems to be in the hands of Jews of Orthodox origin who in the past few years have been taking the active leadership of temples. (Copyright, 1936, by Seven Arts Feature Syndicate)