The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00296

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Jewish Floridian of North Broward
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Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
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Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
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Jewish Floridian of South County
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Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
f
wJemsti Floiridliiai m
Vol. No- ,:1
FLORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY
MIAMI. FLORIDA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1934
Price Five Cents
Jewish News
Around the
World
URGES RAISING OF
IMMIGRATION BARS
I of the immigration
quota in Palestine for Jews from
world was advocafc d
political commission of the
of Nations by the Polish
\V. Kulski, during a dis-
cussion on colonial mandates, ac-
cording to word received by the
Gdynia-American Line, which
a large percentage of
in .it ws to Palestine each
month.
Poland is particularly interested
in Jewi li settlement in Palestine,
Delegate Kulski declared at the
meeting, because of the
favorable opportunities of-
fered in agriculture and industry.
11. pointed out that the dearth of
farm labor in Palestine was due
to tin limited immigration per-
Blitted and strongly urged that the
mandatory government raise the
ban to meet the new economic
conditions prevailing.
Di legate Kulski stressed the sig-
nificance of Palestine to countries
of central and eastern Europe as
an ideal colony to which surplus
population of Jews could be di-
rected.
In the course of Delegate Kul-
ski'.- Bpeech it developed that Po-
land's interest in Palestine was
centered in its increasing trade
unities developed by Polish
Kxports to Palestine from
I have increased from 769,-
n 1927 to almost 6,000,-
last year. This trade
ady greater than Poland's
to Hungary, Jugoslavia
nia. Among the Polish
products bought by Palestine are
ire, clothing, glass products,
machinery and tools, cement, wa-
: draining pipes, sinks, baths
eds.
Jewish Refugee Colony Opened in
Holland
AmsterdamNieuwersluis, the
'" i Jewish refugee settlement
1 on land reclaimed from
tl" Z i; in- Zee, was officially ded-
y League of Nations Hign
Commissioner for German Refu-
lamcs G. McDonald. The
site of the colony, which covers an
Tea ol 175 acres, has been leased
to the Dutch committee for spe-
cial Jewish interests by the Dutch
government for a period of ten
The settlement can house
"ugees, 100 of whom are al-
ready living there. They are be-
ing trained for farming and hor-
ticulture work, which will be their
fatal* career in Palestine and else-
where. In his address at the ded-
ication exercises Commissioner Mc-
Donald lauded the Dutch govern-
"WM. the Jewish committee and
chairman, former Senator Van
Den Bergh, whose generosity
k'ped to finance the project. Mr.
McDonald told the Jewish refu-
ses that "you are both sowing
*id reaping here. You can live
ke both as men and as Jews."
Reliability .. Dependability ...
Questionable Methods of Financing
Noted Publicists Speak Out Against Methods of News Gath-
ering Denounce Questionable Methods of Financing
. Money < ollected for Paper Under Guise of German
Refugee Relief.
Beach to Hold
Dance at Pier
Hitin.no-.......luiiHiiiimiiiiKtuurrMiMiniiiHiumiiiiMiiuii
Announcements
IIKIIKIIIIIIMIII.....HIIIHIIIlllUlfc
li i the integrity of the Jewish0-
11 .-! aphic A been
ioned'.'... II.i the reliabil-
ity of ts l irta been d
nancing been reprimanded?
In 1982 new.- of what wa- hap-
pening to Jews in Germany was
of vital interest to Jewry through-
out the world What depend-
ability could there I"' placed on
the r ports sent to the press of
the entire world by the Jewi Telegraphic Agency? In July,
1932, it is extremely interesting
to find the Jewish Morning Jour-
nal disclosing to the world exactly
how unreliable the .1. T. A. was.
And at that time wo find no less
important an international work-
er than David A. Brown, one-time
chairman of the United Jewish
campaign, in the July 22, 1932, is-
sue of the American Hebrew and
Jewish Tribune in an article head-
ed, "Wanteda More Accurate
source of Jewish International
News Service." among a number
of other things, very emphatically
expressing; himself.
"One might also point out
that it does not speak well for
the reliability of the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency to make
known ... as it does in the
attempt to justify itself
thai some of its reports are
culled from other papers.
Surety, the function of a news
agency is not blind copying.
but painstaking investigation,
especially where news of grave
implications is involved.
"While I do not care to go
into great detail with refer-
ence I., the manner in which
the J. T. A. secures ii- finan-
circumstances should it ever
he beholden to any individual,
charity organisation, local, na-
tional or international organi-
zation for its support."
\\. have published these facts
BO that those of our spiritual lead-
i is. who in their overanxiety to
do good, are led astray and easily
induced to write testimonials, may
truly remember "Chachomim hee-
zoharu b'divraychem," and that
the general public may learn not
to contribute to any cause until
they have become convinced of its
necessity and desirability.
We reprint here a letter
fi om Rabbi Isser W. Muskat of
Beth El Congregation, West Palm
Beach, which is self-explanatory.
Editor the Jewish Floridian.
Dear Sir:
While I believe that your expose
of the charity racket in this sec-
tion of the country is highly com-
The Jewish Floridian.
Miami. Florida.
I ,-t me congratulate you for
the fine public service you are
rendering in exposing para-
des and racketeers. More po^-
er to you!
Faithfully,
(Rabbi) ISSER W. MUSKAT.
West Palm Beach.
cial support, yet we bel.eve
there is a relationship between
their method of financing and
the type of news sent out by
them." "It is weU known
fact that a number of our
charitable organizations in
America have the J.T. A. on
their annual budgets, and that
THERE IS CONSTANT SO-
LICITATION by the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency for funds
from every source in this
country and in other parts of
,he world." "The support of
the J T. A. should come from
those' newspapers or maga-
zines. Jewish or otherwise, who
use their service. Under no
Dear Friend Shochet:
Let me congratulate you upon
your truthful articles about the
"newspaper racketeers." The
title fits them exactly. I have
personal knowledge of an un-
deserving weekly (claiming to
be a weekly) for the past two
years. 1 only saw two papers.
Nevertheless its representative
\i-its our city and all Southern
cities and solicits ads from non-
Jews on the pretense that their
paper is the voice of American
Jewry. I am glad to see that
you are alerl and determined to
expose them.
(Rabbi) A. S. KLEINFELD,
St. Petersburg, Fla.
A ben< fit dance will be given
ni xt Sunday evening at Carter's
Pier, Miami Beach, as the first of
B series of social events planned
by the Beth Jacob Sisterhood of
Miami Beach. An elaborate floor
show will be presented. Miss Syl-
via Shapiro, chairman of the ways
and means committee, reports
many reservations have already
been received.
Mrs. Harry Kerzin, chairman of
the membership committee, and
Mrs. David Rosenbloom, co-chair-
man, launched a drive for new
members during the last week. Of-
ficers of the Sisterhood are Mrs. ]
Harry Z. Silverman, president; !
Miss Jeanette Teller, recording '
secretary; Mrs. Sam Blank, troas- \
urer; Miss Shapiro, corresponding !
secretary.
The organization meets the first
Monday evening of each month in
the study of the rabbi, David J.
Rosenbloom.
CONGREGATION BETH JACOB
(Orthodox)
.'ill Washington Ave., Miami Beach
DAVID I. ROSENBLOOM. Rabbi
Friday evening services begin at
5:30 o'clock. Saturday morning
services begin at 8:30 with Cantor
Boris Schlaehman chanting and
Rabbi Rosenbloom preaching a
sermon in Yiddish on the portion
of the week. Sunday school meets
at 10 a. m. and Talmud Torah
daily at .'i p. m.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
(Conservative)
139 S. W. Third Ave.
MAX SHAPIRO, Rabbi
mendable, I nevertheless desire,
:, a matter of personal privilege
to point out a glaring misstatement
fact which unfortunately
crept into your front page edito-
rial of October l'Jth, entitled
"Startling Facts Come to Light-
Tin- Truth Must Out."
Indeed, sir, let the truth come
out, but the wholo truth and only
the truth. For your statement,
"Between Rosh Hashono and Yom
Kippur we learned that Rabbi Wie-
sci had gone to West Palm Beach,
where he enlisted the active aid
and support of both the Rabbis of
that city and had made a canvass
of the business men of that town"
is misleading and untrue. Ob-
viously you have been misinformed,
so far as "the active aid and sup-
port of BOTH Rabbis" is con-
cerned.
I do not know what assistance
the above named Rabbi may have
received from others in WesfPalm
Beach, but your potent implication
that he received my active aid and
support is utterly unwarranted.
Here are the facts:
Rabbi Wiesel phoned me for an
interview, which I gladly granted
him as a matter of simple cour-
tesy. I had never seen or heard
Board Will
Govern Synagog
At the annual meeting for elec-
tion of officers held last Tuesday
night by the Miami Jewish Ortho-
dox Congregation, an amendment
to its constitution was adopted
whereby a board of eleven direc-
tors will govern the organization.
The board elected will choose tem-
porary chairmen and a permanent
tieasurer and secretaries at its
next meeting, to be held next week.
Nine directors chosen Tuesday
night include: Milton Weiner, H.
M. Drevich, Max Rappaport, Max
Mintzer, Philip Berkowitz, J.
Louis Shochet, Nat Blumberg,
Adolph Daum and Al E. Pallott.
Two other members will be elected
by the board of directors from
seven nominated for the office. A
formal installation of the new-
board will be held shortly and a
committee to arrange for the in-
stallation was named, consisting
of Messrs. Max Rappaport, II. M.
Drevich and Max Mintzer.
Rabbi Shapiro will preach at the
late services, beginning at 8:15
p. m., on "American Legion on
ParadePeace or War?" Cantor
Nathan Wroobel, assisted by the
choir, will chant the services. Sat-
urday morning services begin at
8:30 with the Junior Congregation
meeting at 10:30, when Junior
Cantor Irving Ginsburg will chant
and Junior Rabbi Peritz Schcin-
berg will preach.
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI
(Reform)
137 N. E. Nineteenth St.
DR. JACOB H. KAPLAN, Rabbi
Association to
Elect Officers
The meeting of the Greater
Miami Jewish Cemetery Associa-
tion for the purpose of electing
officers will be held next Wednes-
day night, October 31st, at Beth
David Talmud Torah Hall, begin-
ning at 8 o'clock. All members of
the board are asked to be on hand
promptly.
Regular Friday evening serv-
ices begin at 8:15 o'clock. Mr.
Day J. Apte, president of the con-
gregation, will read the services
;n the absence of Rabbi Kaplan,
who is confined to his home be-
cause of an accident. The public
i> cordially welcome.
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION
(Orthodox)
1548 S. W. Third Street
JULIUS WASHER, Rabbi
Friday evening services begin
al 5:30 o'clock. Saturday morning
services begin at '.' with a short
sermon in Yiddish by the Rabbi.
Sunday morning the Sunday school
meets at the Y. M. H. A. club-
rooms, beginning at 10 o'clock.
Talmud Torah classes meet at the
Synagogue daily at 3 p. m.
Members to Be
Hadassah Guests
of the man before and had no rea-
son whatever to suspect him. But
hardly had I seen and spoken to
h'm for five minutes, when he ap-
peared to me in his real colors. I
quickly realized that there was
neither a Rabbi nor a cause be-
hind the man.
His evasive and profusely apolo-
getic manner, his pathetically in-
criminating remark that "A Rabbi
needs nothing but personality,"
quickly betrayed the appalling pov-
(Continued on Page 6)
Senior Hadassah is sponsoring
a membership tea Monday, Octo-
ber 29th, at 3 p. m. at the home
of Mrs. P. Scheinberg, 1777 S. W.
12th St., which all members and
friends of Hadassah are invited
to attend. In charge of arrange-
ments are Mesdames Barney Wein-
kle, membership chairman; Max
Dobrin, B. Seldman, Joseph Wil-
liamson, Alex. Goldstein, Morris
Plant and Sam Simonhoff. One
of the features of the afternoon
will be a book review by Mrs. I.
M. Weinstein.


Pafe Two
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAW
Friday, October 2G, i More than seventy-five members
attended the meeting of the Young
Men's Hebrew Association last
Wednesday night when enthusias-
tic reports on the progress of the
third annual dance of the organi-
zation were heard. Murry Gross-
man, past president of the organi-
zation and chairman of the dance,
told of the co-operation received
from the citizens at large. The
dance, which is to be held at the
Miami Beach Golf and Country
Club on November 8th, will fea-
ture a number of the best vaude-
ville acts ever presented locally
as part of the evening's entertain-
ment. All Pallott, in charge of the
souvenir program, reported that to the city this week after an ab-
approximately one thousand dol- sence of several months spent vis-
lars had been pledged through this iting relatives and friends in the
source, and a rising vote of thanks
was given to Mr. Hyman Apte
and Mr. A. Cutler for their work
in this respect. Among others
who spoke during the evening were
Al Rosenfeld, president of the Y.j
Cantor Boris Schlachman, Sidney
Segal and several of the new mem-
bers who were admitted at this
meeting.
h '

Cleopatra
might have wo,';
S a 11 d 4i 1 s
like these
Slip your foot into a
slender evening san-
:IaI, jewel studded, and
imagine the royal
.splendor of old Egyp-
tian nights. Silver
k i d, white satin or
black gleaming with
brilliance.
5.95
Dyed to match
your frock at
no extra charge
BDDOFT SHOP. SECOND
FLOOR
BurditiQ's
A surprise party was given by
Mrs. Julius Wilson in celebration
of her husband's ,'iOth birthday
last Saturday evening. During
the course of the evening bridge
was played. Lucky numbers were
drawn for prizes. A midnight buf-
fet supper was served. Guests
present were: Mr. and Mrs. Ham.
Hopkins, Hibiscus Island; Mr. and
Mrs. S. Wilson. Mrs. J. Shaffer
and daughters, Evelyn and Mar-
cine; Mrs. M. Ornstein, Mrs. L.
Brodsky, Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Al-
leu, Mr. and Mrs. J. Hirsch, Mr.
M. Mandelbaum, Joe Mandelbaum,
Mr. and Mrs. B. Chertkof, all of
Miami; Mr. and Mrs. E. W.
Sthultz, Buffalo, N. V.: Mr. and
Mrs. M. Weinstein, Mr. and Mrs.
E. Seadt r, Philadelphia, Pa.; Mrs.
North. She was accompanied by
her son, SBm.
*
Cantor Boris Schlachman of
Beth Jacob Congregation, Miami
Beach, is now at his new home, 327
Washington ave.
*
The Ladies' Auxiliary of the
Jewish Welfare Bureau is spon-
soring a benefit bridge on Wednes-
day afternoon, November 7th, at
2 o'clock at the Southern Cafe-
teria with Mesdames L. Hartz and
Ida Optner in charge of arrange-
ments. Prizes will be awarded for
high scores and refreshments will
be served. The public is urged to
attend. Funds are being used for
the relief work of the organiza-
tion. Others on the committee are
Mesdames Gordon Davis and Rose
Simpson,
* *
Beth David Sisterhood is spon-
soring a benefit card party at its
Talmud Torah Hall Tuesday eve-
ning, November 6th, beginning at
8 o'clock, with Mesdames M.
Scheinberg and J. Lang as the
ses. Prises will be awarded
for high scores and refreshments!
American Legion Post of that city, Rabbi and Mrs. Max Shapiro,
is the house guest of his brother- whose wedding was an event of
in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. two weeks ago, arrived here Tues-
Hyman N. Levy of this city. Also day morning by boat from New
'.. Fishman, New York City; Mr. I will be served. The public is in-
Roy Koppstein, Mr. S. Eagle, New- tfted to attend.
rk, N. J.; Mr. and Mrs. Julius
on and son, Billy.
*
'''- Moi PI int, chairman ol
Hs tacky party I
given Oct i Sist< rh.....1 of
Nexl Tuesday evening, October
30th, beginning at 8 o'clock, a Hal-
l .ween party, sponsored by Mrs.
Sidney II. rainier at her home.
1 itiO S. W. 23rd teirace, will be
has announced the Held for the benefit of the Loyalty
charge of Club of Emunah Chapter, O. E.
Tickets, Mrs. Harry Nev- S. Refreshments will be served,
ins, Mrs. Louis Zeientz; decora- and among the prizes to Ik award-
Mrs. M. Cowen, Mrs. Henry <1 will be a special prize for the
Bulbin, Mrs. 11. Katz; refresh-
ments, Mrs. Gordon Davis, Mrs.
P. Scheinberg, Mrs. Frank I
Mrs. Adolph Wertheimer; enter-
tainment, Mrs. I. M. Weinstein and
Mrs. Henry I). Williams. Tickets
may be obtained from any com-
ttei member. Proceeds will be
used for the U nefit of the reli-
Rioua school.
*
Mrs. S. M. Goodkind entertained
a number of friends in honor of
(.ei -on. Marks Goodkind, at her
home this week. Games and re-
freshments were enjoyed.
*
Mr. and Mis. H, H. Miller, 1136
S. W. Fifth St., announce the mar-
riage of their daughter, Miss
Goldye Miller, to Al I.. Nadler on
August 18.

Gainesville, Fla.At the first
meeting of the 1934-1986 pledge
group of Delta Chapter of Phi
Beta Delta at the University of
Florida the following officers were
elected: Harold Rubin, Miami,
president; Harry Lasris, Jackson-
ville, vice-president; David Kan-
tor, Jacksonville, secretary; Fred
Nelson, Daytona Beach, treasurer;
Moe Bono, Jacksonville, junior
intrafraternity conference, and
Frank Wotltsky, Punta Gorda,
marshal. The pledge group was
honored at a banquet attended by
numerous alumni. Prof. Joseph
engineering
original costume. The pub-
invited to attend. Other nov-
elty entertainment will he
vided.
pro-
Mr. Jacob Werner of New York
urrived in Miami Beach this week.
He i- associated with Mr. Philip
Romer in the meat market of the
Sunshine Kosher Market at Miami
Beach, which will shortly announce
i-.- reopening.
*
Mr. and Mrs. I. Nusbaum and
Bon, Jack, arrived in Miami Beach
last Wednesday.

The Ladies' Auxiliary of the
Miami Jewish Orthodox Congre-
gation will hold one of its regu-
lar bi-weekly card parties next
Tuesday evening, October 30th, at
the home of Mrs. Hyman Traeger,
1001 S. W. Fifteenth ave. Prizes
will be awarded for high scores
and refreshments will be served.
The public is invited to attend.

Mr. Hyman Berkowitch of Nor-
folk, Va., business manager of the
drum and bugle corps of the
visiting them is Mr. Max Levy, a
member of the band of Victory
Post of Washington, D. C.

A committee consisting of Mes-
dames B. Chertkoff, Henry Seit-
lin and L. Silverman is sponsor-
ing a benefit bridge for a family
in distress, at the clubrooms of
the Y. M. H. A., 1567 S. W. 5th
st. next Monday evening, October
2!lth, beginning at 8 o'clock. All
are asked to attend. Prizes will
be awarded and refreshments will
be served.
* *
Loyalty (Tub of Emunah Chap-
ter. 0. E. S., is sponsoring a ben-
ef't dance at the Marine Gardens,
Carter's Pier, Miami Beach, on
Wednesday evening, December 5th.
It: charge of arrangements and
aiding in a souvenir program of
tho event are William Friedman,
Mesdames Clara Fine, Olga
.Schwartz and Sydney II. Palmer.
The worthy matrori, Mrs. Ix'na Si-
mon, and the worthy patron, Mr.
Albert liacher, are aiding in this
work.
The Junior Council of Jewish
Women will hold an important
meeting at the Ponce de Leon Ho-
tel next Tuesday evening, Octo-
bei -nth. beginning at K o'clock,
when business will he transacted.
A program of entertainment will
be presented during the evening.
Al! members an- urged to attend.
*
A special board meeting of the
Junior Council of Jewish Women
was held last night at the home
of Miss Ruth Sontag, when plans
for the coming benefit bridge of
tin organization were announced.
The bridge will be held at the
William Penn Hotel, .Miami Beach,
Tuesday evening, November 0th,
beginning at 8 o'clock. Prizes will
I awarded for high scores and
refreshments will be served. Miss
Lillian Wucher is chairman of the
committee in charge of arrange-
ments.
York. They will be guests at a
reception in their honor to be ten-
dered by Beth David Sisterhood at
its Talmud Torah on Sunday eve-
ning, November 4th. The event
originally scheduled for next Sun-
day was postponed because f the
benefit dance being sponsored by
Beth Jacob Sisterhood at the
Miami Beach Pier.
For Awnings call Kraft
Miami Awning Co. Phone 2-0830
For the Finest in Bread
Try NEW YORK RYE
Weil of the electrical
department
spoke.
of the university,
Among those attending the
American Legion Convention this
week were William Berkowitz and
Morris Levine of Orlando and Mr.
H. Berkowitch of Norfolk, Va.

Mrs. Morris Rappaport returned
*"
Miami
Laundry
Now Serving
BILTMORE LAUNDRY
Patrons
2M N. K. 3rd St. Phone 2-.-.1I1
The Greatest Laundry and
Dry Cleaning Institution
in the South
7>} Afrits MeChlldrea 1*.
Boa Office Opens 1:45 P. M.
Sanday
Sunday-Monday, Oct. 28-29
SYLVIA SIDNEY
CARY GRANT
THIRTY DAY PRINCESS
For Awnings call Kraft
Miami Awning Co. Phone 2-0830
HOMES
FOR SALE
or
RENT
fa AH Sectloa* f HUbI
PRICED REASONABLY
Dade County
Security Co.
UT N. B. First At....
"Jacksonville's Leading
Hotel"
THE
SEMINOLE
JACKSONVILLE, I IV.
(HAS. B. GRINER, Manager
A human, home-like in-
stitution where you will
find your individual com-
fort and entertainment a
matter of great impor-
tance.
A steel fireproof building
located in the heart of
the city.
Every Room with Com-
bination Tub and Show-
er Bath, Radio, Electric
Ceiling Fan, Slat Door
for Summer Ventilation,
Comfortable Beds with
Mattresses of Inner
Spring Construction and
Individual Reading
Lamps.
SEND YOUR LAUNDBT
TO THE
HOME SERVICE
Laundry
ROT H. TUBN1B. Tn*.
ll 8. W. Itk St. PhM. I-MM
WE CALL FOR AND DELIVER
White Oak Leather
HALF SOLES 50c
LADIES' HEELS ..........15c
Atlantic Shoe Shop
140 N. E First At.su.
Opp. Cortes Hotel
/


Friday, October 26, 1934
THE JEWISH PLORIDIAN
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page Throe
Miami. Florida
HI W. ISth Avfnat
PUBLISHED BVEM FHJDA1
JEWISH PLORIDIAN 'PUBLISHING CO
P. 0. Ilu. J7J
EDITORIAL on hi
J. LOUIS SHO( HET, Editor
FRED K. HIIOI-IIET. ( i,,|..... ...
I'hone 2-1182
Phom
CANTOR BORIS SCHLACIIMAN
Hold Kepi, (.,.;,.
H.....'"I '"i"-** matter July I. H130 .,,. .. .
under the Act of M
IVES1 PALM BEACH
I I, SCHUTZEK
: i.-sentntive
ORLANDO
IRENE BRAVERMAN
presentntive
ST. I'l IEKSBI R<;
I'AMIM
MRS. M. II. KISLKK
WEST FLORIDA BUSINESS \i.i\|
S. (.. AROSON
_____42rt;' Central Ave., Tampa. Fla.
ii M nthi
SUB8( UII'TIiin
in.

Vol. 7 An. |.!
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1934

An Evil That Must
Be Eradicated
During the past week- we had
i 'in tu travel through ,i
of Florida J< wish commu-
from Jacksonville south to
\- was in be expected,
-.- in these communities in
i us. And. once again,
u i- emphasized in a man-
ttl ii uld not i Bcape atten
unmitigated gall and au-
'ii the part of a number to
n lelves Rabbi. This w is
1i in- in the greatest degree
-hii. lit iin." who under the
law arc im n licensed to
- animals and fowl iii ac
with the Jewish dietary
In one butcher store we met
man who assumed to dic-
. di -dr matters of law .
qualification was thi fact
' wa- a "shoched" the
man's knowledge of the Jew-
. we are advised, i-
the same as his knowledgi
things in general and English
ticular not to Bay his
if knowledgi of "derech
nother little town we met
hoched" He was a
' nl' a famous Veshiva. he
lly advised us. But when we
i" question him about c< r
faculty and other Rab-
had graduated at the time
led to have completed his
. the falsity of his claims
apparent that even this
in was forced to admit
had attended a few classes,
was all. And yet, this
I" was teaching his COn-
n and, more important, the
West Palm Beach
Notes
md Mrs. Joe Friedman en-
| d la-t week in celebration
ixteenth birthday of their
r, Rose, at the New Palm
1 Hotel here. 1 lancing was
1 and during the evening re-
'M-- were served. Among
1 and Lillian Schutier, Helen
attending were Florence,
yi uth of his town, what Judaism
In another small city a pompous,
il. well bellied gentleman
held forth on his nun virtue: .
R and the n
the community talked of their
ignorance and lack of -l
... (Hinted Talmudic
pts rather profusely Bui
< showed that he had
never had a training of any kind,
than that of a "shoched" and
wi doubt he had a thorough I
.i-n ill ti
onditions must be eradi-
cated. Rabbis in Israe havi
11 Id iii hi:. n. t(nlj those
men w hn have Ix en duly ordi
itions
a- Rabbis for a I ol
entitled t'.
v.-. d a- Rabbi "Shochtim" are
a pro-
: then
.hi; peculiar and particular work,
nl' the J
i. Judaism has sufferi
much .
; ... Rabbis,
t idl; by and permit this
ci ndition to cont inue and I
- further aggravated.
Something must be done and
,:,. We that
;i Rabbis of the larger Florida
Jewish communitii 0
( nsi vative and Reform, and the
., adi is ut' their congregation
niunicatc with one another, an I
,: ; for all
the world who the Rab
. are. and who
chtim" are.
Thus and thus alone, can oui
espect be continued and an
evil be removed.
Beatrice and Ma
Estellc Davidson, E
ana Esther Wallen, Leonor.
;.,. ,1 Pinder, Doroth;
1U.H, i u Balling--.-. Martin
Smith, Harold Wolf, Martin Dunn,
R, bert Forman, Mr. and Mrs. Mau-
,,,,. pi, i,-.,ii. liac Friedman.
"'' business was trans-
11 I r, popular local
: h atl rm, and active c im-
i ently named
u i.....f tin West Palm
lunicip I : and last
: 'l the I inch with
;': I O'Connell.
B Lodge of B'nai
Monday eve-
hwartzberg Hall for the
n of vi mportanl
All in. mil.-. an urged to
Mr. and Mrs. S. Wa rman re-
turned to the citj aftei spending
ummer in the Ninth.
,;,., |lr. Brotherhood met
Monday night at the Temple when
rhood held an im-
nl meeting at the home of
Li itni ." last Tuesday n
Mrs. II. i. .', ;ii
Ii nt of tin organization,
led. Plans for the coming
; were acted on.
. Sam s.-iiei- returned to the
ifter an extended vacation in
i irk.
<>. P. tii mi. r, M, Gn enberg and
i s. Meyei spent the wee
ami at the American Legion
. ion.
i ard party, Bpon
B El Sisterhood, was
ol Mi. and .Mrs.
Ii i last Sunday night, Priz< s
awarded for high scores and
him nis wen served.
St. Petersburg
Notes
T migl : Rabbi William II. Roe
of Temple Beth El will
- thi second si rmon as part
in the national program for spir-
recovery on the subject, "The
ity for Organized Religion."
Last Wednesday tin members
Beth El Sisterhood
gathered at the home of Mrs. N.
: for a benefit bridge, Pi izes
awarded for high scores and
ments wen- served.
Among recent arrivals here are
Mr. and Mrs. X. Nc-wmark and
Mrs. A. Friedman.
Rabb W illiam 11. Rosenblal
i. El was among those
took part in the program hon
ng Legionnaires at w il
Park last Week.
An tanl business mi etinfi
i Beth El will be held
night in the vestr>
rooms of the Temple and all mem-
are ui ged to attend.
I; iii A. S. Kleinfi Id will speak
,,i, "Revelations" at the services
it 8 o'clock at Con-
linn B'nai Israel, 921 9th St.
North.
Rabbi Kleinfeld addressed a pub-
;,.- mi it the city park on
Sunday, October 21, also the Pub
um on Friday, <> tobi r 19.
His topic was "The Jew 88 a Citi-
, n ami His Contribution to Civic
Life."
Dave Rothblatt, Max Dav!: and
Feinberg left Sunday morn-
ing for Miami to attend the Amcr-
ii ir Legion Convention.
Mrs. Annie II. Greenburg died
Saturday at her home in (iulf-
I'uih ral took place at Royal
Palm Cemetery with Rabbi A. S.
.Id officiating. She is sur-
vived by her husband and one son,
Leonard,
The Story of
the Life of
Alfred M. Cohen
l resident of B'Nal B'rlth
We call this "The Story of a
I for the career of
Allr.il M. Cohen has been pro-
i inently distinguished for Jew-
ervice from his early youth.
Ii wa- born in Cincinnati on Oc-
tober 19, 1869.
thi early age of IT Alfred
i Inn became a leader in the
I wry of his community.
d t nh. n'- footsteps turned
.. the law, hut his way of Jewish
;. wai to had him ultimately
presidency of the hoard of
nf the Hebrew Onion
ge.
i d M. Cohen, age IT, was
organizers of the V. M.
II A., he became the librarian,
..i. years later was elected pres-
and in the presidency he re-
i ten years, being besidi b
;hi pre ill nt of the national or-
n of thi Y. M. II. A.'.-.
I h Y. M. II. A. the pioneers of
, an Judaism saw the germ
: perpetual ion For Jewish life
in tin i DW world.
nple knew him early. He
ral y chose his affiliation
n-i i ntered it as one taking a most
anl step. Judaism and its
Temple were largely in keeping of
. ders, but now this young-
. ntered, not as a Yom Kippur
Worshipper, hut as one eager to
i. -pmisiltilities. IL wa.
i yeai s old when he be< ame
dietary of the congregation and
when he relinquished
this devotion.
I :. frequently tire of their de-
tii ideals; the fire Oi
a 'dor becomes a spark.
For him then- was no furling of
- um is he lifted in his child-
IIis -ervi.-e as secretary of
thi congregation having come to
in nl. he at once became a trus-
te and latei took up the presi-
The wider field of Jewish
summoned him, and in
it-til he became one of the hi.aid
of go\ i iin.: of the Hebrew Union
College, and for some seventeen
pa si he has bet n the presi-
ui nt.
01 B'nai B'rith he knew from
. Idhood. His father. Morton
S t ..hen, had been one of the pio-
of the order, and had been
il in his lodge, and had been
a delegate to the conventions of
li was in 1890 that
! M. Cohen himself joined
llem Lodge, which was on--
.en that then flourished in
nati. Hi went through the
tn the presidency and when
. ven lodgi s were made one,
.ted the first president
nf the united organizations.
Then- came to him the pr.si-
i; i..y of District So. 2, by grace
if which he became also a mem-
ber of the executive commit tie ol
ider. It was in the latter of
lice that there came t.i his hands
l! e idea of the llillel Foundation.
A young rabbi, Benejamin Fran-
ought it. In their most ini-
ionable years young .lews iii
the universities were without Ju-
.';. sin, Rabbi Frankel explained.
Other religions were on the cam-
, hut Judaism was an exile.
B'nai B'rith had Berved the sick,
thi aged and the orphaned; was
,. t this an opportunity for B'nai
B'i itii to serve Jewish life V
Alfred M. Cohen caught the vi
There was much talk of the
perpetuation of Judaism. People
were asking what was to become
>f the faith. The young were drift-
ing. Whence wire tn come the
leaders of the next generation'.'
Were not these college trained men
ard women the ones to hear the
manners of Israel? What could
Israel say to its conscience if these
were permitted to drift from in-
KTen nee to negation?
Mr. Cohen ted the conscience of
B'nai B'rith to embrace the Hillel
Foundation, and it was in the fol-
lowing year, 1926, that his elec-
tion to the presidency of the order
pu* him in a commanding place
tn direct a rapid development of
'his service to Jewish life.
In the midst of these services
Mr. Cohen has found lime for
manifold activities at other posts
if duty in Jewry. In all the years
of his manhood he has given of
n.. i If to every cause that had to
I i with Jewish life, whether local,
onal or international.
The appreciation of his fellow-
.ownsmen was attested several
years ago in a public testimonial
after his return from a journey
to the lodges of Europe. This
voyage had been a triumph. The
lodges of England and of the Con-
embraced him as the em-
ii diincnt of the brotherhood that
is Israel. This brother had come
from a distant land and lo he
poke the ideals that were in their
hearts. In his outstretched hand
they beheld the token of the c.-
seiitial unity of Israel, of which
II nai B'rith is the symbol. Iii
him was the covenant by which he
who is of the B'nai B'rith of Eng-
land or of Germany, of Bulgaria
i of Poland, or of China, is at
Mli- With his brethren of America
and of all the world. He deep-
ned their devotion to the order.
He who is a Jew may not think
of the house of Israel as a narrow
mansion without windows from
which to look out upon the world.
The house of Israel has many
windows, looking in many direc-
tions. We call these windows our
ideals, and for the Jew they illu-
minate his prospect as a citizen
of the social community.
By the light of these ethical
ih als, founded in the Torah, he
serves his duties as a citizen. To
- a Jew. Alfred M. Cohen has re-
garded as an obligation having to
lo not only with the congregation
. Israel, but also with his mem-
bership in the community; the
: lealism of his religion he has
nt to the common altar.
He has been seen in the leader-
hip of those battling for good
government in his city. Long ago
. government was not yet
a gem rally accepted civic prin-
ciple, he, as candidate for mayor,
ii il a hopeless struggle against the
entrenched political machine. This
Wa courageous pioneering in a
tin., when municipal government
everywhere was a jungle of cor-
ruption. For two terms he served
in the Ohio senate In the same
spirit.
In April, 1930, he was re-elected
to the presidency of B'nai B'rith,
and through the last five perilous
> ars in Jewish life he has car-
ried on with the same vigor and
nthusiasm as before. In prac-
tically all jparts of the United
State- he has appeared, fighting
for the cause of the order, and in
November of 1938 he went to Lon-
don, England, as B'nai B'rith rep-
i. .illative in the Conference to
Aid German Jewry.
lie looked through the windows
of the house of Israel and per-
ci ived that his civic duty lay on
the side of righteousness. He
thought of the Jewish name; it
must be held in honor. It is tra-
duced when a Jew is seen serving
that which is unclean in the com-
munity; it is honored when a Jew
serves with courage that which is
good.
He has been sensitive to this
in all his days.
(Continued on Page 4)





I


I
I
J
I
V
Page Four
THE JEWISH FLORID1AN
Friday, October 20, i ItaMo #"imait Edited by RABBI S. M. MACHTE1
Founder i.n.l Director, Radio Synasos of Anu-rica
SUNDAY MORNINGS WIOI), MIAMI. FLORIDA
Vol. IV.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1984
No. 45
.
The American Jew in the World War"
Scripture Iteadini;. Genesis, Chapter XIV, Versus 15-24, Inclusive
When Solomon, as Koheleth, tho Preacher, in the Book of Eccle-
siastes, elected to offer advice, he stated his qualifications at the out-
set. He stated that he was the son of David and had been king in
Jerusalem. That experience had fitted him to give advice. When I
depart from my routine to preach to those of the American Legion who
may be listening, and when 1 speak of the part th< American Jew has
played in the World War, I am fortified by the knowledge gained in
three and one-half years as visiting chaplain in government hospitals.
Operating out of my headquarters, at Liberty, N. Y., where many
Jewish ex-service men were hospitalized in tubercular sanitaria. I
covered, in my regular weekly visits, the contract houses in and about
Liberty, Loomis Sanitarium, Otisville Sanitarium, U. S. V. II. 98, at
Castle Point, outside of Beacon. N. Y., and the army post at Pine
Camp, near Watertown, N. Y. If any of the boys from those places
are attending this convention, I should be happy to have them call
on me, that we may talk of old times.
Though, officially, I was to look after thi needs of the Jewish
men, there was never a celebration ol any Jewish festival at which
some of the non-Jewish veterans were not present. At our Passover
Sedarim there were always som Christians. So. also, at Purim parties,
Chanukah observance- and other feasts, the non-Jewish boys par-
ticipated. Things even became so involved that non-Jews, anxious to
get away for a few days from the strict discipline of the hospital
if they wei< ambulatory casespleaded with me to gain them fur-
loughs as "Jews." on the High Holy Days and on other occasions when
furloughs were granted.
So it is from first-hand knowli dge and direct contact with the
men who served overseas that I speak to veteran- and of them. And,
if I appear to take sid< w th the vet. ran-, you may attribute it to my
having stood beside the disabled men in their momentsnay, hours
of anguish, as they continued, in full control of their senses, to pay
the supreme price of loyalty and patriotism. I often marveled at the
braveryyes. and at the sense of humor, of these men who spoke of
their hemorrhages as "-pitting rubles." anil wh at the breakfast
table, when it was reported that one of their number had died dur-
ing the night, would, jokingly, guess as to who would be next.
If the men who witnessed the irieai ind came back often |
speak lightly of religion you must attribute it. in part, to the failure
of religion to have prevented or to have stopped the war. When I
reproached one man for his blasphemy, he replied, "All right, ral
you explain this to me. I knew men who spent their time in the
trenches in prayer, and who went over the top with a prayer on their
lipsand never cam. back. I had other buddies who damned and
blasphemed, who went over the top with a curse on their lipsand
did come back." I gave him an answer, because I had tobut I was
far from satisfied. I could give him a infer one now, and I would
still not be satisfied. 1 attribute it to my ignorance rather than to
my lack of faith. Perhaps I'm too honest.
What pleased me. as I watched the veteran-, was the
camaraderie that existed in the ward! of the ho-: il i -. Jew, Pr
tant, Catholic and unbeliever lay Bide by side without thought of their
religious differences. They were Americans. It is only le, in i
the world that knows no personal suffering, that racial and religious :
prejudices arise to plague men and women who have gra i been
spared physical agonies. Nothing unites men liki mmon afflic- j
tion. So it is that, at this timein ler to remind tl em- i
inate poisonous and malicious tales about the Jew that they are, in |
the vernacular, "barking up the wrong tree I find it necessary to I
summarize the part the American Jew n the World War.
The Jews, though but constituting X per cent of tl
gave over 5 per cent of it- son......-' f of the nat
And, nearly 26 per cent of the more than 250,000 Jews who set
were volunteers. The outstanding deeds of heroi
to recite. Suffice it tO report that not 1,10' for
valor were awarded to men of the Jewish faith. Of thesi
conferred by the American command, 287 by the French, 22 DJ
British, and 40 by various other of the allied command.-. The Con-
gressional Medal of Honor, of which only 78 have thus far
awarded, were conferred on three Jewish soldiers. The Distinguished
Service Cross i- worn by at least 150 American Jewish ex-service men;
The French Medaille Militaire by four American Jew-, and the Croix
de Guerre is known to have been awarded to 174 Jews in the Amer-
ican Expeditionary Forces. Approximately 3,500 Jew- died in action
or of wounds received in combat, and the total number of casua
is about 14,000. This is a higher percentage than our proportion to
service men in general. Where is the man so bold as to deny to the
Jew the courage that he has shown In defense of the country of his
birth or adoption?
Well known are the stories of the Jewish chaplain who held the
cross to the lips of the dying Christian soldier, and of the Christian
chaplain who administered the last rites, as best he could, to the dying
Jew on the battlefield. Where, I ask, is that spirit of brotherhood in
peace time? You men of the American Legion fought for a prin-
ciple. Despotism, jingoism, tyranny was abhorrent to your American
sense of honor and fair play. But, is the peace time jingo less virulent
than his brother in arms? Are there no principles worth defending
with peaceful measures? Shall the spirit of disruption, the process
of corrosion, and the un-American terror of anti-social propaganda
go unchallenged?
That for which you risked your lives and for which your com-
rades gave theirs is surely worth preserving. And even more than
-hat. Our nation is in greater dang, r today than it was IS years
ago. There is an enemy within our shores. The spirit of bigotry, Ci
Communism, of Fascism, of "shirt.sm" has overrun the land. The
very institutions whicT. you fought to protect and perpetuate are be-
ing assailed by those who seek to work under .over of darkness A
darkness induced through an effort to distract your attention from
the real pom, of attack. Beware of their strategy. While they draw
your fire on your fellow citizen.-; while yOU are occupied in battling
your brother, whom they have painted to you as your enemy, they
are sneaking up on you to grasp control of important points.
I can condone the criticism of the misguided but honest critic of
the Bocial status, but I dread the planned intrigues of those who seek
to inject social disorder-, who disseminate propaganda to make Amer-
icans' suspicious of their neighbors, who -peak of "world plots" and
who drag the names of loyal and respected citizens in the mud. If
your Jewish buddies were good enough to stop some of the bullets
headed toward you; if you were brothel enough to get in the path of
shrapnel en route to them, you are -till brothers and should fight side
by side to protect each other from the wave of bigotry and prejudice
and discrimination which will engulf Uf all unless measures are taken
to stem its tide.
The fighting spirit of the Legionnaire is needed now more than
ever. You men still possess it. Others may be timid, but you are
brave. To your reckless bravery ol (8 years ago have be. n added
the maturity and the wisdom of life's experiences. That is an un-
beatable combination. The Cod who spared you and returned you to
us must have His plan. It must be that you are best fitted to serve
the nation in its- present hour of need. You did not fail us then. You
will not fail us now.
SO'
ALTMAN'S HOTEL
SIXTH AVE. ASBURY PARK. N. J. Tel. 1467 or 3415
Situated in the finest section of Asbury Park near the
Boardwalk. Modern in every respect. All sports.
Dietary laws observed. Moderate rates. Open all year.
THOMSON & McKINNON
Members New York Stock Exchange
MIAMI OFFICE:
Sixth Floor First National Hank Building
Telephone 2-7fi01
GIVE-UP BUSINESS FOR CLIENTS OF EXCHANGE
MEMBERS SOLICITED
~s
FOR
FRESH
P*
SEA FOODS
STOP AT
CAPT. TOM'S FISH MART
OUR PRICES ARE THE LOWEST
Our Fish are the freshest Caught by
our own boats daily
If It is See Food, we have it at its very heat, and at attractively
low price" Oar method of handling; and aelliag Sea Food la in
observance with all the aanitary rub*a and regulations.
RADIO
SYNAGOG
Rabbi S. M. Maehtei, founder and
director of the Radio Synagog, will
preach over station WIOI) at nine
o'clock on Sunday morning on
"Spiritual Religion Versus Spirit-
ual Man." In addition t the
sermon there will be prayer mu-
sic, scripture reading and a ques-
tion box.
MIIIUIIIIIMII.IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItllll
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Davis Islands
TAMPA, FLORIDA
5 MINUTES FROM THE CENTER OF THE "TOWN
Tampa's Beautiful Hotel and Apartments
OPEN ALL YEAR
Every Room With Private Bath
11.50 and $2.50NEVER HIGHER
Five-Room Apartments, $40 to $60 a Month
Operated by
MICHEL KLEMTNER and ROSEMARY (GERSON)
KLEMTNER
HMiiiiHiiitiiiiNiiiM......iiinimnmiiiiiiii.......iihhii
GROSSMAN'S
HOTEL
New Jersey Avenue, Near Bead
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J.
Offering Fine Accommodation!
at Moderate Terms
Tho Foremost Hotel in Atlantic
City Catering to Jewish Clientele
Dietary Laws Courteoui Service
Sea Water in All Bathrooms
ALWAYS OPEN
Josef Grossman's
Sons
Those
Visitors
who know
Choose
THE BILTMOKE
while in ATLANTIC CITY
Because at the BILTMORE they
are assured of those little extras
in -. rvice hot and cold sea
water baths surf bathing
directly from hotel conven-
ient open-air dining room for
bathers modern cuisine -yet
food prepared in accordance
with DIETARY LAWS. Social
staff arranges ENTERTAIN-
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Ownership Management
W.M.MALAMl'TM AX
Classified
EMPLOYMENT AGENCIES
For Reliable White or C lured
Help of All Kinds Call
PARR TOUHS AND
EMPLOYMENT AGENCY
543 Colllna Ave., Miami Reach
Rhone 5-2770--2-QT.* __
GARAGES
ROLLINS & BOGGS
Specializing in General Motor
Repairs, Wheel Aligning, Brsk*
Lining, Etc.
14(1 N. W. 5th St. Phone 2-2447
MII.LWORK
Millwork, Screen Windows and
Spindle Doors; Cabinet ^ rk
LEE NOVELTY WORKS
12\ N. W. 26th St. Phone J 7469
MATTRESSES
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1158 N. Miami Ave.
Phone 2-4856
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Upholsterers and Renovators^
ROOFING
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Responsible Roofers since UMJ
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222 \. W. 26th St. Phone 2-SW
U.'


Friday,
October 26, 1934
dtthe
The world-famous team of Janet
Cavnor and Charles Farrell, after
an interlude marked by a flood of
protests against the separation
from screen fans and film exhib-
itors throughout the civilized
world, are appearing in their
twelfth co-starring vehicle,
Change of Heart," which starts
gl the Tivoli Theatre Sunday.
With them appears a brilliant
supporting cast, headed by James
Dunn and Ginger Rogers, Beryl
Mercer, Gustav Von Seyffertitz,
O'Hara, Irene Franklin,
i mple, Jane Harwell and
.Vila Walker.
Dealini in very human fashion
with the joys and sorrows of four
people, the theme and its
nl handling of common
make the picture a
in the Gaynor-Farrell
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page Fire
which was attended by many of
the local Jewish community.
Edward Arnold, rotund charac-
ter actor, has declared war on all
picture authors, ever since
n picture script demanded
lake a bath in a tub of
. ordinary, low-down mud!
The dirty ablutions were part
' the script of Sylvia Sidney's
ring picture for Para-
"Thirty-Hay Princess,"
Ming Sunday to the Seventh
Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan of
Temple Israel is confined to his
home because of an accident to
h>s foot last Tuesday night.
*
In honor of her birthday, a sur-
prize Halloween party was given
recently for Miss Ruth Rossman
of the Prince George Hotel, Miami |
Ucach, by her parents, at the hotel. '
Guests were Miss Eleanor Lust-
garten, Miss Adelaide Sherman,
Mi.-.s Lorraine Rossman, Miss Dul-
cie Bandell, Miss Tee Steinberg,
Miss Phyllis Sontag, Miss Shirley
Wallach, Miss Janet Markowitz,
Miss Lorraine Fried, Miss Florae
Berman, Miss Josephine Goodman,
Miss Lillian Eisman, Miss Ruth
Rossman.
Albert Lehrinan, Maurice Oro-
vitz, Edward de Vries, Roy Simon,
Victor Kahn, Joe Milsley, Herbert
Glickman, John Ryan, Henry
Swartz, Vincent de Vries, Harold
Libowe, Jack Orcker, S. Kaplan,
Frank Glickman, Bernard Kleinph-
ner, Marvin Rubin, Ben Benner,
AIe< Levkaur, Alfred Elliot and
Irving Fineburg.

Mr. Philip Berkowitz, treasurer
of the Miami Jewish Orthodox
Congregation, returned from a
combined business and pleasure
trip last Tuesday.

The first strictly vegetarian res-
taurant in this area will bo
opened tomorrow when Leah's
Dairy and Vegetarian Restaurant
begins business at L58 N. W, Fifth
st., under the supervision of Leah
and Max Friedson of Monticello, \.
V. The Fi iedsons have been en-.
d in the restaurant business tor
the past ten years and will special-
iz< in the "Schildkraut vegetarian
style foods." Steaks, cutlets,
roasts, soups, all of vegetables,
will be featured and particular at-
tention will be paid to the
quiring special vegetarian or dairy
diets. Table d'hote and a la carte
service will be furnished at very
reasonable prices. Foods until
now obtainable only in New York
and other metropolitan centers will
be made available through this
new restaurant.
*
Rabbi and Mrs. Julius Washer
am now located in their new hime
at L012 s. W. 4th st.
Orlando Notes
Mrs. 1.. Swartswald returned to
her home after spending several
months at the Florida Sanitarium
here.
Ansel Wittenstein will be Bar
Mitsva at the Saturday morning
services in Ohev Sholom Congre-
gation. Rev. B. Safer will offi-
ciate.
Mrs. I. Safer was the guest of
Mesdames J. Ottenberg and Sam
Haimowitz during her stay here.
Mrs. j. Ottenberg entertained
recently in celebration of her
daughter, Carolyn's, birthday an-
niversary. Games were played and
refreshments were served.
Jacksonville News
The first meeting of the season
of the Ladies' Hebrew Sheltering
Aid Society and Home for the
Aired was held recently at the
Jacksonville Jewish Center, with
Mrs. Fned Soforenko, president.
At the conclusion of the meet-
ing a delightful social hour was
enjoyed, during which refresh-
ments were served by Mrs. Max
Rothstein in honor of the recent
marriage of her son, Abe. H. Roth-
stcin, to the former Miss Irma
Panken. Assisting in serving were
Mrs. Max Eisenberg, Mrs. Louis
Wolfson, Mrs. A. Nabin and Mrs.
( harks Rubin.
The next executive board meet-
ing of the organization will be held
in the. home of Mrs. Henry Rosen-
vaig, on the Boulevard, and the
next regular meeting with Mrs. J.
Shapiro, Mrs. I:. Rosenberg and
Mrs. 11. Rosenthal as hostesses.
Center officiated at the unveiling
of the tombstone to the memory of
Mrs. L. Grossman at the cemetery
last Sunday morning. Mrs. Gross*
man was the mother of Mrs. Fred
Soforenko, president of the He-
brew Ladies' Aid Society of this
city.
The Ladies' Hebrew Sheltering
- M-iety held a bridge party
!asl Tuesday afternoon in the
Jewish ''liter. The chairman was
Mrs. A. Hoffenberg and her com-
ting of Mrs. J. T-
Wiiensky, Mrs. J. Hartley, Mrs.
Sam Worman and Mrs. B. Becker,
Mrs. B. Safer is spending some
time in Baltimore.
Rabbf Morris I). Margolis of the
Jacksonville Jewish Community
For Awnings call Kraft
Miami Awning Co. Phone 2-0830
Avenue Theatre. Arnold plays the
! f Frcsnam. international
I an"er, ,,n a vacation at a Euro-
"*!.!!,!?" sPec'alizing in mud baths.
Thnty-Day Princess" presents
"M M a banker-promoter. He
j*B the beautiful princess, Syl-
wdney, and plans to use her
s "front" for a huge bond is-
jehe wishes to float in the Unit-
l*h S ^'S D'ans 8 some-
si il 8Wl V when the Pr'ncess takes
I**' and the double who he gets
|*ithT!rSOnate her fa"8 in love
I 111 enemy, a young newspa-
Iftt. 1bli8hCr' BUt the Princess
L r nnd issue, the young
lit K m their love Problems
lned up and Gresham t8
Plat's left.
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Wolfe re-
turned to the city after spending
the summer in New York.
Mr. and Mrs. S. l.ehrman and
son arrived here to spend the win-
ter
At services last Saturday morn-
ing at Cong. Ohev Sholom, in
charge of Rev. B. Safer, Orvin
Lieberman, the son of Mr. and
Mrs. II. Lieberman of this city,
WU Bar Mitzva. Be recited the
Haftoro and pronounced the usual
blessings. A reception in honor
of the occasion was held at the
home of the parents Sunday night,
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your relatives in the So-
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imported articles of high
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Prices compare fa-
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M your local bank or
authorized agent
For Awninga call Kraft
Miami Awning Co. Phone 2-0880
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The tin box or the jelly glass on
the stove that used to catch some
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in the electric kitchen. And what
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clean, than the gleaming white fin-
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refrigeration and water heating
mean cleanliness in your kitchen.
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Vage Six
THE JEWISH FLOKIDIAM
Friday, October 2d
RELIABILITY-
DEPENDABILITY
(Continued from Page 1)
ertj of the man, intellectually as
well as morally. Did I help him?
lh' didn't even ask fen- any help
nol even a "tzetel." He knew bet-
ter!
Our conversation was an agon-
izing ordeal, and as short as it
was painful. When he began to
make uncalled-for admissions of
bia weakness and incompetence, I
terminated the interview to spare
his feelings, and summarily dis-
ii i-se-el the entire matter from my
mind.
What amazes me is that anyone
could be so naive and gullible as
t U duped by a man of that cal-
iber. Frankly, sir, your present
revocations constitute as severe
an indictment of the credulity of
his victims as of the culpability
of the "impostor" himself. Hap-
pily. I can say "B'sodom al tovo
nafshi." I was neither his victim
ni r his accessory.
In the int. rest of truth,
RABBI ISSKR \V. MUSKAT.
QUESTIONS
and
ANSWERS

May we at this time go back
several years ... In 1982 there
arrived a gentleman in Miami who
paid $1.50 for a box at the post
office and then proceeded to visit
the non-Jewish merchants of Miami
and Miami Beach in the interests
of (what he termed) the foremost
Jewish paper in the world, pub-
lished in Miami. The same gen-
tleman and the same stories were
told to non-Jewish merchants in
Tampa and in Jacksonville. Ac-
cording to reliable reports, this
gentleman, who represented the
Jewish Daily Forwards of New
York, a Socialist Yiddish daily
with a i unbined circulation in
these three cities of Jacksonville,
Miami and Miami Beach of not
even one hundred, took out of
these cities a total sum of nearly
thirty-five hundred dollars. What
good did it accomplish for the non-
Jewish merchants and what effect
did this particular episode have
upon the relations between Jews
and non-Jews of these cities? Sim-
ply this the stamp of radical-
ism of an extraordinarily exagger-
ated character was placed on the
.lews of these cities, in addition
t'> tlie fact that resentment
an used by those merchants that
had been duped followed and for
cated.
In 1933 there arrived a gentle-
man from New York City who
.aii! he represented the opinion, a
splendid magazine for those who
like it. He approached a Rabbi
and obtained his endorsement. A
round of the hotels and apart-
ment house- followed. The people
wen shown the Rabbi's endorse-
mc nt, which many of them did not
read. The fact that a Rabbi's
in. me appeared to a letter was
sufficient to them. The represent-
ative appealed not for subscrip-
tions to a magazine, but for aid
for a national Jewish cause. Some
believed that they were aiding
German refugees, and when called
upon later to contribute to the
real cause, declined, saying they
had already contributed, and
showed their receipts. At that
time we directed our readers' at-
tention to the fact and immediate-
ly this representative left this
area. But the public does not
seem to learn.
In our next week's issue we
shall take up the question of those
sheets calling themselves "the
voice of Jewry," their preying
upon the merchants, their stories
often so fantastic as to be ridic-
Q. Which Protestant denomi-
nations have hierarchical forms of
government '.'
A. There are a number of
1 u:. stant bodies in the United
states which have bishops, but
which cannot l>c called hierarch-
ical in their form of government
.-.ince the bishops do not COnSti-
, higher order of the min-
i-try. hut arc merely charged with
,. rtain sp< c alized functions, or
duties. Such are. for example, the
Methodists. North and South, and
the Moravians. The only Christian
lesignated as Protestant that
1 .ay he .ailed hierarchical in the
common sense, as beine, governed
by prelates and inferior clergy, is
Protestant Episcopal Church.
1 should he said, however, that the
laity also included in the legisla-
tive function- of this communion.
'1 he Protestant Episcopal Church
has two legislative bodies, a House
of Bishops and a House of Depu-
ties, which is composed of both
P'iests and laymen. The agree-
ment of both these houses is nec-
essary before any legislation is ef-
fective.
by Jews was taken as early as
March 7, 1934. Since that time
further action has been taken on
thirty occasions by different Jew-
isn groups, culminating on Sep-
ti mber C>, in the entrance of the
Synagogue Council of America into
the campaign. The Synagogue
Council is composed of every sin-
gle major Jewish religious organi-
sation in the country, whether it
be Orthodox. Conservative or Re-
form. In addition to pledging it-
self to co-operate with Protestant
and Catholic- religious organiza-
tions, the Council called upon lead-
i! ami members of Jewish com-
munities throughout the country
nol to countenance demoralizing
pictures.
THE LIFE OF
ALFRED M. COHEN
Q. What is the difference be-
tween a sacrament and a sacra-
mental in Catholic ceremony?
A. The Catholic Guardian of
Little Rock, Ark., answers this
question as follows: A sacramen-
tal is any object set apart and
blessed by the Church to excite
good thoughts, to increase devo-
tion and thus to remit venial sin.
A sacrament always produces
grace directly when there is no
obstacle placed in the way by the
recipient, while a sacramental pro-
; duces grace only indirectly by
causing devotion in the mind of
the user. The principal saeramen-
, tals of the Church are: The sign
of the cross, the cross, crucific,
holy water, vestments, stations of
thfi cross, holy oils, candles, rosary,
scapulars agnus Dei, incense,
church bells, religious medals an I
ashes.
1 Continue d from Pagi 31
Such has been the Jewish life
of Alfred M. Cohen. Still robust,
active in all his affairs as Jew,
lawyer and banker, he does not
look his 75 years.
Once another man who had ar-
rived at the age of 76 was wished
a hundred years of life by his
friends.
"No," he said, "do not wish mo
that. Merely to be alive is not
enough. It is not worthy to live
onlj to breathe and to eat. Wish
me rather that I live in usefulness,
with work to do every day, with
I seme new good done at each sun-
set, but with work never complet-
ed even unto the last day."
This is our wish for Alfred M.
Cohen in behalf of the order.
resent my country in the fourth
winter Olympic Games, I would
nol for moment consider going
to Germany, where my brother Jew
h considered as lower than hu-
man. I represented my country as
a member of the speed skating
team in the Olympic Games at
Lake Placid in 1982 and won the
'(>(> and 1,600-metre skating races
i, 1 the United States. But in the
faci of such a condition, irrespec-
tive of promises fur coutesy to the
Jews by the Nazis, if I were chos-
, n and in the mind of competing
again in the Olympic competition,
1 would refuse curtly to do so as
b friendly and sympathetic ges-
ture toward the -lews of the United
States."
sistance, dryly asked him,
has thee felt in thy pockl
him?"
"Tommy, do you know |
Doth the Busy Little Beel
"No, teacher, I only knl
doth it."
A Quaker once hearing a person
tell how much he felt for another
who was in distress and needed as-
For Awnings call Kraft
Miami Awning Co. Phone 2-0830
For Awnings call Krsl
Miami Awning Co. Phone [
illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllll.....1,
I CINDERELLA BAK1
"Bakt af Putter"
SSPECIALS FOR THIS \\|
E large Chains .............
sSntnll Chains
SGeflochtene Bulkee, 2 for.
SSponge Cake, per Loaf.....
SWhite Mountain Rolls, pi
Do/en .........
SLarge Danish Coffee Rln|
SLarge Pies ......
= Small Pies
E Honey Cookies, 2 Do/, f 1175 W. Plagler St.l
1752 N. E. 2nd AveJ
JTlllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIlj
Q. What part have the .lews
take 11 in the campaign for cleanei
no vies ?
A. Rabbit and Jewish laity
have been among the most severe
Of the- 111.ivies. All of the
Jewish religious bodies and
a number of important secular
In dies have taken action and
pledged co-operation with Protes-
tant and Catholic groups. Action
At All Good Stores
Ask for NEW YORK BREAD
ulous, the change of publishers as
a means of hiding their identities,
. tc.
For Awnings call Kraft
Miami Awning Co. Phone 2-0830
Shea, Non-Jewish Member of 1932
Olympics, to Boycott Games
at Berlin
New YorkIf chosen to repre-
se nt the United States in the PJ36
Olympic games, Jack Shea, 1932
Olympic speed skating champion,
who is a non-Jew, will not com-
pete- if the games are held in Ger-
many, he informed the American-
Jewish Congress. Mr. Shea's state-
ment, spontaneously elicited by the
decision of the American Olympic
Committee to accept Germany's in-
vitation to the Olympics, said: "If
I V/ere one- of those chosen to rep-
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Full Text

PAGE 1

Pafe Two THE JEWISH FLORIDIAW Friday, October 2G, i< J34 More than seventy-five members attended the meeting of the Young Men's Hebrew Association last Wednesday night when enthusiastic reports on the progress of the third annual dance of the organization were heard. Murry Grossman, past president of the organization and chairman of the dance, told of the co-operation received from the citizens at large. The dance, which is to be held at the Miami Beach Golf and Country Club on November 8th, will feature a number of the best vaudeville acts ever presented locally as part of the evening's entertainment. All Pallott, in charge of the souvenir program, reported that to the city this week after an abapproximately one thousand dolsence of several months spent vislars had been pledged through this iting relatives and friends in the source, and a rising vote of thanks was given to Mr. Hyman Apte and Mr. A. Cutler for their work in this respect. Among others who spoke during the evening were Al Rosenfeld, president of the Y.j Cantor Boris Schlachman, Sidney Segal and several of the new members who were admitted at this meeting. h %  %  %  %  Cleopatra might have wo,'; S a 11 d 4i 1 s like these Slip your foot into a slender evening san:IaI, jewel studded, and imagine the royal .splendor of old Egyptian nights. Silver k i d, white satin or black gleaming with brilliance. 5.95 Dyed to match your frock at no extra charge BDDOFT SHOP. SECOND FLOOR BurditiQ's A surprise party was given by Mrs. Julius Wilson in celebration of her husband's ,'iOth birthday last Saturday evening. During the course of the evening bridge was played. Lucky numbers were drawn for prizes. A midnight buffet supper was served. Guests present were: Mr. and Mrs. Ham. Hopkins, Hibiscus Island; Mr. and Mrs. S. Wilson. Mrs. J. Shaffer and daughters, Evelyn and Marcine; Mrs. M. Ornstein, Mrs. L. Brodsky, Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Alleu, Mr. and Mrs. J. Hirsch, Mr. M. Mandelbaum, Joe Mandelbaum, Mr. and Mrs. B. Chertkof, all of Miami; Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Sthultz, Buffalo, N. V.: Mr. and Mrs. M. Weinstein, Mr. and Mrs. E. Seadt r, Philadelphia, Pa.; Mrs. North. She was accompanied by her son, SBm. • Cantor Boris Schlachman of Beth Jacob Congregation, Miami Beach, is now at his new home, 327 Washington ave. • The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Jewish Welfare Bureau is sponsoring a benefit bridge on Wednesday afternoon, November 7th, at 2 o'clock at the Southern Cafeteria with Mesdames L. Hartz and Ida Optner in charge of arrangements. Prizes will be awarded for high scores and refreshments will be served. The public is urged to attend. Funds are being used for the relief work of the organization. Others on the committee are Mesdames Gordon Davis and Rose Simpson, • Beth David Sisterhood is sponsoring a benefit card party at its Talmud Torah Hall Tuesday evening, November 6th, beginning at 8 o'clock, with Mesdames M. Scheinberg and J. Lang as the • ses. Prises will be awarded for high scores and refreshments! American Legion Post of that city, Rabbi and Mrs. Max Shapiro, is the house guest of his brotherwhose wedding was an event of in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. two weeks ago, arrived here TuesHyman N. Levy of this city. Also day morning by boat from New % %  '.. Fishman, New York City; Mr. I will be served. The public is inRoy Koppstein, Mr. S. Eagle, Newtfted to attend. rk, N. J.; Mr. and Mrs. Julius • on and son, Billy. • %  '' %  %  Moi PI int, chairman ol Hs tacky party I given Oct i Sist< rh 1 of Nexl Tuesday evening, October 30th, beginning at 8 o'clock, a Hall .ween party, sponsored by Mrs. Sidney II. rainier at her home. 1 itiO S. W. 23rd teirace, will be has announced the Held for the benefit of the Loyalty charge of Club of Emunah Chapter, O. E. Tickets, Mrs. Harry NevS. Refreshments will be served, ins, Mrs. Louis Zeientz; decoraand among the prizes to IK awardMrs. M. Cowen, Mrs. Henry <1 will be a special prize for the Bulbin, Mrs. 11. Katz; refreshments, Mrs. Gordon Davis, Mrs. P. Scheinberg, Mrs. Frank I Mrs. Adolph Wertheimer; entertainment, Mrs. I. M. Weinstein and Mrs. Henry I). Williams. Tickets may be obtained from any comttei member. Proceeds will be used for the U nefit of the reliRioua school. Mrs. S. M. Goodkind entertained a number of friends in honor of (.ei -on. Marks Goodkind, at her home this week. Games and refreshments were enjoyed. • • Mr. and Mis. H, H. Miller, 1136 S. W. Fifth St., announce the marriage of their daughter, Miss Goldye Miller, to Al I.. Nadler on August 18. • Gainesville, Fla.—At the first meeting of the 1934-1986 pledge group of Delta Chapter of Phi Beta Delta at the University of Florida the following officers were elected: Harold Rubin, Miami, president; Harry Lasris, Jacksonville, vice-president; David Kantor, Jacksonville, secretary; Fred Nelson, Daytona Beach, treasurer; Moe Bono, Jacksonville, junior intrafraternity conference, and Frank Wotltsky, Punta Gorda, marshal. The pledge group was honored at a banquet attended by numerous alumni. Prof. Joseph engineering %  original costume. The pubinvited to attend. Other novelty entertainment will he vided. proMr. Jacob Werner of New York urrived in Miami Beach this week. He iassociated with Mr. Philip Romer in the meat market of the Sunshine Kosher Market at Miami Beach, which will shortly announce i .reopening. Mr. and Mrs. I. Nusbaum and Bon, Jack, arrived in Miami Beach last Wednesday. • • • The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Orthodox Congregation will hold one of its regular bi-weekly card parties next Tuesday evening, October 30th, at the home of Mrs. Hyman Traeger, 1001 S. W. Fifteenth ave. Prizes will be awarded for high scores and refreshments will be served. The public is invited to attend. • • • Mr. Hyman Berkowitch of Norfolk, Va., business manager of the drum and bugle corps of the visiting them is Mr. Max Levy, a member of the band of Victory Post of Washington, D. C. • • A committee consisting of Mesdames B. Chertkoff, Henry Seitlin and L. Silverman is sponsoring a benefit bridge for a family in distress, at the clubrooms of the Y. M. H. A., 1567 S. W. 5th st. next Monday evening, October 2!lth, beginning at 8 o'clock. All are asked to attend. Prizes will be awarded and refreshments will be served. Loyalty (Tub of Emunah Chapter. 0. E. S., is sponsoring a benef't dance at the Marine Gardens, Carter's Pier, Miami Beach, on Wednesday evening, December 5th. It: charge of arrangements and aiding in a souvenir program of tho event are William Friedman, Mesdames Clara Fine, Olga .Schwartz and Sydney II. Palmer. The worthy matrori, Mrs. Ix'na Simon, and the worthy patron, Mr. Albert liacher, are aiding in this work. The Junior Council of Jewish Women will hold an important meeting at the Ponce de Leon Hotel next Tuesday evening, Octobei -nth. beginning at K o'clock, when business will he transacted. A program of entertainment will be presented during the evening. Al! members anurged to attend. • A special board meeting of the Junior Council of Jewish Women was held last night at the home of Miss Ruth Sontag, when plans for the coming benefit bridge of tin organization were announced. The bridge will be held at the William Penn Hotel, .Miami Beach, Tuesday evening, November 0th, beginning at 8 o'clock. Prizes will I awarded for high scores and refreshments will be served. Miss Lillian Wucher is chairman of the committee in charge of arrangements. York. They will be guests at a reception in their honor to be tendered by Beth David Sisterhood at its Talmud Torah on Sunday evening, November 4th. The event originally scheduled for next Sunday was postponed because „f the benefit dance being sponsored by Beth Jacob Sisterhood at the Miami Beach Pier. For Awnings call Kraft Miami Awning Co. Phone 2-0830 For the Finest in Bread Try NEW YORK RYE Weil of the electrical department spoke. of the university, Among those attending the American Legion Convention this week were William Berkowitz and Morris Levine of Orlando and Mr. H. Berkowitch of Norfolk, Va. • • • Mrs. Morris Rappaport returned *" Miami Laundry Now Serving BILTMORE LAUNDRY Patrons 2M N. K. 3rd St. Phone 2-.-.1I1 The Greatest Laundry and Dry Cleaning Institution in the South 7>}


PAGE 1

Vage Six THE JEWISH FLOKIDIAM Friday, October 2d RELIABILITYDEPENDABILITY (Continued from Page 1) ertj of the man, intellectually as well as morally. Did I help him? lh' didn't even ask fenany help— nol even a "tzetel." He knew better! Our conversation was an agonizing ordeal, and as short as it was painful. When he began to make uncalled-for admissions of bia weakness and incompetence, I terminated the interview to spare his feelings, and summarily disii i-se-el the entire matter from my mind. What amazes me is that anyone could be so naive and gullible as t U duped by a man of that caliber. Frankly, sir, your present revocations constitute as severe an indictment of the credulity of his victims as of the culpability of the "impostor" himself. Happily. I can say "B'sodom al tovo nafshi." I was neither his victim ni r his accessory. In the int. rest of truth, RABBI ISSKR \V. MUSKAT. QUESTIONS and ANSWERS May we at this time go back several years ... In 1982 there arrived a gentleman in Miami who paid $1.50 for a box at the post office and then proceeded to visit the non-Jewish merchants of Miami and Miami Beach in the interests of (what he termed) the foremost Jewish paper in the world, published in Miami. The same gentleman and the same stories were told to non-Jewish merchants in Tampa and in Jacksonville. According to reliable reports, this gentleman, who represented the Jewish Daily Forwards of New York, a Socialist Yiddish daily with a i unbined circulation in these three cities of Jacksonville, Miami and Miami Beach of not even one hundred, took out of these cities a total sum of nearly thirty-five hundred dollars. What good did it accomplish for the nonJewish merchants and what effect did this particular episode have upon the relations between Jews and non-Jews of these cities? Simply this the stamp of radicalism of an extraordinarily exaggerated character was placed on the .lews of these cities, in addition t'> tlie fact that resentment an used by those merchants that had been duped followed and for c called hierarchical in their form of government .-.ince the bishops do not COnSti, higher order of the mini-try. hut arc merely charged with ,. rtain sp< c alized functions, or duties. Such are. for example, the Methodists. North and South, and the Moravians. The only Christian lesignated as Protestant that 1 .ay he a iled hierarchical in the common sense, as beine, governed by prelates and inferior clergy, is Protestant Episcopal Church. 1 should he said, however, that the laity also included in the legislative functionof this communion. '1 he Protestant Episcopal Church has two legislative bodies, a House of Bishops and a House of Deputies, which is composed of both P'iests and laymen. The agreement of both these houses is necessary before any legislation is effective. by Jews was taken as early as March 7, 1934. Since that time further action has been taken on thirty occasions by different Jewisn groups, culminating on Septi mber C>, in the entrance of the Synagogue Council of America into the campaign. The Synagogue Council is composed of every single major Jewish religious organisation in the country, whether it be Orthodox. Conservative or Reform. In addition to pledging itself to co-operate with Protestant and Catholicreligious organizations, the Council called upon leadi! ami members of Jewish communities throughout the country nol to countenance demoralizing pictures. THE LIFE OF ALFRED M. COHEN Q. What is the difference between a sacrament and a sacramental in Catholic ceremony? A. The Catholic Guardian of Little Rock, Ark., answers this question as follows: A sacramental is any object set apart and blessed by the Church to excite good thoughts, to increase devotion and thus to remit venial sin. A sacrament always produces grace directly when there is no obstacle placed in the way by the recipient, while a sacramental pro; duces grace only indirectly by causing devotion in the mind of the user. The principal saeramen, tals of the Church are: The sign of the cross, the cross, crucific, holy water, vestments, stations of thfi cross, holy oils, candles, rosary, scapulars agnus Dei, incense, church bells, religious medals an I ashes. 1 Continue d from Pagi 31 Such has been the Jewish life of Alfred M. Cohen. Still robust, active in all his affairs as Jew, lawyer and banker, he does not look his 75 years. Once another man who had arrived at the age of 76 was wished a hundred years of life by his friends. "No," he said, "do not wish mo that. Merely to be alive is not enough. It is not worthy to live onlj to breathe and to eat. Wish me rather that I live in usefulness, with work to do every day, with I seme new good done at each sunset, but with work never completed even unto the last day." This is our wish for Alfred M. Cohen in behalf of the order. resent my country in the fourth winter Olympic Games, I would nol for moment consider going to Germany, where my brother Jew h considered as lower than human. I represented my country as a member of the speed skating team in the Olympic Games at Lake Placid in 1982 and won the '(>(> and 1,600-metre skating races i, 1 the United States. But in the faci of such a condition, irrespective of promises fur coutesy to the Jews by the Nazis, if I were chos, n and in the mind of competing again in the Olympic competition, 1 would refuse curtly to do so as B friendly and sympathetic gesture toward the -lews of the United States." sistance, dryly asked him, has thee felt in thy pockl him?" "Tommy, do you know | Doth the Busy Little Beel "No, teacher, I only knl doth it." A Quaker once hearing a person tell how much he felt for another who was in distress and needed asFor Awnings call Kraft Miami Awning Co. Phone 2-0830 For Awnings call Krsl Miami Awning Co. Phone [ illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 1, I CINDERELLA BAK1 "Bakt af Putter" SSPECIALS FOR THIS \\| E large Chains sSntnll Chains SGeflochtene Bulkee, 2 for. SSponge Cake, per Loaf SWhite Mountain Rolls, pi — Do/en SLarge Danish Coffee Rln| SLarge Pies = Small Pies E Honey Cookies, 2 Do/, f r-1. I<1> SUITS Valuta jr.'. :,II srKr> NEW SPORT TROUSERS Valuta |7 lo $ A 00 no T: FRANK WOLKOWSKY 18 N. E. FIRST AVENUE CALL 2-5607 FOR CORRECT BUS INFORMATION GREYHOUND BUS DEPOT MIAMI BEACH. 515 Washington Avenue—Phone 5-1812 CORAL GABLES, 2202 Ponce de Leon Blvd.—Phone Ev*r. l| Miami—200 N. E. First Street—Phone 2-5607



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f wJemsti Floiridliiai m Vol. • No,:1 FLORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY MIAMI. FLORIDA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1934 Price Five Cents Jewish News Around the World URGES RAISING OF IMMIGRATION BARS I of the immigration quota in Palestine for Jews from world was advocafc d political commission of the of Nations by the Polish \V. Kulski, during a discussion on colonial mandates, according to word received by the Gdynia-American Line, which a large percentage of in .it ws to Palestine each month. Poland is particularly interested in Jewi li settlement in Palestine, Delegate Kulski declared at the meeting, because of the %  favorable opportunities offered in agriculture and industry. 11. pointed out that the dearth of farm labor in Palestine was due to tin limited immigration perBlitted and strongly urged that the mandatory government raise the ban to meet the new economic conditions prevailing. Di legate Kulski stressed the significance of Palestine to countries of central and eastern Europe as an ideal colony to which surplus population of Jews could be directed. In the course of Delegate Kulski'.Bpeech it developed that Poland's interest in Palestine was centered in its increasing trade unities developed by Polish Kxports to Palestine from I have increased from 769,n 1927 to almost 6,000,last year. This trade ady greater than Poland's to Hungary, Jugoslavia nia. Among the Polish products bought by Palestine are ire, clothing, glass products, machinery and tools, cement, wa: draining pipes, sinks, baths eds. Jewish Refugee Colony Opened in Holland Amsterdam—Nieuwersluis, the '" i Jewish refugee settlement 1 on land reclaimed from tl Z i; inZee, was officially dedy League of Nations Hign Commissioner for German Refulamcs G. McDonald. The site of the colony, which covers an •Tea ol 175 acres, has been leased to the Dutch committee for special Jewish interests by the Dutch government for a period of ten The settlement can house "ugees, 100 of whom are already living there. They are being trained for farming and horticulture work, which will be their fatal* career in Palestine and elsewhere. I n his address at the dedication exercises Commissioner McDonald lauded the Dutch govern"WM. the Jewish committee and chairman, former Senator Van Den Bergh, whose generosity k'ped to finance the project. Mr. McDonald told the Jewish refuses that "you are both sowing *id reaping here. You can live k e both as men and as Jews." Reliability .. Dependability ... Questionable Methods of Financing Noted Publicists Speak Out Against Methods of News Gathering Denounce Questionable Methods of Financing Money < ollected for Paper Under Guise of German Refugee Relief. Beach to Hold Dance at Pier Hitin.noluiiHiiiimiiiiKtuurrMiMiniiiHiumiiiiMiiuii Announcements IIKIIKIIIIIIMIII HIIIHIIIlllUlfc li i the integrity of the Jewish 011 .-! aphic A been • ioned'.'... II.i the reliability of ts l irta been d cordially welcome. MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CONGREGATION (Orthodox) 1548 S. W. Third Street JULIUS WASHER, Rabbi Friday evening services begin al 5:30 o'clock. Saturday morning services begin at '.' with a short sermon in Yiddish by the Rabbi. Sunday morning the Sunday school meets at the Y. M. H. A. clubrooms, beginning at 10 o'clock. Talmud Torah classes meet at the Synagogue daily at 3 p. m. Members to Be Hadassah Guests of the man before and had no reason whatever to suspect him. But hardly had I seen and spoken to h'm for five minutes, when he appeared to me in his real colors. I quickly realized that there was neither a Rabbi nor a cause behind the man. His evasive and profusely apologetic manner, his pathetically incriminating remark that "A Rabbi needs nothing but personality," quickly betrayed the appalling pov(Continued on Page 6) Senior Hadassah is sponsoring a membership tea Monday, October 29th, at 3 p. m. at the home of Mrs. P. Scheinberg, 1777 S. W. 12th St., which all members and friends of Hadassah are invited to attend. In charge of arrangements are Mesdames Barney Weinkle, membership chairman; Max Dobrin, B. Seldman, Joseph Williamson, Alex. Goldstein, Morris Plant and Sam Simonhoff. One of the features of the afternoon will be a book review by Mrs. I. M. Weinstein.


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I I I J I V Page Four THE JEWISH FLORID1AN Friday, October 20, i


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Friday, October 26, 1934 THE JEWISH PLORIDIAN THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page Throe Miami. Florida HI W. ISth Avfnat PUBLISHED BVEM FHJDA1 JEWISH PLORIDIAN 'PUBLISHING CO P. 0. Ilu. J7J EDITORIAL on HI J. LOUIS SHO( HET, Editor FRED K. HIIOI-IIET. ( i,,|„ ... I'hone 2-1182 Phom CANTOR BORIS SCHLACIIMAN Hold Kepi, (.,.;,. %  H '"I '"i"-** matter July I. H130 „, .,,. .. under the Act of M IVES1 PALM BEACH I I, SCHUTZEK : i.-sentntive ORLANDO IRENE BRAVERMAN presentntive ST. I'l IEKSBI R<; I'AMIM MRS. M. II. KISLKK WEST FLORIDA BUSINESS \i.i\| S. (.. AROSON 42rt; Central Ave., Tampa. Fla. ii M nthi SUB8( UII'TIIIN •in. • Vol. 7 An. |.! FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1934 An Evil That Must Be Eradicated During the past weekwe had i 'in tu travel through ,i of Florida J< wish commufrom Jacksonville south to \was in be expected, -.in these communities in i us. And. once again, u iemphasized in a manttl ii uld not i Bcape atten • unmitigated gall and au'ii the part of a number to n lelves Rabbi. This w is 1 i inin the greatest degree -hii. lit iin." who under the law arc im n licensed to %  animals and fowl iii ac with the Jewish dietary In one butcher store we met • man who assumed to dic. di -dr matters of law qualification was thi fact %  waa "shoched" the man's knowledge of the Jew. we are advised, ithe same as his knowledgi things in general and English ticular not to Bay his if knowledgi of "derech nother little town we met hoched" He was a %  %  nl' a famous Veshiva. he lly advised us. But when we i" question him about c< r faculty and other Rabhad graduated at the time led to have completed his the falsity of his claims apparent that even this in was forced to admit had attended a few classes, %  was all. And yet, this I" was teaching his COnn and, more important, the West Palm Beach Notes md Mrs. Joe Friedman en| d la-t week in celebration ixteenth birthday of their r, Rose, at the New Palm 1 Hotel here. 1 lancing was 1 and during the evening re'M-were served. Among 1 and Lillian Schutier, Helen attending were Florence, yi uth of his town, what Judaism In another small city a pompous, il. well bellied gentleman held forth on his nun virtue: R and the n the community talked of their ignorance and lack of -l ... (Hinted Talmudic pts rather profusely Bui < showed that he had never had a training of any kind, than that of a "shoched" and wi doubt he had a thorough I .i-n ill ti onditions must be eradicated. Rabbis in Israe havi 11 Id iii hi:. n. t(nlj those men w hn have Ix en duly ordi itions aRabbis for a I ol entitled t'. %  v.-. d aRabbi "Shochtim" are a pro: then .HI; peculiar and particular work, nl' the J i. Judaism has sufferi much %  ; ... Rabbis, t idl; by and permit this ci ndition to cont inue and I further aggravated. Something must be done and ,:,. We • that ;i„ Rabbis of the larger Florida Jewish communitii 0 ( nsi vative and Reform, and the ., adi is ut' their congregation niunicatc with one another, an I ,: ; for all the world who the Rab are. and who chtim" are. Thus and thus alone, can oui espect be continued and an evil be removed. Beatrice and Ma Estellc Davidson, E ana Esther Wallen, Leonor. ;.,. ,1 Pinder, Doroth; 1U .H, i u Balling--.-. Martin Smith, Harold Wolf, Martin Dunn, R, bert Forman, Mr. and Mrs. Mau,,,,. pi, i,-.,ii. liac Friedman. "•'' business was trans11 I r, popular local : h atl rm and active c imi ently named u i f tin West Palm lunicip I : and last : 'l the I inch with ;' : I O'Connell. B Lodge of B'nai %  Monday evehwartzberg Hall for the n of vi mportanl All in. mil.-. an urged to Mr. and Mrs. S. Wa rman returned to the citj aftei spending ummer in the Ninth. ,;,., | l r Brotherhood met Monday night at the Temple when rhood held an imnl meeting at the home of %  Li itni ." last Tuesday n Mrs. II. i. .', ;ii %  Ii nt of tin organization, led. Plans for the coming ; were acted on. Sam s.-iieireturned to the ifter an extended vacation in i irk. <>. P. tii mi. r, M, Gn enberg and i s. Meyei spent the wee ami at the American Legion ion. i ard party, Bpon B El Sisterhood, was ol Mi. and .Mrs. Ii i last Sunday night, Priz< s awarded for high scores and • him nis wen served. St. Petersburg Notes T migl : Rabbi William II. Roe • of Temple Beth El will thi second si rmon as part in the national program for spirrecovery on the subject, "The ity for Organized Religion." Last Wednesday tin members Beth El Sisterhood gathered at the home of Mrs. N. : for a benefit bridge, Pi izes awarded for high scores and ments wenserved. Among recent arrivals here are Mr. and Mrs. X. Nc-wmark and Mrs. A. Friedman. Rabb W illiam 11. Rosenblal i. El was among those took part in the program hon ng Legionnaires at w il Park last Week. An tanl business mi etinfi i Beth El will be held night in the vestr> rooms of the Temple and all memare ui ged to attend. I; iii A. S. Kleinfi Id will speak ,,i, "Revelations" at the services it 8 o'clock at Conlinn B'nai Israel, 921 9th St. North. Rabbi Kleinfeld addressed a pub;,.m i it the city park on Sunday, October 21, also the Pub um on Friday, <•> tobi r 19. His topic was "The Jew 88 a Citi, n ami His Contribution to Civic Life." Dave Rothblatt, Max Dav : and Feinberg left Sunday morning for Miami to attend the Amcrii ir Legion Convention. Mrs. Annie II. Greenburg died Saturday at her home in (iulfI'UIH ral took place at Royal Palm Cemetery with Rabbi A. S. .Id officiating. She is survived by her husband and one son, Leonard, The Story of the Life of Alfred M. Cohen l resident of B'Nal B'rlth We call this "The Story of a I for the career of Allr.il M. Cohen has been proi inently distinguished for Jewervice from his early youth. Ii waborn in Cincinnati on October 19, 1869. thi early age of IT Alfred i Inn became a leader in the I wry of his community. d t nh. n'footsteps turned .. the law, hut his way of Jewish ;. wai to had him ultimately presidency of the hoard of nf the Hebrew Onion ge. i d M. Cohen, age IT, was organizers of the V. M. II A., he became the librarian, ..i. years later was elected presand in the presidency he rei ten years, being besidi B ;hi pre ill nt of the national orn of thi Y. M. II. A.'.-. I h Y. M. II. A. the pioneers of an Judaism saw the germ : perpetual ion For Jewish life in tin i DW world. nple knew him early. He ral y chose his affiliation n-i i ntered it as one taking a most anl step. Judaism and its Temple were largely in keeping of ders, but now this young. ntered, not as a Yom Kippur Worshipper, hut as one eager to i. -pmisiltilities. IL wa. i yeai s old when he be< ame dietary of the congregation and when he relinquished this devotion. I :. frequently tire of their detii ideals; the fire Oi a 'dor becomes a spark. For him thenwas no furling of um is he lifted in his childIIis -ervi.-e as secretary of thi congregation having come to in nl. he at once became a truste %  and latei took up the presiThe wider field of Jewish summoned him, and in it-til he became one of the hi.aid of go\ i iin.: of the Hebrew Union College, and for some seventeen pa si he has bet n the presiui nt. 01 B'nai B'rith he knew from Idhood. His father. Morton S t ..hen, had been one of the pioof the order, and had been il in his lodge, and had been a delegate to the conventions of li was in 1890 that M. Cohen himself joined llem Lodge, which was on-.en that then flourished in nati. Hi went through the tn the presidency and when ven lodgi s were made one, %  .ted the first president nf the united organizations. Thencame to him the pr.sii; i..y of District So. 2, by grace if which he became also a member of the executive commit tie ol ider. It was in the latter of lice that there came t.i his hands l! e idea of the llillel Foundation. A young rabbi, Benejamin Franought it. In their most iniionable years young .lews iii the universities were without Ju.';. sin, Rabbi Frankel explained. Other religions were on the cam, hut Judaism was an exile. B'nai B'rith had Berved the sick, thi aged and the orphaned; was ,. t this an opportunity for B'nai B'I itii to serve Jewish life V Alfred M. Cohen caught the vi There was much talk of the perpetuation of Judaism. People were asking what was to become >f the faith. The young were drifting. Whence wire tn come the leaders of the next generation'.' Were not these college trained men ard women the ones to hear the manners of Israel? What could Israel say to its conscience if these were permitted to drift from inKTen nee to negation? Mr. Cohen ted the conscience of B'nai B'rith to embrace the Hillel Foundation, and it was in the following year, 1926, that his election to the presidency of the order pu* him in a commanding place tn direct a rapid development of 'his service to Jewish life. In the midst of these services Mr. Cohen has found lime for manifold activities at other posts if duty in Jewry. In all the years of his manhood he has given of n.. i If to every cause that had to I i with Jewish life, whether local, onal or international. The appreciation of his fellow.ownsmen was attested several years ago in a public testimonial after his return from a journey to the lodges of Europe. This voyage had been a triumph. The lodges of England and of the Conembraced him as the emii diincnt of the brotherhood that is Israel. This brother had come from a distant land and lo he poke the ideals that were in their hearts. In his outstretched hand they beheld the token of the c.seiitial unity of Israel, of which II nai B'rith is the symbol. Iii him was the covenant by which he who is of the B'nai B'rith of England or of Germany, of Bulgaria i of Poland, or of China, is at MliWith his brethren of America and of all the world. He deep%  ned their devotion to the order. He who is a Jew may not think of the house of Israel as a narrow mansion without windows from which to look out upon the world. The house of Israel has many windows, looking in many directions. We call these windows our ideals, and for the Jew they illuminate his prospect as a citizen of the social community. By the light of these ethical ih als, founded in the Torah, he serves his duties as a citizen. To a Jew. Alfred M. Cohen has regarded as an obligation having to lo not only with the congregation Israel, but also with his membership in the community; the : lealism of his religion he has nt to the common altar. He has been seen in the leaderhip of those battling for good government in his city. Long ago government was not yet a gem rally accepted civic principle, he, as candidate for mayor, ii il a hopeless struggle against the entrenched political machine. This Wa courageous pioneering in a tin., when municipal government everywhere was a jungle of corruption. For two terms he served in the Ohio senate In the same spirit. In April, 1930, he was re-elected to the presidency of B'nai B'rith, and through the last five perilous > ars in Jewish life he has carried on with the same vigor and nthusiasm as before. In practically all jparts of the United Statehe has appeared, fighting for the cause of the order, and in November of 1938 he went to London, England, as B'nai B'rith repi. .illative in the Conference to Aid German Jewry. lie looked through the windows of the house of Israel and perci ived that his civic duty lay on the side of righteousness. He thought of the Jewish name; it must be held in honor. It is traduced when a Jew is seen serving that which is unclean in the community; it is honored when a Jew serves with courage that which is good. He has been sensitive to this in all his days. (Continued on Page 4)



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Friday, October 26, 1934 dtthe The world-famous team of Janet Cavnor and Charles Farrell, after an interlude marked by a flood of protests against the separation from screen fans and film exhibitors throughout the civilized world, are appearing in their twelfth co-starring vehicle, •Change of Heart," which starts gl the Tivoli Theatre Sunday. With them appears a brilliant supporting cast, headed by James Dunn and Ginger Rogers, Beryl Mercer, Gustav Von Seyffertitz, O'Hara, Irene Franklin, i mple, Jane Harwell and .Vila Walker. Dealini in very human fashion with the joys and sorrows of four people, the theme and its nl handling of common make the picture a in the Gaynor-Farrell THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page Fire which was attended by many of the local Jewish community. Edward Arnold, rotund character actor, has declared war on all picture authors, ever since n picture script demanded lake a bath in a tub of ordinary, low-down mud! The dirty ablutions were part the script of Sylvia Sidney's ring picture for Para"Thirty-Hay Princess," Ming Sunday to the Seventh Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan of Temple Israel is confined to his home because of an accident to h>s foot last Tuesday night. • • In honor of her birthday, a surprize Halloween party was given recently for Miss Ruth Rossman of the Prince George Hotel, Miami | Ucach, by her parents, at the hotel. Guests were Miss Eleanor Lustgarten, Miss Adelaide Sherman, Mi.-.s Lorraine Rossman, Miss Dulcie Bandell, Miss Tee Steinberg, Miss Phyllis Sontag, Miss Shirley Wallach, Miss Janet Markowitz, Miss Lorraine Fried, Miss Florae Berman, Miss Josephine Goodman, Miss Lillian Eisman, Miss Ruth Rossman. Albert Lehrinan, Maurice Orovitz, Edward de Vries, Roy Simon, Victor Kahn, Joe Milsley, Herbert Glickman, John Ryan, Henry Swartz, Vincent de Vries, Harold Libowe, Jack Orcker, S. Kaplan, Frank Glickman, Bernard Kleinphner, Marvin Rubin, Ben Benner, AIe< Levkaur, Alfred Elliot and Irving Fineburg. • • Mr. Philip Berkowitz, treasurer of the Miami Jewish Orthodox Congregation, returned from a combined business and pleasure trip last Tuesday. • The first strictly vegetarian restaurant in this area will bo opened tomorrow when Leah's Dairy and Vegetarian Restaurant begins business at L58 N. W, Fifth st., under the supervision of Leah and Max Friedson of Monticello, \. V. The Fi iedsons have been en-. d in the restaurant business tor the past ten years and will specializ< in the "Schildkraut vegetarian style foods." Steaks, cutlets, roasts, soups, all of vegetables, will be featured and particular attention will be paid to the quiring special vegetarian or dairy diets. Table d'hote and a la carte service will be furnished at very reasonable prices. Foods until now obtainable only in New York and other metropolitan centers will be made available through this new restaurant. Rabbi and Mrs. Julius Washer am now located in their new hime at L012 s. W. 4th st. Orlando Notes Mrs. 1.. Swartswald returned to her home after spending several months at the Florida Sanitarium here. Ansel Wittenstein will be Bar Mitsva at the Saturday morning services in Ohev Sholom Congregation. Rev. B. Safer will officiate. Mrs. I. Safer was the guest of Mesdames J. Ottenberg and Sam Haimowitz during her stay here. Mrs. j. Ottenberg entertained recently in celebration of her daughter, Carolyn's, birthday anniversary. Games were played and refreshments were served. Jacksonville News The first meeting of the season of the Ladies' Hebrew Sheltering Aid Society and Home for the Aired was held recently at the Jacksonville Jewish Center, with Mrs. Fned Soforenko, president. At the conclusion of the meeting a delightful social hour was enjoyed, during which refreshments were served by Mrs. Max Rothstein in honor of the recent marriage of her son, Abe. H. Rothstcin, to the former Miss Irma Panken. Assisting in serving were Mrs. Max Eisenberg, Mrs. Louis Wolfson, Mrs. A. Nabin and Mrs. ( harks Rubin. The next executive board meeting of the organization will be held in the. home of Mrs. Henry Rosenvaig, on the Boulevard, and the next regular meeting with Mrs. J. Shapiro, Mrs. I:. Rosenberg and Mrs. 11. Rosenthal as hostesses. Center officiated at the unveiling of the tombstone to the memory of Mrs. L. Grossman at the cemetery last Sunday morning. Mrs. Gross* man was the mother of Mrs. Fred Soforenko, president of the Hebrew Ladies' Aid Society of this city. The Ladies' Hebrew Sheltering M-iety held a bridge party !asl Tuesday afternoon in the Jewish ''liter. The chairman was Mrs. A. Hoffenberg and her comting of Mrs. J. TWiiensky, Mrs. J. Hartley, Mrs. Sam Worman and Mrs. B. Becker, Mrs. B. Safer is spending some time in Baltimore. Rabbf Morris I). Margolis of the Jacksonville Jewish Community For Awnings call Kraft Miami Awning Co. Phone 2-0830 Avenue Theatre. Arnold plays the f Frcsn am. international I an "er, ,,n a vacation at a Euro"*!.!!,!?"• s P e c'alizing in mud baths. Thnty-Day Princess" presents M M a banker-promoter. He j*B the beautiful princess, Sylwdney, and plans to use her s "front" for a huge bond is%  jehe wishes to float in the Unitl*h S ^' S D ans 8 somesi i l 8Wl V when the P r 'ncess takes I**' and the double who he gets |*ithT !rSOnate her fa 8 in love I 111 enemy, a young newspaIftt. 1 bli8hCr BUt the P rincess L £ r n nd issue, the young lit K m their love P roblems lned up and Gresham t8 Plat's left. Mr. and Mrs. Joe Wolfe returned to the city after spending the summer in New York. Mr. and Mrs. S. l.ehrman and son arrived here to spend the winter At services last Saturday morning at Cong. Ohev Sholom, in charge of Rev. B. Safer, Orvin Lieberman, the son of Mr. and Mrs. II. Lieberman of this city, WU Bar Mitzva. Be recited the Haftoro and pronounced the usual blessings. A reception in honor of the occasion was held at the home of the parents Sunday night, (RUSSIA' GIFTS A Torgsin Order will be highly appreciated by your relatives in the Soviet Union. Torgsin offers 15,000 different domestic and imported articles of high quality. Clothing, shoes, foodstuffs and other merchandise ore fer sale. Prices compare favorably with those in the United States for Toriiln order* %  M your local bank or authorized agent For Awninga call Kraft Miami Awning Co. Phone 2-0880 Qanaral RpraaanUtlva ln U.S.A a* AMTORQ. 2(1 Fifth Ave.. N.\ KITCHENS DO 6ET DIRTY. AND SOME KITCHENS HAVE SOOTY WALLS AND BLACKENED POTS AND PANS! IN YOUR KITCHEN! In the all-electric kitchen there is no soot, and pans stay bright for years. The heat of electric cookery is as clean as concentrated sunshine and the electric water heater leaves no tell-tale trail of dirt outlined against the kitchen wall. The tin box or the jelly glass on the stove that used to catch some of the burnt matches has no place in the electric kitchen. And what could be cleaner, or easier to keep clean, than the gleaming white finish of the modern electric refrigerator? There's certainly no argument about it... electric cookery, refrigeration and water heating mean cleanliness in your kitchen. HOME OWNERS! Dojoa kaoa laac, M raBVtMaa aaaj BOOK aader aW Naboaal Unman, Aa. poa aay aadaat ainag aai ocaar peranaaentrr badi-aa ahCaaal equi fm i i ? Yoa may otxaaa uW aeaer from loo) banks tad other moorr-lcndint, ageocies co"pCTineg wHh die Federal HouSMg Adniniurinoi Ask at or year dealer ( SIW.SE OR YOUR FAVORITE DEALER AND BETTER STILL. YOU MAY BUY AN ELECTRIC RANGE AND AN ELECTRIC WATE'R H6ATER TOGETHER F'-R ONLY $5 00 DOWNiAND 24 MONTHS TO PAY'


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