The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00286

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Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
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Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
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Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
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Jewish Floridian of South County
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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewisti IFIIariidliai hi
Vol. 7 -No. 33
FLORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY
_____MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, AUGUST 17. 1934
Price Five Cents
Jewish News
Around the
World
Demand Republican Tarty Disown
Representative McFadden
Sew VorkThe anti-Semitic rec-
ord of Representative I-ouis T. Mc-
, Republican from Pennsyl-
vania, should disqualify him from
mi (if leadership in the Re-
!i party, the Republican na-
tional committee is informed in a
letter from the American Jewish
Conftn signed hy Nathan D.
Perlman, vice-president of the con-
gress and a former Republican
member of congress. The letter
demands that the Republican na-
committee repudiate McFad-
den'a anti-Semitic views, and pro-
igainst his elevation to a po-
of importance in the party,
IS evinced by his having been as-
to make a party address
over the radio. Recall of the as-
signment and McFadden's removal
- high position in the Re-
publican councils are demanded.
Lithuania Suppresses Jewish
Newspapers
Kovno All Jewish newspapers
in Lithuania with the exception of
the Kovno St inline have been sup-
I by the government because
ublished a report from Ger-
many that Lithuania has BUBpend-
parliament of Memel, The
ion is that the suspension
will lii permanent, just as it was
in Latvia, where the Jewish press
was impressed after the recent
change in government.
AlbanyProprietors of a Sulli-
van county hotel pleaded guilty and
wiii' lined $2"> by Justice Clarence
use of Bloomingburg for
serving non-kosher meat as kosher.
'hi- i; the first conviction of a
hotel or restaurant proprietor in
the administration of the new kosh-
er law by the Department of Ag-
riculture and markets.
I in penalty assessed the pro-
of Shawanga Lodge, a ho-
tel at Highview, Sullivan county,
.ile under the section of the
law which forbids "the -ale for
11 t: ei meat falsely represent-
Ik- kosher."
Arbeiter Ring
Elects Officers
The local branch of the Work-
men'.- Circle (Arbeiter Ring) held
election of officers last week, which
"suited in the following being
chosen: Leon Elkin, secretary;
"'in., Seitiin, recording secretary,
a,1|l David Gross, treasurer. B.
Chertkoff, M,-s. I,eon Klkin and S.
Marcus were chosen as directors
for the coming year. Mrs. Henry
Seitiin was elected as a delegate
from the local branch to attend
"W Southeastern convention of the
Workmen's Circle, which will be
h(ll in Atlanta on September 2, 3
an(l 4. prior to his departure for
tne convention an affair in his
h"ni" will be held at the Work-
men's Circle Hall, 701 N. W. Fifth
*> Sunday evening, August 26,
hen a supper will be served and
* Program of gala entertainment
W|" be provided.
Thirty-Two
Years Ago...
Exactly 32 years ago President
Theodore Roosevelt ordered Mr.
Inliii Hay. secretary of state, to
notify Rumania and all the Euro-
pean powers who wen' signatories
in the Treaty of Berlin that the
United Slates, though not a party
to that treaty, deplored the treat-
ment of Jews by Rumania. So im-
pressed was Rumania by the de-
termined hostility of the United
States and other nations that she
ed to make amends and thus
avert a collective intervention.
The note dispatched by Secre-
tary Hay on August 11, 1902,
might well have served as a guide
and light to a later Roosevelt and
his secretary of state. The cur-
rent theory generally offered for
the current official silence defends
such lack of action on the ground
that one govereign nation cannot
inti i fore with the "internal affairs
of another sovereign nation." It
should be noted, however, that this
attitude of high restraint with re-
spect to Germany is not so care-
fully maintained -ay. with Aus-
', tria or even Liberia. The elder
veil justified his Interference
I on "principles of international law
| and eternal justice." Kternality is
evidently short-lived.
A few paragraphs from this
memorable document are rather in-
teresting not only because they
.appropriately expressed civilized
lisapprobation for uncivilized acts,
hut also because they reveal the
extent to which these tinted
Stales have withdrawn from tra-
ditional American policies:
"Starting from the arbitrary and
controvertlble premises that the
native Jews of Rumania domiciled
there for centuries are "aliens not
subject to foreign protection." the
ability of the Jew to earn even
the scant) mean- of existence that
suffice for B frugal race has been
constricted by degrees, until near-
ly every opportunity to win 8 live-
lihood is denied; vpfld until the
helpless poverty of the Jew has
constrained an exodus of such pro-
portions as to cause general con-
cern.
"The political disabilities of the
jews in Rumania, their exclusion
from the public service and the
learned professions, the limitations
of their civil rights, and the im-
position upon them of exceptional
tBXes, Involving as they do wrongs
repugnant to the moral sense ol
liberal modern people-, are not so
directly in poinl for my present
purpose as the public acts which
attack the inherent right of man
a* a bread winner in the ways of
agriculture and trade. The Jews
are prohibited from owning land.
or even from cultivating it as com-
mon laborers. They are debarred
from residing in the rural districts
Many branches of petty trade and
manual production are closed to
them in the overcrowded cities
where they are forced to dwell and
engage against fearful odds, in
the desperate struggle for exist-
ence. Even as ordinary artisans or
hired laborers they may only find
employment in the proportion of
one unprotected alien' to two Ru-
manians' under any one employer.
In short, by the cumulative effect
(Continued on Page 6)
A New Deal
With so much being said and
fortunately being done in recent
months regarding the New Deal,
much interest has been created
by the recent announcement of
a new deal for Religion and Wel-
fare Recovery.
In New York there was re-
cently formed, as appeared in
our columns last week, the Na-
tional Committee for Religion
and Welfare Recovery, an inter-
faith group representing Catho-
lic, Jewish and Protestant cler-
gymen and laymen. The drive
will begin in October and an ef-
fort will be made to have the
entire world realize that the time
for a new deal in Religion and
Welfare work has arrived.
We can hear the shouts of
glee from some Miamians when
the I him In occurs to them of a
religion to suit themselves and
their fancies, and welfare work
to meet their selfish whims. For,
(after all is said and done), who
of us does not know how to run
religion and welfare work far
better than the rabbis and priests
and those who have given of
their very lives to aid their fel-
low men?
Here in Miami, as we note
l he rapid approach of the High
Holy Days, we begin to realize
tbnt a NEW DEAL would work
miracles. Imagine the Greater
Miami area.with a population of
Jen- running into the thousands,
and then note that with Syna-
gogue capacity of less than two
thousand in all. our Synagogues
and Temples were not even half
filled. Certainly we have the
men and women who shout from
the house tops "I am a Jew," and
then conveniently forget the
Synagogues, with the excuse,
"Oh, well, the Synagogues with
their high prices for seats have
driven us away. It's their fault
we can't attend." What a trav-
e-lv upon themselves. There is
not a Synagogue in this com-
munity, or elsewhere, who has
yet refused to permit anyone to
attend because of lack of funds.
Nevertheless, and we recall the
incident very vividly "I'll be
damned if I'll pay for a seat. I'd
rather pay for a good night club
show," was the answer of one
young man when asked to pay
for some pews at a local Syna-
gogue. And vet il wasn't so
many days thereafter that this
same young man came to avail
himself of the services of this
same Synagogue when he came
to say Kaddish for a departed
one. And the same story is true
Of our local Jewish Welfare Bu-
reau. Many a man and woman
who has time and money for
everything in the way of amuse-
ment, has time and again re-
I pulsed the earnest, conscientious
worker for our Jewish Welfare
! Bureau and its Ladies' Auxiliary,
and by way of defense has
charged that the organization
is mismanaged and ill run. An
excuse, we venture to suggest,^
that this self-serving man and
woman knew to be unfair and
unjust.
Certainly the time far a new
deal in religion and welfare has
arrived. The time for this is
1 never more adapted or more suit-
Beth David
Announces Plans
Plans for the High Holy Day
services for Beth David Congrega-
tion, as announced by its officers,
provide for itheusua) traditional
observances with Rabbi .Max Sha-
piro, Rabbi of the Congrega-
tion for the past several years
in charge of the services. Cantor
Louis Hayman, who has been serv-
ing the congregation for a num-
ber nf years, will chant the Maariv
and Musof services on Rosh Hash-
ono and Vom Kippur. Ile recently
returned from New York City,
where he attended a course of spe-
cial instruction in liturgical music,
and has prepared B number of the
famed Cantor Lewandowski's com-
positions, which he will feature
during the services. He will be
assisted by a buys' choir which
Cantor Hayman has been training.
Further announcement- regarding
the service- will appear in an
early issue.
^WIIIIIItlllllHtlllllllllllMllllll.....IMMIIIIIIIMIUIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIHIIlllluiM*.-
Announcements
^IIIIWIIIIIIlMlllllllinilllllllllllllHIIIIUIIIIIIIIINIIIIIIIIIllllinuUMlllUIIUIlf
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
(Conservative)
139 N. W. Third Ave.
MAX SHAPIRO, Rabbi
Services begin at 6:30 tonight.
Saturday morning services begin at
8:30. Mincha services begin at
6:30 p. m., followed by the Maariv
service.
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI
(Reform)
137 N. E. Nineteenth St.
DR. JACOB H. KAPLAN, Rabbi
Brief services will be held tonight
at 8 p. m. There will be no sermon.
This will be continued throughout
the summer during the absence of
Rabbi Kaplan with a Lay member
in charge. Services are held in the
main auditorium.
Y. M. H. A. to
Hold Affairs
The Young Men'- Hebrew Asso-
ciation will be vi ry active in the
next few week-, according to plans
announced at last Wednesday
night's meeting of the organiza-
tion. The first affair will be a
membership get-together at which
thirty-four new members will be
officially welcomed into the ranks
of the association on Wednesday
evening. August 29. A program of
entertainment will be provided and
refreshments will be served. The
next event will be a card party
Thursday evening, August :!0, at s
o'clock, in the clubrooms, with ad-
mission only 25c, or the presen-
tation of one book to the organi-
zation. Refreshments will be
mi veil. Further details will ap-
pear in our next issue.
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION
(Orthodox)
1545 S. W. Third Street
JULIUS WASHER, Rabbi
Services begin tonight at 6:30.
Saturday morning services begin at
9 o'clock. Mincha services at 6:30
p. m., followed by the Maariv
service.
CONGREGATION BETH JACOB
(Orthodox)
311 Washington Ave., Miami Beach
DAVID I. ROSENBLOOM, Rabbi
Services begin tonight at 6:30.
Tomorrow morning services begin
at 8:30. Cantor Schlachman will
chant the services. Mincha services
begin at 6:30 p. m., with Maariv
following.
Star Chapters
Sponsor Party
To raise funds to hi lp bring the
sessions of the Grand Chapter of
the Oriler nf Eastern star of the
State of Florida to Miami, the 29th
district, comprising eleven chap-
iter- uf the order in the Greater
'.Miami area, are sponsoring a
bridge at the Main Shrine Temple
at Biscayne blvd. and l -it H st. to-
morrow, Saturday f-vciiing, Au-
gust IS, beginning at 8 o'clock, to
which the public is invited. Prizes
will be awarded for high score and
refreshments will be served. The
Grand Chapter will meet in Miami
in 1935 and comprises chapters
from the entire state. Its annual
sessions are sought for and usually
bring a large number of visitors.
The party is in charge of the
worthy matrons and patrons of the
local chapters.
able than the PRESENT. We
sincerely hope that our Jews and
Jewesses of the Greater Miami
area and of Florida will realize
this fart, and that in their own
interests and BECAUSE OF
THEIR OWN WELFARE will
sincerely and honestly present a
NEW DEAL.
Committee Named
For Holidays
Renovations of the Synagogue of
the Miami Jewish Orthodox Con-
gregation are nearly finished and
will be completed this week. In
>f the High Holy Day seat-
ing arrangements is a committee
consisting of Messrs. II. M. Dre-
vich, Philip Berkowitz, Max Rap-
paport and Milton Wciiicr. Begin-
ning next Sunday the committee
will be on hand to rent seats for
the holidays. All those who have
purchased memorial seats are
urged to come early so that they
may rent the seats bearing these
memorial plates, as they will be
given the preference.
Rabbi Julius Washer will con-
duct the services and preach the
sermons with Cantor Rabbi Alex.
S. Wiescl chanting the traditional
High Holy day melodies.
RADIO SYNAGOG
Rabbi S. M. Machtei, founder
and director of the Radio Synagog,
will preach over station WIOD at
nine o'clock on Sunday morning on
| "A God of Vengeance, or Retribu-
tion?" In addition to the sermon
there will be prayers, scripture
reading and a question box.


Page Two
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Friday, August 17,




Jewish boys and girls desiring
in apply for the scholarships at the
University of -Miami and at a lo-
cal business school, which are be-
ing provided by the Senior Council
of Jewish Women, are advised to
file their applications immediately
with Mrs. Ida M. Optner. No ap-
plications will be received after
mber l.
More than five hundred men and
women attended the benefit lunch-
;. thi Southern Caf-
ast Wednesday, of which
Is were Ladii -' Auxiliary ol th<
Bu :
committee
'.
num-
i

-
-
Jacob Gell, Mrs. 11. S. Jacobs and
daughter, Sarah, of Atlanta, Ga.,
Miss Ida Sacks of Atlanta. Ga.,
Harry Feinberg, Mr. and Mrs. S.
night, was postponed because of
the absence from the city of a
number of the officers. It will
ho held next Thursday evening, Au-
A. Goldstein and family of West gust 28, at B o'clock, in Beth Da-
Palm Beach, Mr. and Mrs. A. B. vid TalmudTorah Hall. Reports
Clein, Mr. and Mrs. Rubin J. Cleln, of the finances df the organization
Mr. and Mrs. Hilliard clein. Ed-1 will be presented and the presi-
ward, Mildred and Ben Klein. Pol- dent's report will be read.
lowing dinner a surprise wai pre-
sented to Miss Mildred Clein in
ince of her birthday.
jb-

I .

Mr. Louis Jacobskind of the Sea-
board Sanitary Hairy will leave
Saturday night for a visit to New
York City, win re he uill spend
some time.
At a board meeting of the Junior
I of Jewish Women Miss
Ruth Sontag was named chairman
hi final dance of the midsum-
mer -era-- t hat the organi i
ng. II will be
In Id on Sunday August 26,
;.t a placi lounci d in the
h
The chairman I by
M Ida Enj li r, M L ian Wu-
. Mrs, Bernici Wern k >i t and
Mrs. Nat L. Wi
M ii i'. per. S. B '''" '"'
ud Kmn. Ben "'-''I Tuesday evening, August 21,
- no. Irvin Siegel, "' ''"' mezzanine floor of th. A
One of the pretty affairs of the
current season was the bridge
tendered by Mrs. Lou Baron
and Mrs. I.eon Levitt in honor of
their sister-in-law, Mrs. .Julius
r. the fornur Ruth Br n
B n, Mass. The party was
held at the home of Mrs. S, J. Spec-
- -. which
ted with cut
flowers and potted for the
Pi high
Mrs.
I M i Cleii
\ was pre
(tues
e Mes-
for the diagnosis and checking of
eye ailment.- were demonstrated, as
a result of which his already elab-
orate and efficient equipment will
l>e added to from time to time as
new instruments appear. Dr. Beck-
, witt has practiced locally for the
past twenty-four years with a fol-
lowing from adjacent cities and
Nassau.
* *
Mr. and Mrs. .lack Pallott left
Tuesday for a short tour of the
state, during which they will visit
Silver Springs, Tampa and Jack-
sonville, expecting to return the
ly part of nexl week.
-
Word was received here of the
death in New York City la-:
of Mi i Green, the mother
William Friedman of 1037
S. W. 20th ave. Funei:
were hi Id in New i'oi k, hi
body wa li
live communal worker and
h thi r
and Kelly -:. Synagos. of B
V Y.
William Friedman retun
the city after an absen
time, during which he visited the
jewelry centers in Boston and
Providence. He spent some time
with relatives and friend- \nv
York and other northern c
*
Mr. Joe Rabinowitz left f.
Jacksonville, Fla., to atten
funeral of his father, who died
there last Sunday. 11,
to return to the citj
parl of next week.
n f Mi. Haymai
of E Mr. Long is
ithei f Mrs. A. B. clein. a
ter-in-law of the host.-.
Among th ling ri
cue-: of honor, Mr. Hayman Long.
Bernice Long and Alfred Long, all
of Evergreen, Ala.; Mrs. Prances
Berner, I rner and Lillian
Berner, Mr. Scheinberg, Peritz The meeting of the
Scheinberg, Stanley C. Myers, Mr. Miami Jewish Cemetery Associa-1
and Mrs. A. Jacobs, Mr. and Mrs. tion, scheduled for last Wednesday
The
month of
/i re sei ved.
lius Spector i- a bride
days.
Mrs. Ju-
of recent
Greater
1000 New Ties
-x A A
k AA
1
.00
;i I pure si'k
I!, and i aj on
1 otanj wools
I ri] i----plains
checksborders
5 an'l miss YOUR tie among to many.
What's mor.-, you'll probably come away with
half a dozen. They're all handmade and
resiliency constructed. On thi Streel i
Tie Holder .... 1.00
Burdines
Mrs. Louis Levitt entertained re-
cently at a surprise party in hon-
or of her son. William, of Atlanta.
Ga., who was visiting her. Dur-
ing the evening games were played
and delicious refreshments were
served. Mrs. Ix'on Levitt and Miss
Bessie Levitt assisted the h
in entertaining. Among those at-
tending were Frances Bridgewa-
ter, Lois Louis, Maxine Kantor,
Shirley Elkin, Sylvia Wilensky.
Charlotte Kohn, Al Cassell, Dan
Levy. Seymour London. Lew ~:''
Morty Fay. Bill Pallott, Arthur
Rifas, Carl Socolow, Morris Krons-
berg, Ed Romfh and Irving Appel-
baum. The guest of honor, who
is connected with the state high-
way department uf Georgia, left
last week by auto to return to his
!! was accompanied by his
. Miss Bessie Levitt, who will
. two weeks thi
frii nds.
* *
Mrs. I, Tanm :.: aum, her Bon,
Id, and daughter, Carolyn, left
last visit relatives and
friends in Now York. Thej
return the early part of September.

Mr. and Mrs. Leon Flkin are now
in their new home at 1762 X. W.
t.
*
ii I Mrs. Da\ id I. I:
.: y returned to the
city this wi imery,
Ala., where Mi R i nbloom and
ral months visiting
in nts, Mr. and Mrs. S. Sie-
gel. While there Mrs. Rosenbloom
guesl of honor at a num-
ber of pai I

Dr. Charles Beckwitt, Miami's
pioneer optometrist, returned to the
city last Wednesday after a five
weeks' tour of northern and west.
era cities. During his trip Dr.
Beckwitt attended a course of lec-
tures in Chicago conducted by na-
: tional authorities on the <,
the eye, having the advantage of
clinical child and adult cases. The
advantages of modern instruments
Rubin Cleii I clean. S. Sar- tazar Hote,< when tickets for the
B ngham, Ala., Ber- dance wi!1 :' uted '"l(l fur"
... I,,.,., Qrlin, Joe Perl- tner P,ana 1'"1' tne affair wi" '"
Ja Sii n, S. J. Spector, announced. The regular meeting
Miss I elia I llein and the hostesses. '''"' tne
i".......'.....'"".....'......"""..........''".........................................mini...........iiiiHHHi.......i.....inn...........
THE MIRAS0L HOTEL
Augustwill be \
During the afternoon delicious re- ne,d Tuesday evening, August 28, i
at 8 o'clock, in the Alcazar Motel
Miss Lee Kasaimff will be in
charge of the program,
Davis Islands
TAMPA, FLORIDA
5 MINUTES FROM THE CENTER OF THE TOWN
Tampa's Beautiful Hotel and Apartments
OPEN ALL YEAR
Every Room With Private Bath
$1.50 and $2.50NEVER HIGHER
Five-Room Apartments. SKI to .$() a Month
Operated by
MICHEL KLEMTNER and ROSEMARY (GERSON]
KLEMTNER
.......'................1............1..........................1.....Mil.....
Illllllllllllllllllllll.......Illl
The Third Reich in Caricature
A collection of almost 100
famous caricatures on condi-
tions and events in Germany
in English, French and
German.
Foreword by Hcinrich Mann
This volume will make its
appearance early in July
under the sponsorship of
Simplicus Verlag in Prague.
The Coat, Including Three-Color Wrapper......40c
Address advance orders to
SIMPLICUS VERLAG
X-Ziskova 4C, Prague, Czechoslovakia
THE LELANDE-DAVIS HOTEL
ATLANTIC CITY'S NEWEST AND FINEST JEWISH HOTEL
Massachusetts Avenue and Beach-(Opposite Heins Pier)
DIETARY LAWS-EXCELLENT FOOD-MODERATE RATES
Cheerful Rooms sad Baths San Deck
J. GLASER. J. APPLEBAUM. Managers
(Formerly of the New Davis Hotel)
MUSIC DANCING ENTERTAINMENT



Friday. August 17, 1934
THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
PIBMSHBD BVBBY FRIDAY
l.y lb.
lEWIHIi FLORIDIAN PUBLISHING CO.
'" P. O. Boa I97J
Miami. Florida Phone 2-1183
EDITORIAL OFFICES:
111 8. W. IS'* Aana Phaaa l-llll
I, LOUIS SHOCHET, Editor
FRED h SHOCHET, Circulation Manager
CANTOR BORIS SCHLACHMAN,
Field Representative
/nUr.'l aa aecond elaaa matter Julj .
last at the Poat Offlc. at Miami. Florida,
under th. Act ol March 8. 187.
WEST PALM BEACH
SAMUEL SCHUTZER
Representative
ST. PETERSBURG
MRS. MAE BENJAMIN
Representative
ORLANDO
IRENE BRAVERMAN
Representative
TAMPA, FLA.
MRS. M. H. KISLER
Representative
SUBSCRIPTION
Sn Mania*......ii.se
Hoi Tar.......II.M
Vol. 7No. 33
FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 1931
The Brown
Panorama
Jewish news during the recent
was all connected directly
or indirectly with Hitler-ism. In
i Angeles the Congressional
Committee Investigating Un-Amer-
Lctivities was informed that
the Silver Shirts are efficiently or-
ganize I, armed and equipped with
all the paraphernalia for war. All
these Silver Shirt leaders are re-
to have the Swastika adorn-
ing the walls of their homes.
The dispatches that Mexican
planning to organize a
Jewish Congress again
ttention to the activities of
Semitic Gold Shirts, who
i said to be financed by
funds. Bernard Dentsch,
president of the American Jewish
-. now in Mexico, should
be congratulated for having ini-
this much-needed protective
organism for the Jews of Mexico.
1 L mion Sir John Simon, Brit-
ign minister, was compelled
;o issue a public letter denying
that hi had any Jewish blood. This
was an answer to the rumors
spread by the Fascist Black Shirts,
who are trying to discredit Si-
mon's policy by labeling it "Jew-
ish" and "un-British."
There's news from Berlin to the
hat Hitler, conscious of his
added responsibilities as president
and chancellor, is inaugurating a
** policy toward the Jews. He
inned Julius Streicher's rabid
mitic weekly, Der Steuer-
mer, because of a special article
the American government
Mid the president of Czechoslo-
"n the grounds that they
'"" Jl wish. Observers insist that
Hitler must change his policy in
"Urd to the Jews if he intends
a better press abroad and
lf he hopes to rehabilitate Ger-
many's economic position.
A comic supplement to this news
U the offer by the Japanese gov-
ernment to world Jewry of a ter-
ritory near the Russian border in
>ko for the settlement of
60,000 German-Jewish refugees. In
f the fact that the total
*wish population of Japan con-
'- of 1,000, this offer is farcical
nd without any practical basis. It
1 obviously intended to counter-
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page Three
act the Soviet Union's Biro-Bidjan
p,an ""' "' I"1"" t Biro-Bidjan
>S nothing but a buffer state
against Japan.
Hitlerism preponderates in the
Jewiah news in one way or another.
the Jewish panorama presents a
multi-colored view with brown,
black, silver, gold and other hues
Of shirts trying to cany the germ
of Nazism over the lace of the
earth.
Paul May
The death of Paul May, Belgian
ambassador to the United states,
removes the only foreign Jew of
full diplomatic rank from the
Washington scene. May's record
in the service of his country was
a brilliant one. He spent more
time On foreign territory than iu
his own country during his active
life. He hail great personal charm
and fine diplomatic skill in mat-
ters of -tale. Official Washington
regarded him as the most success-
ful Belgian ambassador to this
country for the last fifty year-.
He carried his Jewishness natural-
ly, unafraid and unashamed, at-
tended the orthodox synagogue on
important Jewish holidays, and was
very keenly interested in Jewish
new-, as thi' Jewish newspaper-
men of the Capitol will readily
confirm. His distinguished career
n .lecta credit on his sterling char-
act( r and on tile Jewish people.
West Palm Beach
Notes
Jack Fein of Asbury Park was
a visitor to the city last week.
this week and will conduct services
at Beth El tonight.
Plans for the organization of a
Junior Branch of the Workmen's
Circle were formulated at a meet-
ing in the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Jacobs. This organisation will ad-
mit members between the ages of
16 and IK. Quite a number of
boys and girls attended the first
meeting. The next meeting will be
held Wednesday night, August 22,
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. May
on 2iith st. All boys and girls in-
led are invited to attend.
A joint meeting of the Congre-
gation and Sisterhood of Beth El
to make final arrangements for
the High Holy Days will be held
Tuesday evening, August 22, at
he Synagogue. All members are
urged to attend.
An important meeting of the lo-
cal B'nai B'rith Lodge will be held
next Monday night at the Monterey
Hotel. All members are urged to
attend.
Mr. I.ou llalpern of Belle Glade
-pent the week-end here with his
mother, Mrs. Joe Halpern, follow-
ing which he left for a two weeks'
trip to New York.
Beth El Sisterhood is sponsoring
a benefit card party Sunday eve-
ning, August 19, at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Greenblatt,
707 39th st., with Mrs. Greenblatt
as hostess. Prizes will be awarded
for high scores and refreshments
will be served.
T/u
GLOOM
CHASER
lllllllllllllllllllltlllllll
lllllllllllllllllllllllll
Mrs. l.ongwedDo you mean to
say your husband never does any-
thing to justify a burst of tears
or a fit of hysterics?
Mrs. Just wed-No, indeed. He's
kindness itself.
Mrs. l.ongwedWhy, the mean
thing!
Her FatherThat Percy Pin-
feather of yours will never save a
cent.
GladysWhy, how you wrong
him! Last evening he showed me
a lead dollar, a plugged quarter
and a Chinese coin that he's saved
ever since he was a child!
Mr. and Mrs. A. Herman re-
turned to the city after visiting in
Chicago and New York.
Miss Adeline Goldstein is spend-
ing several weeks with friends in
Miami.
The Misses Esther and Fannie
Sehrebnick are spending some time
in Detroit.
The local Workmen's Circle is
now organizing a junior branch of
the organization for the ages of
15 and 18.
A beni fit card party was held
last Sunday night at Schwartzherg
Hall for Beth Israel Sisterhood. In-
dividual prizes were awarded at
each table for high scores and dur-
ing the evening delicious refresh-
ments were served. Mrs. Sam
Goldman was hostess.
Cy Argintar, president of Tem-
ple Beth Israel, was named one of
the directors of the non-denomina-
tional Church last Sunday morn-
ing during services at the Settler
Theatre.
Sam Green, popular member of
the Theatre Guild, was named busi-
ness manager of the organization,
which is now rehearsing for its
presentation of "Payment De-
ferred." which will be shown dur-
ing September.
Ilr. and Mrs. Carl N. Herman
returned to the city after his sum-
mer vacation and Dr. Herman will
now begin his fifth consecutive
teim with the Beth Israel Temple.
Mr. Leon Goldsmith left this
week to spend a month in New
York.
Orlando Notes
One of the notable events of re-
cent years was the wedding cere-
monies last Sunday night uniting
Ethel Doll Safer, daughter of Rev.
and Mrs. B. Safer of this city, to
Frank Sigal, son of Mr. and Mrs.
1!. Sigal. The Synagogue in which
the ceremonies were held was
beautifully decorated for the event
with potted palms and plants. The
wedding procession marched to the
altar through a lane of palms. Tak-
ing part in the ceremonies were
Rabbi Adolph Burger of Tampa.
Rabbi A. S. Kleinfeld of St. Peters
burg, Cantor Boris Schlachman of
Miami Beach and Rev. B. Safer, lo-
cal spiritual leader, the father of
the bride. Marylin ottenberg and
i Edwin Safer led the procession.
i Pearl Safer, sister of the bride,
wa- maid of honor and Miss Ethel
Sigal was bridesmaid. Myer Sigal,
brother of the groom, was best
man, with Jack Sentler and Joe P.
Safer of Jacksonville and Joe Sa-
fer as ushers. The bride was giv-
en in marriage by her parents and
the groom's parents attended him.
I Music for the processional and re-
cessional was played by Leon Sha-
piro, violinist, and Walter Kimball,
pianist. Following the ceremonies
I a reception and dance were held
in the vestry rooms of the syna-
gogue, with Adolph Prinsky and
his orchestra playing. After the
reception the couple left for a
honeymoon in Miami. Following
their return they will make their
home here.
At a special meeting of Congre-
gation Beth El, held at the home
of Mr. II. Gold, its president, an-
nouncement was made of the elec-
tion of Rabbi Miskat, formerly of
Niagara Falls. N. Y.. to be the
spiritual leader of the congrega-
tion. Rabbi Miskat arrived here
Mr. and Mrs. B. Chepnick and
baby of Jacksonville spent several
days here as the guests of Mr. and
Mrs. M. Baker.
Mrs. A. R. Freidman of St. Au-
gustine is the guest of Mrs. M.
Safer.
A word to the foolish is always
resented.
Love is a blissful dream. Mar-
riage is the alarm clock.
You may as well tell your wife
the truth; she'll find it out any-
way.
'there isn't much satisfaction in
arguing with a man who doesn't
care.
There is talk in automobile cir-
cles of placing the motive power
in the rear of the machine, as in
the mule.
He who tolls what he would do
if he were in your place seldom
knows what to do in his own place.
Truth is mighty and will pre-
vail. Of course it willjust as long
as that which prevails is labeled
the truth.
MotoristWhat happened?
ChauffeurA road hog ran into
us.
MotoristAnd beat it?
ChauffeurOh, no, that's him in
the other ditch, calling us road
hogs.
Young BrideOh, Jack! I for-
got the pie, and it's burnt to a
crisp!
Young HusbandNever mind,
dear! It isn't as if I didn't even
get a smell of it.
A kiss shortens a man's life
three minutes, according to a med-
ical estimator. But three minutes
is not too much to pay for a Mo-
ment.
"We are going to make the peo-
ple dam conscious," says the pres-
ident. Come, come, Mr. Roose-
velt, can't we leave that sort of
language to the Johnsons?
Men and women should look dur-
ing courtship and overlook after
marriage.
Secret service men found coun-
terfeit money concealed in a cheese.
Where are our food inspectors that
they permit this disgusting adul-
teration?
A Southern textile manufactur-
er announces the development of
several new yarns. We look for
them to be broken in shortly over
a national network.
It doesn't matter so much to the
average man what church he at-
tends, just so the seats are com-
fortable.
time here visiting Rev. and Mrs.
B. Safer.
Mrs. S. Cohen and son, Nathan.
of Bradford. Pa., is visiting Mr.
and Mrs. S. L. Frankel and family.
Mrs. B. Katz and Mrs. A. Prin-
sky are spending their vacation at
Daytona Beach.
Martin Segal returned this week
after vacationing at Jacksonville
Beach.
St. Petersburg
Mr. H. M. Jacobs, president of
the B'nai Israel Synagogue, left
on a combined business and pleas-
ure trip, which will take him to
Chicago, III. He is expected to
return to the city the latter part
of the month.
Phil Berger is touring the North.
Mr. B. .1. Cohen, prominent com-
munal worker of this city, will
leave shortly for a fishing trip.
Mr. and Mrs. S. Berger spent
several days at Daytona Beach.
Miss Kay Roth returned from a
visit with her mother at Daytona
Beach.
Congratulations lare baing re-
ceived by Mr. and Mrs. S. Fleisher
on the birth of a baby daughter,
who will be called Phyllis Marylin.
Mrs. Fleisher is the former Esther
Lieberman.
Tampa Notes
The Mfisses MiiJ'.nm Lcdbovftz
and Mildred Simovitz of this city-
are traveling and will visit New
York and Baltimore before return-
ing here.
Mrs. II. M. Jacobs and Mrs. Da-
vid Rothblatt, prominent local com-
munal workers, and active in Jew-
ish affairs here, left for a brief
vacation, during which time they
will visit West Palm Beach anil
Miami Beach.
Mrs. Fred Lebos is the guest of
her aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs.
S. Argintar, in Asheville, N. C.
Miss Tillye Simovitz and Miss
Pauline Leibovitz had as their
guest for the week-end Miss Betty
Leibovitz.
Mrs. S. Essrig and children arc
spending their vacation in Hender-
sonville, N. C.
Mrs. M. G. Rosenberg returned
from a trip to Dothan, Ala., where
she visited her daughter and son-
in-law, Mr. and Mrs. H. Blumberg.
Mrs. I. Berner returned from
Jacksonville, where she was the
gue-t of her niece, Mrs. Millis.
Mrs. Max Safer, Mrs. L. Gold-
berg and Mrs. P. Safer spent some
Mrs. I. Salsbury is attending the
Century of Progress in Chicago.
Mrs. Irving Salsbury, mother
and sister returned this week from
a trip through the state.


Page Four
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
.
f



Edited by RABBI S. If. MACHTEI
Founder and Dlnetor, Kadio Srnaxotf of America
SUNDAY MORNINGS WIOD, MIAMI, FLORIDA
Vol.IV. SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 1934 No. 33.
"Chronic Fault-Finders"
Scripture Reading, Psalm XXXIV, Verses 12-15, Inclusive
A number of the Radio SynagOg has sent me an interesting letter
in which hi explains his allegiance to our services and gives his rea-
sons for considering the presentation on this program a truly religious
and spiritual one as distinguished from the stereotyped religious ser-
mons with their condemnation of all whom the particular church may
consider "sinners." Our correspondent asks the question, "Who can
tell what constitutes sin and who rightly belongs in the class of sin-
ners'"' He has termed the religiously-minded busybodiea "chronic
fault-finders."
In the letter I found enclosed the following poem by Hairy Larky n."
WHO CAN TELL?
How do we know what hearts have vilest sin!
How do we know'.'
Many like sepulchres are foul within.
Whose outward garb is spotless as snow,
And many may be pure we think not so.
How near to God the souls of such have been
What mercy secret penitence may win!
How do we know?
(
How can we tell who have ginned more than we!
How can we tell?
We think our brother walked guiltily.
Judging him in self-righteousness! Ah, well,
Perhaps had we been driven through the hell
Of his temptations, we might be
Less upright in our daily %alk than he
How can we tell?
Dare we condemn the ills that others do?
Dare we condemn?
Their strength is small, their trials are not few.
The tide of wrong is difficult to stem.
And if to us more clearly than to them
Is given knowledge of the good and true.
More do they need oar help and pity, too!
Dare we condemn?
God help us all and lead us day by day!
valu-. but. I doubt if it the effect desired by he a -
The rabbis of old taught "correel yourself, then you ma ycorr -
Other.." Another Jew addressed a mob of sel,-nghteou- one and -id,
"He that is without sin among you, let h.m tint cas a .torn .
It is remarkable how many pure and sinless being. ""
There is so much cas ing of stones, so much fault-fmdmg. such profu.
eritlcism. .
If you would increase your happiness and prolong your life, for-
get your neighbor's faults. Forget all the slander you have heard
Forget the temptations. Forget the fault-finding, and give a little
thought to the cause winch provoked it. Forget the pcculiar^cs o
your triends, and only remember the good points which make you
fond of them. Forget all personal quarrels or histories you may has e
heard by accident, and which, if repeated, would seem a thousand times
worse than they are. Bio: out as far as possible all the disagreeable
of life; they will come, but will only grow larger when you remember
them, and the constant thought of the acts of meanness, or, worse
still, malice, will only tend to make you more familiar with them.
Obliterate everything disagreeable from yesterday. Start out with a
clean sheet today, and write upon it for sweet memory I sake only
those things which are lovely and lovable.
Some go through life's garden looking for weeds and thorns; oth-
ers are always in search of blossoms and flowers. YOU are certain to
find whichever you seek. The weeds will never be entirely uprooted
by you. New ones will grow. In your haste and your ignorance you
may uproot the stem of a sweet flower which has not revealed it-ell
in full bloom. If you want to beautify the garden of life, cultivate
new flowers, plant new ones, fill the garden with the productive that
it may completely hide from view all weed.- and barren spots. It must
be .hat God has some plan for weeds, else they would not be. They
may be misdirected good intentions.
You add nothing to the fullness of life with your fault-finding.
You accomplish only this, that your discordant tone disturbs the har-
mony of life. Look for the good in man, bring out the best in him.
Let that be your contribution to your little circle- of friends and to the
sum t >tal of life.
Friday, August 1 ,. \ See I nderstandjng Reached hV
tween Jews and Arabs in
Palestine
LondonJews and Arabs in I'a|.
estine have reached a tacit under-
standing that both ,people arc
permanent factors in the life of
the country, declares the current
issue Of the weekly N'eai East,
which is devoted to British colonial
interests. This tacit understand-
ing, the weekly holds, is a prelim-
inary to a final and definite id-
justment of the Arab-Jewish situa-
tion.
Poland Legalises New Revisionist
Labor Party
War-aw -The Polish govern-
ment has legalized the new Jew-
ish labor party organized by the
Revisionists in this country. The
party will concern itself exclusive-
ly with labor matters, shunning all
political activity.
ALTMAN'S HOTEL
307 SIXTH AVE. ASBURY PARK. N. J. Tel. 1467 or 3415
Situated in the finest section of Asbury Park near the
Boardwalk. Modern in every respect. All sports.
Dietary laws observed. Moderate .-ates. Open all year.
THIS IS THE YEAR FOR YOUR TRIP TO
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Half Soles..........35c
LADIES' HEELS ............13c
Atlantic Shoe Shop
240 N. E. First Avenue
Opp. Cortex Hotel
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WE (ALL FOR AND DELIVER
God help us all!
We cannot walk along the perfect way.
Evil allures us, tempts us. and we fall!
We are but human and our power is small:
Not one of us may boast, and not a day
Rolls o'er our heads, but each hath need to pray.
God help u- all!
The- Sages have- summed up this same thought in these words:
[shmael, the in of Jose, said, judge not alone, for none may
judge alone save One ." God is qualified to be a sole judge. Man
fjht to pas- judgment on his brothers, acting as sole judge.
But, we do have "chronic fault-finders": men and women who
scrutinize the actions of their fellowmen to discover weaknesses and
tion-: self-righteous individuals who set standards for the con-
fjuct of thers, wh leek to regulate the lives of strangers, who are
:e a iv and eager to condemn those in whom they find faultsor, rather,
in whom they notice traits which, to the critic, appear faulty. These
fault finders are too busy watching others to take any notice of them-
selves. Having convinced themselves of their own virtuousness and
moan the fact that they must live in a world of
sinners, that they must rub elbows with men and women of doubtful
virtues, and that their sensitive n< rves must be shocked by the mere
beings, heirs to the faults of the normal descendant
of Adi Eve. Such men and women, unhappy in this sphere,
iding unhappinesa with their constant criticism, denunciations,
and Ul ble censure, are truly out of place among beings of flesh
and blood. They should be granted their fervent desiresand should
be translated to the realm of the anif-'s.
It cannot be denied that there is much room for improvement in
the nature of man and in his conduct. Corrective measures should be
enforced. The proper agencies are at work. But, I fail to see what
value there is in the nagging, the slander, the defamation of charac-
ter, by these "holier than thou" individuals who damn all who fall be-
low the standards they have set- damn them to eternal scorn.
Then, we have another type of "chronic fault-finder." The man
or woman who thrills at the opportunity to belittle another for the
clothes Ik wear-, the food he eats, and for the thousand, and one other
purely personal habits which should concern no outsider. If the man-
nerisms of B person are objectionable to you, if his conduct is revolt-
your finer sensibilities shun that person. Have nothing to do
with him or her. It is not your duty to ridicule, to condemn, and to
deride. That habit with which you so abundantly are gifted, that
habitual fault-finding, may be very trying on the finer sensibilities
of tne one upon whom you inflict your unsolicited opinions.
The fault-finding of the pulpiteer is not always religion. It may
have as Its animus some subconscious prejudice; it may originate in a
poorly digested meal or it may be the aftermath of the receipt of
some unpleasant news. Even preachers are not immune to the ills
that ocfall all flesh. But, as to the value of the denunciation of sin-
ners, I have my doubts. It may even have the undesired opposite ef-
fect. The eloquence of the minister in describing a particular sin
may arouse- a desire in the heart of some congregant to offer him-
elf to Satan to be tempted. I have l-een ted.l by men and women that
the c ,n -ta.it and repeated fault-finding and tirades of preachers had
driven them from church. On occasion, this may have some hidden
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prid8y, August 17, 1984
THE JEWISH FLOBIDIAN
Page Five
I...dies' Auxiliary of the
Miami Jewish Orthodox Congrega-
tion will entertain at one of its
regular bi-weekly card parties next
Tu<'.- rooms and lawn of the Syn-
L545 S. W. Third st., with
Mesdames Max Rappaport and
Jack Hirsch as the hostesses.
,mI1 he awarded for high
and refreshments will be
The public is invited to
* *
Mi-. Max Weinberger enter-
lie Jay night at a fare
we|| bridge party in honor of her
i. Elsie, who will return
. York after spending sev-
, K,l wei ks in Miami. Prizes l"
a. ie awarded In Betty
. Sadye Pepper and I; i
n|yn Klein, I luring the evening
, i: yul Hawaiian! entertained
*r of ukulele elec
onji those attending ei e
. Betty Greenberg, Paul-
Lillian Dock, Esther
. Tillie Predinger, Ron
. Hesdames Betty Klein,
Si phie Mus--. Anna
! ay Taj lor, Lu :ili<
11 Augustine, Mrs, Pred-
. Samet. Miss Weinberg
oday t" resume her du-
S'i a York < 'it v.
able ground to remonstrate against
the resultant injury to itself, |)Ut
in the name of humanity. The
I niied sia.,-, may not authori-
tatively appeal to the stipulations
of the treat) of Berlin, to which
It was not and cannot become a
signatory, but it docs earnestly ap-
peal to the principles consigned
therein, because the, are the prin-
ciples of international law and
eternal justice, advocating the
broad toleration which that solemn
compart enjoins, and standing
ready to lend its moral support to
the fufilment thereof by its CO-
signatories, for the act of Ruma-
nia itself has effectively joined the
United States to them as an in-
terested party in this regard."
JifoViOsT
Directed by Many Joe Brown,
Paramount'a "Sitting Pretty," with
Jack Oakie, Jack Haley, Ginger
Rogers, Thelma Todd, Gregory Ra-
toff and Lew Cody playing the
leading role.-, is coming next Sun-
day and Monday to the Seventh
Avenue Theatre.
It was produced by Charles R.
Rogers, independent producer on

IIII1MY-TWO YEARS A(i()
ntinued from Page l)
ill successive restrictions, the Jews
ill Rumania have become reduced
lei a state of wretched misery. Shut
nut from nearly every avenue of
self-support which is open to the |
poor "I other lands, and ground
down b) poverty as the natural re-
tail el their discriminatory treat-
ment, the) are rendered incapable
"I lifting themselves from the en-
furred degradation they endure.
Even were the fields of education
"pen to lhem, of civil employment
nd "I commerce, as to 'Rumanian
citizens,' their penury would pre-
sent rising by individual effort.
Human beingB, so circumstanced,
kw virtually no alternatives but
ubmissive suffering, or flight to
-''me land less unfavorable to them
"The I nited States offers an
a-yhini lo the oppressed of all
nds. Uut its sympathy with them
in no njse impairs its just liberty
and right to weigh the acts of the
oppressor in light of their effects
upon Ibis country, and to Judge
ccordingly,
"Putting together the facts now
painful!) brought home to this
government during the past few
Jrs: ibat many of the inhab-
""" "I Rumania are being
foreed. b) artificially adverse dis-
criminations, to quit their native
country; thai the hospitable asy-
lu"i offered by this country is al-
m""t (he only refuge left to them;
"'" 'he) .n. hither unfitted by
W Conditions of their exile to take
MM jn ,|. new |jfe of (hjs |.uu|
""'*<< circumstances either profit-
a'll> i" ihcmselves or beneficial to
* community; and that they are
"bJecU of charity from the outset
'""' '"' long timethe right of
''""iiislranee against the acts of
"' Rumanian government is clear-
;' otablished in favor of this gov-
""mem. Whether consciously and
Purpose, or not, these helpless
PM'l'le. hardened and spurned by
I"'"- "alive land, are forced by the
***'* power of Rumania upon
[.^charity of the United States.
Is Rovernmeat cannot be a tacit
"r > to such an international I
L K It is constrained to pro- !
I ^ againal the treatment to which j
J ''Ws ,,f Rumania are subjected,
' "n" because it has unimpeach-
The story is centered around two
aspiring song writers, working in
a small N'ew York music company.
Their BUCCOBBOa and failures are
depicted, and ends in a climax full
of whirly-girly numbers.
Three of Hollywood's most im-
portant romantic stars, riedric
March, Gary Cooper and Miriam
Hopkins, together with Edward
Everett Horton, than whom there
is no funnier, play the leading
roles in Paramount'a film adapta-
tion of Noel Coward's sensational
stage success, "Designs for Liv-
ing," playing at the Tivoli The-
atre Sunday and Monday.
The picture was directed by
Ernst Lubitsch from the serein
play written by Ben Hecht, author
of many Broadway stage hits, In-
cluding "Front Page."
"Design for Living" concerns it-
self with the romantic- entangle-
ments of three sprightly, light-
hearted artists. The triangular ro-
mance has its inception in a Pari-
sian spring, and wends its hilarious
path through London anil New
York before it reaches its bomb-
shell conclusion.
vivoum
Showi llM and i :** P.M.
2c till 6:30Evening 25c
Matinees Saturday and Sunday
Continuous 2 to 11
Sunday-Monday, Aug. 19-20
FREDRIC MARCH
GARY COOPER
MIRIAM GORDON
Design for Living
o------------------------------------------------------
raW^Jal
S V. T ***,
Adults 2eChildren 10c
Boi Office Opens :4!i P. M.
Sunday
| Sunday-Monday. Aug. 19-20 |
| Sitting Pretty )
JACK OAKIE
GINGER ROGERS
'- =
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(AMOR LOUIS DAYMAN
Who Will Chant at Beth David
High Holy Day Services
Atlantic CityOrganized labor
has led in fighting the spread in
this country of Hitlerism, accord-
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third vice-president of the Amer-
ican Federation of Labor.
The statement was part of a
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Putnam.
Included in the imposing cast
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Kiwanis Club. Woll is here at-
tending the sessions of the A. F.
of Li executive council.
"In Germany we see Hitler with
| his development of racial and re-
ligious antagonisms, now showing
here and there in our own nation.
No movement 1 know of has done
more to prevent their taking hold
in America than has laborand I
am not of the Jewish faith."
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I

Pag- Six
TM JEWISH FLOHDIAN
Friday, August 17, 1934
QUESTIONS
and
ANSWERS
the German government to permit
complete freedom of utterance, it
was decided to hold the meeting
as planned in Berlin, August 4-10.
Q. Why did the Baptist World
Alliance choose to hold a meeting
in Germany this yearl
A. The Baptist World Alliance
which represents the Baptists of all
land-, about twelve million in num-
ber, meets once in ten years. In
192-1 it met in Stockholm] Sweden.
Several years ago the Baptists of
Germany extended an invitation to,
the alliance to meet in Berlin in
1934. As the time drew near when
al decision as to the place of
meeting had to be made, grave
doubts as to the practicability or
wisdom of meeting in Germany
were expressed by many, in view
of the persecution of the Jews and
the suppri ssion "f the liberties of
the church by the Hitler regime.
It was felt that for Baptists to
meet in Germany would be Inter-
preted there as endorsing or con-
doning the course- of the present
government. It was feared, also,
that the expression of the honest
conviction of the delegates on ques-
tion- at issue in Germany today
would lie quite impossible, and that
the historic testimony of Baptists
to tin- principle of the separation
.lunch and state, the right of
private judgment and the equality
.. fore God would nee-
bi |j suppressed. The Ger-
Bapl -. however, vigorously
protested against taking the meet-
ing elsewhere, declaring that un-
circumstances it would do
m an irreparabh injury, where-
as the coming of the Baptists to
i would he likely greatly to
-, : thi Cause <>'' the so-called
irehes. For 1 his reason, and
in view of the definite pledge of
Q. In what sense and in what
degree is the Jew an internation-
alist ?
A. Rabbi Morris s. I.azaron of
Baltimore answers this question as
follows: This question, like most
such general questions, is difficult
to answer in a few sentences. 1
would rather USC the term human-
itarian, without any assumption of
higher attributes of character. 1
would say that the Jew's experi-
ence of sorrow, the ever-recurring
instability of his life- remember
the phrase of Byron, Tribes of
the wandering feet an.I weary
breast" has made him think in
universal terms. This was strength-
ened by the universallsm of his
religion, which conceived of God
as one and the father of all men.
These latter days, however, which
have witnessed such a growth of
the sentiment of nationalism, re-
vealed, too, a rising consciousness
of cultural nationalism among Jews.
But Judaism by and large, like
Christianity, is universalistic and
seeks tin welfare of all humanity
as children of the universal Father.
Q. What are the purposes of
tlie National Catholic Welfare Con-
ference?
A. The National Catholic Wel-
fare Conference, now commonly
known as the "N. C. W. C," was
organized in September, L919, at
the Catholic University of Amer-
ica, at a meeting of the cardinals,
archbishops and bishops of the Ro-
man Catholic Church of the United
and later incorporated un-
;, the law- of the District of
Columbia for the purpose of "'uni-
fying, co-ordinating and organizing
the Cal pie of the United
Slates in work.- of education, BO-
cial welfare, immigrant aid and
other activities." It- headquarters
are located at 1312 Massachusetts
av,... Washington, I>. C. Through
six different departments, namely,
Executive, Education, Press, Social
Action, Legal and Lay Organiza-
tions (the last named includmu
two co-ordinate branches the Na
tional Council of Catholic Men and
the National Council of Catholic-
Women), the N. C. W. C. operates,
under the direction and control of
an administrative committee of
archbishops and bishops, as a serv-
ice organization seeking to fur-
ther the cause of religion in the
United State- as well as to ad-
vance the general welfare of the
nation. At their November, 1988,
meeting the archbishops and bish-
ops authorized a new Department
of Catholic Action, which is now
in the process of organization.
The general objectives of the N.
C. W. C. may be summarized brief-
ly as follows: To serve as the
channel for the interchange of in- j
formation an.I service between the
hierarchy of the United States and
the clergy and laity in their com-
mon work for the church; to be a
central clearing house of informa-
tion regarding activities of Cath-
olic men and women; to promote,
under ecclesiastical supervision,
unity and co-operation among
clergy and laity in matters that
affect the general welfare of the
church and the nation; to aid ex-
isting Catholic organizations to
work more effectively in their own
localities; to co-operate in further-
ing the aims of all approved move-
mints in the interests of the church
and society at large; to participate,
through Catholic representation, in
national and international move-
ments involving moral questions.
Conference to
Be Held Soon
Plans tor the meeting of the of-
ficer, and directors of the Florida
Statewide Conference of Orthodox
and conservative Rabbis and lay-
,, pr0vide for th, gathering to
1. held in Orlando following the
High Holy Days. Mr. B. J. Co-
in.,,, president of th.. lay division,
who i- a resident and prominent
communal worker of Orlando, will
issue the call setting the exact time
within the next few .lays. At this
pr. conference, plans and the
agenda for the -enu-annuai meet-
ing 0f the organization to be held
in Tampa and St. Petersburg in
January will be determined and ar-
,,,!, ,| f0r. While in Orlando the
meeting will also determine the
character of legislation that the
organization will seek to have
adopted at the next meeting of the
Florida legislature in 1985. Mian,
synagogues affiliated with the on
ganization are Beth David Congre-
gation, the Miami Jewish Orthodox
Congregation and Beth Ja
agogue of Miami Beach.
At a meeting in .Miami last Jan.
uary resolutions were adopted tire.
ing Orthodox and Con ervatim
Synagogues throughout th.
to join the organization. A ,am.
paign to insure this will be taken
up at the Orlando meeting.
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Cantor Rabbi Alex. S. Wiesel, Chanting
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Full Text

PAGE 1

wJewisti IFIIariidliai HI Vol. 7 -No. 33 FLORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, AUGUST 17. 1934 Price Five Cents Jewish News Around the World Demand Republican Tarty Disown Representative McFadden Sew Vork—The anti-Semitic record of Representative I-ouis T. Mc, Republican from Pennsylvania, should disqualify him from mi (if leadership in the Re!i party, the Republican national committee is informed in a letter from the American Jewish Conftn signed hy Nathan D. Perlman, vice-president of the congress and a former Republican member of congress. The letter demands that the Republican nacommittee repudiate McFadden'a anti-Semitic views, and proigainst his elevation to a poof importance in the party, IS evinced by his having been asto make a party address over the radio. Recall of the assignment and McFadden's removal high position in the Republican councils are demanded. Lithuania Suppresses Jewish Newspapers Kovno All Jewish newspapers in Lithuania with the exception of the Kovno St inline have been supI by the government because ublished a report from Germany that Lithuania has BUBpendparliament of Memel, The ion is that the suspension will lii permanent, just as it was in Latvia, where the Jewish press was impressed after the recent change in government. Albany—Proprietors of a Sullivan county hotel pleaded guilty and wiii' lined $2"> by Justice Clarence use of Bloomingburg for serving non-kosher meat as kosher. 'hii; the first conviction of a hotel or restaurant proprietor in the administration of the new kosher law by the Department of Agriculture and markets. I in penalty assessed the proof Shawanga Lodge, a hotel at Highview, Sullivan county, .ile under the section of the law which forbids "the -ale for 1 1• t: Sunday evening, August 26, •hen a supper will be served and Program of gala entertainment W| be provided. Thirty-Two Years Ago... Exactly 32 years ago President Theodore Roosevelt ordered Mr. •Inliii Hay. secretary of state, to notify Rumania and all the European powers who wen' signatories in the Treaty of Berlin that the United Slates, though not a party to that treaty, deplored the treatment of Jews by Rumania. So impressed was Rumania by the determined hostility of the United States and other nations that she ed to make amends and thus avert a collective intervention. The note dispatched by Secretary Hay on August 11, 1902, might well have served as a guide and light to a later Roosevelt and his secretary of state. The current theory generally offered for the current official silence defends such lack of action on the ground that one govereign nation cannot inti i fore with the "internal affairs of another sovereign nation." It should be noted, however, that this attitude of high restraint with respect to Germany is not so carefully maintained -ay. with Aus', tria or even Liberia. The elder veil justified his Interference I on "principles of international law | and eternal justice." Kternality is evidently short-lived. A few paragraphs from this memorable document are rather interesting not only because they .appropriately expressed civilized lisapprobation for uncivilized acts, hut also because they reveal the extent to which these tinted Stales have withdrawn from traditional American policies: "Starting from the arbitrary and controvertlble premises that the native Jews of Rumania domiciled there for centuries are "aliens not subject to foreign protection." the ability of the Jew to earn even the scant) meanof existence that suffice for B frugal race has been constricted by degrees, until nearly every opportunity to win 8 livelihood is denied; vpfld until the helpless poverty of the Jew has constrained an exodus of such proportions as to cause general concern. "The political disabilities of the jews in Rumania, their exclusion from the public service and the learned professions, the limitations of their civil rights, and the imposition upon them of exceptional t BX es, Involving as they do wrongs repugnant to the moral sense ol liberal modern people-, are not so directly in poinl for my present purpose as the public acts which attack the inherent right of man a* a bread winner in the ways of agriculture and trade. The Jews are prohibited from owning land. or even from cultivating it as common laborers. They are debarred from residing in the rural districts Many branches of petty trade and manual production are closed to them in the overcrowded cities where they are forced to dwell and engage against fearful odds, in the desperate struggle for existence. Even as ordinary artisans or hired laborers they may only find employment in the proportion of one unprotected alien' to two ••Rumanians' under any one employer. In short, by the cumulative effect (Continued on Page 6) A New Deal With so much being said and fortunately being done in recent months regarding the New Deal, much interest has been created by the recent announcement of a new deal for Religion and Welfare Recovery. In New York there was recently formed, as appeared in our columns last week, the National Committee for Religion and Welfare Recovery, an interfaith group representing Catholic, Jewish and Protestant clergymen and laymen. The drive will begin in October and an effort will be made to have the entire world realize that the time for a new deal in Religion and Welfare work has arrived. We can hear the shouts of glee from some Miamians when the I him In occurs to them of a religion to suit themselves and their fancies, and welfare work to meet their selfish whims. For, (after all is said and done), who of us does not know how to run religion and welfare work far better than the rabbis and priests and those who have given of their very lives to aid their fellow men? Here in Miami, as we note l he rapid approach of the High Holy Days, we begin to realize tbnt a NEW DEAL would work miracles. Imagine the Greater Miami area.with a population of Jenrunning into the thousands, and then note that with Synagogue capacity of less than two thousand in all. our Synagogues and Temples were not even half filled. Certainly we have the men and women who shout from the house tops "I am a Jew," and then conveniently forget the Synagogues, with the excuse, "Oh, well, the Synagogues with their high prices for seats have driven us away. It's their fault we can't attend." What a trave-lv upon themselves. There is not a Synagogue in this community, or elsewhere, who has yet refused to permit anyone to attend because of lack of funds. Nevertheless, and we recall the incident very vividly "I'll be damned if I'll pay for a seat. I'd rather pay for a good night club show," was the answer of one young man when asked to pay for some pews at a local Synagogue. And vet il wasn't so many days thereafter that this same young man came to avail himself of the services of this same Synagogue when he came to say Kaddish for a departed one. And the same story is true Of our local Jewish Welfare Bureau. Many a man and woman who has time and money for everything in the way of amusement, has time and again reI pulsed the earnest, conscientious worker for our Jewish Welfare Bureau and its Ladies' Auxiliary, and by way of defense has charged that the organization is mismanaged and ill run. An excuse, we venture to suggest,^ that this self-serving man and woman knew to be unfair and unjust. Certainly the time far a new deal in religion and welfare has arrived. The time for this is 1 never more adapted or more suitBeth David Announces Plans Plans for the High Holy Day services for Beth David Congregation, as announced by its officers, provide for itheusua) traditional observances with Rabbi .Max Shapiro, Rabbi of the Congregation for the past several years in charge of the services. Cantor Louis Hayman, who has been serving the congregation for a number nf years, will chant the Maariv and Musof services on Rosh Hashono and Vom Kippur. Ile recently returned from New York City, where he attended a course of special instruction in liturgical music, and has prepared B number of the famed Cantor Lewandowski's compositions, which he will feature during the services. He will be assisted by a buys' choir which Cantor Hayman has been training. Further announcementregarding the servicewill appear in an early issue. ^WIIIIIItlllllHtlllllllllllMllllll IMMIIIIIIIMIUIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIHIIlllluiM*.Announcements ^IIIIWIIIIIIlMlllllllinilllllllllllllHIIIIUIIIIIIIIINIIIIIIIIIllllinuUMlllUIIUIlf BETH DAVID CONGREGATION (Conservative) 139 N. W. Third Ave. MAX SHAPIRO, Rabbi Services begin at 6:30 tonight. Saturday morning services begin at 8:30. Mincha services begin at 6:30 p. m., followed by the Maariv service. TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI (Reform) 137 N. E. Nineteenth St. DR. JACOB H. KAPLAN, Rabbi Brief services will be held tonight at 8 p. m. There will be no sermon. This will be continued throughout the summer during the absence of Rabbi Kaplan with a Lay member in charge. Services are held in the main auditorium. Y. M. H. A. to Hold Affairs The Young Men'Hebrew Association will be vi ry active in the next few week-, according to plans announced at last Wednesday night's meeting of the organization. The first affair will be a membership get-together at which thirty-four new members will be officially welcomed into the ranks of the association on Wednesday evening. August 29. A program of entertainment will be provided and refreshments will be served. The next event will be a card party Thursday evening, August :!0, at s o'clock, in the clubrooms, with admission only 25c, or the presentation of one book to the organization. Refreshments will be MI veil. Further details will appear in our next issue. MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CONGREGATION (Orthodox) 1545 S. W. Third Street JULIUS WASHER, Rabbi Services begin tonight at 6:30. Saturday morning services begin at 9 o'clock. Mincha services at 6:30 p. m., followed by the Maariv service. CONGREGATION BETH JACOB (Orthodox) 311 Washington Ave., Miami Beach DAVID I. ROSENBLOOM, Rabbi Services begin tonight at 6:30. Tomorrow morning services begin at 8:30. Cantor Schlachman will chant the services. Mincha services begin at 6:30 p. m., with Maariv following. Star Chapters Sponsor Party To raise funds to hi lp bring the sessions of the Grand Chapter of the Oriler nf Eastern star of the State of Florida to Miami, the 29th district, comprising eleven chapiteruf the order in the Greater '.Miami area, are sponsoring a bridge at the Main Shrine Temple at Biscayne blvd. and l -it H st. tomorrow, Saturday f-vciiing, August IS, beginning at 8 o'clock, to which the public is invited. Prizes will be awarded for high score and refreshments will be served. The Grand Chapter will meet in Miami in 1935 and comprises chapters from the entire state. Its annual sessions are sought for and usually bring a large number of visitors. The party is in charge of the worthy matrons and patrons of the local chapters. able than the PRESENT. We sincerely hope that our Jews and Jewesses of the Greater Miami area and of Florida will realize this fart, and that in their own interests and BECAUSE OF THEIR OWN WELFARE will sincerely and honestly present a NEW DEAL. Committee Named For Holidays Renovations of the Synagogue of the Miami Jewish Orthodox Congregation are nearly finished and will be completed this week. In • >f the High Holy Day seating arrangements is a committee consisting of Messrs. II. M. Drevich, Philip Berkowitz, Max Rappaport and Milton Wciiicr. Beginning next Sunday the committee will be on hand to rent seats for the holidays. All those who have purchased memorial seats are urged to come early so that they may rent the seats bearing these memorial plates, as they will be given the preference. Rabbi Julius Washer will conduct the services and preach the sermons with Cantor Rabbi Alex. S. Wiescl chanting the traditional High Holy day melodies. RADIO SYNAGOG Rabbi S. M. Machtei, founder and director of the Radio Synagog, will preach over station WIOD at nine o'clock on Sunday morning on | "A God of Vengeance, or Retribution?" In addition to the sermon there will be prayers, scripture reading and a question box.



PAGE 1

Page Four THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN f Edited by RABBI S. If. MACHTEI Founder and Dlnetor, Kadio Srnaxotf of America SUNDAY MORNINGS WIOD, MIAMI, FLORIDA Vol.IV. SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 1934 No. 33. "Chronic Fault-Finders" Scripture Reading, Psalm XXXIV, Verses 12-15, Inclusive A number of the Radio SynagOg has sent me an interesting letter in which hi explains his allegiance to our services and gives his reasons for considering the presentation on this program a truly religious and spiritual one as distinguished from the stereotyped religious sermons with their condemnation of all whom the particular church may consider "sinners." Our correspondent asks the question, "Who can tell what constitutes sin and who rightly belongs in the class of sinners'"' He has termed the religiously-minded busybodiea "chronic fault-finders." In the letter I found enclosed the following poem by Hairy Larky n." WHO CAN TELL? How do we know what hearts have vilest sin! How do we know'.' Many like sepulchres are foul within. Whose outward garb is spotless as snow, And many may be pure we think not so. How near to God the souls of such have been What mercy secret penitence may win! How do we know? ( How can we tell who have ginned more than we! How can we tell? We think our brother walked guiltily. Judging him in self-righteousness! Ah, well, Perhaps had we been driven through the hell Of his temptations, we might be Less upright in our daily %alk than he— How can we tell? Dare we condemn the ills that others do? Dare we condemn? Their strength is small, their trials are not few. The tide of wrong is difficult to stem. And if to us more clearly than to them Is given knowledge of the good and true. More do they need oar help and pity, too! Dare we condemn? God help us all and lead us day by day! valu-. but. I doubt if it %  the effect desired by he a The rabbis of old taught "correel yourself, then you ma ycorr Other.." Another Jew addressed a mob of sel,-nghteouone and -id, "He that is without sin among you, let h.m tint cas a .torn It is remarkable how many pure and sinless being. !" There is so much cas ing of stones, so much fault-fmdmg. such profu. eritlcism. If you would increase your happiness and prolong your life, forget your neighbor's faults. Forget all the slander you have heard Forget the temptations. Forget the fault-finding, and give a little thought to the cause winch provoked it. Forget the pcculiar^cs o your triends, and only remember the good points which make you fond of them. Forget all personal quarrels or histories you may has e heard by accident, and which, if repeated, would seem a thousand times worse than they are. Bio: out as far as possible all the disagreeable of life; they will come, but will only grow larger when you remember them, and the constant thought of the acts of meanness, or, worse still, malice, will only tend to make you more familiar with them. Obliterate everything disagreeable from yesterday. Start out with a clean sheet today, and write upon it for sweet memory I sake only those things which are lovely and lovable. Some go through life's garden looking for weeds and thorns; others are always in search of blossoms and flowers. YOU are certain to find whichever you seek. The weeds will never be entirely uprooted by you. New ones will grow. In your haste and your ignorance you may uproot the stem of a sweet flower which has not revealed it-ell in full bloom. If you want to beautify the garden of life, cultivate new flowers, plant new ones, fill the garden with the productive that it may completely hide from view all weed.and barren spots. It must be .hat God has some plan for weeds, else they would not be. They may be misdirected good intentions. You add nothing to the fullness of life with your fault-finding. You accomplish only this, that your discordant tone disturbs the harmony of life. Look for the good in man, bring out the best in him. Let that be your contribution to your little circleof friends and to the sum t >tal of life. Friday, August 1 ,. \