The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00246

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
^Jewish floridlam
Vol. 6. No. 44
Jewish News
Around The
World
FLORIDA'S ONLY JKWISH WEEKLY
MIAMI. FLORIDA. FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 10. 1933
Boasts Nazis Inspired Arab Riot-
in Palestine
Berlin. Confirming previously
expressed suspicions in Jewish cir-
cles, Herr Shafman. -Nazi leader,
told a Hitlerite election meeting
here, that the Arab rlota ir Pales-
tini .ire the direct result of Nazi
propaganda among the Palestine
Arabs, The Nazi speaker said that
Miller's influence i.s no', limited to
Germany but that it extends to
lands where it intends to
stimulate national consciousness
and this Is accomplished through
an event as the riots in
Palestine." The Palestine riots are
being extensively utilized by the
Nazi press in their elec'ion cam-
paign and they are sensationally
featured as an "Arab revolution
against the Jews."
Miami Merchant
Dies Suddenly
Jack Solen, a resident of Miami
lor the past eight years, and a
member oi (he Royal Palm Gro-
cery Co., died early Thursday
morning as a result oi several
month's Illness, He leaves surviving
him, his bride of a year. Evelyn, his
mother. Mrs. Wm. Solen, two broth-
ers. Morris and Abner. three sis-
ters, Mrs. Rose Fine, Mrs. Leah
Morris, and Miss Beatrice Solen.
The funeral services will be con-
ducted this afternoon at 2 p. in.
from the Ahern Funeral Home and
interment will be in the city Ceme-
tery.

Announcements!
Demands Investigation of Nazi
Propaganda by German
Students Here
New York.Dr. Franz Boas, not-
ed anthropologist and professor at
Columbia University, ha< colled on
Ri presentative Samuel Dickstein to
investigate the activities oi German
exchange students in American
universities to reveal whether they
are engaged in Nazi propaganda.
In a letter to Mr. Dickstein, Dr.
Boas quoted an official order of
i lie Supreme Nazi Council Instruct-
II German students in foreign
countries to spread Nazi propagan-
The order cited by Dr. Boas
as follows:
"The Voelkischer Beobachter, No.
231, North German edition, Satur-
day, August 19, 1933, page 5,
imn 6.
Official announcement ot the
supreme command of the Nazi
Party.
The chief of the National So-
cialist German Student Association
issued the following detiee:
All members of the National
Socialist German Students Associa-
tion who during the cominfs win-
emester, 1933-34. will ;tudv at
a foreign university muel Immedi-
eommunicate with Dr. Von
Berlin-Steglitz, Hohenzollers
Strass 6. As soon as they have ar-
rived at the foreign university they
must immediately send their for-
addreas to the he-H of the
foreign office of the National So-
cialist German Students Associa-
tion. The purpose of this measure
is to enable these German student-
' inform their foreign fellow stu-
dents about German conditions and
to instruct them in spreading in-
formation. All members 0.' the Na-
tional Socialist German Students
Association who are alrc-dy abroad
have to write in their addresses for
'he same purpose.
With Hell Hitler.
Dr. Staebel."
Rabbi's Night
To Be Observed
On Wednesday night. November
16th, the Y. M. H. A. will honor all
local Rabbis when Rabbi's Nigh!
will be observed. Rabbi Dr. Jacob
H. Kaplan of Temple Israel. Rabbi
Max Shapiro of Beth David. Rabbi
David I. Rosenbloom of Beth Ja-
cob. Rabbi Julias Washer of the
Miami Jewish Orthodox Congrega-
tion, and Rabbi S. M. Machtei of
the Radio Synagog, have been in-
vited to attend and deliver brief
addresses. Several musical numbers
will be presented on the program
and refreshments will be served
during the evening. The public i
urged to attend.
CONGREGATION BKTII JACOB
(Orthadra)
111 Wi.hinglon Avt.. Miami II.;,. h
DAVID I. RO8ENBLOOM, Rabbi.
The usual early services begin at
5:30 followed by the late Friday
night services at 8 p. m. when the
Rabbi will preach a sermon in ob-
servance of Armistice Day on "War
or Peace. Which?" The chanting
and congregational singing will be
under the direction of Cantor Boris
Schlachman of the Congregation.
Saturday morning services begin at
8:30 a. m. when the Rabbi will
preach a sermon in Yiddish on the
portion of the week. Talmud Torah
meets daily at 3 p. m. and the Sun-
day school every Sunday at 10 a. m.
Friendly Inn
To Begin Work
The annual meeting of the He-
brew Friendly Inn was held at
Beth David Talmud Torah Hall
last Tuesday evening and followinu
a number of addresses by promi-
nent citizens and communal work-
ers of the district, and the reading
of reports of past activities election
were held. The officers elected were
Baron de Hirsch Meyer, president:
Jacob Becker. 1st vice-president:
Emanuel Gordon. 2nd vice-presi-
dent; A. Rappaport, treasurer;
Boris Schlachman. secretary. Plans
provide for the opening of the home
immediately to take care of the
large number of transient cases
which are coming to the attention
of the authorities daily.
A complete list of the Board of
Directors will be published in our
next Issue,
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
1 < Mii-.-r ;it I, <
1.19 N. W. Third Avtnur
MAX SHAPIRO. Rabbi
The usual early services begin at
5:30 followed by the late services
at 8:15 when in observance of
Armistice Day. Rabbi Shapiro will
preach on "The Life-Force Behind
Civilization. Today." Saturday
morning services begin at 8 a. m.
with the Junior Congregation ser-
vices at 10:30 when the Rabbi will
preach and the singing wll be un-
der the direction of Cantor Ka-
minsky. The Bar Mitzva Boy's
Club meets Sunday morning at 8
a. m.
Annual Meeting
Elects Officers
At the annual meetin.; ol the
members of the Miami Jewish Or-
thodox Congregation last Tuesday-
night reports for the past year were
presented by the president end the
various committees. The financial
report showed that all bills had been
paid to date and that a substan-
tial amount was on hand and in
bank. The election of officers which
was unanimous in every cas-> re-
sulted in the following bein:: chos-
en. President. Milton Welner; 1st
vice-president. H. M. Drevilh; 2nd
vice-president, Max Rappaport;
treasurer. Philip Berkowitz;
tary. Joseph Qreenberg, Executive
board consists of Max Mintzer,
Nathan Adelman. Harry Seitlin and
Max Kupferstein. Mr. Wm. Meoh-
lowltz was elected an honorary
member of the executive hoard in
recognition of faithful service.-, ren-
dered the congregation since Us in-
ception. A very Interesting addresi
was delivered by Rabbi Julius
Washer of the congregation.
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION
(Orthodox I
1545 S. W. Third Strt
JII.US WASHER. Rabbi
Y.M.H.A. Girls
Fill Vacancies
At the meeting of the Girls' Di-
vision of the Y. M. H. A. held Tues-
day night at the club house, the
following offices were elected to
fill vacancies: Charlotte Furman.
vice-president; Eeinice Schwartz,
recording secretary; Esther Crem-
er. corresponding iC8tary. The fol-
lowing committees weie elected
Rose Levin, entertainment; Elsie
Relsman. house chairman; Rose
Dubler. publicity.
Regular services begin at 5:30.
Saturday morning services begin at
9 followed by a sermon on the por-
tion of the week by the Rabbi
Mincha services begin at 5 p. m.
followed by the "Shalosh Saudah"
and Maariv. The Talmud Torah
meets daily at 3 p. m. and Sunday
school meets at the Y. M. H. A.
every Sunday at 10 a. m. Late Fri-
day night services will begin with-
in the next few weeks when the
complete program for the season
will be announced.
Jewish Artists
Feature Program
Senior Hadassah will hold a
regular meeting next Monday.
November 13th. beginning at 2 p.
m. in the Acacia Club in the Con-
gress Bldg. A program featuring
works of Jewish poets and musi-
cians will be presented under the
direction of Mrs. Jos. Williamson,
program chairman. Refreshments
will be served.
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI
< Reform I
1.17 N. B. Ninrlrmth Slrrtl
DR. JACOB II. KAPLAN. Rabbi
Very special services will be held |
in honor of Armistice Day. Friday !
evening at 8:15. Instead of the ser- |
mon. Dr. Kaplan will invite the !
entire congregation downstairs to
Kaplan Hall, where a delightful
program will be givenprepared,
written and conducted by Mrs. I.
M. Weinstein. president of the
Sisterhood of Temple Israel.
The public is most cordially in-
vited to attend both the services
and the program. The following if
an outline of the very artistic re-
view of the past and the hope for
the future:
First partTableau, "Retrospect."
Those taking part: Gold Star
Beth David
Sponsors Tea
The Junior Committee of Beth
David Sisterhood Is sponsoring a
member's tea Tuesday evening.
November 14th. at 5 p. m. at the
home of Mrs. A. E. Rosenthal, 1031
S. W. 3rd St.. when a musical pro-
gram will be presented. Refresh-
ments will be served and an en-
joyable evening Is promised. In
charge of arrangements i.s a com-
mittee headed by Mrs. Wm. Wein-
traub chairman, and Mesdames M.
J. Kopelowitz and Jack Simon.
Decorations are in charge of Mrs.
Jack Stone. The public is invited
to attend.
Mother, Mrs. D. J. Apte: Red Cross
Nurse. Mrs. Mitchell Wolfson; Sol-
dier, Myron S. Zeientz; Forgotten
Man. Stanton Field; Spirit of the
New Deal. Mrs. E. Max Goldstein.
SoloistMrs. Evelyn Raff; ac-
companist. Annie Laurie Lee.
Second part "Looking For-
ward." 'a little sermon on world
peace directed especially to Moth-
ers.)
The Mother. Mrs. Jules Pearl-
man; the grandmother. Mrs. Joseph
Williamson; the boy, Teddy Plant;
the girl, Joyce Pearlman.
Price Five Cents
Hadassah Will
Present Plav
Romance, laughh r, pathos, am-
bition, in an Intriguing nlot ar
the qualifications for "The whole
Town's Talking.' the play whirl.
Junior Hadassah 's presr.ilng next
'in. riay, Noven b i will, at the
lur-ple Theater, begi.i,i.< at v.
p. m.
The authors of the play, Anita
Loos and John Emerson. e:e both
well known in this locality, glnce
they spent much of their leisure
time in Palm Beach and often have
isited Miami. Mr. Emerson, him-
self, directed the p'ay when it tlral
pppeared In New Vork. and he
made a tremendous success of this
screamingly funny lace mm*.*!}.
The Whole Town's TalKing." in-
clude.' a vivid presentation of real
people such as one may me*: every-
day. They are entangled in a ludi-
crous web of circumstances which
creates very funny lines. This farce
comedy Is entirely plausible in its
almost burlesqued acting, which
places the town's dumbest book-
keeper in the whiles of a visiting
movie actress and her piize-fi-ht r
husband. The enti-.e case is as fol-
lows :
Joe Davis, "Chesler Binney";
Millicent Rubin. "Ethel Simmons;"
Charlie Tobin. "Mr. Simmons;" Lyl
Chlsling. "Mrs. Simmons;" Ruth
Davis. "Annie." Har.a Mack. "Let-
tie Lythe;" Bert Scroer.berg. "Rog-
er Shields;" Gladys Max. Sadir
Blum," Lillian Fried, "Sally Otis.'
Sophie Silver, "Lyla Wison;" Syl-
via Rayvis. "Mrs. Jackson:" Man-
nie Weinkle, "prise-fighter;" Leo
Chaikin, "taxi-driver."
"Ort" Worker
Arrives Here
Dr B. Aisurowitch who is on a
tour of the United States which
will cover fifty-five of the largest
cities in the United States and
Canada arrived in Miami last Wed-
nesday afternon in the interest of
the Ort campaign for constructive
relief work in Germany and in
countries where German refugees
are now located. While here he will
address a number of organizations
and will open a brief but Intensive
campaign for funds for the Ger-
man relief work.
Arbeiter Ring
To Hold Meeting
An important meeting of the
Workmen's Circle and the Woman's
Club of the organization will be
held on next Sunday evening.
November 12th. at the Workmen's
Circle Hall. 701 N. W. Fifth avc
A very interesting program will be
presented with Mr. M. Savage, or-
ganizer of the Workmen's Circle, of
Jacksonville. Fla., will be the main
speaker of the evening. Refresh-
ments will be served. There will be
no admission charge or collections
of any kinds made. The public Is
invited to attend.


Page Two
THE J EWISH FuOR I Dl AN
Fnday. November 10. 1933

SOCIETY
PLAYING AT THE
TIVOL1 HUM Rl
A very enjoyable evening was
spent at Che Tropical Jungle Gar-
dens la.st Wednesday night when
the first of the informal dances for
the benefit of Beth David Sister-
hood was held in the indoor ball-
room of the gardens. Dancing was
enjoyed and a program was pre-
sented in which the flor show pre-
dominated. Card.- were played by
some of the guests
At the last meeting of the Y M
H A Mr Nat Kupfer. chairman of
the finance committee, reported
that a new system of accounting
had been installed. The selection of
Mi Max Jacobskind as publicity
mar was announced Milt
: reported on the continual
growth of the physical culture class
that a medical examination
had disclosed decided improvement
m the condition of a number of
ittendants. Basketball practice
for members of the Y. M. H A. will
be held Sunday afternoon and all
interested are urged to attend.
Adults 20c
1 hildrrn lOr
!
Boi orri
p.m. Sunday
Evenings 20c
Sun.-Mon., Nov. 12-13
JAMES DUNN-
SALLY EILERS
Hold Me Tight"
______________* !
White Oak Leather
50c
15c
^
1
r
I lalt Soles
l IDIES III I 1 S
I ATLANTIC SHOE SHOP I
10 N I Niril Am. Opp Conn Hoitl""
IV1BER White Oak_
. : Will W< ai Longer. I
r and Time Will
151 st 2- sr
IOLD
WMLBm
Lw-':hPon yo* 40* 50"
On Wednesday evening. Novem-
ber 15th. Beth David Sisterhood is
sponsoring a card party at Nunal-
ly's Patio. 154 E. Flagler St.. begin-
ning at 8:15 p. m. for the benefit
of the Beth David Talmud Torah
chain fund. The public is invited
to attend.
W. E. iDoci Rutherford, well
known in boxing circles, has .Hist
Signed a lease on the Cinderella
Ball Room, and will conduct danc-
ing, boxing exhibitions and other
forms of entertainment.
Last week Mr. Rutherford was
ted unanimously as Matchmak-
: for the Disabled American Vi
erans, Summerall Chapter No. 10.
of which organization. Dr. J. A
Camara 1.- commander. Boxiim will
be conducted under the auspices of
: 1. abled American Veterans at
the Cinderella Ball Room.
day will officially open
Cinderella Ball Room -big
dancegood music Caesar La
Monica and his famous orchestra
... furnish the music. There will
two floor shows during the even-
and admission tickets will be
.rood for both shows Danny Shee-
and hi- dancers and singers
will appear, and present his casl
in "rackets"something new and
ntertaining .Lillian Jenkins, well
singer, will sing 'blue"
ARMISTICE DAY9 P M
mber 11th.
*- *
re'll be no lean years in Ben
ti -not it tlie youth-
reel 1 can help m
Right now IS*
areei I
(i and i.< aside his
make-up box and n< ';i"'i.
livelihood
:. from the hun-
of Hollywood's 01.'
luminarii ire now in
twilight 01 thi ll popularity.
poi -
: eck.ii
111 :' ntures.
pick) <: a poor one.
'1 the dull timi
nd a dry-
hmenl aln ad) car-
. nami pro] In
mlortable inter-
thriving
ility.
During thi filmlni ol Columbia
Pictures ultra-modern drama
Announcing the opening of
HOI GH'!
FOR
VSTKM
II AIR
GROWING
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15
XT

Rossi's Barber Shop
2224-26 Collins AvenueCor. 23rd Street
Near Rone] I'laza
PHONE 5-1626 FOR APPOINTMENTS
Ben Alexander in
"What Price Innocence?"
What Price Innocence?' which
will be at the Tivoli Theatre Sun-
day and Monday, the young act in-
kept constantly in touch with his
business Interest.- Wlllard Mack.
author and featured player in the
production, was amazed at the
twenty-two-year-old player's know-
ledge of business affairs,
The famous starring team of
James Dunn and Sally Eilers will
be seen in their fifth picture to-
gether, "Hold Me Tight.'' which
comes to the 7th Avenue Theatre
Sunday and Monday.
There are lew starring combina-
tions on the screen with histories
a.- interesting as those ol these two
young player-. Ever since "Bad
Girl'' startled cinema-goers with
wo characterizations a.- natural
and effective as any the screen had
ted to date. Fox has con-
tinued the combination successful-
ly. "DaM. Team." "Over the Hill."
"Sailoi and now "Ho I
Tight" entitle the hyphl
: 11 mn-Eili i t Imic Hail of Fame
Known familiarly as Jimmy,
Dunn had his humble beginnim
a- did Sally, m New York City
where both attended the ptiblii
schools. Both worked as exl
big break" and
.'.ere embi -1' business pel -
entering on their act -
.: ai i ers,
Paul H Mark-, prominent local
lett for Washington, D.
C this week in a business trip and |
will return to the city in about ten
days

Mi.-.- Beady Goldenblank is chair-
ind businr manager of the
play, "The Whole Town's Talk:'.-.
to be given by the Junior Hadas! ill
i !. November h at thi Tempi
Theater. Mis Pauline Lasky Is
publicity chairman, assist! .: by Mis
Lyl Chlsllng. other.- in charge in-
clude Miss Hana Mack souvenir
journal, assisted by Mrs, Ann
Itzi i Miss Sylvia R iyi I
Ml <'hi In Mis !.' Sowers
ticket.-, assisted by M\m Betty
Greenberg: Mrs William Flmari
Dr. and Mrs. Georgl I I
returned to 'heir home at
2292 S. W. Sixteen!!, ti ai e aftei
the Middle Wi I
The-, attended ti e Century ol Pro-
exposition in Chii

An event of th week-end was the
open house and dance vm by the
Phi Ep.siion Pi fraternity ol he
University of Mian-; Sat"ida.
home in Granada boulevard.
More than 400 jnlverslt.' students
?nd friends of the fraternitj were
in attendance. Decoration, were
carried out in the fraternity colors
and refreshments wet* wved at
midnight
Fi'iternity members Ir.c'ude Mel-
vln Cohen, superior; Et'gere Lind-
sey. Jack Daly. Lawrence Lefko-
witz. George Relchgott, Stanley
Phillips and Lester Wa'der. Pledges
are Irvine Lipman. Stanley Ro.-e.
Edwin Goldfarb. Henry Schwartz,
Edwin Levinthal. Henna.' POX, Joel
Ehrens and Alfred BUioM.
A most enjoyaole program was
presented at the meetina o! Junior
Hadassah Mondaj evening at the
Ponce de Leon Hotel.
Mrs Joseph Williamson gave a
review of "Storm Bea( n" bv Vir-
I u.ia Hirsh. aivl Mrs. Moses Kiie-
ger, uuest sp 'he-. Bpoke on her
experiences and contacts whil
was in Palestm i some time ago
Miss Beady O ildenblank, cultural
chairman, and M< s Lena Welnkle,
membership chairman, both gave
outlines of their program! lor th(
coming year
Arrangements are now complete
tor "The whole town's Talking."
th< play by Anita Loos and John
Emerson which Junior Hadassah is
pn '.r Tuesdav, N ivi mber 11'h,
at S p. m. at the Temple Theater.
Girls who will ushl r include Miss
Reuuie Goldstein. Mis- Paul] ''
Lasky. Miss Dorothy Roth. Mis-
Dorothy Brill. Miss Retta Mersen.
Mis- Bubbles Robinson, and Miss
Rose Cromer.
Plans are bein : inide lor the an-
nual Turkey Trot which will be
given November !3 h a: the Casa
Loma Hotel in Coral Gables linden
hte directorship it Ml Rose Sow-
ers and Miss Goldstein.
More than one hundred (uests
attended thi' Russian supper spon-
sored last Sunday night by the
Auxiliary ot the Miami Jew-
ish Orthodox O n n ation a- it.-
Supper was sci vci
:.i i\ic and card
joyed afterwards by a large n im-
Qlllll a
sum wa which will
!) di voti <1 to the Talmud
k ni i in congregation.
Mrs. All). : I ROSI llthul Will i)i
at the ti
committee of the B*th David SIs-
30 > m. Tin sdaj
No\ 14 at her home, 1021 S, W
_'3rd .
Junior Council or Jewish Women
met las) Monday In the Spanish
room of the Ponci 'ii Leon hotel.
At the card party given last Sun
day by thi council in connection
with the Young Men Hebrew as-
iation. a large number ol guests
payed bridge and Jther r.unes In
uhargi .a arrangements were Mr
and Mrs. Murray Kellman, Mlsi
Claire Hode.s. Mis, I. .. Ki.sanoll
and Miss Mary Bandell
last Monday in Kaplan hall. a
tableau and play, written and di-
rected by Mrs. I. M. Welnsteln, the
president, was presented. Mrs. Hen-
ry D. Williams ass.-ied in the di-
recting of the play which is entitl-
ed "Looking Forward." Cast Q(
characters included Mrs. Jules
Pearlman. Joyce Pearlman. Mr-
Joseph Williamson and Cuddy
Plant.
In the tableau those rppearlnt
were Mrs. Day J.Apte. Mrs. Mit-
chell Wolfson. Mrs. Evelyn Raff
and Mrs. E. Max Goldstein. Mrs
Mamie Laurie Lee played the musi-
cal accompanimen'. \ meeting cf
the executive board took place a,
1:30 o'clock, precedin; the Bi
meeting.
RADIO SYNAGOG
Rabbi S. M. Machtei. founder and
director of the Radio Synagog. will
preach over WTOD at ten o'clock
on Sunday morning on "Have \\v
Learned The Lesson of The Day0
The sermon will be dedicated to
Armistice Day. In addition to the
sermon there will be pi
hymns, music, scripture reading
and a question box.
For the Best in Fish
FRESH DAILY
BUY *T
EAST COAST
FISH MARKET
Incorporated
360 W. FLAGLER ST.
(At the Bridge
"If It Swims We Have It"
keeping:
ARE WE
t .in 11 with those w hi? trust u-. arc
w c li\ mg up in our obligations it
wc risk their future happines' :'\
ignoring the problems tli.u would
arise for them it. some day. wc
did //"/ come home?
I iic insurance offers the safe
and certain answer. There i
substitute.
A Southern Icalth c\: I ifc In-
surance I'olisv on each one is ne-
cessary ti> protect the others from
the privation and expense caused
by the last illness and death.
A few pennies each weels i
total cost.
Southern Life <\
Health Insurancf
Company
a program on pea-- and the ar- -.- ..
1 S. ( ,ook, AI./;;.;.
mistlce was presented ai ih< mel- n i!,,,ilv Board ,.M.... phont ***}*
ing of Sisterhood ol Ten.ple Israel RmzHmmmU^miS^^
We offer a friendly understanding that extends far beyond a mere
satisfaction.
PRIVATE AMBULANCE SERVICE
DAY AND NIGHT
Phone 2-1314
John W. Burke Funeral Home
No Extra Charge to Drive to Local Towns
Office: 29 N. W. Third AvenuePhone 2-3535
Funeral Parlors1512 W. Flagler St.Phone 2-1314
JOHN W. BURKE.
Funeral Advisor-Director


Friday, November 10, 1933
THE JEWISH FLORIDI AN
Page Three
THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
PUBLISHED EVKRY FRIDAY
b> the
WISH FI.ORIDIAN PUBLISHING CO.
Jr' P, O. Ilu 297.1
Miami, Florida I'hone 2-1183
KDITORIAL OFFICES:
6;l s. W. 16th Avenue I'hone 2-1183
j. LOUIS SIIOCIIET. Editor
HUH K. SIIOCIIET. Circulation Manager
CANTOR BORIS SCHLACHMAN,
Field Representative
i u MCOnd claU matter July 4.
thfl Poat of tiff itt Miami. Florida.
r|,.. Ail of March '1. 1879.
WEST PALM BEACH
ST. PETERSBURG
MRS. MAE BENJAMIN.
Representative
ORLANDO
SYLVIA BERMAN
Representative
TAMPA, FLA.:
MRS. M. H. KISLER
Representative
SUBSCRIPTION
Siv Month*.......II.M
line Year
J2.00
Vol. 6 No. 44
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1933
"Three Spokesmen
For Tolerance"
Under this caption the Louis-
ville "Courier Journal" discusses
editorially the subject of Intoler-
ance In this country. This edi-
torial we reprint and we wish thai
ii could be broadcasted to every
in America. We are threat-
ened al this time with another ol
mil bursts ol racial and re-
ligious intolerance which come to
the surface ever so often. Some-
times these arc encouraged as a re-
sult of a situation like Hu lerisni:
other times they are brought about
by some local condition. Again,
Mime fanatic like the leader ol the
Silver Shirts can find enough gul-
libles in this country of the so-
called infantile Bucker-class who.
delighting in mystery and mum-
mery, will join an organisation with
words, high signs and robes
Thousands joined the Klan not so
much because of any deep rooted
antagonism to other religious or
racial groups but because they lik-
ed the idea of wearing masks and
lobes and using high sounding
names like Imperial Wizard. Kleag-
d other such Big Bad Wolf
titles as children and Ignoramuses
ol all ages and sizes find interest
in.
Al this time, we believe that sen-
timents such as expressed In the
following editorial from the Louis-
ville "Courier Journal" need em-
zing. We must remember that
with conditions as they are. agi-
are given a fertile field to
-"'v the seeds of discord among all
groups. That we must be on the
lookout for and guard against. The
space In this column, we know,
' be devoted to anything more
worthwhile than these views of the
'if the South:
"Does America need instruction
Mid counsel in the matter of toler-
ance? Many Americans might be In-
clined to give a hasty negative in
Answer to such a question for this
country has been considered the
melting pot of races, the land of
the free for people of all religious
beliefs. The first pilgrims who
landed at Plymouth Rock estab-
lished that tradition, and to some
I would seem that the ideal of
those early days has never been ob-
'"terated in the consciousness of
America.
"There is an announcement in
| the press, however, that a group of '
i three clergymen will soon begin a
tour of the Nation, .speaking to '
audiences in thirty-nine cities, of
which Louisville will be one. on the
virtue ol tolerance. That virtue,
| fortunately, Is not the peculiar pos-
set Ion of any creed or sect, though
II has often bee.; extolled as a
fudamental attribute of the Chris-
tian faith. During the tolerance
tour, representatives of three diver-
gent faiths, a Presbyterian minis-
ter, a Catholic priest, and a Jew-
ish rabbi, will attempt to show
'heir audiences how vital a part
this virtue of tolerance plays in the
realization of all creeds.
"These talks might be more tlt-
glven in Germany, some
Americans may say. Certainly
there is a need for them there, but
lhere Is need In this country as
well. In a Nation that thinks of re-
ligious persecution as a disgraceful
attribute ol medieval culture, there
are daily evidences ol bigotry and
intolerance that are medieval in
their conception, it not in their
manner ol demonstration. During
the 1920s, this land ol the free
.saw a movement sweep across the
country like a prairie lire, a move-
ment based on intolerance and deal-
ing m persecution. The Ku Klux
Klan has been destroyed as an or-
ganization since thai time, and its
Grand ECleagle languishes In dis-
grace behind prison bars, but hun-
dreds of thousands of people who
joined the Klan are still a part of
the American public, and n is a
certainty thai most ol them have
iltered their opinion- The
renewed smoldering ol the bonfire
In 1928, durum Al Smith'.- cam-
paign, prove.-, thai point.
Louisville has Its evidences ol
Intolerance, like the other thirty-
eight cities on the Itinerary, and
ii is a good thing thai the tour
will swing this way. The Intolerance
thai exist.- m American cities,
however, Is nothing as compared to
the variety that grows like a lush
weed in the country districts of the
Nation, particularly in the remoter
remons ol the South and the Mid-
dle West. It would be an Inti
Ii experiment to send the threi
speakers to some ol these Outlay-
tlons. and to let them speak
in barn.- and revival tents and from
the platforms of small town opera
houses. Some Of their listen
'would be surprised to find that thi
i iiohc and the Jew were human
beings .iust like the Presbyterians
meetings they are simply trying to
escape the pitfall into which the
German Jews fell. The right of free
speech is precious but it should not
be prostituted to agitation for
racial and religious hatred. We be-
lieve that the propaganda of the
Nazis is no better than espionage
and espionage is a crime. There is
no disposition to deny Nazis the
privilege of voicing political and
economic beliefs but neither Nazis
nor anyone else, particularly aliens,
have the right to come here and
violate in principle, il not in fact,
and to urge others to do likewise
every constitutional guarantee of
religious and racial tolerance
The Refugee High
Commissioner
Nazis and Tree
Speech
Jewish leaders and the Jewish
press in this country have long
been aware of Nazi propaganda in
the United States but it required
the great publicity resulting from
an official ban on a Nazi demon-
stration In New York to convince
the general public of the existence
of such propaganda. By prohibit-
ing the Nazi meeting in New-
York Mayor O'Brien not only pre-
vented the Nazis from further
spreading their poisonous creed but
he did a valuable service in focus-
ing 'he attention of the entire
country on what has been going on.
The hearing which Mayor O'Brien
I held before deciding to bar the
Nazi meeting was featured by the
appearance of two Jews who plead-
ed, in the name of free speech and
the right of free assembly, that the
Nazis be allowed to stage their
meeting. Such an attitude is in-
comprehensible and almost inde-
fensible. Jews never advocate sup-
pression of free speech or free press
or the right of free assembly. But
in urging the prohibition of Nazi
The appointment by the Council
oi the League of Nations of James
O. MacDonald, chairman of the
Foreign Policy Association, as high
commissioner for German refugees
Is the flrsl concrete step on the
part ol the world powers to afford
a measure ol relief to the victims
Ol the Nazi regime. The fact that
the United States has consented to
name an official representative to
overnlng board to which the
high commissioner will be respon-
sible makes this action even more
important. How Mr. MacDonald
will deal with the problem of the
es Is not yel known, but all
his wide experience, tad and pa-
tience will be needed to handle this
emergency. As an American he is
m .an ideal position to do a splen-
did job. The governing board, to
which he will report, is to consist
of representatives of fifteen na-
tions and a number of Jewish
agencies. The funds with which his
wink is to be financed are expect-
ed to come in large measure from
Jew- particularly American Jew.-
There can be no quarrel with such
an arrangement except that it Is
not improbable that if the relief
.m of the high commissioner
Is entirely subsidized by Jews, it
may lose some of its practical value
We believe that the powers repre-
sented on the governing board
should contribute something, even
a small sum. if only to show that
their interest in the work of the
high commissioner is not academic
When a nation has a financial
stake In an enterprise, small as it
may be. it is more likely to be
closely informed as to what Is be-
ing done with its funds. Such an
arangement. too. would make it
impossible for the Hitler govern-
ment to impair the functioning of
the high commissioner on the al-
leged ground that he is in the pay
of Jews.
From a wedding no'i. > in the
Topeka Capital: "The bride has
been loved by everyone in the com-
munity."
THE
France is nettled by swarms of
spies carrying cameras near her
new torts, as it cuts into sales of
souvenir postcards of the same.
A brain truster informs as that
this Is an era of "robust collectiv-
ism," which may explain Mae West
and her galaxy of jewels.
Railway interests complain that
500.000 hoboes patronize their
freights. With stouter brake rods,
the buses might easily swing some
of this trade.
Simplicity is the keynote: A talk-
ing point for a current motor car
is that three of last year's talking
points have been left off the new-
model.
Where did you learn those
words?"
Shakespeare uses them."
"Well, don't play with him."
Here's a picture of my husband
standing In front of a saloon."
"That's funny. I don't see your
husband."
iExamines the picture) "Why the
big bum went In there again."
Reb Zalmen was the richest bin
also the stingiest man of Suwalk.
His only heir was his nephew, who
would inherit the total fortune
when the rich man died.
One day a friend of the family
said to the old man, "I hear your
nephew Is going to marry. You
ought to do something to make him
happy."
"I will." said Reb Zalmen. with
a sardonic smile, "I'll pretend that
I am dangerously ill."
A Jewish young man of Khelin
which is a city of wiseacres
on a train bound i'or another town
where he was to be married the
same evening. On the road the
train stopped because of englm
trouble and the groom was infoiru-
ed that he could no: reach his
destination before the following
morning. The young man therefore
dispatched >h' following wire to
the bride:
"Very sorry cannot arrive on
scheduled time for the rhuppah.
Please do nol ;o on with the ceie-
mony before my arrival."
On pinions black the night appealed
Over the sombre eitv
I wept. and. fancying I feared
The dark, the heavens took pity.
For light they :nade a swift decree:
The Moon displayed her crescent.
a meteor flashed Impetuously,
The stars were acquiescent
But still I weptin secret as
I shunned the beams they
flaunted;
How could these kind ones know it
was
Your love's light that I wanted?
A strong case is being made out
for reopening the Chicago fair next
spring, in case of any progress
turning up to celebrate.
Ii seems that there were a COUQle
ol Irishmenno. pardon, a couple
of Jews, a son and hi.; father. "For
why. Patrick." said the father, "do
you always brings home a leport
card with bad marks?" 'Don't you
know. TBtte," replied Hans, with a
twinkle in his eye, 'the teachers
an' anti-Semites?" "Then what can
we do about it. Ivan11" asked the
father, just to keep the converse
tlon going. "There's only one thing
I can think of," said little Olaf.
"and thai is to be baptized, and
then the teacher.- won't punish me
for being a Jew." "All right Gui-
seppe," said the father, "anything
for good marks in school."
No sooner said than done. Fran-
cois was forthwith baptized, taken
into the church, announced to his
teacher that he was going to Sun-
day school regularly, and proceed-
ed to come home the next month
with even worse marl: than before.
"So, Dimitri; ismack!) Low
marks you are getting! (smack!'
And why aren't you getting better
marks, hah?"
"Don't you know. Tattc?" replied
Pedro, "what do you expect of a
goylsh kop?"
A trapeze artist, performnig in a
circus in Oklahoma, saw a giii
among the spectators, instantly fell
in love with her. hurried to her
through the crowd after the show,
proposed, was accepted, and that
night made her his wife, the daie-
devil!
In some states aenallsts are re-
quired by law to confine themselves
to somersaulting through space
They can't expose them.iieves reck-
lessly to marriage. But in Okla-
homa it is just anything to make
people shudder.
What Perfume Best
Lures" Men?
Magazine Advt.
Well, a good many have been
trapped by the perfume of a steak
being broiled.
A Chicago woman flatly refuses
to accept a release from jail be-
cause she has nothing to wear, and
the season has waned for fan
dancing.
I thought I was forgetting you
The boyish way you used to smile.
The thoughtful things you used to
do
In just your special sort of style
But when I meet somebody new,
And they're not ta'.' and slim
and strong,
With laughing eyes of deepest blue.
I know that I'm completely
wrong.
It's foolishness to feel this way,
When ev'rything is past repair,
Yet be that silly as it may,
I know for sure I'M always care
It's about time the President is-
sued a proclamation that a nation
half patriot and half chiseler can
not endure.
A horse called Quorum won a
race at Jamaica the other day. This
will come as a surprise to most
race followers. They hadn't suppos-
ed that enough horses ran at. those
New York tracks to get a quorum
How about a code limiting the
labor of those football cheer lead-
ers?
"What's the matter?"
"Why, I wrote a long (lowing ar-
ticle on milk and the editor con-
densed it."
deserves.
It is a wise fool who can keep his
lack of wisdom to himself.
Love that laughs at locksmiths
never giggles at the plumber.
Poor relations wonder if the rich
one really has a poor memory.
Some men are like silver-plated
knives; they look bright, but are
dull.
Some of our girls do their sleigh-
ing in January and their slaying in
June.
A girl has a young man twisted
around her finger when he circles
it with an engagement ring.


Page Four
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Friday. November 10, 1933


: : : : : : : : : : *+ *:- '' '' '' *' '' *
t
*
*
*
2\atou dgnagng Stslbtitt
Edited by RABBI S. M. MACHTEI i-I
Founder and Director. Radio Byntgog of Amtrlca *;*
Sunday Mornings WIOD, Miami, Flomda I
So. 8 |
1933
vou stand in awe at sundown to view the supreme work of art of
of the rising .suna master-piece by
the
the
i'illB'l

BOGGS
'
* Vol. III. SUNDAY. NOVEMBER
T;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;. : : : : : : : : : : : : : > ? > ?
"The Jew,A Symbol of Individualism"
Scripture Reading, Deuteronomy, Chapter XIV, venae l and 2.
Lei us, for the moment, put aside the reference to being "above all the
ulty translation ol the Original Hebrew, -an objectionabli
phrase and one that Irritates the non-Jew and let us concern ourslevea
with the -peculiar" people. I believe that those who seek the cause
of much oi the hatred of the Jew will find it In the peculiarity to which
U Deuteronomist refers, a natural aversion on the part of the mass to
tng thai stands off apart and maintains Its own Individualism,
unyielding and unconforming, distinctive.
a local editorial writer, Truman T. Felt, who displays an under-
standing of and an Insight into the working of the human mind In both
it., normal and abnormal psychology, recently wrote an article from
which I quote. The writer, in discussing the fears oi the average person
which bind him to a middle path in life, says. "We can never be quite
sure of man.- superiority In the animal world so long as we judge other
species or genera by the standards ol man. but. if there Is one among
them thai lias broken the spell of Middles magic attraction, be it fish
or fowl, we hazard thai it will outdistance man In the course toward
farthest Objectives." Further on. he writes. "In every phase of life.
the same blind loyalty to the mean and the horror of extremes may be
found." In .science. Mr. Felt claims, an equal horror of extreme- exists.
He write.-. "... we know too well the clannish schools of thought among
them ithe scientists) and the persecution of those who first challenge
accepted law.-" But the greatest challenge to the cult of "Middle-Wor-
shippers, as he calls them, we find In the words of the author. "We
seek the mediocre through fear of extremesfear that we may mitsake
the worst for the best Wi cannot distinguish them readily, except as
something quite different from that to which we are accustomed, and it
ii a rare Individual Who is willing to be wholly wrong many times mere-
ly to b, found absolutely right once when his more sluggish fellows,
h up with him. He knows too well that he will be considered wrong
by the majority, whether he is or not. so long as he is different and that
lie probably will be denied many creature comforts by the all powerful
cult of the not-too-fat-and-not-too-thin for the rest of his natural life."
In this though! I find the germ for Jew-baiting that has existed in
all times. The mass is suspicious of one who will not assimilate, one who
will not conform to the accepted views, but. who tenaciously holds to his
OWn. The Jew i.- indeed a peculiar people. He would long sine- havi
ceased to be had he been satisfied with mediocrity and had he adopted
tin manners of the mass about him. It takes courage to die.-- differently
than the mode prescribes. It require.- strength of character for an ab- i
nomallj large man to walk the streets to be -tared at and to be pointed
out ak. It is indicative of backbone" for the midget to mingle I
with the average human being to be the recipient ol glances full of o :.-
tempt and ridicule. It also Is evidence of poor breeding in the ma.-.- for
them to single out individuals ol dress and manner, physique and thought.
as objei I :' and creatures to be shunned.
I recall er ot one man for wealth. Win n ...-kid why he so
atly wanted wealth, he replied. "That I might wear my old and com-
fortable clothes without fear ot being called poor.' but rather considered
a rich eccentrl But. Why should anyone fear to dress in comfort?
What rlghl lie mass to object to the individualism of any person or
uroup? Where would civilization be today were it not for the fearless
pathfinders who dared to venture in untrodden paths?
The Jew is peculiar. He is different. He is uncompromising. Yes. he
holds to the teachings of righteousness and justice He .-till worships the
Ji hovah who was good enough for the Christian world to adopt. He
studies the ancient lore which inspired Jesus and which the Christ
pa.-sed on to his disciples and to succeeding generations. Those teachings
must be beneficent to have merited such wide adoption. The Jew is pe-
culiar and canonical because he still prays in the languaee which Ji
used and in which he conversed with his disciples. I fail to see the
menace In such peculiarity. Let us reason it out.
Would mankind have been any better off. if. instead of holding to
the Faith of Abraham, the Israelites had assimilated the Ecyptian : ;
of idolatry and then would have passed them on through Christ? Would
civilization have advanced further if the Hebrews who entered Canaan
had adopted the worship of Baal and Moloch, and. then would have
passed those faiths on to the human race? How much happier would
man be today if. during the Babylonian exile, the Jews had succumbed
to the worship of Zoroaster and then, in turn, had civen a Christ to the
world who would ha\e preached the teachings of Zarathustra? Or. would
it have been better for the present seneration. if the Jews had not
battled the Hellenistic influences, and. having accepted the Greek Pan-
theon, had sent forth a Jesus to preach of Zeus and Venus, Apolli
Diana Instead of Jehovah and Moses. David and Isaiah?
What harm is there in be:
in- lar people as lone as the human weal is not menaced by the
ideas and practices? Will your esthetic taste be pleased to view all men
dressed in one uniform garb? Will ycur artistic eye be less jarred by the
vista of a scene of one uniform color? Do you suffer from altaphobia
and dread the sight of a mountain or a tall man? Must God remold the
earth to level hills and to fill in valleys that no peculiaritu i
Or. are you unaware that you enjoy individualism and that it i- the
peculiar and distinctive things that make your life interesting? You
applaud an actor for his individualism, his towerinc above medic
You enjoy the music of the accomplished artist because he is better than
the average. You stand enraptured before the painting of the master be-
cause he has not merely thrown colors together on canvass but because
he has portrayed something distinctive in his own inimitable style. And.
setting sun.or. at dawn.
Great Artist of the Universe.
Shake vourself of that fear of the extremes. Banish your dread oi m
the peculiar and the individualistic. Accept Life in its totality, and be p ^ ^^ Repairing
happy. ,. ,. ..
I am mindful of the fact that the theory of "rugged individualism ^
Is taboo at this period and that it Is frowned upon by those who call
themselves "better society." I have not spoken of Individualism In its
sense of egotism and in its anti-social practice of "I come first and the
devil take the rest of society." There is nothing in the teachings of the
Jew that recommends such an attitude. Where it is found in practice i
The Very Finest of Sole Leather
Immediate Attention in the (leane-t
and H' -i Shop in Miami
PrleM Kiirht Convenient Location
Wi Make Your Shoe" Look Like Ne

SEYBOLD ARCADE
t N. E. Flfrt Street
is denounced by the Jew as well as by his neighbors. What I do wish tol|
condemn Is the tear, the groundless fear of anything Jusl because it is
different, and for no other reason or cause.
The Jew has suffered and still suffers as a result of hi.- being a
"peculiar people." In B measure, through the Radio Synagoe services. I
lifted the veil that the Christian may become familiar with us and
Judge of our peculiarities. Our aims are akin to yours because you drink
from the same spring. Our objectives for the good of mankind are simi-
lar, if not identical, for was not your torch kindled from ours?
It ill behooves us to quarrel over forms, mere external manifestations.
Let us rather contribute our own distinctive effort to attain the great
and ultimate coal.a race of men who live in harmony and in love and
who merit the designation of having been created in the image of God.
our Common Father;in that we shall be happy to conform.

BIY AT
GROSSMAN'S
Choice Fruits and Vegetables
Stand No. 1.
Roosevelt Curb Market I
X. E. 2nd Ave. and 14th St. i
corner stand-
Son Bean Bread
and other \euetablc bread*
(;ooi> health baking
company, inc.
21(5 W. Klaitler St. Phone 2-8511
1401 Washington Avenue, M. B.
The "Good Health" Kind
Hotel And Restaurant Equipment
GEORGE I.. DIXOX COMPANY
"The Home Thai Senice limit"
lino N. E. 2nd Avenue

Phone 2-6:51
We Pay 5o Interest
The
Morris Plan
Company
Of Miami
VINCENT R. BRICE. Manager.
105 N. E. First Ave.,
MIAMI, FLA.
For Fresh
Sea Foods
stop AT
GAPT. TOM'S
FISH MART
OUR PRICES ARE THE LOWEST
Our lish are the freshest Caught by our own bo.its dailv
If it is Sea Food, we have it at its very best, and at attractively
low prices. Our method of handling and selling Sea Food Is in ob-
servance with all the sanitary rules and regulations.


Friday. November 10, 1933
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page Five
SOCIETY
The Girls' Division of the Y. M.
H A. is sponsoring an informal lea
lor the parents to be s>ven at the
club house. S. W 16th Ave. and
5th St.. Sunday. November 19,
from 3 o'clock to 5 o'clock. Re-
ireshments will be served and a
musical program provided. The
public is cordially invited to attend.

More than fifteen tables of bridge
were In play 'a51 Wednesday at the
home of Mrs. A. E. Rosenthal for
the benefit of the Infant Welfare
Fund "1 the Senior Hadassah. De-
Hclous refreshments were served
and prizes were awarded for high
to Mesdames A. S. Fried-
Harry Orlln. Louis Zeientz
and Victor Mell.

A meeting of the Executive Board
ol the Junior Council of Jewish
Women will be held at the home
i| Miss Sylvia Dreisen Wednesday
evening, November 15th. when im-
portant business will be transacted
and plans for the coming dance of
the organization will be discussed.

The Maccabees have organized a
hoys band. Rosary Picciolo, solo
cornet ist for the Caesar La-
Monica band, who was recommend-
ed by Caesar LaMonica. is leader
and principle instructor. This band
.Mil be a permanent Institution and
i ach member will have careful in-
. .unions on the instrument he
A tin(c-year program of instruc-
and training has been plan-
tnd Sir Knight Picciolo will
add additional instructors as the
enrollment increases and the ne-
slty demands.
II any of our readers nave a boy
or girl, musically inclined to play
n band or string Instrument, they
will have an opportunity for the
join this boy'.'- band under
high class, able directors
: tractors; and their daugh-
become a member of the or-
a, At the present tune the
meeting at one o'clock Sat-
irday afternoon; the Junior Macca-
'durt at two-thirty, and the
tra at three, at the Scottish
Hiii Temple. N. W. North River
Drive and 3rd steet. The hour of
'lie band meeting may be changed
lor the convenience of some of the
i should the demand arise
tor a change of hours.
This band will be the best tnown
band in Miami or the State of
Florida, as a picture of the band
and leaders will be carried in a
uie which has an estimate of
500.000 readers. Thus is a Macca-
bee magazine, and A. M. Coffin.
State Manager of The Maccabees.
Stated that lie would see that there
nice write up in this maga-
zine at least every three months.
Arrangements have been made
whereby the cost to the pupil and
member of this band or orchestra
; very small indeed, as The Macca-
Bre carrying a very large part
f the load. Only a limited number
Will be taken, so don't wait if you
want your child to take advantage
f this opportunity.
Plans for the installation of the
Ladies Auxiliary of the Jewish
Welfare Bureau to be held at Kap-
lan Hall Monday. November 20th.
will be announced in our next is-
sue. Mrs. Milton Weiner is chair-
man of the committee in charge of
arrangements.
New Market
Opens Thursday
know that she has returned to her
home from the Florida Sanitarium
where she has been confined for
the last two weeks.
e
Rev. and Mrs, B. Safer entertain-
ed recently with an open house in
honor of their son, Mr. Abraham
Safer, of Jacksonville and his
bride.
Mrs. B. J. Cohen was hostess at
a benefit bridge, sponsored by the
Ladies Auxiliary of the Congrega-
tion at her home last night.
The chicken chow mein supper,
sponsored by the Temple Sister-
hood of the Congregation Beth El,
which was held at Uie home of Mr.
and Mrs. Max Blattnor on Sunday
evening, was one of the biggest
successes of the season.
The Cut Rate Kosher Market
operated by Hyman Waldorf will
open for business at 237 N. W
Fifth street next Thursday. Novem-
ber 16th, with a scale of prices in
keeping with the economic condi-
tions of the day. Mr. Waldorf will terc.sted.
operate the business on the theory
that the Jewish people of the
Greater Miami area desire Kashei
meats at all times but want the
meats at prices in keeping with
present day conditions. In announc-
ing this policy, Mr. Waldorf said.
"I want to prove what I have al-
ways believed. I feel that If the
meats are priced right, the Jewish
people will buy Kosher meats, and
The Congregation Beth El will
conduct their Friday night services
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Solon
Klepper. A cordial invitation to at-
tend is extended to all who are in -
St. Petersburg
Notes
this Sunday evening, Nov. 12th,
with Mrs. M. Feldman and Mrs.
Abrahams as hostesses. Refresh-
ments will be served and a prize
given to each table.
*
Installation of officers of Con-
gregation Bnai Israel took place
Sunday evening. Rabbi A. S. Klein-
feld installed the officers: H. M.
Jacobs, president; J. Fuchs, vice-
president; H. Herman, treasurer,
and M. Benjamin, secretary; trus-
tees: Dave Rothblatt, chairman, A.
Sierkese. Ed Goldman, S. Fyvolent
and Frank Rabin. Rabbi Kleinfeld
gave a stirring address, and each
officer in turn expressed his plea-
sure in being able to serve the
Congregation. Sandwiches and re-
freshments were served during the
evening.
The social committee of Congre-
gation Bnai Israel, is giving a so-
cial and dance at the Congregation.
921 9th St. No., on Monday ece-
nlng, Nov. 20th.
*
The Judaic Council held their
regular meeting on Monday eve-
ning and plans are being made for
a Cake Sale.
The Young Maccabees had a
pretty Hallowe'en party which was
held at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Dave Rothblatt. 42nd St. So., with
Mrs. Rothblatt as hostess.

"Here's a picture of my husband
standing in front of a saloon."
"That's funny, I don't see your
husband."
Examines the picture' "Why the
big bum went in there again."
Royal Typewriters
New and Factor? Rebuilt
Portables, W9.S0 to M0.00
B. VV I If AC K I K. Local Dealer
210 N. K. 2nd St. Phone 2-011.S
Rabbi A. S. Kleinfeld's Armistice
sermon will be "Optimism and
Cheerfulness" for this Friday eve-
ning. Nov. 10th. 8 o'clock, at Con-
I propose to enable them to do this, j gregation Bnai Israel. 921 9th st, no.
without sacrificing quality or Kash-
Delaney & Beers
Kodak Kinixhinif and Enlarging
Commercial Work and llame Portrait.
50% Off on All Amateur Work
21J N. E. 4th St. Phone l-SIXft
FOR THE FINEST
IN
CHOICE LIVE POULTRY
HENS, FRYERS, PULLETS,
DICKS
FRESH FISH
And The Best
FLORIDA EGGS
Visit
Florida Poultry and
Egg Co. "
WHOLESALE and RKTAII.
1225-27 W. FLagler Street
| Our "Egg-O-Scope"
j Is at your disposal to prove the
quality of our eggs.
rus." "My place will be open for
Inspection to all Rabbis and all citi-
zens who desire to assure them-
selves that every rule of Kashrus :-
strictly observed." As an openm;
feature customers will be given one
pound of ground meat free with
every dollar order. Kishkes, lungs,
etc., which are favorites of the
Jewish people will be given free ol
: charge.
The Ladies Auxiliary and Aid
Society will hold their semi-month-
ly Card Party at the Congregation

Orlando, Fla.
Notes
TIVOLI
-hex (1:1.1 ntld !>;(ln P. M.
Sunday 20c till 6:30 P. M.
Sun.-Mon., Nov. 12-13
JEAN PARKER
WILLARD MACK
"WHAT PRICE
INNOCENCE?"
MACCABEES m

Mr and Mrs. Lon Wolly and
Mr. and Mrs. Abe Shapiro motored
lo Tallahassee Sunday.
Mrs, Belle Hoffman has returned
from St. Petersburg, where she has
been attending the Florida State
Nurses Convention. Mrs. Hoffman
acted as chairman of the Private
Duly Section and was re-elected to
hold this position for another year.
The Synagog of the Congrega-
tion Ohev Sholem. is undergoing
extensive alterations which will
make it one of the most outstand-
ing and attractive synagogs in this
section. New floors are being laid
in the vestry rooms and the entire
synagog is being dedecorated. The
vestry rooms are being made over
into a social room where dances
will be held. It is the purpose of
the members to make this social
room a social meeting place for the
Jewish people in this section of the
state. Mr. Louis Wolly. who is in
charge of the alterations, deserves
special credit for his untiring ef-
forts.

The many friends of Mrs. Perry
M. Lichtenstein will be glad to
I.. (Pop) GERSON
Buver of all kinds of scrap
metal. We sell auto parts,
machinery etc.
2141 X. W. SECOND AVENUE

Kevs Made While You Wait
R.L. (Bob) CARR
Safe. Gun and Lock Expert
ALL WORK GI'ARANTEEI)
211 N. E. 13th St. Phone 2-071K
NICELEY
Funeral I Ionic
IISI Washington Av.. Minmi llrnrh
PHONE 5-335.r>
SIDEBOTTOM
Ice Cream Co.
2124 N. W. 7th Ave.
1100 W. I I:. -1. r St.
71.1 V W. .lllh SI.
PHONE 2-3012
Our Automatic and Automatic Hi certificates pro-
vide low coal term protection for five or ten years
and automatic conversion to a permanent plan cer-
tificate at the end of the term period without medi-
cal examination or certificate of good health.
if you have nol a Bufficienl amount of Insurance to
pay all of your debts in case of your death, and
leave your family comfortably provided for, and
are earning only a moderate safary or amount of
income, this policy will appeal to you. It has all the
advantages of any other policy in the forms of
settlement option.
SPECIFIC BENEFIT
One-fifth of the face amount of the certificate for
loss of one hand, one fool or Bighl of one eye. by
accident. This does not reduce the face amount of
the certificate.
REFUND OPTIONS
Payment of refunds >dividends) after two years member-
ship:
In cash. (This option is automatic if no other option is
selected.)
By leaving the refunds with the Society to accumulate at
the rate of interest earned by The Maccabees
Rate the first year, age 35, $12.10.
+----
HOME SERVICE
Laundry
ROY H. Tl KSKR.'Prop.
1225 S. W. Blh St. Phone l-MM
SPECIAL
A 20 per cent discount of every
bundle of 75 cents or more.
.---__.__._--------------------+
A. M. COFFIN, State Manager
The Maccabees,
226 Seybold Bldg.,
.Miami. Florida.
Dear Sir:
I would like to know more about your
special policies.
Name ........................................ Age
Address ...............................................
+


Page Six
THE JEWISH FLOR IDI AN
Friday. November 10. 1933
Rabbi Will
Dedicate Home
Formal dedication services for
the John W. Burke Funeral Home
will be held Sunday afternon, No-
vember 12th. beginning promptly at
4 p. m. at the home. 1512 West
Flagler st. Prominent members of
the clergy will officiate among
whom will be Rabbi Dr. Jacob H.
will be heard in a number of selec-
tions during the ceremonies. Mr.
Burke who is president of the
Burke Funeral Home has been in
the mortuary profession for nine
years, and is vice president and
manager of the King Funeral Home.
29 N. W. Third avenue, with which
he became associated two years
and eight months ago. follow-
ing the death of the late Frank
McGhan. then the owner of the
business. Previously he was em-
ployed as director of ambulance
service and assistant funeral direc-
tor by Mr. Median.
Mr. Burke is a graduate of the
American College of Embalming.
St. Louis. Mo, and holds an em-
balmer's and funeral directors li-
. -.id by the Missouri state
board of embalming.
PLAYISG AT the
Til AVE. THEATRE
John W. Burke
Kaplan of Temple Israel. Robert
H. Fennell. past president of the
Junior Chamber of Commerce, will
preside at the ceremonies.' The
Caesar La Monica String Ensemble
Tampa, Fla.
Notes
Mr and Mrs Harry Goldman of
St. Petersburg. Fla.. was the guest
of his sister and brother-in-law.
Mr and Mrs. Jacob Winner, of
Tampa, over the week-end.
Miss Rave Argintar has returned
to the city after having spent four
weeks in Atlanta and Newnan.
Ga. She has as her guest Miss Mil-
dred Lebos. of Atlanta. Ga.
Rabbi A Burger of Rodoph Sho-
lom Temple will speak on Armis-
tice at services at the Temple Fri-
day evening. Nov. 10. at 8 p. m
Mr and Mrs. Wm. Weber. 802
West Francis Ave.. have announc-
ed the engagement of their daugh-
Miss Minnie Cracowaner. whose
engagement to Mr. Irvin Salsbury
was anounced recently, was enter-
tained at a bridge party given bv
Miss Ruth Salsbury. sister of her
fiance, Wednesday evening, Nov. 1.
at the Floridian hotel.
w
Miss Elva Kensinger received the
prize for high score and Miss
Janice Mower and Muss Sadie Bill-
field won the cut prizes. Miss Cra-
cowaner was presented a gift. Miss
Salsbury was assisted by Mrs.
Daniel Cracowaner and Mrs. A.
Salsbury, mothers of the betrothed
couple, and Mrs. E. H. Steinberg'
aunt of the bride elect.

Miss Elva Kensinger entertained
recently at her residence, 2107
Southview Avenue, to honor Miss
Minnie Cracowaner, bride "lor-.
Miss Odls Wilson received hit,,,
scoer prize. Miss Mollie Bergman
the second high award, Miss Pe^y
Card, the cut prize and Miss Eil
Adelson the consolation. A salad
course was served.
Mrs. Lane will entertain in hono;
of Miss Cracowaner Thursda\
ning, November 9th.
* ?
The Ladies Auxiliary of Rodcp:-,
Sholom Temple will give a Rou-
manian Garden Party at the homes
of Mrs. J. Abramovitz and Mrs. H
Perlman, Sunday evening. Nov. 15
A very lovely program has been ar
ranged and Mrs. Chas. Markow;'.
is general chairman for the
assisted by Mesdames I. Lei'.man
H. Perlman, L. Gordon and I. Mm-
movitz.
PALM
Sally Eilers in the Fox film, "Hold
Me Tight," her latest co-starring fea-
ture with James Dunn in the hading
masculine role.
ter. Miss Ruth Weber, to Mr.
Manuel Buchman. son oi Mr. and
Mrs. J. M Buchman. 5114 Central
Avenue. Tampa.
Miss Weber was born in New
York city and came to Tamp.' as
a child, she is a graduate ot Hills-
borough high school.
Mr. Buchman. a native Tampa>i,
also received his education at
Hillsborough high school and Is
connected in business with his
father.
Good paint is always worth more than you pay for Itregan
of how much that may be. The value of property protection cai
be gauged by the cosl oi the means employed.
In addition, paint Is the great beautlfier ot surfaces. Nothing
can take its place tor enhancing the appearance of any obje
which it is applied. When you paint, be sure to use
It is your guarantee of qualitya product that will stand the V
severest tests of weather and time and require the least amount ot
renewing.
A Ask us about paints, varnishes, their use and moderate cost
Binswanger &l Co., Inc. 1
GLASSMIRRORSPAINTS
1212 N. E. 2nd Ave.Phone 2-8232
S. II. ROSKNDORF, Manager
v ,
V*.
I
V
: :
^fl^tf^i^ ^sw F^W^ W <' believe that the Jens of Miami are entitled to
%J\J%JMJ r^ l_r?^ strirtly K0SHER MEATS at PRICES That ARE FAIR
and REASONABLE, and will make it our business to provide it at all times.
AN UNEXCELLED COMBINATION OF
HIGHEST QUALITY LOWEST PRICES ABSOLUTE KASHRUS
BEEF MBMMi VEAL
STEAKS u, 25( free,b L K. hk CHOPS CUTLETS ,,, 25(
BREAST OF BEEF 25l SiSEH BREAST -.........................20c
MIDDLECHUCK-^rCT 'ZZ,:,:ZlZ SHOULDER _,,,.. 25(
GROUND BEEF 18c f" SHOULDER m ,>m, ,, 18(
TONGUE ib 20c __ LIVER ,. 45(
HENS IB 24c-pori/ri*v-SPRINGERS 28c
PULLETS. FRYERS. HENS. SPRINGERS. BROILERS AND DUCKS. TURKEYS ON ORDER.
Grand Opening
Thursday November 16di
*
CUT RATE KOSHER MARKET
237 N. >V. flfTI STREET
PliCNC 3-2297
Kashrus I nder The Supervision of Local Rabbis


Full Text

PAGE 1

^Jewish floridlam Vol. 6. No. 44 Jewish News Around The World FLORIDA'S ONLY JKWISH WEEKLY MIAMI. FLORIDA. FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 10. 1933 Boasts Nazis Inspired Arab Riotin Palestine Berlin. —Confirming previously expressed suspicions in Jewish circles, Herr Shafman. -Nazi leader, told a Hitlerite election meeting here, that the Arab rlota ir Palestini .ire the direct result of Nazi propaganda among the Palestine Arabs, The Nazi speaker said that Miller's influence i.s no', limited to Germany but that it extends to lands where it intends to stimulate national consciousness and this Is accomplished through an event as the riots in Palestine." The Palestine riots are being extensively utilized by the Nazi press in their elec'ion campaign and they are sensationally featured as an "Arab revolution against the Jews." Miami Merchant Dies Suddenly Jack Solen, a resident of Miami lor the past eight years, and a member oi (he Royal Palm Grocery Co., died early Thursday morning as a result oi several month's Illness, He leaves surviving him, his bride of a year. Evelyn, his mother. Mrs. Wm. Solen, two brothers. Morris and Abner. three sisters, Mrs. Rose Fine, Mrs. Leah Morris, and Miss Beatrice Solen. The funeral services will be conducted this afternoon at 2 p. in. from the Ahern Funeral Home and interment will be in the city Cemetery. Announcements! Demands Investigation of Nazi Propaganda by German Students Here New York.—Dr. Franz Boas, noted anthropologist and professor at Columbia University, ha< colled on Ri presentative Samuel Dickstein to investigate the activities oi German exchange students in American universities to reveal whether they are engaged in Nazi propaganda. In a letter to Mr. Dickstein, Dr. Boas quoted an official order of i lie Supreme Nazi Council InstructII German students in foreign countries to spread Nazi propaganThe order cited by Dr. Boas as follows: "The Voelkischer Beobachter, No. 231, North German edition, Saturday, August 19, 1933, page 5, imn 6. Official announcement ot the supreme command of the Nazi Party. The chief of the National Socialist German Student Association issued the following detiee: —All members of the National Socialist German Students Association who during the cominfs winemester, 1933-34. will ;tudv at a foreign university muel Immedieommunicate with Dr. Von Berlin-Steglitz, Hohenzollers Strass 6. As soon as they have arrived at the foreign university they must immediately send their foraddreas to the he-H of the foreign office of the National Socialist German Students Association. The purpose of this measure is to enable these German student' inform their foreign fellow students about German conditions and to instruct them in spreading information. All members 0.' the National Socialist German Students Association who are alrc-dy abroad have to write in their addresses for 'he same purpose. With Hell Hitler. Dr. Staebel." Rabbi's Night To Be Observed On Wednesday night. November 16th, the Y. M. H. A. will honor all local Rabbis when Rabbi's Nigh! will be observed. Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan of Temple Israel. Rabbi Max Shapiro of Beth David. Rabbi David I. Rosenbloom of Beth Jacob. Rabbi Julias Washer of the Miami Jewish Orthodox Congregation, and Rabbi S. M. Machtei of the Radio Synagog, have been invited to attend and deliver brief addresses. Several musical numbers will be presented on the program and refreshments will be served during the evening. The public i urged to attend. CONGREGATION BKTII JACOB (Orthadra) 111 Wi.hinglon Avt.. Miami II.;,. h DAVID I. RO8ENBLOOM, Rabbi. The usual early services begin at 5:30 followed by the late Friday night services at 8 p. m. when the Rabbi will preach a sermon in observance of Armistice Day on "War or Peace. Which?" The chanting and congregational singing will be under the direction of Cantor Boris Schlachman of the Congregation. Saturday morning services begin at 8:30 a. m. when the Rabbi will preach a sermon in Yiddish on the portion of the week. Talmud Torah meets daily at 3 p. m. and the Sunday school every Sunday at 10 a. m. Friendly Inn To Begin Work The annual meeting of the Hebrew Friendly Inn was held at Beth David Talmud Torah Hall last Tuesday evening and followinu a number of addresses by prominent citizens and communal workers of the district, and the reading of reports of past activities election were held. The officers elected were Baron de Hirsch Meyer, president: Jacob Becker. 1st vice-president: Emanuel Gordon. 2nd vice-president; A. Rappaport, treasurer; Boris Schlachman. secretary. Plans provide for the opening of the home immediately to take care of the large number of transient cases which are coming to the attention of the authorities daily. A complete list of the Board of Directors will be published in our next Issue, BETH DAVID CONGREGATION 1 < Mii-.-r ;it I, <• 1.19 N. W. Third Avtnur MAX SHAPIRO. Rabbi The usual early services begin at 5:30 followed by the late services at 8:15 when in observance of Armistice Day. Rabbi Shapiro will preach on "The Life-Force Behind Civilization. Today." Saturday morning services begin at 8 a. m. with the Junior Congregation services at 10:30 when the Rabbi will preach and the singing wll be under the direction of Cantor Kaminsky. The Bar Mitzva Boy's Club meets Sunday morning at 8 a. m. Annual Meeting Elects Officers At the annual meetin.; ol the members of the Miami Jewish Orthodox Congregation last Tuesdaynight reports for the past year were presented by the president end the various committees. The financial report showed that all bills had been paid to date and that a substantial amount was on hand and in bank. The election of officers which was unanimous in every cas-> resulted in the following bein:: chosen. President. Milton Welner; 1st vice-president. H. M. Drevilh; 2nd vice-president, Max Rappaport; treasurer. Philip Berkowitz; tary. Joseph Qreenberg, Executive board consists of Max Mintzer, Nathan Adelman. Harry Seitlin and Max Kupferstein. Mr. Wm. Meohlowltz was elected an honorary member of the executive hoard in recognition of faithful service.-, rendered the congregation since Us inception. A very Interesting addresi was delivered by Rabbi Julius Washer of the congregation. MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CONGREGATION (Orthodox I 1545 S. W. Third Strt JII.US WASHER. Rabbi Y.M.H.A. Girls Fill Vacancies At the meeting of the Girls' Division of the Y. M. H. A. held Tuesday night at the club house, the following offices were elected to fill vacancies: Charlotte Furman. vice-president; Eeinice Schwartz, recording secretary; Esther Cremer. corresponding iC8tary. The following committees weie elected Rose Levin, entertainment; Elsie Relsman. house chairman; Rose Dubler. publicity. Regular services begin at 5:30. Saturday morning services begin at 9 followed by a sermon on the portion of the week by the Rabbi Mincha services begin at 5 p. m. followed by the "Shalosh Saudah" and Maariv. The Talmud Torah meets daily at 3 p. m. and Sunday school meets at the Y. M. H. A. every Sunday at 10 a. m. Late Friday night services will begin within the next few weeks when the complete program for the season will be announced. Jewish Artists Feature Program Senior Hadassah will hold a regular meeting next Monday. November 13th. beginning at 2 p. m. in the Acacia Club in the Congress Bldg. A program featuring works of Jewish poets and musicians will be presented under the direction of Mrs. Jos. Williamson, program chairman. Refreshments will be served. TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI < Reform I 1.17 N. B. Ninrlrmth Slrrtl DR. JACOB II. KAPLAN. Rabbi Very special services will be held | in honor of Armistice Day. Friday evening at 8:15. Instead of the ser| mon. Dr. Kaplan will invite the entire congregation downstairs to Kaplan Hall, where a delightful program will be given—prepared, written and conducted by Mrs. I. M. Weinstein. president of the Sisterhood of Temple Israel. The public is most cordially invited to attend both the services and the program. The following if an outline of the very artistic review of the past and the hope for the future: First part—Tableau, "Retrospect." Those taking part: Gold Star Beth David Sponsors Tea The Junior Committee of Beth David Sisterhood Is sponsoring a member's tea Tuesday evening. November 14th. at 5 p. m. at the home of Mrs. A. E. Rosenthal, 1031 S. W. 3rd St.. when a musical program will be presented. Refreshments will be served and an enjoyable evening Is promised. In charge of arrangements i.s a committee headed by Mrs. Wm. Weintraub chairman, and Mesdames M. J. Kopelowitz and Jack Simon. Decorations are in charge of Mrs. Jack Stone. The public is invited to attend. Mother, Mrs. D. J. Apte: Red Cross Nurse. Mrs. Mitchell Wolfson; Soldier, Myron S. Zeientz; Forgotten Man. Stanton Field; Spirit of the New Deal. Mrs. E. Max Goldstein. Soloist—Mrs. Evelyn Raff; accompanist. Annie Laurie Lee. Second part — "Looking Forward." 'a little sermon on world peace directed especially to Mothers.) The Mother. Mrs. Jules Pearlman; the grandmother. Mrs. Joseph Williamson; the boy, Teddy Plant; the girl, Joyce Pearlman. Price Five Cents Hadassah Will Present Plav Romance, laughh r, pathos, ambition, in an Intriguing nlot ar the qualifications for "The whole Town's Talking.' the play whirl. Junior Hadassah 's presr.ilng next 'in. riay, Noven b i will, at the lur-ple Theater, begi.i,i.< at v. p. m. The authors of the play, Anita Loos and John Emerson. e:e both well known in this locality, glnce they spent much of their leisure time in Palm Beach and often have •isited Miami. Mr. Emerson, himself, directed the p'ay when it tlral pppeared In New Vork. and he made a tremendous success of this screamingly funny lace mm*.*!}. The Whole Town's TalKing." include.' a vivid presentation of real people such as one may me*: everyday. They are entangled in a ludicrous web of circumstances which creates very funny lines. This farce comedy Is entirely plausible in its almost burlesqued acting, which places the town's dumbest bookkeeper in the whiles of a visiting movie actress and her piize-fi-ht r husband. The enti-.e case is as follows : Joe Davis, "Chesler Binney"; Millicent Rubin. "Ethel Simmons;" Charlie Tobin. "Mr. Simmons;" Lyl Chlsling. "Mrs. Simmons;" Ruth Davis. "Annie." Har.a Mack. "Lettie Lythe;" Bert Scroer.berg. "Roger Shields;" Gladys Max. Sadir Blum," Lillian Fried, "Sally Otis.' Sophie Silver, "Lyla Wison;" Sylvia Rayvis. "Mrs. Jackson:" Mannie Weinkle, "prise-fighter;" Leo Chaikin, "taxi-driver." "Ort" Worker Arrives Here Dr B. Aisurowitch who is on a tour of the United States which will cover fifty-five of the largest cities in the United States and Canada arrived in Miami last Wednesday afternon in the interest of the Ort campaign for constructive relief work in Germany and in countries where German refugees are now located. While here he will address a number of organizations and will open a brief but Intensive campaign for funds for the German relief work. Arbeiter Ring To Hold Meeting An important meeting of the Workmen's Circle and the Woman's Club of the organization will be held on next Sunday evening. November 12th. at the Workmen's Circle Hall. 701 N. W. Fifth avc A very interesting program will be presented with Mr. M. Savage, organizer of the Workmen's Circle, of Jacksonville. Fla., will be the main speaker of the evening. Refreshments will be served. There will be no admission charge or collections of any kinds made. The public Is invited to attend.


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EVWL079JF_NKI7ZA INGEST_TIME 2013-05-07T23:40:06Z PACKAGE AA00010090_00246
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

Page Four THE JEWISH FLO R I D I A N Friday. November 10, 1933 •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• *+• • • • • • : '•' '•' '•' *•' '•' t 2\atou dgnagng Stslbtitt Edited by RABBI S. M. MACHTEI i-I Founder and Director. Radio Byntgog of Amtrlca *;* SUNDAY MORNINGS WIOD, MIAMI, FLOMDA I So. 8 | 1933 vou stand in awe at sundown to view the supreme work of art of of the rising .sun—a master-piece by the the %  %  %  %  i'illB'l %  %  • BOGGS %  %  %  Vol. III. SUNDAY. NOVEMBER T ; .;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;. •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •> &f •> &f • "The Jew,—A Symbol of Individualism" Scripture Reading, Deuteronomy, Chapter XIV, venae l and 2. Lei us, for the moment, put aside the reference to being "above all the ulty translation ol the Original Hebrew, -an objectionabli phrase and one that Irritates the non-Jew and let us concern ourslevea with the -peculiar" people. I believe that those who seek the cause of much oi the hatred of the Jew will find it In the peculiarity to which U Deuteronomist refers, a natural aversion on the part of the mass to tng thai stands off apart and maintains Its own Individualism, unyielding and unconforming, distinctive. A local editorial writer, Truman T. Felt, who displays an understanding of and an Insight into the working of the human mind In both it., normal and abnormal psychology, recently wrote an article from which I quote. The writer, in discussing the fears oi the average person which bind him to a middle path in life, says. "We can never be quite sure of man.superiority In the animal world so long as we judge other species or genera by the standards ol man. but. if there Is one among them thai lias broken the spell of Middles magic attraction, be it fish or fowl, we hazard thai it will outdistance man In the course toward farthest Objectives." Further on. he writes. "In every phase of life. the same blind loyalty to the mean and the horror of extremes may be found." In .science. Mr. Felt claims, an equal horror of extremeexists. He write.-. "... we know too well the clannish schools of thought among them ithe scientists) and the persecution of those who first challenge accepted law.-" But the greatest challenge to the cult of "Middle-Worshippers, as he calls them, we find In the words of the author. "We seek the mediocre through fear of extremes—fear that we may mitsake the worst for the best Wi cannot distinguish them readily, except as something quite different from that to which we are accustomed, and it ii a rare Individual Who is willing to be wholly wrong many times merely to b, found absolutely right once when his more sluggish fellows, h up with him. He knows too well that he will be considered wrong by the majority, whether he is or not. so long as he is different and that lie probably will be denied many creature comforts by the all powerful cult of the not-too-fat-and-not-too-thin for the rest of his natural life." In this though! I find the germ for Jew-baiting that has existed in all times. The mass is suspicious of one who will not assimilate, one who will not conform to the accepted views, but. who tenaciously holds to his OWn. The Jew i.indeed a peculiar people. He would long sinehavi ceased to be had he been satisfied with mediocrity and had he adopted tin manners of the mass about him. It takes courage to die.-differently than the mode prescribes. It require.strength of character for an abi nomallj large man to walk the streets to be -tared at and to be pointed out ak. It is indicative of backbone" for the midget to mingle I with the average human being to be the recipient ol glances full of o :.tempt and ridicule. It also Is evidence of poor breeding in the ma.-.for them to single out individuals ol dress and manner, physique and thought. as objei I :'• and creatures to be shunned. I recall er ot one man for wealth. Win n ...-kid why he so atly wanted wealth, he replied. "That I might wear my old and comfortable clothes without fear ot being called poor.' but rather considered a rich eccentrl But. Why should anyone fear to dress in comfort? What rlghl lie mass to object to the individualism of any person or uroup? Where would civilization be today were it not for the fearless pathfinders who dared to venture in untrodden paths? The Jew is peculiar. He is different. He is uncompromising. Yes. he holds to the teachings of righteousness and justice He .-till worships the Ji hovah who was good enough for the Christian world to adopt. He studies the ancient lore which inspired Jesus and which the Christ pa.-sed on to his disciples and to succeeding generations. Those teachings must be beneficent to have merited such wide adoption. The Jew is peculiar and canonical because he still prays in the languaee which Ji used and in which he conversed with his disciples. I fail to see the menace In such peculiarity. Let us reason it out. Would mankind have been any better off. if. instead of holding to the Faith of Abraham, the Israelites had assimilated the Ecyptian :• ; of idolatry and then would have passed them on through Christ? Would civilization have advanced further if the Hebrews who entered Canaan had adopted the worship of Baal and Moloch, and. then would have passed those faiths on to the human race? How much happier would man be today if. during the Babylonian exile, the Jews had succumbed to the worship of Zoroaster and then, in turn, had civen a Christ to the world who would ha\e preached the teachings of Zarathustra? Or. would it have been better for the present seneration. if the Jews had not battled the Hellenistic influences, and. having accepted the Greek Pantheon, had sent forth a Jesus to preach of Zeus and Venus, Apolli Diana Instead of Jehovah and Moses. David and Isaiah? What harm is there in be: inlar people as lone as the human weal is not menaced by the ideas and practices? Will your esthetic taste be pleased to view all men dressed in one uniform garb? Will ycur artistic eye be less jarred by the vista of a scene of one uniform color? Do you suffer from altaphobia and dread the sight of a mountain or a tall man? Must God remold the earth to level hills and to fill in valleys that no peculiaritu i Or. are you unaware that you enjoy individualism and that it ithe peculiar and distinctive things that make your life interesting? You applaud an actor for his individualism, his towerinc above medic You enjoy the music of the accomplished artist because he is better than the average. You stand enraptured before the painting of the master because he has not merely thrown colors together on canvass but because he has portrayed something distinctive in his own inimitable style. And. setting sun.—or. at dawn. Great Artist of the Universe. Shake vourself of that fear of the extremes. Banish your dread oi m the peculiar and the individualistic. Accept Life in its totality, and be p ^ ^^ Repairing happy. ,. ,. .. %  I am mindful of the fact that the theory of "rugged individualism ^ Is taboo at this period and that it Is frowned upon by those who call themselves "better society." I have not spoken of Individualism In its sense of egotism and in its anti-social practice of "I come first and the devil take the rest of society." There is nothing in the teachings of the Jew that recommends such an attitude. Where it is found in practice i The Very Finest of Sole Leather Immediate Attention in the (leane-t and H' -i Shop in Miami PrleM Kiirht — Convenient Location %  Wi Make Your Shoe" Look Like Ne %  SEYBOLD ARCADE t N. E. Flfrt Street is denounced by the Jew as well as by his neighbors. What I do wish tol| condemn Is the tear, the groundless fear of anything Jusl because it is different, and for no other reason or cause. The Jew has suffered and still suffers as a result of hi.being a "peculiar people." In B measure, through the Radio Synagoe services. I lifted the veil that the Christian may become familiar with us and Judge of our peculiarities. Our aims are akin to yours because you drink from the same spring. Our objectives for the good of mankind are similar, if not identical, for was not your torch kindled from ours? It ill behooves us to quarrel over forms, mere external manifestations. Let us rather contribute our own distinctive effort to attain the great and ultimate coal.—a race of men who live in harmony and in love and who merit the designation of having been created in the image of God. our Common Father;—in that we shall be happy to conform. %  %  %  %  BIY AT GROSSMAN'S Choice Fruits and Vegetables Stand No. 1. Roosevelt Curb Market I X. E. 2nd Ave. and 14th St. i •CORNER STANDSON Bean Bread and other \euetablc bread* (;ooi> HEALTH BAKING COMPANY, INC. 21(5 W. Klaitler St. Phone 2-8511 1401 Washington Avenue, M. B. The "Good Health" Kind Hotel And Restaurant Equipment GEORGE I.. DIXOX COMPANY "The Home Thai Senice limit" lino N. E. 2nd Avenue Phone 2-6:51 We Pay 5o Interest The Morris Plan Company Of Miami VINCENT R. BRICE. Manager. 105 N. E. First Ave., MIAMI, FLA. For Fresh Sea Foods STOP AT GAPT. TOM'S FISH MART OUR PRICES ARE THE LOWEST Our lish are the freshest — Caught by our own bo.its dailv If it is Sea Food, we have it at its very best, and at attractively low prices. Our method of handling and selling Sea Food Is in observance with all the sanitary rules and regulations.



PAGE 1

Friday, November 10, 1933 THE JEWISH FLORIDI AN Page Three THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN PUBLISHED EVKRY FRIDAY b> the % %  WISH FI.ORIDIAN PUBLISHING CO. Jr P, O. Ilu 297.1 Miami, Florida I'hone 2-1183 KDITORIAL OFFICES: 6 ;l s. W. 16th Avenue I'hone 2-1183 j. LOUIS SIIOCIIET. Editor HUH K. SIIOCIIET. Circulation Manager CANTOR BORIS SCHLACHMAN, Field Representative i u MCOnd claU matter July 4. thfl Poat of tiff itt Miami. Florida. r|,.. Ail of March '1. 1879. WEST PALM BEACH ST. PETERSBURG MRS. MAE BENJAMIN. Representative ORLANDO SYLVIA BERMAN Representative TAMPA, FLA.: MRS. M. H. KISLER Representative SUBSCRIPTION Siv Month* I I.M line Year J2.00 Vol. 6 — No. 44 FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1933 "Three Spokesmen For Tolerance" Under this caption the Louisville "Courier Journal" discusses editorially the subject of Intolerance In this country. This editorial we reprint and we wish thai ii could be broadcasted to every in America. We are threatened al this time with another ol mil bursts ol racial and religious intolerance which come to the surface ever so often. Sometimes these arc encouraged as a result of a situation like Hu lerisni: other times they are brought about by some local condition. Again, Mime fanatic like the leader ol the Silver Shirts can find enough gullibles in this country of the socalled infantile Bucker-class who. delighting in mystery and mummery, will join an organisation with words, high signs and robes Thousands joined the Klan not so much because of any deep rooted antagonism to other religious or racial groups but because they liked the idea of wearing masks and lobes and using high sounding names like Imperial Wizard. Kleagd other such Big Bad Wolf titles as children and Ignoramuses ol all ages and sizes find interest in. Al this time, we believe that sentiments such as expressed In the following editorial from the Louisville "Courier Journal" need emzing. We must remember that with conditions as they are. agiare given a fertile field to -"' %  v the seeds of discord among all groups. That we must be on the lookout for and guard against. The space In this column, we know, be devoted to anything more worthwhile than these views of the 'if the South: "Does America need instruction Mid counsel in the matter of tolerance? Many Americans might be Inclined to give a hasty negative in Answer to such a question for this country has been considered the melting pot of races, the land of the free for people of all religious beliefs. The first pilgrims who landed at Plymouth Rock established that tradition, and to some •I would seem that the ideal of those early days has never been ob'"•terated in the consciousness of America. "There is an announcement in | the press, however, that a group of i three clergymen will soon begin a tour of the Nation, .speaking to audiences in thirty-nine cities, of which Louisville will be one. on the virtue ol tolerance. That virtue, | fortunately, Is not the peculiar posset Ion of any creed or sect, though II has often bee.; extolled as a fudamental attribute of the Christian faith. During the tolerance tour, representatives of three divergent faiths, a Presbyterian minister, a Catholic priest, and a Jewish rabbi, will attempt to show 'heir audiences how vital a part this virtue of tolerance plays in the realization of all creeds. "These talks might be more tltglven in Germany, some Americans may say. Certainly there is a need for them there, but lhere Is need In this country as well. In a Nation that thinks of religious persecution as a disgraceful attribute ol medieval culture, there are daily evidences ol bigotry and intolerance that are medieval in their conception, it not in their manner ol demonstration. During the 1920s, this land ol the free .saw a movement sweep across the country like a prairie lire, a movement based on intolerance and dealing m persecution. The Ku Klux Klan has been destroyed as an organization since thai time, and its Grand ECleagle languishes In disgrace behind prison bars, but hundreds of thousands of people who joined the Klan are still a part of the American public, and n is a certainty thai most ol them have iltered their opinionThe renewed smoldering ol the bonfire In 1928, durum Al Smith'.campaign, prove.-, thai point. Louisville has Its evidences ol Intolerance, like the other thirtyeight cities on the Itinerary, and ii is a good thing thai the tour will swing this way. The Intolerance thai exist.m American cities, however, Is nothing as compared to the variety that grows like a lush weed in the country districts of the Nation, particularly in the remoter remons ol the South and the Middle West. It would be an Inti Ii experiment to send the threi speakers to some ol these Outlaytlons. and to let them speak in barn.and revival tents and from the platforms of small town opera houses. Some Of their listen 'would be surprised to find that thi i iiohc and the Jew were human beings .iust like the Presbyterians meetings they are simply trying to escape the pitfall into which the German Jews fell. The right of free speech is precious but it should not be prostituted to agitation for racial and religious hatred. We believe that the propaganda of the Nazis is no better than espionage and espionage is a crime. There is no disposition to deny Nazis the privilege of voicing political and economic beliefs but neither Nazis nor anyone else, particularly aliens, have the right to come here and violate in principle, il not in fact, and to urge others to do likewise every constitutional guarantee of religious and racial tolerance The Refugee High Commissioner Nazis and Tree Speech Jewish leaders and the Jewish press in this country have long been aware of Nazi propaganda in the United States but it required the great publicity resulting from an official ban on a Nazi demonstration In New York to convince the general public of the existence of such propaganda. By prohibiting the Nazi meeting in NewYork Mayor O'Brien not only prevented the Nazis from further spreading their poisonous creed but he did a valuable service in focusing 'he attention of the entire country on what has been going on. The hearing which Mayor O'Brien I held before deciding to bar the Nazi meeting was featured by the appearance of two Jews who pleaded, in the name of free speech and the right of free assembly, that the Nazis be allowed to stage their meeting. Such an attitude is incomprehensible and almost indefensible. Jews never advocate suppression of free speech or free press or the right of free assembly. But in urging the prohibition of Nazi The appointment by the Council oi the League of Nations of James O. MacDonald, chairman of the Foreign Policy Association, as high commissioner for German refugees Is the flrsl concrete step on the part ol the world powers to afford a measure ol relief to the victims Ol the Nazi regime. The fact that the United States has consented to name an official representative to overnlng board to which the high commissioner will be responsible makes this action even more important. How Mr. MacDonald will deal with the problem of the • es Is not yel known, but all his wide experience, tad and patience will be needed to handle this emergency. As an American he is m .an ideal position to do a splendid job. The governing board, to which he will report, is to consist of representatives of fifteen nations and a number of Jewish agencies. The funds with which his wink is to be financed are expected to come in large measure from Jewparticularly American Jew.There can be no quarrel with such an arrangement except that it Is not improbable that if the relief .m of the high commissioner Is entirely subsidized by Jews, it may lose some of its practical value We believe that the powers represented on the governing board should contribute something, even a small sum. if only to show that their interest in the work of the high commissioner is not academic When a nation has a financial stake In an enterprise, small as it may be. it is more likely to be closely informed as to what Is being done with its funds. Such an arangement. too. would make it impossible for the Hitler government to impair the functioning of the high commissioner on the alleged ground that he is in the pay of Jews. From a wedding no'i. > in the Topeka Capital: "The bride has been loved by everyone in the community." THE France is nettled by swarms of spies carrying cameras near her new torts, as it cuts into sales of souvenir postcards of the same. A brain truster informs as that this Is an era of "robust collectivism," which may explain Mae West and her galaxy of jewels. Railway interests complain that 500.000 hoboes patronize their freights. With stouter brake rods, the buses might easily swing some of this trade. Simplicity is the keynote: A talking point for a current motor car is that three of last year's talking points have been left off the newmodel. •Where did you learn those words?" •Shakespeare uses them." "Well, don't play with him." Here's a picture of my husband standing In front of a saloon." "That's funny. I don't see your husband." iExamines the picture) "Why the big bum went In there again." Reb Zalmen was the richest bin also the stingiest man of Suwalk. His only heir was his nephew, who would inherit the total fortune when the rich man died. One day a friend of the family said to the old man, "I hear your nephew Is going to marry. You ought to do something to make him happy." "I will." said Reb Zalmen. with a sardonic smile, "I'll pretend that I am dangerously ill." A Jewish young man of Khelin which is a city of wiseacres on a train bound i'or another town where he was to be married the same evening. On the road the train stopped because of englm trouble and the groom was infoirued that he could no: reach his destination before the following morning. The young man therefore dispatched >h' following wire to the bride: "Very sorry cannot arrive on scheduled time for the rhuppah. Please do nol ;o on with the ceiemony before my arrival." On pinions black the night appealed Over the sombre eitv I wept. and. fancying I feared The dark, the heavens took pity. For light they :nade a swift decree: The Moon displayed her crescent. A meteor flashed Impetuously, The stars were acquiescent But still I wept—in secret— as I shunned the beams they flaunted; How could these kind ones know it was Your love's light that I wanted? A strong case is being made out for reopening the Chicago fair next spring, in case of any progress turning up to celebrate. Ii seems that there were a COUQle ol Irishmen—no. pardon, a couple of Jews, a son and hi.; father. "For why. Patrick." said the father, "do you always brings home a leport card with bad marks?" 'Don't you know. TBtte," replied Hans, with a twinkle in his eye, 'the teachers an' anti-Semites?" "Then what can we do about it. Ivan 11 asked the father, just to keep the converse tlon going. "There's only one thing I can think of," said little Olaf. "and thai is to be baptized, and then the teacher.won't punish me for being a Jew." "All right Guiseppe," said the father, "anything for good marks in school." No sooner said than done. Francois was forthwith baptized, taken into the church, announced to his teacher that he was going to Sunday school regularly, and proceeded to come home the next month with even worse marl: than before. "So, Dimitri; ismack!) Low marks you are getting! (smack!' And why aren't you getting better marks, hah?" "Don't you know. Tattc?" replied Pedro, "what do you expect of a goylsh kop?" A trapeze artist, performnig in a circus in Oklahoma, saw a giii among the spectators, instantly fell in love with her. hurried to her through the crowd after the show, proposed, was accepted, and that night made her his wife, the daiedevil! In some states aenallsts are required by law to confine themselves to somersaulting through space They can't expose them.iieves recklessly to marriage. But in Oklahoma it is just anything to make people shudder. What Perfume Best Lures" Men? —Magazine Advt. Well, a good many have been trapped by the perfume of a steak being broiled. A Chicago woman flatly refuses to accept a release from jail because she has nothing to wear, and the season has waned for fan dancing. I thought I was forgetting you— The boyish way you used to smile. The thoughtful things you used to do In just your special sort of style But when I meet somebody new, And they're not ta'.' and slim and strong, With laughing eyes of deepest blue. I know that I'm completely wrong. It's foolishness to feel this way, When ev'rything is past repair, Yet be that silly as it may, I know for sure I'M always care It's about time the President issued a proclamation that a nation half patriot and half chiseler can not endure. A horse called Quorum won a race at Jamaica the other day. This will come as a surprise to most race followers. They hadn't supposed that enough horses ran at. those New York tracks to get a quorum How about a code limiting the labor of those football cheer leaders? "What's the matter?" "Why, I wrote a long (lowing article on milk and the editor condensed it." deserves. It is a wise fool who can keep his lack of wisdom to himself. Love that laughs at locksmiths never giggles at the plumber. Poor relations wonder if the rich one really has a poor memory. Some men are like silver-plated knives; they look bright, but are dull. Some of our girls do their sleighing in January and their slaying in June. A girl has a young man twisted around her finger when he circles it with an engagement ring.



PAGE 1

Page Six THE JEWISH FLOR IDI AN Friday. November 10. 1933 Rabbi Will Dedicate Home Formal dedication services for the John W. Burke Funeral Home will be held Sunday afternon, November 12th. beginning promptly at 4 p. m. at the home. 1512 West Flagler st. Prominent members of the clergy will officiate among whom will be Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. will be heard in a number of selections during the ceremonies. Mr. Burke who is president of the Burke Funeral Home has been in the mortuary profession for nine years, and is vice president and manager of the King Funeral Home. 29 N. W. Third avenue, with which he became associated two years and eight months ago. following the death of the late Frank McGhan. then the owner of the business. Previously he was employed as director of ambulance service and assistant funeral director by Mr. Median. Mr. Burke is a graduate of the American College of Embalming. St. Louis. Mo, and holds an embalmer's and funeral directors li. -.id by the Missouri state board of embalming. PLAYISG AT THE Til AVE. THEATRE John W. Burke Kaplan of Temple Israel. Robert H. Fennell. past president of the Junior Chamber of Commerce, will preside at the ceremonies.' The Caesar La Monica String Ensemble Tampa, Fla. Notes Mr and Mrs Harry Goldman of St. Petersburg. Fla.. was the guest of his sister and brother-in-law. Mr and Mrs. Jacob Winner, of Tampa, over the week-end. Miss Rave Argintar has returned to the city after having spent four weeks in Atlanta and Newnan. Ga. She has as her guest Miss Mildred Lebos. of Atlanta. Ga. Rabbi A Burger of Rodoph Sholom Temple will speak on Armistice at services at the Temple Friday evening. Nov. 10. at 8 p. m Mr and Mrs. Wm. Weber. 802 West Francis Ave.. have announced the engagement of their daughMiss Minnie Cracowaner. whose engagement to Mr. Irvin Salsbury was anounced recently, was entertained at a bridge party given bv Miss Ruth Salsbury. sister of her fiance, Wednesday evening, Nov. 1. at the Floridian hotel. w • Miss Elva Kensinger received the prize for high score and Miss Janice Mower and Muss Sadie Billfield won the cut prizes. Miss Cracowaner was presented a gift. Miss Salsbury was assisted by Mrs. Daniel Cracowaner and Mrs. A. Salsbury, mothers of the betrothed couple, and Mrs. E. H. Steinberg' aunt of the bride elect. • • • Miss Elva Kensinger entertained recently at her residence, 2107 Southview Avenue, to honor Miss Minnie Cracowaner, bride "lor-. Miss Odls Wilson received hit,,, scoer prize. Miss Mollie Bergman the second high award, Miss Pe^y Card, the cut prize and Miss Eil Adelson the consolation. A salad course was served. Mrs. Lane will entertain in hono; of Miss Cracowaner Thursda\ ning, November 9th. &f • The Ladies Auxiliary of Rodcp:-, Sholom Temple will give a Roumanian Garden Party at the homes of Mrs. J. Abramovitz and Mrs. H Perlman, Sunday evening. Nov. 15 A very lovely program has been ar ranged and Mrs. Chas. Markow;'. is general chairman for the assisted by Mesdames I. Lei'.man H. Perlman, L. Gordon and I. Mmmovitz. PALM Sally Eilers in the Fox film, "Hold Me Tight," her latest co-starring feature with James Dunn in the hading masculine role. ter. Miss Ruth Weber, to Mr. Manuel Buchman. son oi Mr. and Mrs. J. M Buchman. 5114 Central Avenue. Tampa. Miss Weber was born in New York city and came to Tamp.' as a child, she is a graduate ot Hillsborough high school. Mr. Buchman. a native Tampa>i, also received his education at Hillsborough high school and Is connected in business with his father. Good paint is always worth more than you pay for It—regan of how much that may be. The value of property protection cai be gauged by the cosl oi the means employed. In addition, paint Is the great beautlfier ot surfaces. Nothing can take its place tor enhancing the appearance of any obje which it is applied. When you paint, be sure to use It is your guarantee of quality—a product that will stand the V severest tests of weather and time and require the least amount ot renewing. A Ask us about paints, varnishes, their use and moderate cost Binswanger &L CO., Inc. 1 GLASS—MIRRORS—PAINTS 1212 N. E. 2nd Ave.—Phone 2-8232 S. II. ROSKNDORF, Manager v %  •, V*. I V %  : %  %  : %  ^fl^tf^i^ ^sw F^W^ W <' believe that the Jens of Miami are entitled to %J\J%JMJ r^ l_r?^ strirtly K0SHER MEATS at PRICES That ARE FAIR and REASONABLE, and will make it our business to provide it at all times. AN UNEXCELLED COMBINATION OF HIGHEST QUALITY LOWEST PRICES ABSOLUTE KASHRUS BEEF MBMMi VEAL STEAKS u, 25 ( FREE B L K hk CHOPS CUTLETS ,,, 25 ( BREAST OF BEEF 25 l SiSEH BREAST 2 0 c MIDDLECHUCK-^rCT 'ZZ,:,:ZlZ SHOULDER _,,,.„. 25 ( GROUND BEEF 18 c f SHOULDER m ,„>M, ,, 18 ( TONGUE IB 20 c __ LIVER %  ,.„ 45 ( HENS IB 24 c pori/ri v -SPRINGERS 28 c PULLETS. FRYERS. HENS. SPRINGERS. BROILERS AND DUCKS. TURKEYS ON ORDER. Grand Opening Thursday November 16di CUT RATE KOSHER MARKET 237 N. >V. flfTI STREET PliCNC 3-2297 Kashrus I nder The Supervision of Local Rabbis



PAGE 1

Friday. November 10, 1933 THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page Five SOCIETY The Girls' Division of the Y. M. H A. is sponsoring an informal lea lor the parents to be s>ven at the club house. S. W 16th Ave. and 5th St.. Sunday. November 19, from 3 o'clock to 5 o'clock. Reireshments will be served and a musical program provided. The public is cordially invited to attend. • • • More than fifteen tables of bridge were In play 'a 51 Wednesday at the home of Mrs. A. E. Rosenthal for the benefit of the Infant Welfare Fund "1 the Senior Hadassah. DeHclous refreshments were served and prizes were awarded for high to Mesdames A. S. FriedHarry Orlln. Louis Zeientz and Victor Mell. • • • A meeting of the Executive Board ol the Junior Council of Jewish Women will be held at the home i| Miss Sylvia Dreisen Wednesday evening, November 15th. when important business will be transacted and plans for the coming dance of the organization will be discussed. • • The Maccabees have organized a hoys band. Rosary Picciolo, solo cornet ist for the Caesar LaMonica band, who was recommended by Caesar LaMonica. is leader and principle instructor. This band .Mil be a permanent Institution and i ach member will have careful in. .unions on the instrument he A tin(c-year program of instrucand training has been plantnd Sir Knight Picciolo will add additional instructors as the enrollment increases and the neslty demands. II any of our readers nave a boy or girl, musically inclined to play n band or string Instrument, they will have an opportunity for the join this boy'.'band under high class, able directors : tractors; and their daughbecome a member of the ora, At the present tune the meeting at one o'clock Satirday afternoon; the Junior Macca• 'durt at two-thirty, and the tra at three, at the Scottish Hiii Temple. N. W. North River Drive and 3rd steet. The hour of 'lie band meeting may be changed lor the convenience of some of the i should the demand arise tor a change of hours. This band will be the best tnown band in Miami or the State of Florida, as a picture of the band and leaders will be carried in a uie which has an estimate of •500.000 readers. Thus is a Maccabee magazine, and A. M. Coffin. %  State Manager of The Maccabees. Stated that lie would see that there nice write up in this magazine at least every three months. Arrangements have been made whereby the cost to the pupil and member of this band or orchestra ; very small indeed, as The MaccaBre carrying a very large part f the load. Only a limited number Will be taken, so don't wait if you want your child to take advantage f this opportunity. Plans for the installation of the Ladies Auxiliary of the Jewish Welfare Bureau to be held at Kaplan Hall Monday. November 20th. will be announced in our next issue. Mrs. Milton Weiner is chairman of the committee in charge of arrangements. New Market Opens Thursday know that she has returned to her home from the Florida Sanitarium where she has been confined for the last two weeks. • • e Rev. and Mrs, B. Safer entertained recently with an open house in honor of their son, Mr. Abraham Safer, of Jacksonville and his bride. Mrs. B. J. Cohen was hostess at a benefit bridge, sponsored by the Ladies Auxiliary of the Congregation at her home last night. The chicken chow mein supper, sponsored by the Temple Sisterhood of the Congregation Beth El, which was held at Uie home of Mr. and Mrs. Max Blattnor on Sunday evening, was one of the biggest successes of the season. The Cut Rate Kosher Market operated by Hyman Waldorf will open for business at 237 N. W Fifth street next Thursday. November 16th, with a scale of prices in keeping with the economic conditions of the day. Mr. Waldorf will terc.sted. operate the business on the theory that the Jewish people of the Greater Miami area desire Kashei meats at all times but want the meats at prices in keeping with present day conditions. In announcing this policy, Mr. Waldorf said. "I want to prove what I have always believed. I feel that If the meats are priced right, the Jewish people will buy Kosher meats, and The Congregation Beth El will conduct their Friday night services at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Solon Klepper. A cordial invitation to attend is extended to all who are in St. Petersburg Notes this Sunday evening, Nov. 12th, with Mrs. M. Feldman and Mrs. Abrahams as hostesses. Refreshments will be served and a prize given to each table. • • Installation of officers of Congregation Bnai Israel took place Sunday evening. Rabbi A. S. Kleinfeld installed the officers: H. M. Jacobs, president; J. Fuchs, vicepresident; H. Herman, treasurer, and M. Benjamin, secretary; trustees: Dave Rothblatt, chairman, A. Sierkese. Ed Goldman, S. Fyvolent and Frank Rabin. Rabbi Kleinfeld gave a stirring address, and each officer in turn expressed his pleasure in being able to serve the Congregation. Sandwiches and refreshments were served during the evening. The social committee of Congregation Bnai Israel, is giving a social and dance at the Congregation. 921 9th St. No., on Monday ecenlng, Nov. 20th. • • The Judaic Council held their regular meeting on Monday evening and plans are being made for a Cake Sale. The Young Maccabees had a pretty Hallowe'en party which was held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Dave Rothblatt. 42nd St. So., with Mrs. Rothblatt as hostess. • • "Here's a picture of my husband standing in front of a saloon." "That's funny, I don't see your husband." • Examines the picture' "Why the big bum went in there again." Royal Typewriters New and Factor? Rebuilt Portables, W9.S0 to M0.00 B. VV I If AC K I K. Local Dealer 210 N. K. 2nd St. Phone 2-011.S Rabbi A. S. Kleinfeld's Armistice sermon will be "Optimism and Cheerfulness" for this Friday evening. Nov. 10th. 8 o'clock, at ConI propose to enable them to do this, j gregation Bnai Israel. 921 9th st, no. without sacrificing quality or KashDelaney & Beers Kodak Kinixhinif and Enlarging Commercial Work and llame Portrait. 50% Off on All Amateur Work 21J N. E. 4th St. Phone l-SIXft FOR THE FINEST IN CHOICE LIVE POULTRY HENS, FRYERS, PULLETS, DICKS FRESH FISH And The Best FLORIDA EGGS Visit Florida Poultry and Egg Co. WHOLESALE and RKTAII. 1225-27 W. FLagler Street | Our "Egg-O-Scope" j Is at your disposal to prove the quality of our eggs. rus." "My place will be open for Inspection to all Rabbis and all citizens who desire to assure themselves that every rule of Kashrus :strictly observed." As an openm; feature customers will be given one pound of ground meat free with every dollar order. Kishkes, lungs, etc., which are favorites of the Jewish people will be given free ol : charge. The Ladies Auxiliary and Aid Society will hold their semi-monthly Card Party at the Congregation Orlando, Fla. Notes TIVOLI -hex (1:1.1 ntld !>;(ln P. M. Sunday 20c till 6:30 P. M. Sun.-Mon., Nov. 12-13— JEAN PARKER WILLARD MACK "WHAT PRICE INNOCENCE?" !" MACCABEES m Mr and Mrs. Lon Wolly and Mr. and Mrs. Abe Shapiro motored lo Tallahassee Sunday. Mrs, Belle Hoffman has returned from St. Petersburg, where she has been attending the Florida State Nurses Convention. Mrs. Hoffman acted as chairman of the Private Duly Section and was re-elected to hold this position for another year. The Synagog of the Congregation Ohev Sholem. is undergoing extensive alterations which will make it one of the most outstanding and attractive synagogs in this section. New floors are being laid in the vestry rooms and the entire synagog is being dedecorated. The vestry rooms are being made over into a social room where dances will be held. It is the purpose of the members to make this social room a social meeting place for the Jewish people in this section of the state. Mr. Louis Wolly. who is in charge of the alterations, deserves special credit for his untiring efforts. • • • The many friends of Mrs. Perry M. Lichtenstein will be glad to I.. (Pop) GERSON Buver of all kinds of scrap metal. We sell auto parts, machinery etc. 2141 X. W. SECOND AVENUE Kevs Made While You Wait R.L. (Bob) CARR Safe. Gun and Lock Expert ALL WORK GI'ARANTEEI) 211 N. E. 13th St. Phone 2-071K NICELEY Funeral I Ionic IISI Washington Av.. Minmi llrnrh PHONE 5-335. r > SIDEBOTTOM Ice Cream Co. 2124 N. W. 7th Ave. 1100 W. I I:. -1. r St. 71.1 V W. .lllh SI. PHONE 2-3012 Our Automatic %  and Automatic Hi certificates provide low coal term protection for five or ten years and automatic conversion to a permanent plan certificate at the end of the term period without medical examination or certificate of good health. if you have nol a Bufficienl amount of Insurance to pay all of your debts in case of your death, and leave your family comfortably provided for, and are earning only a moderate safary or amount of income, this policy will appeal to you. It has all the advantages of any other policy in the forms of settlement option. SPECIFIC BENEFIT One-fifth of the face amount of the certificate for loss of one hand, one fool or Bighl of one eye. by accident. This does not reduce the face amount of the certificate. REFUND OPTIONS Payment of refunds >dividends) after two years membership: In cash. (This option is automatic if no other option is selected.) By leaving the refunds with the Society to accumulate at the rate of interest earned by The Maccabees Rate the first year, age 35, $12.10. + HOME SERVICE Laundry ROY H. Tl KSKR.'Prop. 1225 S. W. Blh St. Phone l-MM SPECIAL A 20 per cent discount of every bundle of 75 cents or more. __.__._ + A. M. COFFIN, State Manager The Maccabees, 226 Seybold Bldg., .Miami. Florida. Dear Sir: I would like to know more about your special policies. Name Age Address + —



PAGE 1

Page Two THE J EWISH FuOR I Dl AN Fnday. November 10. 1933 SOCIETY PLAYING AT THE TIVOL1 HUM Rl A very enjoyable evening was spent at Che Tropical Jungle Gardens la.st Wednesday night when the first of the informal dances for the benefit of Beth David Sisterhood was held in the indoor ballroom of the gardens. Dancing was enjoyed and a program was presented in which the flor show predominated. Card.were played by some of the guests At the last meeting of the Y M H A Mr Nat Kupfer. chairman of the finance committee, reported that a new system of accounting had been installed. The selection of Mi Max Jacobskind as publicity mar was announced Milt : reported on the continual growth of the physical culture class that a medical examination had disclosed decided improvement m the condition of a number of ittendants. Basketball practice for members of the Y. M. H A. will be held Sunday afternoon and all interested are urged to attend. Adults 20c 1 hildrrn lOr Boi orri !" p.m. Sunday Evenings 20c Sun.-Mon., Nov. 12-13— JAMES DUNNSALLY EILERS •Hold Me Tight" White Oak Leather 50c 15c ^ 1 r I lalt Soles %  l IDIES III I 1 S I ATLANTIC SHOE SHOP I 10 N I Niril AM. Opp Conn Hoitl"" I V1BER — White Oak_ • : Will W< ai Longer. I r • and Time Will 151 st 2sr IOLD WMLBm Lw-':hPon yo* 40* 50" On Wednesday evening. November 15th. Beth David Sisterhood is sponsoring a card party at Nunally's Patio. 154 E. Flagler St.. beginning at 8:15 p. m. for the benefit of the Beth David Talmud Torah chain fund. The public is invited to attend. W. E. IDOCI Rutherford, well known in boxing circles, has .Hist Signed a lease on the Cinderella Ball Room, and will conduct dancing, boxing exhibitions and other forms of entertainment. Last week Mr. Rutherford was ted unanimously as Matchmak: for the Disabled American Vi erans, Summerall Chapter No. 10. of which organization. Dr. J. A Camara 1.commander. Boxiim will be conducted under the auspices of : 1. abled American Veterans at the Cinderella Ball Room. day will officially open Cinderella Ball Room -big dance—good music Caesar La Monica and his famous orchestra ... furnish the music. There will two floor shows during the evenand admission tickets will be %  .rood for both shows Danny Sheeand hidancers and singers will appear, and present his casl in "rackets"—something new and %  ntertaining .Lillian Jenkins, well singer, will sing 'blue" ARMISTICE DAY—9 P M mber 11th. ** re'll be no lean years in Ben ti -not it tlie youthreel • 1 can help m Right now IS* areei I • (i and i.< aside his make-up box and n< %  ';i"'i. livelihood :. from the hunof Hollywood's 01.' luminarii ire now in twilight 01 thi ll popularity. • poi : %  eck.ii 111 :' %  ntures. %  pick) <: a poor one. '1 the dull timi nd a dryhmenl aln ad) car. nami pro] In mlortable interthriving ility. During thi filmlni ol Columbia Pictures ultra-modern drama Announcing the opening of HOI GH'! FOR VSTKM II AIR GROWING WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15 XT % %  Rossi's Barber Shop 2224-26 Collins Avenue—Cor. 23rd Street Near Rone] I'laza PHONE 5-1626 FOR APPOINTMENTS Ben Alexander in "What Price Innocence?" %  W hat Price Innocence?' which will be at the Tivoli Theatre Sunday and Monday, the young act inkept constantly in touch with his business Interest.Wlllard Mack. author and featured player in the production, was amazed at the twenty-two-year-old player's knowledge of business affairs, The famous starring team of James Dunn and Sally Eilers will be seen in their fifth picture together, "Hold Me Tight.'' which comes to the 7th Avenue Theatre Sunday and Monday. There are lew starring combinations on the screen with histories a.interesting as those ol these two young player-. Ever since "Bad Girl'' startled cinema-goers with •wo characterizations a.natural and effective as any the screen had ted to date. Fox has continued the combination successfully. "DaM. Team." "Over the Hill." "Sailoi and now "Ho I Tight" entitle the hyphl : 11 mn-Eili i t m. Tin sdaj No\ 14 at her home, 1021 S, W _'3rd Junior Council or Jewish Women met las) Monday In the Spanish room of the Ponci 'ii Leon hotel. At the card party given last Sun day by thi council in connection with the Young Men Hebrew asiation. a large number ol guests payed bridge and Jther r.unes In uhargi .a arrangements were Mr and Mrs. Murray Kellman, Mlsi Claire Hode.s. Mis, I. .. Ki.sanoll and Miss Mary Bandell last Monday in Kaplan hall. A tableau and play, written and directed by Mrs. I. M. Welnsteln, the president, was presented. Mrs. Henry D. Williams ass.-ied in the directing of the play which is entitled "Looking Forward." Cast Q ( characters included Mrs. Jules Pearlman. Joyce Pearlman. MrJoseph Williamson and Cuddy Plant. In the tableau those rppearlnt were Mrs. Day J.Apte. Mrs. Mitchell Wolfson. Mrs. Evelyn Raff and Mrs. E. Max Goldstein. Mrs Mamie Laurie Lee played the musical accompanimen'. \ meeting cf the executive board took place a, 1:30 o'clock, precedin; the Bi meeting. RADIO SYNAGOG Rabbi S. M. Machtei. founder and director of the Radio Synagog. will preach over WTOD at ten o'clock on Sunday morning on "Have \\v Learned The Lesson of The Day 0 The sermon will be dedicated to Armistice Day. In addition to the sermon there will be pi hymns, music, scripture reading and a question box. For the Best in Fish FRESH DAILY BUY *T EAST COAST FISH MARKET Incorporated 360 W. FLAGLER ST. (At the Bridge "If It Swims We Have It" keeping: ARE WE t .in 11 with those w hi % trust u-. arc w c li\ mg up in our obligations it wc risk their future happines' :'\ ignoring the problems tli.u would arise for them it. some day. wc did //"/ come home? I iic insurance offers the safe and certain answer. There i substitute. A Southern Icalth c\: I ifc Insurance I'olisv on each one is necessary ti> protect the others from the privation and expense caused by the last illness and death. A few pennies each weels i total cost. SOUTHERN LIFE <\ HEALTH INSURANCF COMPANY A program on pea-and the ar-.. .. 1 S. ( ,OOK, AI./;;.;. mistlce was presented ai ih< mel. n i!,,,i lv Board ,. M .... phont %  **}* ing of Sisterhood ol Ten.ple Israel RmzHmmmU^miS^^ We offer a friendly understanding that extends far beyond a mere satisfaction. PRIVATE AMBULANCE SERVICE DAY AND NIGHT Phone 2-1314 John W. Burke Funeral Home No Extra Charge to Drive to Local Towns Office: 29 N. W. Third Avenue—Phone 2-3535 Funeral Parlors—1512 W. Flagler St.—Phone 2-1314 JOHN W. BURKE. Funeral Advisor-Director