The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00225

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewisti Florid tin
pfopie nay cme and P*Ple
M ,hich have gone on with the
>lfadfast faith of the Jewish peo-
plr 8oe> '' and on forever, even
unlo eU-rni'y-
VunR Jacob Panheffski. just a
, (f month- ago in the prime of
hlth and vigor, as so many oth-
rrsho haw been struck down by
thf throe- of the depression and
gnomic struggle, came to Miami
Brarh to seek work. Infortunately
bf found none. The Hebrew
Friendly Inn came to his aid and
there provided food and lodging
a. ii has for many other homeless
nftderers. But young Robert was
rrvtlfss I"' wanted not charity
but an opportunity to work. He
did odd jobs from time to time and
js( as he was about to begin work
it a steady position he fell seri-
ously ill. To the Jackson Memorial
hospital and from there because
he was a charity ward he was
Ukrn to the County hospital at
Kendall where he underwent an
operation. He was finally dis-
charged but because- of the long
deprivations he had undergone.
Robert now became mentally irre-
-pcinsiblr. One day he was arrest-
ed and after some study of the
use he was committed to the
Slate Hospital for Insane at C'hat-
tahoochec.
The Jewish Welfare bureau
which had become interested in
Ins ease did all within its power
I" make life more bearable. But
Robert, now no more his normal
self, tore .it the bandages he was
earinc alter the operation, and
at < hatl.iliooc hec became desper-
Mctj ill. there Robert died, far
from hi- friends, far from his peo-
ple, .imi there he was burled.
Then ,me call after call, ap-
peal ftei appeal from the family
'i Milwaukee, all too poor to do
anything themselves. Bring our
lv to "Kaver Visroel" was their
'Ppeal. !,.( him find a resting
P'aee within the Jewish fold."
Rabbis were appealed to. Primar-
ily this was no matter for Miami.
"as .1 much a problem for oth-
er Jewish communities in Florida.
The ( sid shel Kmes Sister-
Mdand the Greater Miami Jew-
Mi Cemetery association was ap-
pealed to, And soon the wheels
*ttn to turn. Letters and tele-
Wains were srn, (o every Jewish
Mamnnity in Florida. St. Peters-
bu't responded with a small con-
tributi..,,. Jacksonville, the nearest
J'ish community of size to Chat-
UMOchee agreed to provide a bur-
1,1 Plot at the Jewish cemetery.
'nit
no other communities as much
" acknowledged the letters. The
rr> Which never yet in the history
" the Jewish people has gone
ahetded, "Bring our boy's body
'" "Kaver YisroelV resounded
* and doser. and more em-
Phati.allv each day. Something
mus| be done. Something was
done.
And now
(butter
. with the cost of
rr'"g. express charges and
""ier costs not small, being paid
1 "" Greater Miami Jewish
,m,''iv association and the si--
Hrhood of Cheaed shel Emes.
0,*rt I'ar.heffski will at last
'""" '" rest within the folds of
Own people. Wandering about
"s life, restless and struggling
I.ORID.VS ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY
MIAMI. FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JUNE 16, 1933.
Price Five Cents
Welfare Bureau
Sponsors Benefit
Those interested in helping carry
on the work of relieving the needy-
Jewish families of this district are
urged to attend a bridge patty at the
Columbus hotel next Wednesday
evening, June 21, when a very pleas-
ant evening of entertainment will
be sponsored. Prizes will be awarded
for high scons and refreshments will
be served in charge ol general ar-
rangements for this affair is Mrs
Many Oliphant, who Ls being a
ed by members of the organization
Talmud Torah
Resumes Sessions
Cemetery Board
Elects Officers
The annual election of officers of
the Oreater Miami Jewish Cemetery
association was held last Wednesday
night and the following were unan-
imously elected: W. L. Williams.
president: I. l. Mintzer, vice presi-
dent; M. B. Frank, treasurer: H. M.
Drevich. financial secretary, and
Sadye O. Rose, recording secretary.
Directors who will serve are William
Mechlowitz. J. Louis Shochet. Harry
M.ukowitz. Lewis Brown. Sol Gold-
strom and Mesdames Morns Kotkin
and Sol Schwartz, Mr Manuel Rip-
pa i- honorary president. These offi-
cers will be installed at a banquet to
be held in Beth David Talmud Tor-
ah hall on Wednesday evening, June
28. when the officers and directors
and their wives, the pre I
pn rident, secretary and treasurer of
each congregation, tl nt and
vice president of ei rhood
will attend A resolution of thanks
to the outgoing officers was
mously adopted, II being pointed out
that one of the main: accomplish-
ments was the reduction In the In-
debtedness ni tl tery and the
bi ilnin of title to the
plot for the principal sums paid In
In charge of arrangi for the
banquet ls a commit1' mslsl
Mi idames Manuel Rlppa, M
Kotkin, Sol Schwartz, s. O. Rose, L.
Abrams. and Messrs. H. M. Di
Sol Schwartz. M. B. Frank and M
Rippa.
According to an announcement
made this week the Talmud Torah
of the Miami Jewish Orthodox con-
gregation will continue its summer
session daily except Saturday and
Sunday beginning at 10 a.m. every
morning, Mr. Herman Braunstein.
nationally known educator. Ls direc-
tor of the Talmud Torah and in di-
recl charge of the work. In outlining
the plans for the Talmud Torah. Mr.
Braunstein said. "I am happy that
the officers and board of the con-
ion and its Ladies" auxiliary-
air in thorough accord with my
plans for enrolling every Jewish boy
and girl m the City in obtaining
some knowledge of Hebrew, our tra-
ditions, history and faith." "Never
before in our history has the neces-
sity for a Jewish education been so
manifestly and vividly brought home
to our people as at this time, partic-
ularly because of the German out-
against all who have Jewish
blood in them." "I am happy to Bay
that every Jewish boy and girl Ls
me to attend our Talmud Tor-
ah and to enrol] as a student." "Ev-
en though they may be unable to
pay for their children's tuition or
may belong to some other congrega-
tion, we shall be happy to extend
our facilities to them so that their
children may be brought up to re-
specl and know themselves." "Espe-
cially do we want those in the
iborhood of the congregation to
their children to us." "During
unmet- the boy and girl is free
from school work and worries and Is
fore enabled to quickly grasp
and ui : without much i
on his part, it i- the bo
the year for Jewish education and
Children may be enrolled at
1545 S. W. Third
street any morning after 9:31 a.m.
Synagog calls
Generel Meeting
All members of the Miami Jewish
Orthodox congregation are urged to
attend a meeting of the entire con-
gregation to be held at the syna-
gogue next Tuesday evening, June
20, beginning at 8:15 p.m.. when im-
portant matters will be presented for
the consideration of the members.
An important announcement will be
made regarding the work of the Tal-
mud Torah and plans for the im-
mediate future of the congregation
will be acted on.
Ladies Install
New Officers
. ...
Announcements!
CONGREGATION BETH JACOB
(Orthodox)
SI I Washington Ae Miami Beach
The usual services begin at 6:30
p.m. Saturday morning services be-
gin at 8:30 and Mincha services, fol-
lowed by Marriv at 6:30 p.m. Late
services have been discontinued un-
til the High Holidays. Daily services
begin at 8 a.m.
Cemetery To
Be Beautified
Auxiliary Plans
Picnic Series
Plans for a series of summer pic-
nics for the benefit of the Ladies'
auxiliary ol the Miami Jewish Orth-
I odox congregation will be announced
' soon. The funds will be used exclus-
ively- towards the upkeep of the sum-
mer term of the Talmud Torah.
which is being supported by the or-
ganization, in charge of arrange-
ments will be a committee whose
raster will be announced at the next
meeting of the auxiliary Tuesday-
evening. June 26. by Mrs Jack
Hirsch, president of the auxiliary.
i the search for a livelihood de-
nied him through no fault Of In-
own. Robert will *> thi,t ew"
lasting peace, not in a paupers
grave at Chattataooctaee but in the
midst of his own Jewish people,
Ind so that age-old cry, "let me
rest among my own," "Bring me
to 'Kaver YisroelV will again be
aaswend in the only way that
jews throughout the centunes
have ever replied.
Much progress has been made in
the past several weeks towards the
permanent beautification of the
Jewish section or the Woodlawn
cemetery which is owned by the
sociation. The plans provide for the
landscaping of the entire tract as
well as of the individual graves, with
ilian pine hedges bordering
the public driveway. During the past
week a concrete block tool house has
been built and a permanent keeper
has been engaged. The Sisterhood of
Chesed Shel Emes is assuming full
responsibility for the expense of the
complete landscaping, permanent
upkeep and the erection of the tool
house. As soon as sufficient funds
are raised a chapel will be erected
on the cemetery grounds. Last Wed-
nesday the officers of the Greater
Miami Jewish Cemetery association
passed a unanimous vote of thanks
to the officers and members of the
Sisterhood for the splendid work ac-
complished by them during the past
year.
A very- interesting and pleasant
nening was spent last Sunday night
when the officers and board of di-
rectors of the Ladies' auxiliary of the
Miami Jewish Orthodox congrega-
tion were installed in office at a
banquet held at the Palatial Kosher
irant. In charge of arrange-
ments was a committee headed by-
Mr.-. Max Kupferstein. who was as-
sisted by Mrs. J. L. Shochet and
Messrs. H. M. Drevitch and Max
Rappaport. The banquet was for-
mally opened by Mr. Max Kupfer-
stein. who presented the toastmaster
of the evening. The invocation was
offered by Mrs. jack Hirsch. Ad-
were made bj Mrs. Ida
Buckstein, first president of the or-
itlon; Mr- William Mechlo-
witz. Mrs. Meyer Schwartz, president
of the Ladies' auxiliary of the Jew-
ish Welfare bureau: Mrs. Bernard
Simon, past president of the Senior
Council Of Jewish Women: Mr-
Max Kupferstein. Messrs. Milton
nt of the con.
tion: Nathan Adelman. H M. Dre-
vitch. Jack Hirsch and Max Kupfer-
stein. A very eloquent address was
delivered by Mr, Herman Braun-
stein. director of the congregation's
Talmud Torah on "The Necessity Ol
a Jewish Education Today." Follow-
ing the formal administering of the
oath of office, responses were made
by Mrs. Jack Hirsch. the newly-
elected president, and Mrs. Harry
Kotkin. who was elected vice presi-
dent. Cantor Nathan Wroobel sang
several Yiddish songs, which were
ereatly enjoyed by those attending.
A number of congratulatory tele-
grams were received.
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI
(Reform)
137 N. i: Nineteenth Street
DR. JACOB II. KAPLAN, Rabbi
Beginning with services on Friday-
night, services will be held in Kap-
lan hall during the summer months,
and will be very brief. Services for
the benefit of those who take theii
religion seriously and wish to at-
tend services.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
(Conaervatire)
139 N. W. Third Wnue
MAX SHAPIRO, Rabbi
Friday evening services begin at
6:30 p.m. Saturday morning services
begin at 8:30 a.m. Mincha followed
by Marriv begin at 6:30. Daily ser-
vices begin at 8 a.m.
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION
'Orthodox)
1145 B. W. Third Street
JONAH E. CAPLAN, Rabbi
Friday evening services begin at
6:30 p.m. Saturday morning services
begin at 9 a.m. and the Mincha and
Marriv services at 6:30 p.m. Talmud
Torah will resume on Monday at
the usual hour. Arrangements for
Yahrzeit may be made by calling
the sexton. Mr. William Clein. 2-
0879.
Club to Banquet
New Officers
The Hebrew Athletic club will hold
its official installation of officers at
a formal banquet to be given the
week of June 25. the exact time and
place to be announced In the next
issue of The Jewish Floridian. In
charge of the arrangements is a
committee consisting of Hymar.
Apte. Murray Kellman and H. Ler-
ner. Plans call for an evening that
will hear a number of the leading
citizens of Miami talk on matters of
vital importance to the community.
as well as a number of musical se-
lections by prominent artists.
Hadassah Names
Committee Heads
Meeting at the home of its recent-
ly elected president. Mrs. Max Do-
brin. Senior Hadassah newly elected
officers discussed plans for the com-
ing installation tea which will be
held Monday afternoon. June 26. at.
the Strath Haven hotel. Miami
Beach, beginning at 2:30 p.m. In
charge of the arrangements is Mrs.
Leonard Epstein, who will be assist-
ed by Mrs. Sam Simonhoff. Commit-
tee appointments announced by Mrs.
Dobrin were: Palestine Supplies.
Mrs. Sam Katz: Education. Mrs.
Leonard Epstein: Hospitality. Mrs.
Harry I. Lipton: Program. Mrs.
Frances Williamson, assisted by Mrs.
Harry Weinberg: Personal Interest,
Mrs. Louis Heiman: Membership,
Mrs. Barney Weinkle; School Lun-
cheon. Mrs. Isidor Cohen: Jewish
National Fund. Mrs. Julius Simpson:
Infant Welfare. Mrs. Morns Dubler:
Milk Bag Fund. Mrs. B. Kandel:
Way- and Means. Mesdames Sam
Simonhoff and Louis Zeientz: offi-
cial representative. Mrs. Mannie
Wesson; Senior-Junior representa-
tive. Mrs. H. Krieger; Publicity, Mrs.
Bernard Simon.


The Junior Hadassah will hold an
important meeting Monday night.
June 19. at the Ponce de Leon hotel,
when plans for the installation of
the recently chosen officers will bo
announced. All members are urged
to attend.
a
Miss Mildred Clein entertained
with a bridge at her home last week
with five tables of bridge in play
honoring the Misses Jo Marlowe and
Frances Bridge water of Birming-
ham, and Rose Finn. Edith C'ein.
Sarah Glustrom. Mollie Clein and
Janet Clein of Atlanta. Others at-
tending were Beckie Weingarten.
Ruth Goldberg. Ruth Drevitch. Na-
talie Pallott. Dot Roth. Maxine
Kantor. Lois Louis. Mrs. R. J. Clein.
Edna Wolkoski. Sylvia Leibovit. Ros-
alyn Daum. Myrtle Zeientz. Char-
lotte Kohn and Ben Clein. who re-
cently returned from the Georgia
Military academy where he Is a stu-
dent.
Julv 1.2.3
TO ALMOST ANY-
WHERE YOU WANT
TO GO
Through! the South. East and
West. lull Seven-Day Limit
From Miami
ROUND TRIP
.New York- -$31.25
Chicago 34.00
Washington 23.10
Philadelphia 28.00
Proportionately low fares from
all other East Coast points.
IliinJmls nj other destinations
CONSULT AGENTS
FLORIDA
EAf T COA1T
RAILWAY
Mr. and Mrs. George A. Rubin of
Rockford. III., and daughters, Arhne
and Bubbles, who spent the past
' winter season here, returned to their
home by auto last Monday.

The Misses Ray U. and Esther V.
Shochet. daughters of Mr. and Mr.-.
J. Louis Shochet. left last Sunday
by auto to visit relatives in Balti-
more. Md. On their way there they
will visit friends in Orlando. Jack-
sonville and Washington. D. C. They
will spend the summer in the North,
returning here before the high holi-
days.
As we go to press the A. Z. A.
Junior Bnai Brithi is entertaining
a number of its student members
who returned to the city after hav-
Ing spent the past year at colleges
in Florida and elsewhere.

An important meeting of the Lad-
les' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish
Orthodox congregation will be held
at the synagogue next Tuesday eve-
ning, June 20. All members are urg-
ed to attend.

The mania!;, ol Ml l Han-
nah P.' hter ': Mr, Ellas
R. Rose of this city, to Mr g
August, tin' son oi Mr. and Mrs. G.
t, will be solemnized at Beth
navid synagogue Sunda;
",8. at 7 30 p.m. Tin- will be
audi-
;
8 p.m.
k stark lected
bees at 1 ion oi
at :":'I0 w.
W(
I :\ '. ;
Tampa pas) commander;
iret Kelly, Miami, lieu!' :
inder; Norman Ho well, Miami,
.in: Earl H impa, pres-
dl nt: Etii' Mian...
I eper; .lack Kelly. Tampa, and Lu-
-Ule Guise, Miami, dag bearers; Rae
- ns. Tampa, and Eugene Stark
Miami, guards, and Albcn I.auven-
Ino, Miami, sentinel.
The convention opened Tuesday.
At night delegate.- attended a ban-
quet at the Coral Gable- Country
club. Wednesday afternoon they
were entertained with a sightseeing
trip of the Miami area and a beach
party.
More than 75 delegates from all
parts of the state were in attend-
ance.

An important meeting of the exec-
utive board of the Ladles' auxiliary
of the Jewish Welfare bureau will be
held at the home of its president
Mrs Meyer Schwartz, next Monday.
June 19. beginning at 1:30 and this
will be followed by a general meeting
of the members promptly at 2:15.
All members are urged to attend.

Mr. and Mis. Sydney H Mayer oi
423 N. E. Twenty-third street, have
announced the engagement of their
daughter, Cecile Dessa. to Milton
Allied Pearlstine of Charleston. S.
C. the marriage to be in August
Miss Mayer was graduated from
Miami High school and received her
B A. degree recently from Agnes
Scott college. Mr. Pearlstine is the
son of Mr. and Mrs. H. Pearlstine oi
Charleston. He received his degree
from Citadel Military academy and
is a past president of the Citadel
Alumni association.
Mrs Isaac Levin. 430 N. E. Twi 11-
tv-ninth street, and Mrs. H. H. Mil-
40 N. W. Eighth street, will be
among the 1.500 delegates attending
.In- council ol the Union of Ameri-
can Hebrew Congregations. the
bienni '. assembly of thi
:' di ration of Ti mj
and tii'1 tilth biennial con-
dition ol the National Fedi
: i mple Brol hei hoods Mrs Em-
ma Mom r l- ,u.
Mil take place a: !h' li
In Chicago, .June ih-l'l. one
: thi features on the union pro-
.' ill be a symi
ligion Tomorrow
Ralph Gro n
two of the local young men wl
well known in athletic and
Atlanta fi i
While thi re they will
visit friends and relatives, They will
o visit veral other southei i
les Mi Grossman is athletic direc-
tor and Mr. Relsman secretary ol
the Hebrew Athletic club.
SIDHBOTTOM
Ice Cream Co.
2424 N. W. 7th Ave.
I 100 W. 1 lad' SI.
733 N. W. .Illh SI.
PHONE 2-3MI2
We have just
opened
Currey's
Cut Flowers
and Fruits
Floral Designs Our Specialty
227 E. FLAGLER STREET
Ponce de Leon Hotel
-----------1
CAMP WOHELO
For Girls
An Ideal Vacation Spot for
Vour Daughter
Ml K 111 \ I1KRKOWITCH LEVY
Owner and Director
Hilda Riesner
187 8. W. Thirteenth Street
MIAMI REPRESENTATIVE
For Information Phone 3-2493
The first ol a series ol summei
dances of the Junior Council of Jew-
ish Women will be held at the Coral
Gables Country club on Sunday eve-
ning, July 2. with Miss Miriam
8chelnberg In charge of the arrange-
ments, assisted by Lee Ka-sanoff. j
Bessie WermkofT. Claire Simon. Flo |
Merlin. Mary Ann Kamin. Eleanor
Sheldon and Harriet Kantor. At this
dance the first of a series of dance
contests will be begun, the winners
of each dance to compete at the
final dance for a loving cup. The
next meeting of the organization
will be held at the Ponce de Leon
hotel on Tuesday evening. June 20
when important business will be dis-
cussed. Meetings hereafter will be
held at the homes of different mem-
bers and rho.se unable to obtain
transportation may communicate
with Miss Lee Kasanolt. who has
been named telephone chairman.

The Misses Sylvia and Millie Drel-
sen left last week for Massachusetts
where they will spend their summer
vacation.

Miss Beatrice SharT, daughter of
Mrs. Max Shaft, pioneer resident ol
Miami, will become the bride of Dr.
Leonard Finn at a ceremony to be
held at the Strath Haven hotel, Mi-
ami Beach. Following the ceremony
which will be attended by immediate
members of the family only, there
will be a dinner for the bridal party
and relatives. The bride will be at-
tended by her sister Daisy as maid
of honor and she will be given in
marriage by her uncle, Mr. B. M.
Frank. Sidney Pepper will be best
man and little Charlotte Frank will
be flower girl. Following the cere-
monies and dinner all friends of the
family are invited to attend a recep-
tion at the home of the bride. 319
N E Twenty-fifth street. No cards
have been issued. The couple will
leavi lor a brief honeymoon trip to
Jacksonville. Columbus. Ohio and
other points north.

The Misses Betty Greenberg and
Esther Kaufman will be hostesses at
a card party the latter part of this
month for the benefit of the Junior
Council of Jewish Women.

The lawn party and dance being
sponsored by the Hebrew Athletic
club will be held on Sunday evening.
June 25. at the community centre,
when plans call for an evening ol
gala entertainment and dancing, in
chargl oi arrangements is a com-
mittee headed by Manuel Weinklc
who is beinu assisted by Murry
man. Leo Chaikin and Sol Le-
vin.
Amoi representing the
: Council ol Jewi.-h Women to
tea bell Iven by the
senior group an- Pauline Shonfeld,
i. K .i Kohn, Bi
WernikOfl and Mary Am. Kamin.
taurant,
D44 Ocean drive. Miami Beach, is
ii mi popular spoi
on the beach front because ol the
I and
the \' i table prici
ft ntlj I)*'1 n completely ren-
' -
fashion with the tropical
:. I .' Open hearth tire
in i for roas ting and rotisserie is
used tor the preparation ol many
delicious dishes and in addition to
sandwiches ol all kind-. Ice cold be i r
and drink-, complete meals ari
Cialized in. An excellent place to
cool oil amid pleasant surroundings
.' the same tune providing delicious
fi d to serve the most exacting is
provided at Bornstein's.
AdulU 20r
Children 10c
Box Office
open* B : i'<
p.m. Sunday
Sunda> and Monday. June l*-l!
JOHN BAKRYMORE in
"BILL of
DIVORCEMENT
With Catharine Hepburn
and Itilhr Burke
Crowds are still coming daily
the Dobson & Co. fire sale of groce
ies at the German hall. S. W. Eigh
avenue and Fourth street, to ta
advantage of the tremendous ..,,
ings offered them on well know
standard brands of canned goo.
and other groceries, and as fast
the merchandise is sold it is belt]
replenished from the $52,000 Hi
Bros.. Inc. stock, sold to the Dobsoi
company through insurance con]
panics who carried the fire losses
feature of the sale is the absoluti
guarantee of every article sol
something usually absent when tin
sales are held. Attention of ou
readers is called to a few of tin av
ings shown in an ad appearing i
our issue, and to the further facJ
that hundreds of other well know
articles may be purchased at re4
markably low prices. The same courJ
teous treatment which has brouelil
forth much praise is being accorded
all customers, and will be shown]
throughout the continuance ol the)
sale.
Cantor Boris Schlachman chanted]
the Friday night and Saturday
morning services at Bnai Israel con-J
gregatlon last week at the request fl
Rabbi Kleinleld and the officers ufl
the congregation. Cantor Schlach-I
man is the guest of Mr. Hyn j
Jacobs, president of the con
tion. during his stay here.


Accumulate
Capital!
INVEST IN
MORRIS PLAN
CERTIFICATES
Sums in multiples nf S1.00 will
be accepted and applied to pur-
chase of Certificates which in-
issued in denominations of S50
to S5.000.
It is the policy of the Company
to rash these Certificates at
face value upon request.
THE
MORRIS PLAN
COMPANY
of MIAMI
VINCENT H. BRICK, liar.
105 N. E. First Avenue
MIAMI, FLORIDA
Now you ran bu\
BILTMORE
LAUNDRY SERVICE
at a price that fits your pocket boob'
PHONE 3-3(187 21 N. W. 9TII ST.


Alexander Orr, Jr., Inc.
Plumbing and Heating
MIAMI in m ii
1122 I6ih si. Phone 5-3S46
MIAMI
45 N. W. 3rd SI. Phone 2-3691
CARTER FUNERAL SERVICE
'.14 WEST FI.AKI.ER STREET PHONES 2-8421 2-84
MITCHELL JACOBY, Experienced Jewsib Attendant in Charge


. iJjV. tune It, mi.
THE JEWISH
FLOKIDIAN
PUBLISHED KVEKY FRIDAY
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MOI M.ORIDIAN PUBLISHING CO.
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FRIDAY, JINK 16, 1933.
Vol. (i, No. 24.
A GOVERNOR ON HITI.EKISM
Not only Jews, but all other advo-
cates of religious equality welcomed
Governor Albert C. Ritchie's address
before the meeting ol the American
..ii Conference Against Rat lal
ution In Germany, held in
n Monday, June 5.
"1 am not concerned with the
:orm 01 government Germany has
adopted, or with political conditions
:here. Such things are for Germany
:o decide. Hut whatever our race
ud whatevei our creed, we are all
en oi God. His teaching was
ii] Love. We have no
nd Idly and Indifferently
by when Love and Brotherhood and
Understanding are trampled by
ruthless and when the forces
: Hate are unleashed."
As citizens of free America we
gave the elemental right to say that
of bigotry and prejudice
do longer be fomented and
capitalized by an opportunist for his
Ijloriflcatii n, bul to the tragic detri-
ment of a people who are our broth-
May your protest be heard when-
nd wherever, as now in Ger-
nmental might and dic-
r threaten the Inalien-
; man."
The above quotations from Gover-
Rll address contain expres-
Dught under which all
liglous liberty can safc-
lrstand In the battle against Hitler-
am and the like.
Would that oilier governors would
1 be unafraid and voice those
une sentiments which would
them as fearless champions
,; human rights and liberties.
JEWISH ATHLETES
The executive committee of the
Olympic, ames. an international
eatlon, has declared through
Gieral Charles Sherill, U. S. dclc-
Wte to the Vienna meeting of the
tattmational body, that Germany
' only permit Jews to reprc-
,'i"" nations in the games,
jrteduicd to be held in Berlin, but
"St Jew., must be free to represent
Germany as well. It is a Just and a
li* decision. Germany, of course,
d not accede to this demand, yet
*>es not. the games will be
re than in the Prussian
| aP"al. The world well may acclaim
Kb a decision.Palm Beach Times.
"an fears not only with his brain.
Vs' eminent Dr. Orile, but also
'"h his thyroid, his adrcnal-sym-
*thet'( tern, and in fact with
and cell of his body." In
bad Situation I seem to fear
* *ith my feet, and they go right
| la5' from there.
|51Jjarity 1LS a cl(k often proves a
THE JEWISH FLORIDI
AN
Condition of
German Jews
Is Told
In launching the campaign for the
relief of German Jews last week,
Habbi Jonah B. Wise, director of
the campaign, .said:
"The existing civil law excludes
the Jews from all official positions,
from the highest down to the posl
of night watchman. Only one per
cent oi all the Jews in Germany are
permitted to retain Mich official po-
sitions as t hey were holding when
the present laws went into effect
But, since the law envisages one a-
a Jew who has merely had a Jewish
grandparent, the number of 'com-
plete' Jews who may benefit from
this law is greatly lessened. Accept-
ing the formula of what constitute-,
a Jew as outlined In the present civil
law. they constitute from 10 to 15
per cent of the German population:
yet, only one per cent are to be per-
mitted to hold official positions. The
only mitigation Ol the decree Is the
permission to remain in public posi-
tions that has been extended to
I hose who had tho e positions prior
to 19H. and also those who
in the trenches during the war. as
well as the -on.s and lather.- of Jew-
ish soldiers who were killed In the
war.
"There are 5,048 .i' wish ci\ I
vants in Prussia," Rabin Wise con-
tinued, "and approximately o.ooo in
all of Germany. They constitute
only one-hall ol one per cent of the
entire civil service. Here, therefore,
the "Aryan clause' applies. Assum-
ing the most i nate Inter-
pretation Ol the law, Jew.- as civil
servants will nol exceed l.non. Five
thousand will lose their Jobs, and. to
make things worse, Will be denied
pensions.
A numerus clausus has been set
up for lawyer- -the same one per
cent. The question arises: are those
who have accepted baptism to be in-
cluded In the official calculation as
Jews? There are about 10.000 law-
yers in Germany, ol whom about 2.-
800 are lews At the be-t. only one-
third Of them can continue m prac-
tice. Fifteen hundred will lose their
means ol livelihood Nor is this all;
most, if not all, ol the elder lawyers
are also notaries public, and m Ger-
many, B notary public Is a civil ser-
vant. Here the Aryan test' will get
In its deadly work. The Jewish law-
yers who will be permitted to con-
tinue m practice will cease to be
notaries, and as notarial work Is the
main business of lawyers In Ger-
many, even those Jews who are still
permitted to serve as lawyer, will
And themselves without sufficient
practice and with Insufficient means
of livelihood."
Taking up nexl the medical pro-
taB8lon m Germany, Rabbi Wise
pomted out that of the 50,000 phy-
acians m that country. 7,000 are
jews. The existing cui law regard-
ing the profession Is analogous to
the law relating to civil servants, he
said "Under its provisions. he
pointed out, "Jewish physicians can
not engage m insurance pract.ee.
subject only to the same exceptions
M in the case of other Civil servants
Since in Germany, from eighty to
eighty-five per cent of all medical
practice Is Insurance practice the
.w Jewa wno will be permitted t
serve the public as physicians will
have DO revenue Indeed, the Situa-
tion there Is such that even these
rflW8 who are permitted to engage In
;, pracuce. have thai ,H,,n,sK,n
1 ly in theory 1'he pat,en- who d-
-,,e, treatment must obtain a CSrtt-
tia-e from bi. 81Ck Fund JKi >
;llHl 0,^ are now issued with the
Inscription, 'Does not hold good for
Jewish doctors.'
"Thus, anywhere between four and
five thousand of the seven thousand
''wish physicians in Germany are
losing their livelihoods. To that
number we must add Jewish muni-
1 'pal officials, male and female, pub-
lie welfare workers, and so on say
another thousand who have lost or
are losing their means ol livelihood.
And to these must be added, also,
iome 500 pharmaceutical chemists
and pharmacists, and about l.ooo
dentists driven out of practice. If we
add another category, that is Jews
On the operatic and dramatic stages.
in the lilms. musicians, journalist,-.
authors and so on. we have another
3.000 who haw lost their jobs and
are without incomes. Thus we pile
UP a total oi 13.000 to 15,000 'intel-
lectuals' alter having deducted the
InfUniteslmal minority who for reas-
ons like those already describee! are
.still permitted to work for a living."
Taking up the fields of commerce
and Industry, Rabbi Wise said that
there were about 70.000 Jews en-
i In commercial pursuits and In
trade in Germany plus 75.000 "white
collar' employees and 20.000 work-
men A very considerable proportion
of them were seriously suffering
from unemployment, he states, bo-
tore the present regime came into
power, since the boycott, the num-
ber Ol unemployed Jews, m these
fields, he declared, has increased so
rapidly as to total from 20.000 to 25,-
000 "We were credibly informed
that the German government con-
templates a numerus clausus here.
also, limiting the number of Jewish
"white collar" worker to five per
cent. The numb) r ol business men.
owners or part-owners ol Indepen-
dent establishments Is steadily being
forced down by the methods with
which all the world Is now familiar.
"If these plans are carried out, as
we are constrained to believe they
Will," declared Rabbi Wise, "German
Jewry will be utterly and completely
ruined. I cannot sufficiently under-
score the statement that if anything
like a numerus clausus is introduced
with regard to commerce, industry
and trade, German Jewry as such
will be entirely ruined. There will be
nothing left for them but starvation
or exodus!
"Already thousands of them are
besieging the olfices ol the commit-
tee m Berlin and other cities for as-
sistance In getting away to some-
where, anywhere. Viewing the possi-
bilities for flight from Germany
most optimistically, we must reckon
on an exodus of a minimum of 50.-
000 during the next two years. Those
who still remain in the land will be
cruelly impoverished, as I have
pointed out. but will still. In a cer-
tain sense have a i-hance to make a
livelihood, though a very inadequate
one. These 50,000 who will emigrate
during the next two years do not In-
clude those who have already fled;
nor the so-called 'Ost-Juden'. the
.Jewish masses Irom eastern Europe
Of whom the larger number will
have to be repatriated. There are
from 80,000 to 00,000 Ost-Juden' of
whom between 40,000 and 50,000 will
have to be returned whence they
came mostly as refugees during
lie World war. as victims of the war
itself, of pogroms and 'white rcvolu-
lons' and Red revolutions' and the
.ountlcss miseries to which the Jews
of eastern Europe were subjected to
from 1914 on. Then there is a group
of 7.000 stateless' holders of Nansen
passports, which Will increase the
stream of emigrants since they have
no homeland to which to return.
Thus far. well over 25.000 refu-
,,. have registered with aid com-
mittees In France. Switzerland, Hol-
land. England. Czecho Slovakia.
Denmark, the Saar Region, Austria.
Luxembourg and elsewhere. Many
thousands more have not yet applied
to the committees because they are
Page Three
THE
^8&i GUMftM
The American Law Institute says
that if you fall out of an airplane
Into somebody's back yard, you are
a trespasser there. It might be a bet-
ter idea to fall through the roef, and
ask the maid to announce that you
have come for a call. Nearly all hos-
tesses will be reasonably gracious
under those circumstances.
How did Noah and his family pass
the time in the Ark while waiting
for the flood to subside? Addressing
the annual meeting ot the Education
Association conference (Bng.), Dr.
C. w. Klmmine told a story of a
teacher who asked one of his pupils
that question. The teacher suggested
that Noah spent the time fishing,
but the bright lad interrogated ridi-
culed the idea on the ground that
there were only two worms m the
Ark.
Green Is to be the popular color
tins summer in male attire. We were
pretty sure if we held on for long,
our tuxedo would return to fashion.
still using up the remnants of their
msans. We know that in France
there are now from four to live
thousand, with 100 to 120 new ar-
rivals daily: over n.ooo in Switzer-
land, an equal number in Holland, a
similar number in England and from
lour to five thousand scattered in
other countries.
The possibilities for absorption
oi these refugees into the general
population is very slight. In almost
every country they are forbidden to
accept employment or to be em-
ployed because of economic condi-
tions. Switzerland makes exceptions
only in the case of purely political
refugees. Relatively, the most favor-
able conditions exist in France.
However, there, too. only a small
number can be placed, like doctors.
chemists, business men and indus-
trialists.
"In England efforts are being
made to find some possibilities tot
settling a fair number. In other
countries such efforts are useless
The possibilities do not exist. Efforts
are made to assist at least some of
them in obtaining work and getting
settled, but with only slight success.
The possibilities for emigration to
countries across the sea are simi-
larly limited. Hardly more than, say
3,000 Jews will be able during the
course of one year to emigrate to
oversea countries, chiefly South.
America, and a limited number of
refugees will be able to settle in Pal-
estine.
"Meanwhile the distress in Ger-
many itself is growing stupendously.
Thousands are besieging the various
Offices in Berlin and all other large
towns. Practically all doctors and
lawyers and nearly all intellectuals
are without any income. Their in-
dividual fates will probably not be
decided before September. But. al-
ready they are beginning to starve
The dismissed employees are getting
no dole or assistance in any form
from the government. Distress and
misery are beginning to spread like
a devouring cancer over the whole
Jewish community."
The funds raised by the Joint Dis-
tribution committee in this country
and by Jewish committees In other
lands will be used to relieve the en-
tirely destitute, to assist the "white
collar" men and women to find a
means of gaining a livelihood, and
will be used also to aid the Jewish
communities of Germany to estab-
lish schools for their youth where
they will be equipped for economic
battle with the hopeless future
awaiting them, said Rabbi Wise.
A modern ship with stabilizers is
just like the rest of us it's last its
roll.
I shall love the parade of life
When I can no longer march;
The starry dip of the Ha -.
The blue of the heavenly arch.
I shall love the uplifted heads,
And the poise and the valiant
St ride
Of the procession I cannot join.
As I watch them step in pride.
Though I never march again,
But sit on thi there,
Furrowed and pale of brow.
With Time's silver on my hair;
Though i have but a memory
Of the happiness and the strife
when I marched with the turbulent
throng.
I shall love the parade ol life!
A historian reports that women
used cosmetics In the Middle Ages.
Women still use cosmetics in the
middle ages.
Then there was the fat woman
who. when told to take lots of exer-
cise, immediately began lumping at
every ((inclusion she saw,
Old Man Goliath stomped and
roared:
"Come on. you measly creature
Stand up and fiRht me like a man,
And rate a Sunday feature!''
Heh!
Hehl
Heh!
Then David he looked down his
nose;
He felt his knees grow colder.
"Let me alone," he says, "until
I get a little bowlder!"
Ho!
Ho!
Ho!
We are all blind until we see
That In the human plan
Nothing is worth the making, if
It does not make the man
Why build these cities glorious
II man unbuilded got ?
In vain we build the work, unless
The builder also grows.
The patter of tiny feet was heard
Ion the stairs. Mrs. Kinderly raised
'her hand, warning the members ol
| her bridge club to be silent.
"Hush!" she said softly. "The chil-
dren are going to deliver then good-
night message. It always gives uie a
feeling of reverence to hear them.
I Listen."
There was a moment o tense sil-
ence, then. "Mama." came the mes-
sage in a shrill whisper. "Willie
found a bedbug."
Pietro had been warned to beware
of rattlesnakes, but was told that
they give warning before they
spring. Next day he was eating his
luncheon on a pine log when he saw
a big rattler coiled a few feet In
front of him. He eyed the serpent
and began to lift his leu:- over the
log. He had barely got them out of
the way before the snake's fangs hit
the log beneath him.
"Son of a gunna." yelled Pietro.
"Why you no ringa da bell?"
"I have heard." writes a corres-
pondent of a medical columnist,
that eating frogs' legs will make one
limber. Is there any truth in this?"
Undoubtedly. Limber frogs" legs
make your own legs limber. A frog's
body, on the other hand, is charac-
terized by unusual rigidity. To se-
cure suppleness in the torso a diet
of angleworms is prescribed.


Page lour
THE JEWISH FLORID IAN
Friday, June 16, 195 3.
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Haton ^yttagng Sullrtttt
Edited by RABBI S. M. MACHTEI
Pound** and Dlnetor, Radio ByMgas of America
Sunday Mornings V"IOD, Miami, Florida f
Vol. II. Sl'NDAY, Jl/NE 11. 1933. No. 7. j
???????????????????????????????????????????????
The Rise in the Spiritual Value
Sermon Delivered, by Herbert V. Feibelman, Guest Speaker
MARCH 4. 1933. will ever remain a great day in history. No act of man
will add to us lustre or contribute to its permanence in the galaxy ot
holidays. The date of the fall of the Bastille. Independence day. nay. even
days of high holy celebration will call for no more widespread recognition.
for March 4. 1933. marked an event of world-wide importance. It marked
the time when humanity Itself gained hope of a new freedom. It climaxed
the days and months Of despondence and distress Nations that seemed
destined to carry the yoke of war burdens, for the first time felt ease from
their miseries thai had seemed eternal, Men on that day could conceive of
relief from thi shackles of economic .'...-.cry.
1WAS in the nation's capitol that day It was cold and dreary and the
atmosphere was murky with leaden clouds Thousands had come to
Wu -o attend the ir..r..^..:.;:-.on. perhaps the greatest crowds in the
: Inaugurations It was an orderly and serious throng of men and
women and children of all ranks. The elders came for an event they ex-
pected to be memorable It was They sought a word of comfort and got it.
The air was surcharged with the querj What will Roosevelt say?'' I sat
In on th< stands on tlu Whit< House lawn and can still hear the per-
radio voice ol the new leader, through the loud speaker, as he inspired
the American people, and. through them, the teeming millions of the
world, with his concept of true happiness He said "Happiness lies not in
the mere possess:,-.-, o: mon j it lies In the joy of achievement, in the
effort The Joj and moral stimulation of work no longer
must bo for n in the mad chase of evanescent profits. These dark days
will be worth .i'.'. us Li they teach us that our true destiny is not
to be ministered unto, but to minister to ourselves and to our fellow men."
THIRTEEN million unemployed and millions of others affected by the
depi conomic and sociological conditions comprehended the
good that musl flow from the evil of their sufferings. America, the land of
almosl unlimited resources, of great and farms and factories, of
materials for i and food heard its call to duty to its people
and to the world. The world and America o the dauntless spirit of
Franklin dm >, with a vision ol .i Moses and an eloquence of
a Jen mlah pn ached a gospel of human Interdependence, of mutual help-
:.:'.:. atlon of the spiritual valui
IF I read the temper of our people correctly said this author of "the
r.e-.. .: : realized before our inter-
dependence on each other: that we ..:.:. take but we must
as well, i : rward we must move u .i trained and loyal
arm} willing tc sa v: ot a common discipline. because
without .:p becomes effect-
ive We are : kn ruling I i submit u lives and property to
such discipllni b .. i- it makes ssibl i alms at a
larger good"
THE subs
: t be i A. but < :.. their funds that trulj
n 's souls nact -
mi tits made possit -. .-
respoi consdtui
:.- ni I The in-
y of our s sen ed Tl .: i for-
bearanl -
and with d t: the iranscenden: Deeds :'. the
-r rurreocj -;:r .to;:3ec
(Uld :
AND what fundan I government : tsk perm
entli Roosevt I progrmair r-n ited.
well considered and lose! Sr ;t tili.-.:..-.: t;
thl tull :: 1 .:-: tfcl jgh ".;-.- agl
relief act r ving unemi -.- Act
or raising n :. the V< .--....-. act er of
ar:.:.; D :r it
veil measure be it .-_ by
Inaugu |
and f got ernmi j rma-
nem
rIE day : imited f\p:;:tdt.;:; .: natural
aught a cist
values the spiritual -.i:ur L.:....:. r-j.;: tr.it :ap:ti:
ll the product ot ... OEM though later
needs capital The time Is r will Bud Its rr-iri ihi
power ol Its own pre-emim .~ and wishes of a'
lew master minds In Wall itn I sforgu ma;
the | ad libituir. We -. oe::e: labor condl-
supply of men and n In the comptai
M traffic ::' the ex. We -ar.t do faje
T'r.e tt.it..;-. _- : ir;; _-^
POWI put the :ip:t-:: back when il beta
The r.at. Nucea of men and rr.i-
tenal Human liberty dependent as ever on .abor honestly re-
warded, red and must :.-.-. r agair. be bartered at -.:.-
oy changers The I the hee.
heard b;. tless lead-: bo recognizes DO I
enjoj the proill of the many a: the expense of the need- ;_-.- _:,;
commerce These supports of a modem c: .-:and on f_-rr.e: grc md
There is now and must ever be a partnership be:veer, goverameni and
business, founded firmly on human welfare, on common understanding
and mutual helpfulness The greater good and not private profit must first
be served. Governmental control of the sinews of war and of peace is
insured. We see that the spiritual value has more permanence than any
money standard. Precious human welfare and not precious metals form
the basic standard for permanent happiness.
T1
HOSE who have followed closely the trend of recent events here and
1 abroad expect even further changes in the economic structure. The
millenium is not here. The leaven of perfect functioning has not been ob-
tained. Experimentation is still "in the air." We. in America, are confident
as we are proud, of the superiority of government by a written constitu-
tion. We are sure that the basic principles of our government are sound.
We know the extent of their expansion to meet the most severe emergen-
cies. In times of stress, we have not hesitated to make one branch of the
government the executive the agent of another, the legislative. We do
not fear the centralization of power within constitutional limits. We stand
four-square behind our 150-year-old system, and are wholly unprepared to
suffer the extremes of the Russian experiment or the mob frenzy of Hit-
lensm. Perhaps something good may be evolved from these chimerical
tampenngs with ordered liberty. We know not. But we are certain that the
capacity of our own system has commanded a position of influence, well
recognized at every international parley within the present generation.
THIS new concept of ordered liberty, this product of the horrible years
of depression, this new trend of governmental force and policies will
inevitably spread beyond our shores. The great world economic parley, j
which, by the way. is sponsored by the League of Nations, itself rejected
in America less than 15 years ago this world conference on economic
needs, meets on the morrow. America is represented and represented well.
Through the enactment of timely currency legislation which the Presi-
dent urged months ago in his book. "Looking Forward" the American
delegates have the facilities for stabilizing world currency and credit and
trade, and we may be sure that the spirit of March 4 last will make itself
felt in London: America will assert a doctrine of the very interdependence
of humanity itself. The world's unemployed await accords and agreements
in line with the Roosevelt formulae.
NO American pulpit should fail at this time to record thankfulness for
the blessing of the experiences of the past three years. We may well
utter our thanksgiving for a great social revolution that has brought a
new day. We have suffered that we might learn, that we might fully ap-
preciate the reward of a new day. The secretary of the interior, in a recent
address to college graduates, urged that we comprehend the new order, out
of which the salvation of our present-day civilization shall come. He said:
"We are accustoming ourselves to drastic changes in our modes of living.
Hesitantly, even fearfully, we are embarking on new social adventures
is surely as our forefathers set out on untrodden and uncharted paths
in the earlier days. Our belief in the irresistible power of position and
money has been shattered "
TO the extent that we appreciate this age-old but newly applied phil-
osophy, to that extent we shall be partners in the great adventure of
hung today Our problems at home and abroad can be answered only in
; the spirit of interdependence between the very elements of civilization
II We shall grasp our problems of supply and demand, of taxation, of
I governmental and individual debts, in the spirit of human welfare. The
task of the individual is to keep step with the mighty swing towards the
happiness that requires a measure of individual sacrifice, of subordination
of self to common weal.
ISRAEL long ago learned her lesson and taught it. Israel learned the
transcendent truth of the eternal value of the spirit. It has been the
.onored custom to record the perpetual existence of the gospel of
-'--'' deca-v of ^o^ nations and people who sought to destroy
:: in" ::' destroyed themselves The scattered tribes can now
Hence of the standard that their forbears reared in a
Is have been raised anew in a
......' J :-'' thai within recent years, forgot the very
remnant of these tribes mav be. they can
: March 4 began the journey to a spinoual Canaan
famllj '.v. : .... wit,, oavjd of old. pray for the renewal
irit
F R E E
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S. W. 2nd Ave. and Bridge
Phone 3-1181
Delaney & Beers
Kodak Finiihins and Enlarging
Commercial Work and Home Portrait.
50% Off on All .Amateur Work
212 N. E. 4th St. Phone 2-5385
Royal Typewriters
N'ewjind Factory Rebuilt
Portables. S29.50 to J60.00
B. W. THACKER, Local Dealer
210 N. B. 2nd St. Phone 2-0115
In the Heart of Your
Neighborhood
PIGGLY
WIGGLY
A Miami Institution
MIAMI
\(Al)i:.MY
OF ARTS
328 N. E. 2nd Ave.
Fine and Commercial Art. Life class-
en. Adult Public Speaking, repres-
sion. Dramatics. t;roup and individual
instruction.
The same high standards of in-
struction at summer prices. Visitors
welcome-


.Jjvji^.
16, 193 3.
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
SOCIETY
To women, linked to one man
I ,T the ties ol family. One, the wife.
love with him; the oth-
|ff. the da liter, a stranger.
Then the entrance of two new
I aen. younger, romantic, promising
Llease l>'- the emotional impris-
lonment thai Held both women.
Who was to make the sacrifice?
And what was it to be?
This dramatic tangle of criss-
oassed lives and loves provides the
I basic plot tot "A Bill of Divorce-
gent.' tin' RKO-Radio picture in
thich John Barrymore and an all-
;pporting cast appear on the
,t the Tivoli theatre, next
I Sunday and Monday.

Tho.-e featured with Barrymore in
I this, one of the greatest roles of his
are Katharine Hepburn. Bil-
ge Burke. Paul Cavanagh. and Dav-
ri Manners. The picture, from Clem-
| tnce Dam-'.- famous stage play, was
directed by George Cukor. who di-
I acted the recent Constance Bennett
... What Price Hollywood?"

Loui.s Spector, the son of Mr. and
J Spector. was taken sud-
..: yesterday morning and was
; on for appendicitis at the
a Memorial hospital, where
B pitllent. He is resting
nicely.
fage Five
PLAYING AT THE
TIVOLI THEATRE

SPENCER
U i reate a design
i iall) for you
MRS. FLORENCE WALZER
Registered Spencer <'orsetiere
; II B, H 7th \w. Phone 2-2838
MIAMI. I I iiKIIM
TtiClfTy
Laundry Service
Hal work Ironed, wrarinif apparel
dam), and rriidy l iron.
Mnda>. I in *da) and
Wednesday, IS lbs.
Taaradaj and
Iridai. II |h.
WHITE BELT LAUNDRY
L.___,
Underwood Fish &
Poultry Market
II N. W. I2TH AVK.
Fresh Dressed Poultry
on Hand, or Dressed
While You Walt
MILK FED FRYERS
YARD EGGS
FRESH FISH
*-________
HOME SERVICE
Laundry
1IOV ||. TUKNKR, Prop.
"M s. W. nth SI. Phune 2-:.6.'.l
i
SPECIAL
2H His. Rough Dry, $1.00
Hat Work Finished
Mr. and Mrs. Morton Pagan and |
daughter Sunshine of the Palatial
Kosher restaurant, will leave today
for Chicago. 111., to visit their rela- '
nve.s there. They will return to Mi-
ami after the high holidays in Oc-
tober.
*
The Miami section of the Senior
Council of Jewish Women will en-
tertain about a hundred members
and friends at a tea in the Columbus
hotel next Tuesday afternoon, June >
20. at 3:30 p.m.. with Mrs. Sydney
L. Weintraub heading the receiving
line. Receiving with her will be Mes-
dames Harry I. Magid. P. Schein-
berg. Daniel Cromer. Morris Dubler.
Charles Beckwitt. Loui.s Hayman,
and David Bass. Mrs. Chas. Green-
field, social chairman, will be as-
Isted In greeting the guests by Mrs.
Mark Max Presiding at the tea urn
Will be Mrs iMdor Cohen and Mrs.
Benjamin Axehoad. honorary presi-
dent and vice president of the or-
ganization. They will be assisted in
carving by members of the Junior
Council. A beautiful lace cloth will
cover the tea table and garden
will be used .1- di corations.
Mrs Daniel Cromer will pn
program with Evelyn Ran", conl
singing, .md Caw', Oakes. violinist.
11 a numb- both being
accompanii d by A
.it the pi.mo A piano numb'
four hands will be presented by
Chester Cassell and Maui C
The next : the
: r Council of Ji wish v.
will be held on Wi di
the home ol Mrs.
Samuel Aronowltz.
rk Gable i
ird and Doroth; M kalU are
featured In No Man I Hi r own."
he new film which will be the at-
traction at the Tivoli thi atn Sun-
and Monday.
als with tin
1 big-time gambler and card-sharp,
who operates among Wall
millionaires and on trans-Atlantic
liners. With Dorothy Mackaill
come-on and with Oranl Mitchell
and Paul Ellis as assistants, Gable
lures his victims into poker games
and trims them easily.
Trouble enters the partnership,
however, because Dorothy is madly
In love with Gable, and the gambler
is fed up with her. When he walks
out on her. she threatens to go to
the district attorney, and Gable,
with Detective J. Farrell McDonald
too hot on his trail, decides to leave
New York until Dorothy has cooled
off.
In Glendale. he meets Carole
Lombard, a bored small-town beau-
~' duct the Friday night as well as
Saturday morning services.
"VfntPC Frank Kleinfeld. the son of Rabbi
A. s. Kleinfeld, Is visit inn at St.
Petersburg, having Jusl finished his
NO MAN OF HER OWN
ty, and because he loses the toss of
a coin, marries her. He takes her
bark to New York, intending to use
her m much the same way he had
used Dorothy. But two things hap-
pen: This hard-boiled, fast and
loose gambler falls in love with his
wife, and Dorothy, back from a
Mediterranean cruise, violently re-
sents the marriage of her ex-boy
friend. The result is exciting drama

A regular meeting of Beth David
Sisterhood will be held at Its Tal-
mud Torah hall next Wednesday
June 21, at p.m. All members are
to attend, as Important an-
ments will be made.
The regular i ard party
the I the Mi-
ami Jewish Orthoxl'
held
with quite a number of
m play. !'
Ion was
Dr. and Mrs. Carl N. Herman left
Saturday for a two months' stay in
Chicago where Dr. Herman will
again take special work at the Uni-
versity of Chicago.
An interesting meeting of the Beth
Israel Sisterhood, beginning a 1 o'-
clock luncheon at Schwartzberg hall,
was held last Tuesday. Luncheon
was followed by a business meeting
and program.
Mrs. R. W. Apte. Mrs. I. M. Prager
and Mrs. M. L. Pastroff were the
luncheon committee: Mrs. Sam A.
Goldstein presided at the business
meeting, and Mrs. Marshall Fciga
was chairman of the program.
Miss Rachel Oppenheim presented
a report on the Trl-State Sisterhood
convention she recently attended in
Savannah and gave an interesting
account of the bi-centennial of the
Savannah congregation.
St. Petersburg Notes
first year at college in New York.
Closing exercises and public exam-
ination of pupils of Bnai Israel Sab-
bath school was held on Sunday,
June 4. when a large number of
prizes were awarded for scholastic
attainments.
Mrs. May Benjamin, of 868 Cen-
tral avenue, this city, was named
the local representative of the Jew-
ish Floridian and will be in charge
of St. Petersburg correspondence.
Much progress in the communal
Jewish life of St. Petersburg has
been made during the past year,
particularly at Bnai Israel congre-
gation since the arrival here last
September of Rabbi A. S. Kleinfeld.
its spiritual head. He is the director
of religious and scholastic activities
in the congregation and aided by
the president and other officers of
the congregation has shown splen-
did results during the past eight
months.
i Dr. V. K. Jindra "
PHYSICIAN and SI RGEON

Announces Rcmoial of
//" Offices to
"5 WEST FLAGLER STREET ^
Off let Hour-.:
2 to 5 p.m-----7 to 8 p.m.
PHONE 2-6057 m
'
iTIVCLi:
W. Fla*lr at 8th Phone 2-3152
NEW POLICY 20c All. I> \\
Sundav and Monda). June 1S-1I
CLARK GABLE in
"NO MAN of
HER OWN"
I With Carole Lombard and
| Dorothy Mackaill
The
r tins i(j
coming season ; y Mrs
Bro< Sun-
day. Octobi mi '':
Wednesday, October i. '
tin Wed! ay. October 25.
rung card party; Sundaj Novem-
l good will danci Wedm
::;be:- 15, regular meetini : No-
: 28-29. fOOd sail I MX
.X Chanuka dinner; Decemb.
regular meetim:: January 17. regu-
lar meeting: January 24. minstrel
-how: February 18. musical birthday
party; February 21. regular meeting:
March 4. Punm dinner; March 6.
Purim dance: March 21. regular
meeting: April 3. afternoon card
party: April 18. regular meeting:
May 16. election of officers, and May
29, installation luncheon.
Mr. and Mrs. David Sherman en-
! tertained Sunday night for their
' daughter. Adelaide, whose ninth an-
niversary was observed. Playmates
i and other guests who attended were
John Klein. Shirley Mallach. Frank
JGlickman. Mildred Zmn. Jennie
Bishop. Shirley Elkim. Victor Kohn.
] Rose Levine. Rosalyn Damn. Irving
'and Ruby Schindler. Josephine
Good. Joe Field and Bernie Frank.
The annual picnic of Congregation
Bnai Israel, and all its affiliated or-
ganizations, took place last Sunday
at Madeira Beach. There was a large
attendance, many races were held
and prizes awarded. Cantor Schlach-
man was the out-of-town guest
One of the prominent event- <.:
.miner season li the approach-
ing wedding of Sylvia Schwartz to
Mr. Ben Wolfson. which will take
place at the Lakewood Estates
Country club. Thursday evening.
i me 15.
Mi -. Bessie Orossman and da
l Chicago. 111., who havi
spending the past lour months here.
.iir returning home Sunday, June
The man who is always going to
do a lot of great things usually ends
by doing a lew small ones.
Hit The Bicycle
Trail From Hurdine's
"Cycle Suits"
$L98
TMIWO FLOOR
fiu rdino's
Mrs. E. Oelman will sponsor a
bridge party at her home in the
future, for the benefit of the
Auxiliary and Aid society of
Congregation Bnai Israel.
Special Friday night services will
be conducted by Congregation Bnai
Israel with Rabbi A. S. Kleinfeld
preaching a sermon on "Father's
Day.'' Cantor Boris Schlachman.
who is here on a tour of the state
(or the Jewish Floridian. will con-
uneral I lome Humanity Belter Operated hy McGIIAVS WIDOW N. W. Ird Ave. ,- M5SSMM
King F '/'- Srn FRANK G I'hoi
GLASS
J. A. SALV1N & COMPANY
169 N. W. ",lh St.
Phone 2-9124
Auto and window .-l.i picture
framing, mirror* and re-nilverinir.
and hla-tiru:.
Radio Synagog
Summer Rates
$4.oo rs
Jfcn-Tlqii
"SanitariunC.
SfuJChro/uc Cases
MiSSi -^ Fr<^
The regular services of the Radio
Synagog under the auspices of Rabbi
S. M. Machtei. its founder and di-
rector, will be heard Sunday morn-
ing over WIOD at 10 a.m.. when a
special message from Rabbi Machtei
will be read. Rabbi Machtei is now
' In New York City on matters of the
Radio Svnagog and his return has
, been somewhat delayed. The usual
i prayers and music will be heard.
BORNSTEIN'S
DINNERS
r*A Jewish Home Cooked CA^
J)UC Full Course jUC
Jewish I lome Cooked
Full Course
Chicken, Steak, Chops
All Kinds of Delicious Sandwiches lie Cold Beer and Soft Drinks
944 Ocean Drive Miami Beach
For fresh
Sea Foods
STOP AT
CAPT. TOM'S
FISH MART
Flafler St and Miami River
Phone 2-5321 W Never Cloae
OUR PRICES ARE THE LOWEST
Our Fish are the freshest Caught by our own boats daily
If it Is Sea Food, we have it at Its very best, and at attractively
low prices. Our method of handling and selling Sea Food Is In ob-
servance with all the sanitary rules and regulations.


Page Six
THE JEWISH FLORIDJAN_
Friday, June 16, I93J
SOCIETY
PLAYING AT THE
7T11 AVENUE THEATRE
Dear Pat:
Oh darling, I'm so dreadfully un-
happy. Bill and I are no longer en-
gaged and I do believe that I'm the
most miserable girl in the whole
world.
Oh. it's all that DeVere Harleys
fault. She's so lovely that I don't
blame Bill for appearing interested
in her. I was so jealous that I broke
our engagement off and he seemed
perfectly willing to call it quits. It's
not my fault that I'm just naturally
an ugly duckling. I never did have
much time or money to spend on
myself.
Well, it all sums up to this: Rita
Harper has invited me to come and
visit her while her folks are away
on a business trip and I've decided
to go. She lives in New York and
that'll be a good place to drown my
sorrow. You see. I'm still in love
with him. I'm too unhappy to write
more but will let you know when I
get to New York.
Your broken-liearted pal,
Joan.
Pat dearest:
Here I am in New York and. I
might add. I just love it. There's so
much to see and do. but to tell the
truth, I haven't had time to take in
many of the .sights because I've been
busy doing something else. I told
Rita all about Bill and our broken
engagi ment and sin- says that if I
would try to make myself more at-
tractive Unit he might sil up and
take notice when I got home. Rita
tells me it doesn't require a great
deal of money or lots of time to
make oneself more attractive and
that no one is just naturally so un-
attractive that they can't make
themselves over into "glamorous and
charming creatures.' 1 Those are
Rita's very words I'm just quol-
111.'. 1 Rita has promised to teach me
all she knows on the subject of good
looks and insists that she can make
ine so attractive that Bill will have
to gasp for breath when he sees me.
Sounds impossible to me. but we
shall see what we shall see.
first. I had to make a list of my
good points and another one of my
bad points. Believe me. that takes
real honesty. After you've admitted
that you have a poor mouth or rath-
er small eyes, the next step is to try
and tone down your bad points by
not calling attention to them in any-
way and accentuating your good
points by trying to call attention to
them. Every woman will find that
she has some redeeming feature and
she should play that up so that
when people look at her they will
only notice that outstanding point
and go away with the impression
that she is a good looking woman
because she has lovely eyes or a nice
mouth. They will forget that she had
a poor nose or rather large ears.
It's getting late and I must have
my beauty sleep so be patient and
I'll write you at my first opportun-
ity.
As ever,
Joan.
The annual donor's dinner given
by Junior Hadassah to those who
have contributed or caused to be
contributed the sum of five dollars
to the organization was held at the
Tropical Jungle Gardens last Mon-
day night when a dinner and dance
was held. Mrs. Veeda Cromer was
toastmistress, Mrs. Jennie Rotfort
delivered the invocation, with Miss
Lena Weinkle delivering the address
of welcome. A number of mock tele-
grams from nationally known celeb-
rities were read during the evening
and parodies on traits of members
present were included. A movietone
news broadcast was made from the
orchestral stand, the microphone
and amplifying system being used
Veeda Cromer served as the an-
nouncer. Bede Goldenblank as ac-
companist and Hanna Mack as solo-
ist. A floor show and dance followed.
Among those attending were Sylvia
Miles. Harry Bass. Sylvia Rayvis, Al
Pallott. Mr. and Mrs. Jasper Crom-
er. Rose Sowers. Dora Mohilner.
Dorothy Brill. Sam Miller, Annette
Wechsler, Milton Friedman. Marion
Blank. Emanuel Weinkle. Hanna
Mack. Herman Mack. Mr. and Mrs.
S. Rotfort. Miss Lena Weinkle. Leo
Chaikin, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Solen.
Mrs. Ruth Dubbin. Jack Zion. Ida
Cohen. Phil Lerner. Mr. and Mrs.
Carl Weinkle, Bede Goldenblank,
Aaron Weinkle, Bea Silver. Ben Sil-
ver. Esther Rosengarten. Nat Dub-
ler. Betty Greenberg. Milton Brill,
Pauline Lasky and Ed Levin.

Final plans for the congregational
dance being sponsored by the Beth
David Sisterhood and administrative
board of Beth David congregation
for Sunday evening. June 25. will be
announced in the next issue of The
Jewish Floridian. The proceeds will
be used for the purpose of paintini;
the synagogue and Talmud Torah.
The usual dancing will be followed
by a number of acts by prominent
artists and members of some of the
local night clubs.

According to a statement by Rabbi
S. M. Machtei of the Radio SynagOg,
a meeting Ol its members and sym-
pathizers will be called immediate!;
upon his return to Miami at which
lime definite plans lor the lee
erection ol permanent headquarters
lor the Radio Synagog will be defi-
nitely announced.
"Many of the listeners and mem-
bers of the Radio Synagog during
the past season have felt the need of
a permanent meeting location where
they may gather on Friday ninhts.
Saturday mornings and Sunday
mornings when the sermon is broad-
cast.'' said Rabbi Machtei. "and be-
cause of these repeated requests I
have felt that with the continued
growth of the Radio Synagog it is
only fair that the general public be
acquainted with our plans for the
coming season." "Though not as yet
determined, it may be that we shall
have high holiday services of the
Radio Synagog in our own perma-
nent headquarters." "This should
not be taken as a matter of compe-
tition, but simply to fill that need
which is becoming more and more
apparent every day."
( OMPU II
Beer Equipment
Also Domestic Refrigerators
Geo. Patterson, Inc.
1409 Biacaynt llld. I'hnnr 2-4854
S K E E T S
2S6 s. W. Bth St., Miami, Fla.
RADIO A. ELECTRIC Sl'ITI.Y
Set 1 iMi/itu' in Short Waivt
I: lallation or Repairlnn
OPEN EVENINGS
Have your radio checked up by our
new Radio Analyser. No charjre for
this service*

LOSEY, the Florist
Bonded Member Florists
11 legrapb Delh en Assn.
2H0I N. W. 17TH AVENUE
Phone* B-lSSfl 1*8#33
,Uli'""////,
j|fV SPEND <~
YOUR
VACATION
THIS YEAR IN
FLORIDA
fort/out HEALTH!
w/////iii,iiiu\A
THE I
HOF BRAUi
JUO! 'p mi 1
Ice Cold
DRAUGHT
BEER
LARGE af~\
*" 18 m
glass ^y%_s
Bar Kosher Sandwiches
and Lunches
Open All Night
JOHN MOREY
616 Collins Ave. Miami Beach
----------------------------------+
KATHARINE HEPBURN
Mountain gorillas are found to be
more intelligent than those on the
coastal plains. The more inaccessible
the mountain, the more intelligent.
Frequently an apt quotation is
better than an original remark.
Never give up the good things you
have while hoping for better.
True love makes a man so reckless
that he doesn't care who knows of
his happiness.
The height of sweetness depends
upon the size of the girl a fellow is
in love with.
Some women are so curious that
they will listen to advice just to find
out what it's like.
Somehow it is awfully hard for a
mother to persuade her daughter to
marry the kind of man who will
make her happy.
Another spring shall come, as fair
as this.
Another year will furnish ample
room
For song and birth, for leafing
time and bloom,
For moon touched sigh, or inarticu-
late kiss.
Another spring shall bring ecstatic
bliss
To resurrected loves which fled
the tomb
Of sealed-in winter; the frozen
pending doom
Has pardoned them to joy; that I
must miss.
For never will your narrow, clever
bands
Weave beauty for me in these af-
ter years.
No other time, your opium-sweet
voice sing
The thick, soft words of songs of
other lands,
Of high barred windows, drooping
flowers and tears.
*-------------------j
RICHARD D. SMITH
Sinclair Service
Station & Garage
2432 S. W. 8th St.
Specialized Service in
Fords and Chevrolets
Young men about to start somtj
thing on their upper lips might ma
application to a federal land ban]
for a grower's loan.
Soy Bean Bread
and other vegetable breads
GOOD HEALTH BAKING
COMPANY, INC.
2165 W. Flagler St. Phone 2-5811
The "Good Health" Kind

pWEILBAGHRR'S
MARKET

PR IMF MEATS
727 S. W. 6th St.
1227 W. Flagler St.
B Phone 2-5712
a We Deliver
m
1'iiiaiiiiiaiiiiaiiiiiaiiuianiiiH
Try
DODDY PIES
2723 S. W. 8th St.
HOG A YARNS
Free Instructions
All New Shades of Bouclc.
Crevenna and Glaronourr
Wool Yarns
The
LoRi::\i: shop
1849 Biscayne Blvd.
$52,000
FIRE SALE OF GROCERIES
]{AR(.AINS (;AL()UK
Libby's, Royal Arms, College Inn
Goods, From The Wholesale Grocery
Stock of Hill Bros., Inc. Turned Over
To The Insurance Companies After
Recent Fire To Be Sold
REGARDLESS of COST
EVERY ARTICLE GUARANTEED
Maxwell House or Alladin
COFFEE 22c
I-II). can
PET or CARNATION
MILK 5c
Tall can
I'illsliury's Best Four \\w
FLOUR 16c
5-lb. bag
TKTI.EVS '4-lb. pkg.
With 10c size attached All for
TEA
15c
Medium 50-60*1
PRUNES 10c
I ll)s. Just out of storage
1(1 1-cent boxes
MATCHES 5c
ROYAI. ARMS
SPINACH
No. 21 2 large can
12'/2c
BARTI.ETT PEARS 7c No. 1, Royal Arms
BAKER'S COCONUT 8c No. 1 can
PALM OLIVE SOAP Regular bar 5c
STRING BEANS Apte No. 2 can 6 for 25c
Small O. K.
Soap or Powder l'/zc
1 Kadi
DOBSON & COMPANY
S. W. 8th Ave. and S. W. 4th Street
GERMAN SOCIETY BUILDING
Plenty Parking Space


Full Text

PAGE 1

The Junior Hadassah will hold an important meeting Monday night. June 19. at the Ponce de Leon hotel, when plans for the installation of the recently chosen officers will bo announced. All members are urged to attend. • • a Miss Mildred Clein entertained with a bridge at her home last week with five tables of bridge in play honoring the Misses Jo Marlowe and Frances Bridge water of Birmingham, and Rose Finn. Edith C'ein. Sarah Glustrom. Mollie Clein and Janet Clein of Atlanta. Others attending were Beckie Weingarten. Ruth Goldberg. Ruth Drevitch. Natalie Pallott. Dot Roth. Maxine Kantor. Lois Louis. Mrs. R. J. Clein. Edna Wolkoski. Sylvia Leibovit. Rosalyn Daum. Myrtle Zeientz. Charlotte Kohn and Ben Clein. who recently returned from the Georgia Military academy where he Is a student. Julv 1.2.3 TO ALMOST ANYWHERE YOU WANT TO GO Through! the South. East and West. lull Seven-Day Limit From Miami ROUND TRIP .New York-$31.25 Chicago 34.00 Washington • 23.10 Philadelphia 28.00 Proportionately low fares from all other East Coast points. IliinJmls nj other destinations CONSULT AGENTS FLORIDA EAf T COA1T RAILWAY Mr. and Mrs. George A. Rubin of Rockford. III., and daughters, Arhne and Bubbles, who spent the past winter season here, returned to their home by auto last Monday. • • • The Misses Ray U. and Esther V. Shochet. daughters of Mr. and Mr.-. J. Louis Shochet. left last Sunday by auto to visit relatives in Baltimore. Md. On their way there they will visit friends in Orlando. Jacksonville and Washington. D. C. They will spend the summer in the North, returning here before the high holidays. As we go to press the A. Z. A. %  Junior Bnai Brithi is entertaining a number of its student members who returned to the city after havIng spent the past year at colleges in Florida and elsewhere. • • • An important meeting of the Ladles' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation will be held at the synagogue next Tuesday evening, June 20. All members are urged to attend. • • • The mania!;, ol Ml l Hannah P.' hter ': Mr, Ellas R. Rose of this city, to Mr g August, tin' son oi Mr. and Mrs. G. t, will be solemnized at Beth navid synagogue Sunda; ",8. at 7 30 p.m. Tinwill be audi; 8 p.m. k stark lected bees at 1 ion oi at :":'I0 w. %  • W( I :\ '. %  ; Tampa pas) commander; iret Kelly, Miami, lieu!' : inder; Norman Ho well, Miami, .in: Earl H impa, presdl nt: Etii' Mian... I eper; .lack Kelly. Tampa, and Lu-Ule Guise, Miami, dag bearers; Rae ns. Tampa, and Eugene Stark Miami, guards, and Albcn I.auvenIno, Miami, sentinel. The convention opened Tuesday. At night delegate.attended a banquet at the Coral GableCountry club. Wednesday afternoon they were entertained with a sightseeing trip of the Miami area and a beach party. More than 75 delegates from all parts of the state were in attendance. • • • An important meeting of the executive board of the Ladles' auxiliary of the Jewish Welfare bureau will be held at the home of its president Mrs Meyer Schwartz, next Monday. June 19. beginning at 1:30 and this will be followed by a general meeting of the members promptly at 2:15. All members are urged to attend. • • • Mr. and Mis. Sydney H Mayer oi 423 N. E. Twenty-third street, have announced the engagement of their daughter, Cecile Dessa. to Milton Allied Pearlstine of Charleston. S. C. the marriage to be in August Miss Mayer was graduated from Miami High school and received her B A. degree recently from Agnes Scott college. Mr. Pearlstine is the son of Mr. and Mrs. H. Pearlstine oi Charleston. He received his degree from Citadel Military academy and is a past president of the Citadel Alumni association. Mrs Isaac Levin. 430 N. E. Twi 11tv-ninth street, and Mrs. H. H. Mil%  40 N. W. Eighth street, will be among the 1.500 delegates attending .•Incouncil ol the Union of American Hebrew Congregations. the bienni %  '. assembly of thi : %  di ration of Ti mj and tii' 1 tilth biennial condition ol the National Fedi : i • mple Brol hei hoods Mrs Emma MOM r l,u. Mil take place a: !h' li • In Chicago, .June IH-L'L. one : thi features on the union pro%  .' ill be a symi ligion Tomorrow Ralph Gro n two of the local young men wl well known in athletic and Atlanta fi i While thi re they will visit friends and relatives, They will o visit • veral other southei i les Mi Grossman is athletic director and Mr. Relsman secretary ol the Hebrew Athletic club. SIDHBOTTOM Ice Cream Co. 2424 N. W. 7th Ave. I 100 W. 1 lad' SI. 733 N. W. .Illh SI. PHONE 2-3MI2 We have just opened Currey's Cut Flowers and Fruits Floral Designs Our Specialty 227 E. FLAGLER STREET Ponce de Leon Hotel 1 CAMP WOHELO For Girls An Ideal Vacation Spot for Vour Daughter Ml K 111 \ I1KRKOWITCH LEVY Owner and Director Hilda Riesner 187 8. W. Thirteenth Street MIAMI REPRESENTATIVE For Information Phone 3-2493 The first ol a series ol summei dances of the Junior Council of Jewish Women will be held at the Coral Gables Country club on Sunday evening, July 2. with Miss Miriam 8chelnberg In charge of the arrangements, assisted by Lee Ka-sanoff. j Bessie WermkofT. Claire Simon. Flo | Merlin. Mary Ann Kamin. Eleanor Sheldon and Harriet Kantor. At this dance the first of a series of dance contests will be begun, the winners of each dance to compete at the final dance for a loving cup. The next meeting of the organization will be held at the Ponce de Leon hotel on Tuesday evening. June 20 when important business will be discussed. Meetings hereafter will be held at the homes of different members and rho.se unable to obtain transportation may communicate with Miss Lee Kasanolt. who has been named telephone chairman. • • • The Misses Sylvia and Millie Drelsen left last week for Massachusetts where they will spend their summer vacation. • • • Miss Beatrice SharT, daughter of Mrs. Max Shaft, pioneer resident ol Miami, will become the bride of Dr. Leonard Finn at a ceremony to be held at the Strath Haven hotel, Miami Beach. Following the ceremony which will be attended by immediate members of the family only, there will be a dinner for the bridal party and relatives. The bride will be attended by her sister Daisy as maid of honor and she will be given in marriage by her uncle, Mr. B. M. Frank. Sidney Pepper will be best man and little Charlotte Frank will be flower girl. Following the ceremonies and dinner all friends of the family are invited to attend a reception at the home of the bride. 319 N E Twenty-fifth street. No cards have been issued. The couple will leavi lor a brief honeymoon trip to Jacksonville. Columbus. Ohio and other points north. • • • The Misses Betty Greenberg and Esther Kaufman will be hostesses at a card party the latter part of this month for the benefit of the Junior Council of Jewish Women. • • • The lawn party and dance being sponsored by the Hebrew Athletic club will be held on Sunday evening. June 25. at the community centre, when plans call for an evening ol gala entertainment and dancing, in chargl oi arrangements is a committee headed by Manuel Weinklc who is beinu assisted by Murry man. Leo Chaikin and Sol Levin. Amoi representing the : Council ol Jewi.-h Women to tea bell Iven by the senior group anPauline Shonfeld, i. K .i Kohn, Bi WernikOfl and Mary Am. Kamin. taurant, D44 Ocean drive. Miami Beach, is II mi %  popular spoi on the beach front because ol the I and the \' i table prici ft %  ntlj I)*' 1 n completely ren' fashion with the tropical :. I .' Open hearth tire in i for roas ting and rotisserie is used tor the preparation ol many delicious dishes and in addition to sandwiches ol all kind-. Ice cold be i r and drink-, complete meals ari Cialized in. An excellent place to cool oil amid pleasant surroundings .'• the same tune providing delicious fi d to serve the most exacting is provided at Bornstein's. AdulU 20r Children 10c Box Office open* B : i'< p.m. Sunday Sunda> and Monday. June l*-l! JOHN BAKRYMORE in "BILL of DIVORCEMENT With Catharine Hepburn and Itilhr Burke Crowds are still coming daily the Dobson & Co. fire sale of groce ies at the German hall. S. W. Eigh avenue and Fourth street, to ta advantage of the tremendous ..,, ings offered them on well know standard brands of canned goo. and other groceries, and as fast the merchandise is sold it is belt] replenished from the $52,000 Hi Bros.. Inc. stock, sold to the Dobsoi company through insurance con] panics who carried the fire losses feature of the sale is the absoluti guarantee of every article sol something usually absent when tin sales are held. Attention of ou readers is called to a few of tin av ings shown in an ad appearing i our issue, and to the further facJ that hundreds of other well know articles may be purchased at re4 markably low prices. The same courJ teous treatment which has brouelil forth much praise is being accorded all customers, and will be shown] throughout the continuance ol the) sale. Cantor Boris Schlachman chanted] the Friday night and Saturday morning services at Bnai Israel con-J gregatlon last week at the request fl Rabbi Kleinleld and the officers ufl the congregation. Cantor Schlach-I man is the guest of Mr. Hyn j Jacobs, president of the con tion. during his stay here. Accumulate Capital! INVEST IN MORRIS PLAN CERTIFICATES Sums in multiples nf S1.00 will be accepted and applied to purchase of Certificates which inissued in denominations of S50 to S5.000. It is the policy of the Company to rash these Certificates at face value upon request. THE MORRIS PLAN COMPANY of MIAMI VINCENT H. BRICK, liar. 105 N. E. First Avenue MIAMI, FLORIDA Now you ran bu\ BILTMORE LAUNDRY SERVICE at a price that fits your pocket boob' PHONE 3-3(187 21 N. W. 9TII ST. Alexander Orr, Jr., Inc. Plumbing and Heating MIAMI in M II 1122 I6ih si. Phone 5-3S46 MIAMI 45 N. W. 3rd SI. Phone 2-3691 CARTER FUNERAL SERVICE '.14 WEST FI.AKI.ER STREET PHONES 2-8421— 2-84 MITCHELL JACOBY, Experienced Jewsib Attendant in Charge



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•.Jjvji^. 16, 193 3. THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN SOCIETY T „o women, linked to one man I T the ties ol family. One, the wife. love with him; the oth|ff. the da liter, a stranger. Then the entrance of two new I aen. younger, romantic, promising Llease l>'the emotional imprislonment thai Held both women. Who was to make the sacrifice? And what was it to be? This dramatic tangle of crissoassed lives and loves provides the I basic plot tot "A Bill of Divorcegent.' tin' RKO-Radio picture in thich John Barrymore and an all; pporting cast appear on the %  ,t the Tivoli theatre, next I Sunday and Monday. • • • Tho.-e featured with Barrymore in I this, one of the greatest roles of his are Katharine Hepburn. Bilge Burke. Paul Cavanagh. and Davri Manners. The picture, from Clem| tnce Dam-'.famous stage play, was directed by George Cukor. who diI acted the recent Constance Bennett ... What Price Hollywood?" • • • Loui.s Spector, the son of Mr. and J Spector. was taken sud..: yesterday morning and was ; on for appendicitis at the a Memorial hospital, where B pitllent. He is resting nicely. fage Five PLAYING AT THE TIVOLI THEATRE SPENCER U i reate a design i iall) for you MRS. FLORENCE WALZER Registered Spencer <'orsetiere ; II B, H 7th \w. Phone 2-2838 MIAMI. I I iiKIIM TtiClfTy Laundry Service Hal work Ironed, wrarinif apparel dam), and rriidy l„ iron. Mnda>. I in *da) and Wednesday, IS lbs. Taaradaj and Iridai. II |h. WHITE BELT LAUNDRY L. ,„ Underwood Fish & Poultry Market II N. W. I2TH AVK. Fresh Dressed Poultry on Hand, or Dressed While You Walt MILK FED FRYERS YARD EGGS FRESH FISH *—HOME SERVICE Laundry 1IOV ||. TUKNKR, Prop. "M s. W. nth SI. Phune 2-:.6.'.l i— SPECIAL 2H His. Rough Dry, $1.00 Hat Work Finished Mr. and Mrs. Morton Pagan and | daughter Sunshine of the Palatial Kosher restaurant, will leave today for Chicago. 111., to visit their rela' %  nve.s there. They will return to Miami after the high holidays in October. • • The Miami section of the Senior Council of Jewish Women will entertain about a hundred members and friends at a tea in the Columbus hotel next Tuesday afternoon, June > 20. at 3:30 p.m.. with Mrs. Sydney L. Weintraub heading the receiving line. Receiving with her will be Mesdames Harry I. Magid. P. Scheinberg. Daniel Cromer. Morris Dubler. Charles Beckwitt. Loui.s Hayman, and David Bass. Mrs. Chas. Greenfield, social chairman, will be asIsted In greeting the guests by Mrs. Mark Max Presiding at the tea urn Will be Mrs iMdor Cohen and Mrs. Benjamin Axehoad. honorary president and vice president of the organization. They will be assisted in carving by members of the Junior Council. A beautiful lace cloth will cover the tea table and garden will be used .1di corations. Mrs Daniel Cromer will pn program with Evelyn Ran", conl singing, .md CAW', Oakes. violinist. 11 a numb• both being accompanii d by A %  .it the pi.mo A piano numb' four hands will be presented by Chester Cassell and Maui C The next : the : r Council of Ji wish v. will be held on Wi di • the home ol Mrs. Samuel Aronowltz. rk Gable i ird and Doroth; M kalU are featured In No Man I Hi r own." he new film which will be the attraction at the Tivoli thi atn Sunand Monday. als with tin 1 big-time gambler and card-sharp, who operates among Wall millionaires and on trans-Atlantic liners. With Dorothy Mackaill come-on and with Oranl Mitchell and Paul Ellis as assistants, Gable lures his victims into poker games and trims them easily. Trouble enters the partnership, however, because Dorothy is madly In love with Gable, and the gambler is fed up with her. When he walks out on her. she threatens to go to the district attorney, and Gable, with Detective J. Farrell McDonald too hot on his trail, decides to leave New York until Dorothy has cooled off. In Glendale. he meets Carole Lombard, a bored small-town beau~' duct the Friday night as well as Saturday morning services. "VfntPC Frank Kleinfeld. the son of Rabbi A. s. Kleinfeld, Is visit inn at St. — Petersburg, having Jusl finished his NO MAN OF HER OWN ty, and because he loses the toss of a coin, marries her. He takes her bark to New York, intending to use her m much the same way he had used Dorothy. But two things happen: This hard-boiled, fast and loose gambler falls in love with his wife, and Dorothy, back from a Mediterranean cruise, violently resents the marriage of her ex-boy friend. The result is exciting drama • • • A regular meeting of Beth David Sisterhood will be held at Its Talmud Torah hall next Wednesday June 21, at p.m. All members are to attend, as Important anments will be made. The regular i ard party the I the Miami Jewish Orthoxl' • held %  with quite a number of m play. !' Ion was Dr. and Mrs. Carl N. Herman left Saturday for a two months' stay in Chicago where Dr. Herman will again take special work at the University of Chicago. An interesting meeting of the Beth Israel Sisterhood, beginning a 1 o'clock luncheon at Schwartzberg hall, was held last Tuesday. Luncheon was followed by a business meeting and program. Mrs. R. W. Apte. Mrs. I. M. Prager and Mrs. M. L. Pastroff were the luncheon committee: Mrs. Sam A. Goldstein presided at the business meeting, and Mrs. Marshall Fciga was chairman of the program. Miss Rachel Oppenheim presented a report on the Trl-State Sisterhood convention she recently attended in Savannah and gave an interesting account of the bi-centennial of the Savannah congregation. St. Petersburg Notes first year at college in New York. Closing exercises and public examination of pupils of Bnai Israel Sabbath school was held on Sunday, June 4. when a large number of prizes were awarded for scholastic attainments. Mrs. May Benjamin, of 868 Central avenue, this city, was named the local representative of the Jewish Floridian and will be in charge of St. Petersburg correspondence. Much progress in the communal Jewish life of St. Petersburg has been made during the past year, particularly at Bnai Israel congregation since the arrival here last September of Rabbi A. S. Kleinfeld. its spiritual head. He is the director of religious and scholastic activities in the congregation and aided by the president and other officers of the congregation has shown splendid results during the past eight months. i Dr. V. K. Jindra %  PHYSICIAN and SI RGEON %  %  Announces Rcmoial of %  //" Offices to %  "•5 WEST FLAGLER STREET ^ Off let Hour-.: 2 to 5 p.m 7 to 8 p.m. %  PHONE 2-6057 m %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  iTIVCLi: W. Fla*lr at 8th Phone 2-3152 NEW POLICY — 20c All. I> \\ Sundav and Monda). June 1S-1I CLARK GABLE in "NO MAN of HER OWN" I With Carole Lombard and | Dorothy Mackaill The r tins i(j coming season ; %  • y Mrs Bro< Sunday. Octobi mi % %  %  : Wednesday, October i. '• %  tin Wed! ay. October 25. rung card party; Sundaj Noveml good will danci Wedm :: ;be:15, regular meetini : No:• 28-29. fOOd sail I MX .X Chanuka dinner; Decemb. regular meetim:: January 17. regular meeting: January 24. minstrel -how: February 18. musical birthday party; February 21. regular meeting: March 4. Punm dinner; March 6. Purim dance: March 21. regular meeting: April 3. afternoon card party: April 18. regular meeting: May 16. election of officers, and May 29, installation luncheon. Mr. and Mrs. David Sherman en! tertained Sunday night for their daughter. Adelaide, whose ninth anniversary was observed. Playmates i and other guests who attended were John Klein. Shirley Mallach. Frank JGlickman. Mildred Zmn. Jennie • Bishop. Shirley Elkim. Victor Kohn. ] Rose Levine. Rosalyn Damn. Irving 'and Ruby Schindler. Josephine Good. Joe Field and Bernie Frank. The annual picnic of Congregation Bnai Israel, and all its affiliated organizations, took place last Sunday at Madeira Beach. There was a large attendance, many races were held and prizes awarded. Cantor Schlachman was the out-of-town guest One of the prominent event<.: .miner season li the approaching wedding of Sylvia Schwartz to Mr. Ben Wolfson. which will take place at the Lakewood Estates Country club. Thursday evening. i me 15. Mi -. Bessie Orossman and da l Chicago. 111., who havi spending the past lour months here. .iir returning home Sunday, June The man who is always going to do a lot of great things usually ends by doing a lew small ones. Hit The Bicycle Trail From Hurdine's "Cycle Suits" $L98 TMIWO FLOOR fiu rdino's Mrs. E. Oelman will sponsor a bridge party at her home in the future, for the benefit of the Auxiliary and Aid society of Congregation Bnai Israel. Special Friday night services will be conducted by Congregation Bnai Israel with Rabbi A. S. Kleinfeld preaching a sermon on "Father's Day.'' Cantor Boris Schlachman. who is here on a tour of the state (or the Jewish Floridian. will conuneral I lome %  Humanity Belter Operated hy McGIIAVS WIDOW N. W. Ird Ave. ,M5SS—MM King F '/'Srn FRANK G I'hoi GLASS J. A. SALV1N & COMPANY 169 N. W. ",lh St. Phone 2-9124 Auto and window .-l.i— picture framing, mirror* and re-nilverinir. •and hla-tiru:. Radio Synagog Summer Rates $4.oo rs Jfcn-Tlqii "SanitariunC. SfuJChro/uc Cases MiSSi -^— Fr <^ The regular services of the Radio Synagog under the auspices of Rabbi S. M. Machtei. its founder and director, will be heard Sunday morning over WIOD at 10 a.m.. when a special message from Rabbi Machtei will be read. Rabbi Machtei is now In New York City on matters of the Radio Svnagog and his return has been somewhat delayed. The usual i prayers and music will be heard. BORNSTEIN'S DINNERS r*A Jewish Home Cooked CA^ J)UC Full Course jUC Jewish I lome Cooked Full Course Chicken, Steak, Chops All Kinds of Delicious Sandwiches lie Cold Beer and Soft Drinks 944 OCEAN DRIVE • MIAMI BEACH For fresh Sea Foods STOP AT CAPT. TOM'S FISH MART Flafler St and Miami River Phone 2-5321 W Never Cloae OUR PRICES ARE THE LOWEST Our Fish are the freshest — Caught by our own boats daily If it Is Sea Food, we have it at Its very best, and at attractively low prices. Our method of handling and selling Sea Food Is In observance with all the sanitary rules and regulations.



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. iJjV tune It, mi. THE JEWISH FLOKIDIAN PUBLISHED KVEKY FRIDAY b> the MOI M.ORIDIAN PUBLISHING CO. '*'• p. ii. Bui 1(71 ilUmi. Florida Phone 2-1183 "" EXECUTIVE OFFICES I ilU( s ,,„rM. Hid*. PhOM 2-S493 — BDITORIAL OFFICES I Ml '. HI* An'nur I'hnne 2-1183 1 I J. LOUS SIIOCIIET, Editor l|iAKI> (Mil.IN. Aderliin Manaitrr ag) K. 8HOCHET, Circulation Manager ml clii-H matter July 4. i orfi.e at Miami. Florida, : March i. 17. WKST I'M M BEACH OFFICE III Kiithlh Slreel Mr*M. S.hrebnick. Representative -I BSCRIPTION $1,110 $2.00 FRIDAY, JINK 16, 1933. Vol. (i, No. 24. A GOVERNOR ON HITI.EKISM Not only Jews, but all other advocates of religious equality welcomed Governor Albert C. Ritchie's address before the meeting ol the American ..ii Conference Against Rat lal ution In Germany, held in n Monday, June 5. "1 am not concerned with the :orm 01 government Germany has adopted, or with political conditions :here. Such things are for Germany :o decide. Hut whatever our race ud whatevei our creed, we are all en oi God. His teaching was II] Love. We have no nd Idly and Indifferently by when Love and Brotherhood and Understanding are trampled by ruthless and when the forces : Hate are unleashed." As citizens of free America we gave the elemental right to say that of bigotry and prejudice DO longer be fomented and capitalized by an opportunist for his Ijloriflcatii n, bul to the tragic detriment of a people who are our brothMay your protest be heard whennd wherever, as now in Gernmental might and dicr threaten the Inalien; man." The above quotations from GoverRll address contain expresDught under which all liglous liberty can safclrstand In the battle against Hitleram and the like. Would that oilier governors would 1 be unafraid and voice those une sentiments which would them as fearless champions ,; human rights and liberties. JEWISH ATHLETES The executive committee of the Olympic, ames. an international eatlon, has declared through G ieral Charles Sherill, U. S. dclcWte to the Vienna meeting of the tattmational body, that Germany •' only permit Jews to reprc, i "" nations in the games, jrteduicd to be held in Berlin, but %  "St Jew., must be free to represent Germany as well. It is a Just and a li decision. Germany, of course, •d not accede to this demand, yet *>es not. the games will be re than in the Prussian | a P"al. The world well may acclaim %  Kb a decision.—Palm Beach Times. "an fears not only with his brain. Vs eminent Dr. Orile, but also '"h his thyroid, his adrcnal-sym* thet ( tern, and in fact with and cell of his body." In bad Situation I seem to fear *ith my feet, and they go right | la 5' from there. |5 1 Jj arity 1LS a cl( k often proves a THE JEWISH FLORIDI AN Condition of German Jews Is Told In launching the campaign for the relief of German Jews last week, Habbi Jonah B. Wise, director of the campaign, .said: "The existing civil law excludes the Jews from all official positions, from the highest down to the posl of night watchman. Only one per cent oi all the Jews in Germany are permitted to retain Mich official positions as t hey were holding when the present laws went into effect But, since the law envisages one aa Jew who has merely had a Jewish grandparent, the number of 'complete' Jews who may benefit from this law is greatly lessened. Accepting the formula of what constitute-, a Jew as outlined In the present civil law. they constitute from 10 to 15 per cent of the German population: yet, only one per cent are to be permitted to hold official positions. The only mitigation Ol the decree Is the permission to remain in public positions that has been extended to I hose who had tho e positions prior to 19H. and also those who in the trenches during the war. as well as the -on.s and lather.of Jewish soldiers who were killed In the war. "There are 5,048 .i' wish ci\ I vants in Prussia," Rabin Wise continued, "and approximately o.ooo in all of Germany. They constitute only one-hall ol one per cent of the entire civil service. Here, therefore, the "Aryan clause' applies. Assuming the most i nate Interpretation Ol the law, Jew.as civil servants will nol exceed l.non. Five thousand will lose their Jobs, and. to make things worse, Will be denied pensions. •A numerus clausus has been set up for lawyer-the same one per cent. The question arises: are those who have accepted baptism to be included In the official calculation as Jews? There are about 10.000 lawyers in Germany, ol whom about 2.800 are lews At the be-t. only onethird Of them can continue m practice. Fifteen hundred will lose their means ol livelihood Nor is this all; most, if not all, ol the elder lawyers are also notaries public, and m Germany, B notary public Is a civil servant. Here the Aryan test' will get In its deadly work. The Jewish lawyers who will be permitted to continue m practice will cease to be notaries, and as notarial work Is the main business of lawyers In Germany, even those Jews who are still permitted to serve as lawyer, will And themselves without sufficient practice and with Insufficient means of livelihood." Taking up nexl the medical protaB8lon m Germany, Rabbi Wise pomted out that of the 50,000 phyacians m that country. 7,000 are jews. The existing cui law regarding the profession Is analogous to the law relating to civil servants, he said "Under its provisions. he pointed out, "Jewish physicians can not engage m insurance pract.ee. subject only to the same exceptions M in the case of other Civil servants Since in Germany, from eighty to eighty-five per cent of all medical practice Is Insurance practice the „. w Jewa w no will be permitted t serve the public as physicians will have DO revenue Indeed, the Situation there Is such that even these rflW8 who are permitted to engage In ;, pracuce. have thai ,H,,n,sK,n 1 ly in theory 1'he pat,enwho d-,,e, treatment must obtain a CSrtttia-e from bi. 81Ck Fund JKi > ;llHl 0,^ are now issued with the Inscription, 'Does not hold good for Jewish doctors.' "Thus, anywhere between four and five thousand of the seven thousand •''wish physicians in Germany are losing their livelihoods. To that number we must add Jewish muni1 'pal officials, male and female, publie welfare workers, and so on say another thousand who have lost or are losing their means ol livelihood. And to these must be added, also, iome 500 pharmaceutical chemists and pharmacists, and about l.ooo dentists driven out of practice. If we add another category, that is Jews On the operatic and dramatic stages. in the lilms. musicians, journalist,-. authors and so on. we have another 3.000 who haw lost their jobs and are without incomes. Thus we pile UP a total oi 13.000 to 15,000 'intellectuals' alter having deducted the InfUniteslmal minority who for reasons like those already describee! are .still permitted to work for a living." Taking up the fields of commerce and Industry, Rabbi Wise said that there were about 70.000 Jews eni In commercial pursuits and In trade in Germany plus 75.000 "white collar' employees and 20.000 workmen A very considerable proportion of them were seriously suffering from unemployment, he states, botore the present regime came into power, since the boycott, the number Ol unemployed Jews, m these fields, he declared, has increased so rapidly as to total from 20.000 to 25,000 "We were credibly informed that the German government contemplates a numerus clausus here. also, limiting the number of Jewish "white collar" worker to five per cent. The numb) r ol business men. owners or part-owners ol Independent establishments Is steadily being forced down by the methods with which all the world Is now familiar. "If these plans are carried out, as we are constrained to believe they Will," declared Rabbi Wise, "German Jewry will be utterly and completely ruined. I cannot sufficiently underscore the statement that if anything like a numerus clausus is introduced with regard to commerce, industry and trade, German Jewry as such will be entirely ruined. There will be nothing left for them but starvation — or exodus! "Already thousands of them are besieging the olfices ol the committee m Berlin and other cities for assistance In getting away to somewhere, anywhere. Viewing the possibilities for flight from Germany most optimistically, we must reckon on an exodus of a minimum of 50.000 during the next two years. Those who still remain in the land will be cruelly impoverished, as I have pointed out. but will still. In a certain sense have a i-hance to make a livelihood, though a very inadequate one. These 50,000 who will emigrate during the next two years do not Include those who have already fled; nor the so-called 'Ost-Juden'. the .Jewish masses Irom eastern Europe Of whom the larger number will have to be repatriated. There are from 80,000 to 00,000 Ost-Juden' of whom between 40,000 and 50,000 will have to be returned whence they came mostly as refugees during lie World war. as victims of the war itself, of pogroms and 'white rcvolulons' and Red revolutions' and the .ountlcss miseries to which the Jews of eastern Europe were subjected to from 1914 on. Then there is a group of 7.000 stateless' holders of Nansen passports, which Will increase the stream of emigrants since they have no homeland to which to return. • Thus far. well over 25.000 refu,,. have registered with aid committees In France. Switzerland, Holland. England. Czecho Slovakia. Denmark, the Saar Region, Austria. Luxembourg and elsewhere. Many thousands more have not yet applied to the committees because they are Page Three THE ^8&i GUMftM The American Law Institute says that if you fall out of an airplane Into somebody's back yard, you are a trespasser there. It might be a better idea to fall through the roef, and ask the maid to announce that you have come for a call. Nearly all hostesses will be reasonably gracious under those circumstances. How did Noah and his family pass the time in the Ark while waiting for the flood to subside? Addressing the annual meeting ot the Education Association conference (Bng.), Dr. C. w. Klmmine told a story of a teacher who asked one of his pupils that question. The teacher suggested that Noah spent the time fishing, but the bright lad interrogated ridiculed the idea on the ground that there were only two worms m the Ark. Green Is to be the popular color tins summer in male attire. We were pretty sure if we held on for long, our tuxedo would return to fashion. still using up the remnants of their msans. We know that in France there are now from four to live thousand, with 100 to 120 new arrivals daily: over n.ooo in Switzerland, an equal number in Holland, a similar number in England and from lour to five thousand scattered in other countries. The possibilities for absorption oi these refugees into the general population is very slight. In almost every country they are forbidden to accept employment or to be employed because of economic conditions. Switzerland makes exceptions only in the case of purely political refugees. Relatively, the most favorable conditions exist in France. However, there, too. only a small number can be placed, like doctors. chemists, business men and industrialists. "In England efforts are being made to find some possibilities tot settling a fair number. In other countries such efforts are useless The possibilities do not exist. Efforts are made to assist at least some of them in obtaining work and getting settled, but with only slight success. The possibilities for emigration to countries across the sea are similarly limited. Hardly more than, say 3,000 Jews will be able during the course of one year to emigrate to oversea countries, chiefly South. America, and a limited number of refugees will be able to settle in Palestine. "Meanwhile the distress in Germany itself is growing stupendously. Thousands are besieging the various Offices in Berlin and all other large towns. Practically all doctors and lawyers and nearly all intellectuals are without any income. Their individual fates will probably not be decided before September. But. already they are beginning to starve The dismissed employees are getting no dole or assistance in any form from the government. Distress and misery are beginning to spread like a devouring cancer over the whole Jewish community." The funds raised by the Joint Distribution committee in this country and by Jewish committees In other lands will be used to relieve the entirely destitute, to assist the "white collar" men and women to find a means of gaining a livelihood, and will be used also to aid the Jewish communities of Germany to establish schools for their youth where they will be equipped for economic battle with the hopeless future awaiting them, said Rabbi Wise. A modern ship with stabilizers is just like the rest of us —it's last its roll. I shall love the parade of life When I can no longer march; The starry dip of the Ha -. The blue of the heavenly arch. I shall love the uplifted heads, And the poise and the valiant St ride Of the procession I cannot join. As I watch them step in pride. Though I never march again, But sit on thi there, Furrowed and pale of brow. With Time's silver on my hair; Though i have but a memory Of the happiness and the strife when I marched with the turbulent throng. I shall love the parade ol life! A historian reports that women used cosmetics In the Middle Ages. Women still use cosmetics in the middle ages. Then there was the fat woman who. when told to take lots of exercise, immediately began lumping at every ((inclusion she saw, Old Man Goliath stomped and roared: "Come on. you measly creature — Stand up and fiRht me like a man, And rate a Sunday feature!'' Heh! Hehl Heh! Then David he looked down his nose; He felt his knees grow colder. "Let me alone," he says, "until I get a little bowlder!" Ho! Ho! Ho! We are all blind until we see That In the human plan Nothing is worth the making, if It does not make the man Why build these cities glorious II man unbuilded got ? In vain we build the work, unless The builder also grows. The patter of tiny feet was heard Ion the stairs. Mrs. Kinderly raised 'her hand, warning the members ol | her bridge club to be silent. •"Hush!" she said softly. "The children are going to deliver then goodnight message. It always gives uie a feeling of reverence to hear them. I Listen." There was a moment o£ tense silence, then. "Mama." came the message in a shrill whisper. "Willie found a bedbug." Pietro had been warned to beware of rattlesnakes, but was told that they give warning before they spring. Next day he was eating his luncheon on a pine log when he saw a big rattler coiled a few feet In front of him. He eyed the serpent and began to lift his leu:over the log. He had barely got them out of the way before the snake's fangs hit the log beneath him. "Son of a gunna." yelled Pietro. "Why you no ringa da bell?" "I have heard." writes a correspondent of a medical columnist, that eating frogs' legs will make one limber. Is there any truth in this?" Undoubtedly. Limber frogs" legs make your own legs limber. A frog's body, on the other hand, is characterized by unusual rigidity. To secure suppleness in the torso a diet of angleworms is prescribed.



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Page Six THE JEWISH FLORIDJAN_ Friday, June 16, I93J SOCIETY PLAYING AT THE 7T11 AVENUE THEATRE Dear Pat: Oh darling, I'm so dreadfully unhappy. Bill and I are no longer engaged and I do believe that I'm the most miserable girl in the whole world. Oh. it's all that DeVere Harleys fault. She's so lovely that I don't blame Bill for appearing interested in her. I was so jealous that I broke our engagement off and he seemed perfectly willing to call it quits. It's not my fault that I'm just naturally an ugly duckling. I never did have much time or money to spend on myself. Well, it all sums up to this: Rita Harper has invited me to come and visit her while her folks are away on a business trip and I've decided to go. She lives in New York and that'll be a good place to drown my sorrow. You see. I'm still in love with him. I'm too unhappy to write more but will let you know when I get to New York. Your broken-liearted pal, Joan. Pat dearest: Here I am in New York and. I might add. I just love it. There's so much to see and do. but to tell the truth, I haven't had time to take in many of the .sights because I've been busy doing something else. I told Rita all about Bill and our broken engagi ment and sinsays that if I would try to make myself more attractive Unit he might sil up and take notice when I got home. Rita tells me it doesn't require a great deal of money or lots of time to make oneself more attractive and that no one is just naturally so unattractive that they can't make themselves over into "glamorous and charming creatures.' 1 Those are Rita's very words — I'm just quol111.'. 1 Rita has promised to teach me all she knows on the subject of good looks and insists that she can make ine so attractive that Bill will have to gasp for breath when he sees me. Sounds impossible to me. but we shall see what we shall see. first. I had to make a list of my good points and another one of my bad points. Believe me. that takes real honesty. After you've admitted that you have a poor mouth or rather small eyes, the next step is to try and tone down your bad points by not calling attention to them in anyway and accentuating your good points by trying to call attention to them. Every woman will find that she has some redeeming feature and she should play that up so that when people look at her they will only notice that outstanding point and go away with the impression that she is a good looking woman because she has lovely eyes or a nice mouth. They will forget that she had a poor nose or rather large ears. It's getting late and I must have my beauty sleep so be patient and I'll write you at my first opportunity. As ever, Joan. The annual donor's dinner given by Junior Hadassah to those who have contributed or caused to be contributed the sum of five dollars to the organization was held at the Tropical Jungle Gardens last Monday night when a dinner and dance was held. Mrs. Veeda Cromer was toastmistress, Mrs. Jennie Rotfort delivered the invocation, with Miss Lena Weinkle delivering the address of welcome. A number of mock telegrams from nationally known celebrities were read during the evening and parodies on traits of members present were included. A movietone news broadcast was made from the orchestral stand, the microphone and amplifying system being used Veeda Cromer served as the announcer. Bede Goldenblank as accompanist and Hanna Mack as soloist. A floor show and dance followed. Among those attending were Sylvia Miles. Harry Bass. Sylvia Rayvis, Al Pallott. Mr. and Mrs. Jasper Cromer. Rose Sowers. Dora Mohilner. Dorothy Brill. Sam Miller, Annette Wechsler, Milton Friedman. Marion Blank. Emanuel Weinkle. Hanna Mack. Herman Mack. Mr. and Mrs. S. Rotfort. Miss Lena Weinkle. Leo Chaikin, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Solen. Mrs. Ruth Dubbin. Jack Zion. Ida Cohen. Phil Lerner. Mr. and Mrs. Carl Weinkle, Bede Goldenblank, Aaron Weinkle, Bea Silver. Ben Silver. Esther Rosengarten. Nat Dubler. Betty Greenberg. Milton Brill, Pauline Lasky and Ed Levin. • • • Final plans for the congregational dance being sponsored by the Beth David Sisterhood and administrative board of Beth David congregation for Sunday evening. June 25. will be announced in the next issue of The Jewish Floridian. The proceeds will be used for the purpose of paintini; the synagogue and Talmud Torah. The usual dancing will be followed by a number of acts by prominent artists and members of some of the local night clubs. • • • According to a statement by Rabbi S. M. Machtei of the Radio SynagOg, a meeting Ol its members and sympathizers will be called immediate!; upon his return to Miami at which lime definite plans lor the lee erection ol permanent headquarters lor the Radio Synagog will be definitely announced. "Many of the listeners and members of the Radio Synagog during the past season have felt the need of a permanent meeting location where they may gather on Friday ninhts. Saturday mornings and Sunday mornings when the sermon is broadcast.'' said Rabbi Machtei. "and because of these repeated requests I have felt that with the continued growth of the Radio Synagog it is only fair that the general public be acquainted with our plans for the coming season." "Though not as yet determined, it may be that we shall have high holiday services of the Radio Synagog in our own permanent headquarters." "This should not be taken as a matter of competition, but simply to fill that need which is becoming more and more apparent every day." ( OMPU II Beer Equipment Also Domestic Refrigerators Geo. Patterson, Inc. 1409 Biacaynt llld. I'hnnr 2-4854 S K E E T S 2S6 s. W. Bth St., Miami, Fla. RADIO A. ELECTRIC Sl'ITI.Y Set 1 iMi/itu' in Short Waivt I: lallation or Repairlnn OPEN EVENINGS Have your radio checked up by our new Radio Analyser. No charjre for this service* LOSEY, the Florist Bonded Member Florists 11 legrapb Delh en Assn. 2H0I N. W. 17TH AVENUE Phone* B-lSSfl 1*8#33 ,Uli'""////, j|f V SPEND <~ YOUR VACATION THIS YEAR IN FLORIDA fort/out HEALTH! W/////III,IIIU\A THE I HOF BRAUi JUO! %  'p MI 1 Ice Cold DRAUGHT BEER LARGE %  af~\ *" %  18 m GLASS %  ^y%_s Bar Kosher Sandwiches and Lunches Open All Night JOHN MOREY 616 Collins Ave. Miami Beach + KATHARINE HEPBURN Mountain gorillas are found to be more intelligent than those on the coastal plains. The more inaccessible the mountain, the more intelligent. Frequently an apt quotation is better than an original remark. Never give up the good things you have while hoping for better. True love makes a man so reckless that he doesn't care who knows of his happiness. The height of sweetness depends upon the size of the girl a fellow is in love with. Some women are so curious that they will listen to advice just to find out what it's like. Somehow it is awfully hard for a mother to persuade her daughter to marry the kind of man who will make her happy. Another spring shall come, as fair as this. Another year will furnish ample room For song and birth, for leafing time and bloom, For moon touched sigh, or inarticulate kiss. Another spring shall bring ecstatic bliss To resurrected loves which fled the tomb Of sealed-in winter; the frozen pending doom Has pardoned them to joy; that I must miss. For never will your narrow, clever bands Weave beauty for me in these after years. No other time, your opium-sweet voice sing The thick, soft words of songs of other lands, Of high barred windows, drooping flowers and tears. j RICHARD D. SMITH Sinclair Service Station & Garage 2432 S. W. 8th St. Specialized Service in Fords and Chevrolets Young men about to start somtj thing on their upper lips might ma application to a federal land ban] for a grower's loan. Soy Bean Bread and other vegetable breads GOOD HEALTH BAKING COMPANY, INC. 2165 W. Flagler St. Phone 2-5811 The "Good Health" Kind %  pWEILBAGHRR'S MARKET %  %  PR IMF MEATS %  727 S. W. 6th St. %  1227 W. Flagler St. B Phone 2-5712 a We Deliver m %  %  1'iiiaiiiiiaiiiiaiiiiiaiiuianiiiH %  %  %  Try DODDY PIES 2723 S. W. 8th St. HOG A YARNS Free Instructions All New Shades of Bouclc. Crevenna and Glaronourr Wool Yarns The LoRi::\i: SHOP 1849 Biscayne Blvd. $52,000 FIRE SALE OF GROCERIES ]{AR(.AINS (;AL()UK Libby's, Royal Arms, College Inn Goods, From The Wholesale Grocery Stock of Hill Bros., Inc. Turned Over To The Insurance Companies After Recent Fire To Be Sold REGARDLESS of COST EVERY ARTICLE GUARANTEED Maxwell House or Alladin COFFEE 22c I-II). can PET or CARNATION MILK 5c Tall can I'illsliury's Best Four \\w FLOUR 16c 5-lb. bag TKTI.EVS 4 -lb. pkg. With 10c size attached All for TEA 15c Medium 50-60*1 PRUNES 10c I ll)s. Just out of storage 1(1 1-cent boxes MATCHES 5c ROYAI. ARMS SPINACH No. 2 1 2 large can 12'/ 2 c BARTI.ETT PEARS 7c No. 1, Royal Arms BAKER'S COCONUT 8c No. 1 can PALM OLIVE SOAP Regular bar 5c STRING BEANS Apte No. 2 can 6 for 25c Small O. K. Soap or Powder l'/zc 1 Kadi DOBSON & COMPANY S. W. 8th Ave. and S. W. 4th Street GERMAN SOCIETY BUILDING Plenty Parking Space



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wJewisti Florid tin p f opie nay c me and P*P le M lf adfast faith of the Jewish peoplr 8 oe> '' and on forever, even unlo eU-rni'yV„un R Jacob Panheffski. just a (f monthago in the prime of h „lth and vigor, as so many othrr sho haw been struck down by thf throeof the depression and gnomic struggle, came to Miami Brarh to seek work. Infortunately bf found none. The Hebrew Friendly Inn came to his aid and there provided food and lodging a. ii has for many other homeless nftderers. But young Robert was rrvtlfss I"' wanted not charity but an opportunity to work. He did odd jobs from time to time and j„ s ( as he was about to begin work it a steady position he fell seriously ill. To the Jackson Memorial hospital and from there because he was a charity ward he was Ukrn to the County hospital at Kendall where he underwent an operation. He was finally discharged but becauseof the long deprivations he had undergone. Robert now became mentally irre-pcinsiblr. One day he was arrested and after some study of the use he was committed to the Slate Hospital for Insane at C'hattahoochec. The Jewish Welfare bureau which had become interested in Ins ease did all within its power I" make life more bearable. But Robert, now no more his normal self, tore .it the bandages he was •earinc alter the operation, and at < hatl.iliooc hec became desperMctj ill. there Robert died, far from hifriends, far from his people, .imi there he was burled. Then ,me call after call, appeal ftei appeal from the family 'i Milwaukee, all too poor to do anything themselves. Bring our lv to "Kaver Visroel" was their 'Ppeal. !,.( him find a resting P'aee within the Jewish fold." Rabbis were appealed to. Primarily this was no matter for Miami. "as .1 much a problem for other Jewish communities in Florida. The ( sid shel Kmes Sister%  Mdand the Greater Miami JewMi Cemetery association was appealed to, And soon the wheels •*ttn to turn. Letters and teleWains were srn (o every Jewish Mamnnity in Florida. St. Petersbu 't responded with a small contributi..,,. Jacksonville, the nearest J 'ish community of size to ChatUMOchee agreed to provide a bur1,1 Plot at the Jewish cemetery. 'nit no other communities as much acknowledged the letters. The rr > Which never yet in the history the Jewish people has gone %  ahetded, "Bring our boy's body '" "Kaver YisroelV resounded *• and doser. and more emPhati.allv each day. Something mus| be done. Something was done. And now (butter with the cost of rr '"g. express charges and ""ier costs not small, being paid 1 ""• Greater Miami Jewish ,m, ''iv association and the si-Hrhood of Cheaed shel Emes. 0, *rt I'ar.heffski will at last '""" '" rest within the folds of •Own people. Wandering about "s life, restless and struggling I.ORID.VS ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY MIAMI. FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JUNE 16, 1933. Price Five Cents Welfare Bureau Sponsors Benefit Those interested in helping carry on the work of relieving the needyJewish families of this district are urged to attend a bridge patty at the Columbus hotel next Wednesday evening, June 21, when a very pleasant evening of entertainment will be sponsored. Prizes will be awarded for high scons and refreshments will be served in charge ol general arrangements for this affair is Mrs Many Oliphant, who Ls being a ed by members of the organization Talmud Torah Resumes Sessions Cemetery Board Elects Officers The annual election of officers of the Oreater Miami Jewish Cemetery association was held last Wednesday night and the following were unanimously elected: W. L. Williams. president: I. L. Mintzer, vice president; M. B. Frank, treasurer: H. M. Drevich. financial secretary, and Sadye O. Rose, recording secretary. Directors who will serve are William Mechlowitz. J. Louis Shochet. Harry M.ukowitz. Lewis Brown. Sol Goldstrom and Mesdames Morns Kotkin and Sol Schwartz, Mr Manuel Rippa ihonorary president. These officers will be installed at a banquet to be held in Beth David Talmud Torah hall on Wednesday evening, June 28. when the officers and directors and their wives, the pre I pn rident, secretary and treasurer of each congregation, tl nt and vice president of ei %  rhood will attend A resolution of thanks to the outgoing officers was mously adopted, II being pointed out that one of the main: accomplishments was the reduction In the Indebtedness ni tl tery and the bi ilnin of title to the plot for the principal sums paid In In charge of arrangi for the banquet LS a commit 1 mslsl Mi idames Manuel Rlppa, M Kotkin, Sol Schwartz, s. O. Rose, L. Abrams. and Messrs. H. M. Di Sol Schwartz. M. B. Frank and M Rippa. According to an announcement made this week the Talmud Torah of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation will continue its summer session daily except Saturday and Sunday beginning at 10 a.m. every morning, Mr. Herman Braunstein. nationally known educator. Ls director of the Talmud Torah and in direcl charge of the work. In outlining the plans for the Talmud Torah. Mr. Braunstein said. "I am happy that the officers and board of the conion and its Ladies" auxiliaryair in thorough accord with my plans for enrolling every Jewish boy and girl m the City in obtaining some knowledge of Hebrew, our traditions, history and faith." "Never before in our history has the necessity for a Jewish education been so manifestly and vividly brought home to our people as at this time, particularly because of the German outagainst all who have Jewish blood in them." "I am happy to Bay that every Jewish boy and girl Ls me to attend our Talmud Torah and to enrol] as a student." "Even though they may be unable to pay for their children's tuition or may belong to some other congregation, we shall be happy to extend our facilities to them so that their children may be brought up to respecl and know themselves." "Especially do we want those in the iborhood of the congregation to their children to us." "During unmetthe boy and girl is free from school work and worries and Is fore enabled to quickly grasp and ui %  : without much i on his part, it ithe bo the year for Jewish education and Children may be enrolled at 1545 S. W. Third street any morning after 9:31 a.m. Synagog calls Generel Meeting All members of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation are urged to attend a meeting of the entire congregation to be held at the synagogue next Tuesday evening, June 20, beginning at 8:15 p.m.. when important matters will be presented for the consideration of the members. An important announcement will be made regarding the work of the Talmud Torah and plans for the immediate future of the congregation will be acted on. Ladies Install New Officers ... •Announcements! CONGREGATION BETH JACOB (Orthodox) SI I Washington Ae„ Miami Beach The usual services begin at 6:30 p.m. Saturday morning services begin at 8:30 and Mincha services, followed by Marriv at 6:30 p.m. Late services have been discontinued until the High Holidays. Daily services begin at 8 a.m. Cemetery To Be Beautified Auxiliary Plans Picnic Series Plans for a series of summer picnics for the benefit of the Ladies' auxiliary ol the Miami Jewish OrthI odox congregation will be announced soon. The funds will be used exclusivelytowards the upkeep of the summer term of the Talmud Torah. which is being supported by the organization, in charge of arrangements will be a committee whose raster will be announced at the next meeting of the auxiliary Tuesdayevening. June 26. by Mrs Jack Hirsch, president of the auxiliary. i„ the search for a livelihood denied him through no fault Of Inown. Robert will %  •*> t hi,t ew lasting peace, not in a paupers grave at Chattataooctaee but in the midst of his own Jewish people, Ind so that age-old cry, "let me rest among my own," "Bring me to 'Kaver YisroelV will again be aaswend in the only way that jews throughout the centunes have ever replied. Much progress has been made in the past several weeks towards the permanent beautification of the Jewish section or the Woodlawn cemetery which is owned by the

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Page lour THE JEWISH FLORID IAN Friday, June 16, 195 3. **+*+++**+*+++++++******++*****+***+•:• &f +*++*+*++** + + I + + Haton ^yttagng Sullrtttt Edited by RABBI S. M. MACHTEI Pound** and Dlnetor, Radio ByMgas of America SUNDAY MORNINGS V"IOD, MIAMI, FLORIDA f Vol. II. Sl'NDAY, Jl/NE 11. 1933. No. 7. j &f&f&f&f &f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f &f &f &f &f&f&f • &f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f The Rise in the Spiritual Value Sermon Delivered, by Herbert V. Feibelman, Guest Speaker M ARCH 4. 1933. will ever remain a great day in history. No act of man will add to us lustre or contribute to its permanence in the galaxy ot holidays. The date of the fall of the Bastille. Independence day. nay. even days of high holy celebration will call for no more widespread recognition. for March 4. 1933. marked an event of world-wide importance. It marked the time when humanity Itself gained hope of a new freedom. It climaxed the days and months Of despondence and distress Nations that seemed destined to carry the yoke of war burdens, for the first time felt ease from their miseries thai had seemed eternal, Men on that day could conceive of relief from thi shackles of economic .•'...-.cry. 1 WAS in the nation's capitol that day It was cold and dreary and the atmosphere was murky with leaden clouds Thousands had come to Wu -o attend the ir..r..^..:.;:-.on. perhaps the greatest crowds in the : • Inaugurations It was an orderly and serious throng of men and women and children of all ranks. The elders came for an event they expected to be memorable It was They sought a word of comfort and got it. The air was surcharged with the querj What will Roosevelt say?'' I sat In on th< stands on tlu Whit< House lawn and can still hear the per• radio voice ol the new leader, through the loud speaker, as he inspired the American people, and. through them, the teeming millions of the world, with his concept of true happiness He said "Happiness lies not in the mere possess:,-.-, o: mon j it lies In the joy of achievement, in the effort The Joj and moral stimulation of work no longer must bo for n in the mad chase of evanescent profits. These dark days will be worth .i'.'. us Li they teach us that our true destiny is not to be ministered unto, but to minister to ourselves and to our fellow men." T HIRTEEN million unemployed and millions of others affected by the depi conomic and sociological conditions comprehended the good that musl flow from the evil of their sufferings. America, the land of almosl unlimited resources, of great and farms and factories, of materials for i and food heard its call to duty to its people and to the world. The world and America o the dauntless spirit of Franklin DM >, with a vision ol .i Moses and an eloquence of a Jen mlah pn ached a gospel of human Interdependence, of mutual help:.:'.:. atlon of the spiritual valui I F I read the temper of our people correctly said this author of "the r.e-.. .: %  : realized before our interdependence on each other: that we ..:.:. take but we must as well, i : rward we must move u .i trained and loyal arm} willing tc sa v: ot a common discipline. because without .:p becomes effective We are : kn ruling I i submit u lives and property to such discipllni b .. i%  it makes ssibl i alms at a larger good" T HE subs : t be i A. but < :.. %  their funds that trulj n 's souls nact mi tits made possit -. • .respoi consdtui :.ni I The iny of our s sen ed Tl .: i forbearanl and with d t: the iranscenden: Deeds :'. the -r rurreocj ; :r .to;„:3ec (Uld : A ND what fundan I government : tsk perm entli Roosevt I progrmair r-n ited. well considered and lose! Sr ;t tili.-.:..-.: t; thl tull :: 1 .:-: tfcl jgh ".;-.-• agl relief act r ving unemi -.•Act or raising n %  :. the V< .%  -....-. act er of ar:.:.; D :r it veil measure — be it .-_ by Inaugu | and f got ernmi j rmanem r IE day : imited f\p:;:tdt.;:; .: natural aught a cist values • %  the spiritual -.i:ur L. :....:. r-j.;: tr.it :ap:ti: ll the product ot ... OEM though later needs capital The time Is r will Bud Its rr-iri ihi power ol Its own pre-emim .~ and wishes of a' lew master minds In Wall itn I sforgu ma; the | ad libituir. We -. %  oe::e: labor condlsupply of men and n In the comptai M traffic ::' the ex. We -ar.t DO faje T'r.e tt.it.. %  ;-. _: ir; ; •_-^ POWI put the :ip:t-:: back when il beta The r.at. Nucea of men and rr.itenal Human liberty dependent as ever on .abor honestly rewarded, red and must :•.-.-.• r agair. be bartered at -.:.oy changers The I the hee. heard b;. %  tless lead-: bo recognizes DO I enjoj the proill of the many a: the expense of the need•;_-._ : ; commerce These supports of a modem c: .-:and on f_-rr.e: grc md There is now and must ever be a partnership be:veer, goverameni and business, founded firmly on human welfare, on common understanding and mutual helpfulness The greater good and not private profit must first be served. Governmental control of the sinews of war and of peace is insured. We see that the spiritual value has more permanence than any money standard. Precious human welfare and not precious metals form the basic standard for permanent happiness. T 1 HOSE who have followed closely the trend of recent events here and 1 abroad expect even further changes in the economic structure. The millenium is not here. The leaven of perfect functioning has not been obtained. Experimentation is still "in the air." We. in America, are confident as we are proud, of the superiority of government by a written constitution. We are sure that the basic principles of our government are sound. We know the extent of their expansion to meet the most severe emergencies. In times of stress, we have not hesitated to make one branch of the government — the executive — the agent of another, the legislative. We do not fear the centralization of power within constitutional limits. We stand four-square behind our 150-year-old system, and are wholly unprepared to suffer the extremes of the Russian experiment or the mob frenzy of Hitlensm. Perhaps something good may be evolved from these chimerical tampenngs with ordered liberty. We know not. But we are certain that the capacity of our own system has commanded a position of influence, well recognized at every international parley within the present generation. T HIS new concept of ordered liberty, this product of the horrible years of depression, this new trend of governmental force and policies will inevitably spread beyond our shores. The great world economic parley, j which, by the way. is sponsored by the League of Nations, itself rejected in America less than 15 years ago — this world conference on economic needs, meets on the morrow. America is represented and represented well. Through the enactment of timely currency legislation — which the President urged months ago in his book. "Looking Forward" — the American delegates have the facilities for stabilizing world currency and credit and trade, and we may be sure that the spirit of March 4 last will make itself felt in London: America will assert a doctrine of the very interdependence of humanity itself. The world's unemployed await accords and agreements in line with the Roosevelt formulae. N O American pulpit should fail at this time to record thankfulness for the blessing of the experiences of the past three years. We may well utter our thanksgiving for a great social revolution that has brought a new day. We have suffered that we might learn, that we might fully appreciate the reward of a new day. The secretary of the interior, in a recent address to college graduates, urged that we comprehend the new order, out of which the salvation of our present-day civilization shall come. He said: "We are accustoming ourselves to drastic changes in our modes of living. Hesitantly, even fearfully, we are embarking on new social adventures is surely as our forefathers set out on untrodden and uncharted paths in the earlier days. Our belief in the irresistible power of position and money has been shattered T O the extent that we appreciate this age-old but newly applied philosophy, to that extent we shall be partners in the great adventure of hung today Our problems at home and abroad can be answered only in ; the spirit of interdependence between the very elements of civilization II We shall grasp our problems of supply and demand, of taxation, of I governmental and individual debts, in the spirit of human welfare. The • task of the individual is to keep step with the mighty swing towards the happiness that requires a measure of individual sacrifice, of subordination of self to common weal. I SRAEL long ago learned her lesson and taught it. Israel learned the transcendent truth of the eternal value of the spirit. It has been the .onored custom to record the perpetual existence of the gospel of -' %  --'' %  deca v of ^o^ nations and people who sought to destroy :: in :: destroyed themselves The scattered tribes can now Hence of the standard that their forbears reared in a Is have been raised anew in a J : %  -'•' %  thai within recent years, forgot the very remnant of these tribes mav be. they can :• March 4 began the journey to a spinoual Canaan famllj '.v. : .... wit,, oavjd of old. pray for the renewal • irit F R E E Radio^Show See the in u RCA VICTOR RADIOS Home Auto float Free Jig-Saw Puzzle to All Viewing the New Radios Pan-American Radio, Inc. 1809 N. K. 2nd Av*. Phone 2-5048 RCA Victor Distributor Call 2-50J8 for Radio Service BON TON Dry Cleaners (all For and Deliver Carpetn and RUJCK Cleaned or Dyed We Do Pleating Plant and Main Office: 37 N. W. 5th Ave. Phone 2-S715 Dr. A. T. knowles ;"ih AT*. Phone :-";• :*s N. MODERN PET HOSPITAL Lane IndKidaal Boardinc Ron. Effeeti.e Tiek Medicine Sold SCHCOLMKS NEW YORK Bohemian Rye Produced by New York Bread 4 Cake Co_ Inc. NIGELEY Funeral I lome ISU Wa.hineton A.e.. Miami Rearh PHONE 5-3355 MIRRORS We make table tops. We re-silver old mirrors. >>e make new mirrors of any desijrn. We make anything and everrthinr pertaininr to mirrors and {lass. Miami Mirror & Glass Works and (1) V Miami AT.. Phone S-ll RADIO REPAIR 4 ADJUSTMENT SERVICE N. W. 7th Ave. al 34th St. Phone 2-5055 Equipped with the most complete line of radio test and rePair equipment in Miami, wishes to announce that we are In a position to service all types ihousr or car) radios that you have been unable to get results with as well as ret;ular replacement Jobs at minimum C1>sL Radio lip.Ill 111:; is an eiurinrerinc proposition and calls for Traininjt Experience, and i ,|ii.|im,iit (Better be sure than sorrv.l Dealers' work solicited. Free Examination and Pickup —+ FISHERMAN Come out to 79th Street — get I your bait and tackle at the Tarpon Tackle Shop! 79th St. and Biseayne Blvd. + The Finest and Freshest Vegetables in Florida Live Poultry Everything Choice MRS. A. WALL 32 and 33 FARMERS CURB MARKET S. W. 2nd Ave. and Bridge Phone 3-1181 Delaney & Beers Kodak Finiihins and Enlarging Commercial Work and Home Portrait. 50% Off on All .Amateur Work 212 N. E. 4th St. Phone 2-5385 Royal Typewriters N'ewjind Factory Rebuilt Portables. S29.50 to J60.00 B. W. THACKER, Local Dealer 210 N. B. 2nd St. Phone 2-0115 In the Heart of Your Neighborhood PIGGLY WIGGLY A Miami Institution MIAMI \(Al)i:.MY OF ARTS 328 N. E. 2nd Ave. Fine and Commercial Art. Life classen. Adult Public Speaking, repression. Dramatics. t;roup and individual instruction. The same high standards of instruction at summer prices. Visitors welcome