The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00217

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
& Jewish 'Floridtin
Vol. 6. NO. It.
LORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY
MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, APRIL 21, 1933.
Price Five Cents
In order thai the voten may
acquainted with the var-
i tdidates for the city com-
mission of Miami, the following
ni i\ tiffcriil, without
icnt, for the guidance of the
i nil rs.
in making his campaign for office
0i city commissioner, c. c. Blake
urged the voters in the coming mu-
nicipal election to exercise their
right ol suffrage in the same man-
ner as they would attend to their
own business affairs and to consider
a candidate's private and business
life in arriving at their decision. He
itn i (! the necessity of constructive
work in the future and promised a
businesslike, economical and careful
administration of public affairs,
nch as bonding, taxation and public
utility rates.
Tom Kelly is making his entry
into politics as a candidate for the
city commission. He came to Miami
about 14 years ago to recuperate
from injuries received during the
World war and engaged in the in-
surance business. Is a life member
of the Harvey Seeds past. American
Legion, three times captain of the
world champion drum and bugle
corps, now commanding officer ol
the 265th coast artillery of the Flor-
ida National Guard, prominent offi-
cer of the local Elks lodge, one of
the active organizers and backers
of the Miami Junior Chamber of
Commerce drum and bugle corps.
He lias taken an active part in the
local communal life and is stressing
a Ian solution of the problems of
the bonded indebtedness of Miami.
Its utility rates, and complete re-
organization of the city's admini-
strative departments in order to re-
duce the cost of government. He
himself to a system of dis-
trict representation in city govern-
ment so that each section ol the
city may have a representative in
1 commission.
Jack Maltzie. though a newcomer
in politics is not unknown to the
rank and file of Miamians. partic-
ularly tlie large number of local
worker.-, with whom he has been as-
sociated for the past several years.
is a native of Pittsburgh.
Pa., where he received his general
education and then graduated from
irnegie Tech as a civil engin-
eer. Coming to Miami about 11! years
a'-'" l.e became connected with the
construction firm of R. c. Huffman
n the building of the Tamiami
later helped in the construc-
tion of the Overseas highway and in
'' Homestead road. He organized
the county construction forces which
provided labor for the unemployed
and later became connected with
Hie federal Reconstruction Finance
Corporation, in his work In direct-
tog the unemployed. Maltzie at-
lalned the respect of the many
thousand of local workers who came
under him for his fairness of treat-
ment, and many a dollar was ad-
vanced by him in numerous in-
stances out of his personal funds to
lp allay want in needy families.
His many friends point to the fact
'hat his engineering abilities are
needed by the city at this time and
would help save thousands of dol-
Continutd on Page Six!
Cantor to be
Given Tribute
In recognition of his many years
ol service to the Jewish religious
world and particularly to "Chaza-
nui.ii.- Cantors Boris 8chlachman,
Louis Hayman and Nathan Wroo-
be! have formed a committee which
Is arranging a farewell banquet to
Cantor i Kaminsky ol New York
City, who winter vai
in Miami and Miami Beach. Cantor
Kaminsky, who occupied noted po I
lam- in renowned synagogui
this country and abroad Is partic-
ularly famous for the large number
ol liturgical compositions of famous
cantors which he has succeeded In
recovering for the synagogue and
particularly for putting into per-
manent form many ol the fam-
ous traditional "skarbove nigunhn"
handed down from generation to
generation until the present time.
In addition to this research work.
Cantor Kaminsky has composed a
large number of original synagogue
works which have been accepted by
the world of "Chazanuth" not only
for Its melodic beauty but for the
splendid interpretation given the
text by the music adapted to it. The
local cantors who form the com-
mittee arranging the banquet have
been studying with Cantor Kamin-
sky for a number of years during his
stay here every winter. The affair
wil be held on Sunday evening.
April 23, at the Nemo hotel and res-
ervations may be made by phoning
any member of the committee.
Bnai Brith Host
to Large Crowd
Quite a large gathering attended
the meeting of the local Bnai Brith
lodge last Tuesday evening with Mr.
\v. L. William.- presiding. Addresses
were made by Mr. W. L. Williams.
Adolph Freund. L. Levy of Wiscon-
sin, Isaac Levin, and Stanley C. My-
ers. The membership committee re-
ported that nme applications mi
members had been filed. Plans for a
joint celebration of Mother's day
with the A. Z. A. (Junior Bnai
Brith i were discussed and a com-
mittee consisting of Nat Williams,
chairman, to be assisted by Mi
William Friedman. I. Levin. Ed
Friedman and A. Freund was auth-
orized to conduct the affair which
will be an event of May 14. The
Palm Beach lodge of Bnai Brith
will be the guests of the local or-
ganizations at this celebration. Fol-
lowing the business session Nal
William- as master of ceremonies.
presented a musical entertainment
which included orchestral selections
and other entertainment. Refresh-
ments were served at a late hour.
The social meeting will be a month-
ly event hereafter.
Noted Worker
Visits Miami
Harry Greenstein of Baltimore.
Mel. is a visitor at the Strathhaven
hotel. Miami Beach. Mr. Greenstein
is a prominent attorney of Balti-
more and for a number of .rat.
served as the president of the
Young Men's Hebrew association
and as executive secretary of the
Federated Jewish Chanties of Balti-
more. He is recuperating from a re-
cent illness.
Rabbi is Honor
Guest at Banquet
One of the most impressive events
of recent years was the farewel ban-
quet held at the Nemo hotel last
Tuesday night In honor of Rabbi
and Mrs Lazarus Axelrod, formerly
of Beth Jacob congregation. Miami
Beach. The tables, set in the lorm
of a horseshoe, were beautifully dec-
i with cut flowers specially ar-
ranged. At the head of the table
sat Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan of
Temple Israel, who acted as toast- '
master. Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan ol |
the Miami Jewish Orthodox congre- ;
gation, Rabbi Max Shapiro of Beth
David congregation, Cantor Boris
Schlachman, Munya Zhitomerski.
prominent journalist, and a number
of other prominent citizens of the
Greater Miami section as well as
several prominent tourists.
In opening his remarks. Rabbi
Kaplan told of the struggles of the
rabbinate, the duties imposed on the
Jewish laymen, and spoke in glow-
ing terms of the contribution to the
betterment of Jewry in this district
by Rabbi Axelrod. Cantor Schlach-
man was heard in a number of folk
j songs accompanied at the piano by
Moonya Zhitomersky. Rabbi Jonah
E. Caplan then spoke and told of his
knowledge of the constructive ac-
| complishments of Rabbi Axelrod
during his stay here for the past
' two years and extended his wish for
| a successful career in the future. He
was followed by Rabbi Max Shapiro.
I who told of the esteem that Rabbi
Axelrod was held in in a number of
cities that he had served and of his
work in the local community as a
force for the uplift of Jewry. Moon-
ya Zhitomersky then spoke and told
ol the position of the rabbi in Jew-
ish lite throughout history and ex-
ed his hope that the sterling
qualities of Rabbi Axelrod would be
fittingly appreciated. A number of
j tourists, including Mr. Ulin of Bos-
ton. Mrs. Jafle of Chicago, and oth-
ers, told of their esteem for the
rabbi gained by him because of his
zeal in the interest of Judaism and
the betterment of the Jewish people
locally. The rabbi was then present-
ed with a substantial sum in cash
by a committee representing men
and women who had worshipped at
the Beth Jacob synagogue for a
number of years during the rabbi's
stay here. The last speaker of the
evening was Rabbi Axelrod. who
was introduced in very eloquent
fashion by Rabbi Kaplan, the toast-
master. Rabbi Axelrod told of his
arrival in Miami Beach, of his work
here, of his efforts in his humble
way to contribute his bit towards a
better Jewry and concluded by say-
ing that while he had felt discour-
aged by the struggles that a rabbi
must undergo and had suffered
here, the outburst of genuine friend-
ship as evidenced by the banquet
had removed every vestige of dis-
appointment and that he would
again rededicate himself to the du-
i ties of the profession he had chosen
for his life's work. Rabbi Axelrod
concluded with a blessing and
thanks of appreciation to all his
friends who had attended.
Rabbi Axelrod is now considering
a number of offers of pulpits in the
North but will not make his decision
until sometime in the fall.
Hebrew Club
Hears Speakers
Attended by a large number of
members, the Hebrew Athletic club
held a business meeting followed by
a dance program last Wednesday
night at the Community centre.
Murray Grossman, the president of
the organization, told of the work
ol the club and detailed the plans
made for a number of benefit af-
fairs. What impressed the hearers
was the sincerity of the club's of-
fer and attempt to have every Jew-
ish organization in the Greater Mi-
ami district use its facilities without
charge. A number of members spoke
as did Mr. McCready, one of the
candidates for the city commission,
who promised to make a survey of
the club's needs and to help as much
as possible. In between a number of
dance novelties. Robert R. Williams,
president of the Riverside Improve-
ment association and former justice
of the peace, was introduced. In a
very vigorous speech he discussed
the issues of the present campaign
and pledged himself to an intelli-
gent solution of the bond problem,
a reduction in taxes, and a reduc-
tion in utility rates. In concluding
his address he pointed to his record
in public office and pledged his ev-
ery effort as a citizen to stamp out
prejudice and bigotry in the selec-
tion of officeholders. "If elected.''
Mr. Williams said, "I pledge myself
to see that every citizen receives
full recognition and privilege that
he may be entitled to, regardless of
creed or religious affiliation.'' At the
conclusion of the address he re-
ceived a long and enthusiastic ova-
tion.
I Announcements!
I______________i
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION
(Orthodox)
IMI S. W. Third Street
JONAH E. CAPLAN, Rabbi
The early Friday evening Bervicet
be::m at 6 p.m. There will be no late
services in the future until the fall,
these having been discontinued im-
mediately after Passover. Saturday
morning service- begin at the Mincha and Marriv services at
6 p.m.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
(Conaervative)
139 N. W. Third Avenue
MAX SHA~PIRO, Rabbi
Regular early services begin at 6
p.m. with the late services at 8:15
p.m.. when Rabbi Shapiro will
preach on "What About the War
to End War?" This will be based on
the American-Japanese strained re-
lations. Cantor Louis Hayman will
chant the services and direct the
choir singing.
CONGREGATION BETH JACOB
(Orthodox)
311 Washington Ave., Miami Beach
The usual early services begin at
6 p.m. with the late services at 8:15
when a prominent layman will ad-
dress the congregation. Cantor Boris
Schlachman will conduct the ser-
vices and chant. Saturday morning
services begin at 8:30 and Mincha
services, followed by Marriv at 5:30
p. m.
Ladies Elect
New Officers
At the meeting of Beth David Sis-
terhood hed last Wednesday at the
Beth David Talmud Torah hall offi-
ceis were elected for the coming
year. Mrs. Isidor Cohen was unan-
imously elected a delegate to the
sixteenth annual convention of the
Women's League of the United Syn-
agogue of America, which will be
held at New York City on May 7.
8 and 9. Mrs. Lewis Brown was
chosen as the alternate delegate.
In the election for officers the fol-
lowing were chosen: Mrs. Lewis
Brown, president; Mrs. Morris Dub-
ler. first vice president: Mrs. Stan-
ley C. Myers, second vice president:
1 Mrs. J. Kopplowitz, corresponding
secretary: Mrs. Harry Oliphant. re-
cording secretary; Mrs. Isidor Fine,
financial secretary: Mrs. Sol Wein-
kle. treasurer; Mrs. Ed Friedman,
auditor, and Mrs. B. Kandle. ser-
geant-at-arms. Directors to serve a
three-year term are Mrs. Louis Hay-
man. Mrs. Michael Arnold and Mrs.
Sam Wiesel. Elected to serve a two-
year term were Mrs. William Fried-
man and Mrs. Harry Isaacs. The in-
stallation luncheon will be held at
1 the Talmud Torah hall on May 3.
with Mrs. Morris Dubler in charge
i ol arrangements.
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI
(Reform)
137 N. E. Nineteenth Street
DR. JACOB H. KAPLAN, Rabbi
Services will be held tonight at
8:15. Dr. Kaplan has chosen for his
subject "How Does God Manifest
Himself to Man?" The public is cor-
dially invited.
Sunday school each Sunday from
10 until noon.
Ladies Auxiliary
To Meet Monday
A regular meeting of the Ladies'
auxiliary of the Jewish Welfare bu-
reau will be held at Kaplan hall
next Monday. April 24, beginning at
2 p.m.. when important business will
be transacted. All members are urg-
ed to attend promptly.
Annual May Day
Dance is Planned
The second annual May Day
dance sponsored by the Miami chap-
ter of Junior Hadassah will be held
on April 7. at the Floridian hotel
Miami Beach, when the May Day-
queen will be chosen from contest-
ants representing every Jewish or-
ganization in Greater Miami. Last
year Miss Bedc Goldenblank was
the winner of the popularity contest
by which the queen was chosen.
Each Jewish organization is asked
to send their nominations to the
chairman of the committee. Miss
Hannah Mack, not later than April
30, sp that proper arrangements can
be made. The proceeds of the dance
and the attendant popularity con-
test are devoted to the Jewish Na-
tional fund. Further details will ap-
pear in our next issue.
These annual affairs have aroused
a spirit of rivalry among the dif-
ferent organizations in the district
because the May queen is chosen on
the basis of the number of votes
cast. The runners-up are awarded
the honors of being made ladies In
waiting and smaller prizes.



,'
I


Page Two
THE JEWISH FLORID'AN
Friday, Apri| 2| ,01,
I
Mr.s. Adele Vince Rose presented a
resume of "Saunders Oak"' by Rob-
ert Raynolds last Tuesday evening
at the home of Mrs. Alex Goldstein.
808 Euclid avenue, Miami Beach.
This was the regular meeting of the
Fortnightly Book Review club. A so-
cial hour followed.

Mr. and Mrs. William Fox of New
York entertained at the Miami Bilt-
more hotel dinner dance Friday
night, honoring their son-in-law and
daughter. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Ris-
kin. who were married here Friday,
with Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan officiat-
ing. Bride's roses and lilies of the
valley formed the centerpiece for
the table. Guests were Mr. and Mr.s.
Harry Winston. Mr. and Mrs. Wil-
liam B. Steinhardt. Mrs. Leonard
C. Van Wye and Miss Belle Fox, all
of New York; Miss Ann Kemter of
Atlanta, Edward Morris of New
York, Harry Fischer of Washington,
Sidney de Young of Boston. Ben
Kallen of New York and Roy Gindy
of Cleveland.

Plans for the girls' break dance
of the Junior Council of Jewish
Women to be held at the Beth Dav-
TIVOLI
W. FlaEler at 8th Phone 2-3352
Sunday and Monday, April 23-24
"TROUBLE in
PARADISE"
with
Kay Francis Miriam Hopkins
One wan a hrunvltf. one wa- a blonde
but ihey both hiw red.
Kl IIL'S
STUDIO of DANCING
presents
"STARS of
TOMORROW"
Sons and Dance Revue
FRIDAY EVE.. APRIL 28
8:15 P. M.
nt the
Temple Theatre
Admission 50c, Children 25c
PHONE 3-1559
FISHING TACKLE
AT
Bargain Prices
Tarpon Tackle
Shop
79th Street
Juat EaM of lli-.ra.vnr Blvd.
HOME SERVICE LAUNDRY
Mrs. Clara D. Kersey, Prop.
1225 8. W. 6th St. Phone 2-5654
SPECIAL
20 lbs. Rough Dry, $1.00
Flat Work Finished
'+
MAXWELL
HOUSE
There Is A Reason!
We arc aervinK a dinner worth n
dollar for .10r. and are running to
capacity. Come out and make us
prove it. Steak, chopt*. aea food,
fried chicken, nmothered chicken,
hot rolls, home made pics, real
coffee. Special turkey dinner every
Sunday. 12 noon to 8 p.m.
MAXWELL HOUSE
2147 S. W. 8th St. ITamiaml Trail)
Phone 2-5922
id Talmud Torah hall on Sunday.
April 23. include a dramatic skit
under the direction of Miss Milli-
cent Rubin, who is coaching the
play. In charge of arrangements for
this dance is a committee headed by
Miss Ruth Son tag. She Ls being as-
sisted by the Misses Mildred Dreis-
en. Henrietta Hirsch. Charlotte
Kohn. Harriet Kanter and Sara
Kohn.
*
The Hebrew Athletic club will
hold an initiation of recently elected
members next Wednesday night at
the clubrooms of the organization in
its Community centre, with Milton
Klein as chairman of the member-
ship committee directing the cere-
monies. Full details of the gala
vaudeville show to be given by the
organization at Its clubrooms on
May 14, under the direction of Abe
Goldman, will be announced next
Wednesday night.

An important meeting of the Lad-
ies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish
Orthodox congregation will be held
next Tuesday tllght, April 25. when
election of officers will be held fol-
lowing the report of the nominating
committee of which Mr.s. Max Kup-
fesrtein is chairman. All members
ire urged to attpnd as very impor- i
tant business will be transacted fol-
lowing the election of officers.

Under the direction of Mrs. Harry
Oliphant and the supervision of
Rabbi Max Shapiro the pupils of
Beth David Sunday school and Tal-
mud Torah presented their Passover
play last Sunday morning at the I
assembly of the Sunday school. The
annual Passover Sader preceded the
play which was witnessed by a large
number of adults in addition to the
pupils.

The annual donor's tea of the
Senior Hadassah will be held on
Monday next. April 24. at the home
of Mrs. Joseph Williamson. 1444
Meridian avenue, Miami Beach, and
will be open to all who have earned
their quota of funds.

Beth David Sunday school teach-
ers will be hosts at a benefit bridge ;
for the Beth David library fund on
Wednesday evening, April 26. be-
ginning at 8 p.m. Prizes will be
awarded for high scores and re- '
freshments will be served.

The Tuttle garage is now offer-
ing special summer rates for the
storage of autos in a fire and storm
proof building so that the fullest
protection is always assured. They
are also offering extremely low rates
for repair work.
Live Poultry and Choice
Fruits and Vegetables
Prices Right
MRS. A. WALL
6:,-66 City Terminal Market
S. W. 2nd Ave. and 2nd St.
CHOICE LIVE POULTRY
HENS. FRYERS. PULLETS,
DUCKS, ETC.
FRESH FLORIDA EGGS
at reasonable prices.
ELORIDA
POULTRY & EGG
COMPANY
Wholesale and Retail
1011-13 S. W. 8th St.
Phone 2-8334
Jack Kru*. Mir. We Deliver
Mrs. Philip Berkowitz returned to
her home after having spent several
weeks as a patient at the University
hospital.

Word has Just been received here
of the birth of a baby daughter to
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Kanter of
Passaic. N. J. Mrs. Kanter is the for-
mer Jane Schonfeld. the daughter
of Mr. and Mrs, Joseph Schonfeld.
long-time residents of Miami.

Ml Lillian Wucher and Mrs.
Bi ssie Wernlkoff arc co chairmen
of a benefit bridge for the Junior
Council of Jewish Women which will
be held at the home of Miss Wuch-
er. 726 Michigan avenue. Miami
Beach, next Tuesday evening. April
25. beginning at 8 o'clock. Prises
will be awarded and refreshments
will be served.

Mrs, Manuel Rippa entertained a
group of friends at her home last
Tuesday afternoon at bridge in hon-
or of Mrs. R. Yunes. who will leave
shortly to spend her summer vaca-
tion in Boston and nearby points.
Assisting the hostess in entertaining
were the Misses Ida and Mollie Eng-
ler. A beautiful prize of a crystal
bead chain was presented to the
guest of honor by the hostess Fust
prize for high score was awarded to
Mrs. Morris Dubler and the booby
prize was won by Mrs. Jake Bngler,
Among those attending were Mes-
dames Stone. Cohen. L. Weinkle. S.
Schwartz, Morns Kotkin, I. i
stein. Chas. Goldstein. Morris Dub-
ler. i. Cohen. I, L. Mintzer, J. Bng-
ler, Lewis Brown. J. Simpson, A.
Neunan. Mike Kotkin. L. Bancicl
and I. Fine During the afternoon
Passover refreshments wen- served.

The Mac Rose Follies will be pre-
sented by the Mae Rose Studio of
Dancing, Friday. April 21. at 8:15
at the Scottish Rite Temple theatre
A most diversified and entertaining
program has been arranged. The
dance routines, all of which were
originated by Mae Rose and Bill
Perks, will be executed by an array
of talented Juveniles as well as ad-
vanced students, many of whom
have been appearing on some of the
foremast southern theatrical circ-
uits.
Among those participating are:
Mae Rose. Bill Pecks. Esther Bain.
Jacqueline Rosen. Betty Berney. Es-
ther Lea Silverman. Jerry Rauzin
and Bobby Reisman.
a a
Senior Hadassah ls now arranging
a thrift luncheon, the proceeds of
which will be devoted to the fund
for infant welfare work in Palestine.
Mrs. Sam Simonhoff is chairman of
the arrangements committee and
she Ls being assisted by Mrs. Louis
Zeientz. The affair will be held at
Kaplan hall on Tuesday. April 25.
at noon.

Mrs. Bernard Simon will preside
at the regular meeting of the Senior
Council of Jewish Women on Wed-
nesday, April 26, beginning at 2 p.m.
at the Ponce de Leon hotel, when
the nominating committee headed
by Mrs. Isidor Cohen will present
the report of the committee recom-
mending officers for the coming
year. Election will follow. All mem-
bers are urged to attend. Eighteen
Passover baskets were distributed to
needy Jewish families by the coun-
cil.

A regular meeting of Hadassah
was held at the Miami Acacia club
last Monday when announcement
was made that a baby beauty show
would be held shortly. Mrs. L. Roth
is chairman and she is being assist-
ed by Mesdames B. Kandel. Frances
Williamson. Sam Simonhoff. Max
Dobrin, M. Wesson. H. Weinberg and
H. Rubin. Full details of this event
will appear in our next issue.

Mr. and Mrs. Perry Stone are be-
ing congratulated on the birth of a
baby girl las) week at the Victoria
hospital. The baby was named at a
ceremony In the Miami Jewish Or-
thodox congregation last Tuesday
morning and a reception was ten-
dered the worshippers immediately
after the services.
a a a
Mr. and Mr.s. Harry I. Lipton left
Is Saturday to spend several weeks
In New York City,

Mr, Jacob Becker, vice president
of Beth Jacob congregation. Miami
Beach, left last Saturday on a brief
business trip to Washington. D. C.
He will return the early part of
next week.

Kay Francis, the Mine. Colet of
"Trouaie in Paradise." from the play
by Latzlo Aladar. coming to the
four years old. her mother. Rather
ine Clinton, a well-known stock ac-
Tivoli theatre on Sunday and Mon-
day. was born in Oklahoma City of
theatrical parents. When she was
tress, put the child in a private
school in New York, and returned
to the stage.
A series of private schools fol-
lowed. The stage claimed her. her
first role being the player queen in
the modern dress version of "Hani.
let." She then spent a season with
Stuart Walker's stock companies in
Cincinnati, Indianapolis and Dav-
ton. and, on her return to Ne
York, appeared in "Venus,'' "Crime,"
and "Elmer the Great."
Her first screen role was as Wal-
ter Huston's leading woman in
"Gentlemen of the Press" since
that time she has appeared in
"Dangerous Curves," "The Cocoa-
nuts." "Behind the Makeup." -street
of Chance." "Let's Go Native," "The
Virtuous Sin." "Street of Women.'
"Jewel Robbery" and other films.

Plans for a theatre party for
Thursday. May 4. are now being
made by the Junior Council of Jew-
ish Women.
r
BISGAYNE TENT & AWNING CO.
INCORPORATED
An nillgs for the Better Homes at Prices to l'lea\e Yon
TENTS. SAILS, FLAGS. LAWN and GARDEN FURNITl'RE
ANYTHING MADE OF CANVAS
241 S. W. 6th St. -:- Phone 2-3602
Now you can buy
14 BILTMORE
LAUNDRY SERVICE
at a price that fits your pocket book!
PHONE 3-3687 21 N. W. 9T1I ST.
Alexander Orr, Jr., Inc.
Plumbing and Heating
MIAMI IIEACII
II-':' I'.rh SI. I'hnnr .V.1.116
MIAMI
4.1 N. W. Jrd St. Phoiif 2-3691
"Neu Deal" the Battle Cry of McCretdy
Leo F. McCready
"NEW DUAL" McCRHADY
My Ambition Is to Help Solve the Tax and Bond Problems
My Ambition Is to Secure a New Deal at the City Hall
Candidate for
CITY COMMISSIONER
CITY OF MIAMI
Primary May 2 -:- Election June 6
My Pledged Policy Is a Safe and Sane
Economical Business Administration
__________"?* Reduction" the Battle Cry of McCready


tnfrv. AP"1 21. 1933.
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
PCIII.ISHED EVERY FRIDAY
by iln
irwISII H.ORIDIAN IM III.l.-ll I M. CO.
Jt P. <>. Box 2973
Miami. Florida Phone 2-1183
EXECUTIVE OFFICES:
llj.ll s.nirily Kid*. Phone 2-S493
KIIITORIAI. OFFICES:
j.| s. W. I.'ilh Avenue Phone 2-1183
J. LOUIS SHOCHET, Editor
EPWAKH I ARI.IN. Adverllning Manacer
mill h SHOCHET. Circulation Manager
Eniercl it- second rlasa matter July 4.
iMU 1 I he Pol Office at Miami. Florida.
wider lh Art of March 3. 1879.
VEST I'AI.M BEACH OFFICE
414 Eighth Street
Mrs, M. Schrcbnick. Reprenentative
Six Mnnlhi
Onr Year
SlBSt RII'TION
11.00
12.01
FRIDAY. APRIL 21, 1933.
Vol. 6. No. 16.
No Boycott
An Editorial on the Nazi Front
That the Germans cannot main-
lain an anti-Semitic program with-
out harming themselves is obvious.
That the Jews of America and other
countries cannot institute an eco-
nomic war against Germany is
equally clear. Under these circum-
stances what is to be done? A deli-
cate and difficult question. Logically
viewed, a reconciliation would seem
the only solution. If Hitler were to
say to world public opinion, call off
your protests and I will guarantee
equal treatment and equal oppor-
tunities to all Jews residing in Ger-
many, the Jewish leadership would.
we believe, be happy to engage in a
serious effort to make the world
realize that Germany, even Hitlerite
Germany, is entitled to equal treat-
ment and equal opportunity among
the nations. But Hitler will not say
the word. His followers are looking
to him to keep the many promises
made during his opposition days. He
promised a new Germany. A Jewless
Germany, He promised the end of
unemployment and the beginning
of an era of prosperity. He unfolded
to the workers a vision of a socialist
state and to the Junkers he held up
:he picture of a strong and militar-
istic government in which the Ho-
henzollerns would play a leading if
not the leading role. To the capital-
ists he pledged his unrelenting fight
against the dangers of communism.
Which parts of this program can he
Wry out at the present time?
To the Hitler mentality it appears
I that the anti-Jewish and anti-
Communist war is the best political
maneuver. He most probably realized
that Jem in foreign lands would be
aroused and in their indignation
challenge the present regime in
Germany. But Hitler knows that
the proposed Jewish boycott against
German merchandise is not a seri-
ous threat. Economically it would
"lean little, because the "buy at
home" movements in many coun-
tries have reduced German exports
'o so low a figure that a Jewish
boycott would not seriously affect
the situation. Herr Hitler, however,
15 very anxious for a pretext for his
anti-Jewish campaign. He wants to
satisfy the anti-Semitic wing of his
Wtv without risking too much
prestige in foreign lands. The Jew-
ish boycott against German goods
tomes most appropriately. It gives
Herr Hitler a chance to shout self-
defense, retaliation and counter-
attack. Mr. Hitler does not wish for
anything better than engaging in an
economic war with world Jewry.
World Jewry is the weakest oppon-
ent he can select, yet at the same
time provides a rallying slogan of
foreign aggression for the conflicting
e'ements of his party.
Should we proclaim a boycott we
The Psychology
Of Hitlerism
ANEW word has been coined to
express and define a mental
attitude which has evolved in recent
years as the result of happenings in
Germany and while the history o*
the Jews shows discrimination and
persecution from time to time its
more modern condition can best bo
described by giving to the word
"Hitlerism" its proper and psycho-
logical meaning and effect.
Anti-Semitism has been known in
Germany for many years. Quite a
number of ambitious Jews have
found it necessary for their pur-
poses to disclaim their Jewish faith,
a few of whom later in life as illu-
strated by the career of Emil Ludwig
"Cohen" having been brought back
should merely be falling into a po-
litical trap. An economic boycott,
against whomever it may be direct-
ed, is a cruel and atrocious measure.
It involves the suffering of innocent
people. A boycott is not In harmony
with the ethical and pacifistic Jew-
ish outlook. We cannot decry the
German economic boycott if we en-
gage in the same nasty business.
Jewish leadership cannot accept the
boycott idea.
Emil Ludwig. keen observer of
European affairs, says: "Germany
cannot continue the existence of her
banks and commerce without Amer-
ica. If Jewish capital in New York
wishes, it can force an improvement
in the position of the German Jews."
This statement is significant. It
implies that Germany requires the
assistance of American financiers
in order to overcome its present dif-
ficulties. It implies also that Jewish
capital is sufficiently strong in this
country to influence the policy of
American banks towards Germany.
Political battles today are fought
over the banker's conference table.
A boycott would only hit the small
manufacturers and small exporters
of Germany in a small way. Ameri-
can banks, however, can dictate to
German big business and politicians
at the proper time. It is for the Jew-
ish leadership to prepare as strong
a Jewish case as possible for the
day when American banks will have
to decide the economic fate of the
Reich.
German Jewry is being assaulted
physically and paralyzed econom-
ically. German Jewry is the victim
of a ruthless anti-Semitic platform
advocated since the first day Hitler
began building his party. The Nazis
have always been the aggressors. If
we allow Herr Hitler to carry out his
anti-Semitic program under cover of
a counter-offensive, then he will
outflank us. It is an old rule in the
diplomatic game to charge the other
fellow with aggression in order to
have a justification for retaliation.
Shall we give Nazi leaders a pretext
to proceed in their economic war
against the Jews?
The policy of the world Jewish
leadership must be one of non-
resistance. At the same time we
must mobilize all non-Jewish liberal
elements and compel them to take
up the cudgel against the injustice
and atrocities perpetrated by the
Nazis. A steady stream of informa-
tion must be placed before public
opinion, in the hope, that the time
is not far when Germany wUl ad-
dress itself to the world for cooper-
ation. Then the floor will belong to
the enlightened nations, who must
make it a condition sine qua non to
Mr. Hitler that he stop anti-Semit-
ism or forfeit their help. It is as the
victims of a premeditated assault
that we must appear before the bar
of public opinion, and not as the
opponents of Hitler & Company in
an economic battle. (Reprint)
to their faith by reason of German
discrimination and persecution a
long time before the present anti-
Semitic outbreak now being wit-
nessed in Germany.
After the war Germany experi-
enced different kinds of leadership
and different forms of government
before Hitler became a formidable
personage in the political life of
Germany. Hitler, perceiving the un-
rest and discontent of the German
although not a native German, be-
gan an appeal fashioned to obtain
the support of the different dissat-
isfied and discontented elements of
Germany much like a candidate for
political office in the United States
who would invent a platform made
up of planks containing promises
tending to appease and gratify the
wishes and prejudices of every phase
of American life, our platform in
this country upon which a candi-
date hoped to obtain his election
would appeal to those opposed to
the Eighteenth Amendment and
would promise to secure its repeal
and after his successful campaign
resulting in his election he would
naturally be bound to redeem his
party and personal pledges and
promises.
If Hitler knew nothing else he cer-
1 tainly had a profound knowledge of
' the psychology of his people and he
! knew that one of the things upon
which he could appeal to a consid-
erable element in Germany was the
feeling of anti-Semitism which he
found present and he therefore
seized upon it and developed it with
the result that he succeeded in not
only increasing the amount of anti-
Jewish feeling but he also inflamed
it to a high intensity and created a
new kind of anti-Semitism utilizing
the temper of the people disappoint-
ed in their defeat on the battlefield,
their general feeling of resentment
against the imposition of penalties
following an unsuccessful war, the
unhappy mind due to privation and
hardship, the unsatisfactory forms
of government and kinds of leader-
ship experienced by the German
people and a catering to the envy
and jealousy of all elements who
would be benefitted by the removal
of the Jew from competition in the
economic, industrial, political and
professional life of Germany. De-
spite what has been said in order to
appease the feeling of the German
and to make a distinction between
the German and Hitler in his rela-
tion to the Jew the truth is that
there has been an ever-present anti-
Jewish feeling in Germany, which,
while under restraint and in the
background to a more or less extent,
was undoubtedly present to a more
or less degree.
The Germany of today has been
made ready for a number of years
for the present feeling of anti-
Semitism and the treatment the
Jews are receiving in Germany is
but the effect of long standing
causes accentuated and developed
by Hitler and his followers for pur-
pose of political benefit, for the stu-
dent of German affairs recognizes
that the recent edicts against the
Jews are but redemptions of pledges
and promises made to the German
people by those now in power. It is
easy to understand the psychology
of a people such as I have described
and more easily understandable
when we judge of it in the light of
past experience and study of mob
psychology. The German people are
but following the experience of mob
delusions of other countries.
Prance had such an experience
when her people became deluded
with the propaganda of John Law
and the Mississippi scheme. England
underwent the same delusion in the
insane conduct of her people in the
East India bubble. The staid, phleg-
matic and conservative Dutch were
affected in the same manner during
the Tulip mania when tulips be-
Page Thr
THE
GLOOM
CHAlEi
I used to read with childish pride
about New England's pioneer who
left his British fireside to find re-
ligious freedom here. His sturdy col-
leagues had a hunch that each
should pray as each saw fit; but, lo,
before a year, this bunch had passed
religious laws that bit. He who left
preachers in the lurch was fined, or
spanked with heavy sticks, till Roger
Williams said the church should be
kept out of politics.
I've often echoed Roger's views;
that's what I call an honest deal. If
you like prunes and Irish stews,
must I throw out my grits and
meal? Tom thinks the world will
fall apart in nineteen hundred and
thirty-eight; while Dick believes
with all his heart that he was once
a monkey's mate. Go on and eat
your fish or ham on Sunday noon
or midnight Friday; but don't for-
bid my leg of lamb, or try to pick
my friends or pie day. If you like
fishing, golf or tripe, or cobbling
shoes, or bridge on Sundays, from
me you'll never hear a gripe, if I
may choose my toys and fun days.
I never beat my breast and cry if
Chinks eat rats, or lest a wop mix
garlic with his chicken pie; I'll let
them choose their smell and chop
sticks. Likewise I have no yen to
rap the views of foreign gents: why
should a man get mad because a
Jap reads Dix. Mahomet, Glyn or
Buddha? I pick my spinach, sports
and socks, my faith and fancies,
fads and fuel, and if some poor, mis-
guided ox butts in. I pull back like
gem for moral growth; Dad taught
me tolerance, a mule.
My mother taught me how to
pray, a priceless way to perfect
peace; I thank them both. How
many homes and heads and hearts
would be intact and free from cares,
if only we would do our parts to
keep each nose in its affairs.
There was a Jew and a Scotch-
man at a live stock show the
came more valuable than gold to the
people of Holland. Witness the cru-
sades and the crimes committed in
religious fanaticism. Very few peo-
ples have escaped those absurd mo-
ments of delusion. We in this coun-
try were touched by it in 1928 when
the political campaign to many
meant expression of religious preju-
dice accompanied by a bitterness
and fervor hitherto unknown to us.
We know that Hitler's redemption
of his promises culminated in the
edicts recently promulgated in Ger-
many, the people were fed upon
them, a fanaticism was created,
anti-Semitism became a delusion of
the mob and while extraordinary in
its force and intensity was but a
natural repercussion of the cam-
paign which preceded. Hitler prom-
ised to "throw the Jews to the lions"
and he fulfilled his promise, he
knew his poeple would be content
with nothing else than what he has
granted them. Jews removed from
opportunity of education, from the
arts and sciences, from law and
medicine, from industrial and po-
litical life of Germany would neces-
sarily benefit those remaining in
these different spheres of German
life and like all mobs delusion has
taken the place of reason, the pres-
ent thought is all powerful, there is
no vision of tomorrow, not the
slightest conception of right and
wrong, justice, fairness, the welfare
of the German people as a whole,
the affect upon the future of Ger-
many of this action are all forgot-
ten, not even thought of, in the in-
sane delusion of the moment.
Our people have lived through
Scotchman had a horse to sell and
the Jew wanted to buy it. but he
didn't want to pay $300 for it, and
that was the price the Scotchman
made and would not come down a
single penny of it so they bar-
gained back and forth and couldn't
come to any agreement so each
went about his own business and
then went back to their respective
towns. A few days after the show
the Jew gets a wire from the Scotch-
man in which he says he has
thought it over and if the Jew will
wire him $100 he will ship the horse
to him. Which the Jew did. When
the horse arrived the Jew discovered
it was dead. The Scotchman waited
and waited for the Jew to protest
because he had sent him a dead
horse but no word came from the
Jew. When the next horse show
took place the Scotchman met the
Jew, but decided not to say any-
thing until the Jew would mention
it first. The first day passed and the
second day passed and the Jew
didn't say anything about the dead
horse. Finally the Scotchman could
not contain himself any longer and
said to the Jew: "Abie, you knew
that horse I sent you was dead,
didn't you?" "Sure," said Abie, "but
that's all right." The Scotchman
could hardly believe his ears be-
cause the Jew had gotten a dead
horse for his $100 and wasn't com-
plaining. "Well, what did you do
about it?" asked the Scotchman.
"Well," said the Jew, "when I saw
it was dead I raffled it off and I
sold 500 tickets at a dollar apiece.'
"Raffled it off? How in the world
could you get away with it? Why,
the horse was dead!" "I know," said
the Jew, "but the only one that
complained was the man who won
the raffle and when he complain-
ed I gave him his dollar back."
discrimination and persecution all
through their history, they under-
stand what difficulties and obstacles
must be encountered and overcome,
they will surmount the present sit-
uation as they have those of the
past. The horror of the civilized
world and the manifestation of dis-
gust at Germany's actions will cause
Hitler and his followers to recog-
nize the force and power of world
opinion and after a while will per-
meate through the entire German
system until it reaches every walk of
life and after a while the people of
Germany will stand aghast at their
own conduct and make them regret
their intemperate and unreasonable
action and when this occurs, they
will turn from their false leaders as
the mob always does, and destroy
those who brought upon them world
contempt. This may take time, our
people must suffer until Germany
regains her senses. In the not far
distant Germany the value of an
Einstein will become fixed when a
Hitler will be scorned and detested.
The Jew of Germany will again take
his place in the life of Germany,
whatever its form of government
may be. The mob will recover its
normality, real German leadership
will bring it back, a cultural people
will recover its ideals and the world
will wait for the next demonstration
of mob delusion because mobs every-
where go into delusions of one kind
or another, they always have and
always will.
Hitlerism is but an incident. Juda-
ism is a great faith a religious
faith and belief it will survive the
fanaticism of man and will live af-
ter Hitlerism has died.






Page Four
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
I
?????????????????????????????????????????????#
Edited by RABBI S. M. MACHTEI f
+ Poundw tnd Diraetor, Radio SyiMffOg of America &
j. Sunday Mornings
+
WIOD, Miami, Florida X
SUNDAY, APRIL 16, 1933.
No. 19. f
I Vol. 1.
? > : : : : # : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : < : : : : : : : : ? > ?
"The Living-Dead and the Dead-Living"
Scripture Reading, Dent. Chapter XXX, Venei 19 and 20
ON Tuesday morning, prayers will be recited in the synagogues for the
souls of the departed who have gone from this physical plane for
more than one year. They are -spoken of as "the dead.'" We. wlio are still
moving in this plane and who are visible to one another call ourselves "the
living." You and I may not agree on the meanings of these words. I want
to challenge the common usage of these terms. If by "dead" you mean
that the individual you and I knew is no longer here with us. I beg to
differ with you. If by "dead" you mean die loss of all influence after the
spark of activity and motion on this earth lias left the body. I again take
a different view. If by "dead" you refer to that old bromide "dead and
buried" or to its sister "dead and forgotten." I must hold an opinion that
conflicts with yours
AND if. by "living" you imply that state of being Which houses a divine
spark of action, of good, of locomotion, and of some contributing
factor to the common weal. I must beg permission to coin hyphenated
words to accurately describe the forms of "living" things I should rather
say. the degrees of "living" things. There are "living-dead" and "dead-
living."
A JEWISH lady, who was widowed not a year ago. is subject to attacks
from a more or less chronic disease. These attacks may come at any
hour of the day or night. If one should come on by day and its advent
should be anticipated it is a simple matter to take the antidote and to
minimize the ill effects of the attack. Should the attack come on during
sleep, the patient lacks the strength to go for his medicine or even to cry
out for help. A few weeks ago this lady was awakened from sleep by a
dream at about 1:30 in the morning. She dreamt that her husband, who
is "dead." mind you. shook her as he stood beside her bed. He sought to
wake her and kept saying. "Go downstairs and take something. Hurry,
wake up. Go downstairs and take something." She woke from her sleep,
left her bed and walked down to the kitchen, on the floor below, and took
an antidote to counteract an attack which she felt coming upon her. I
saw that man lowered to his grave. You will tell me that he is dead and
gone. I will tell you that he is of the living-dead." He is gone from the
physical plane. Our physical eyes cannot see him and our material ears
cannot hear him. but. his widow, over whom he was and is watching,
heard him and saw him. To her he is very much alive and an active in-
fluence. There are many other such proofs that I could offer of "life"
after death. Time will not permit.
NOW I know that you can. each of you. show me proof of the "dead-
living." You all know of peoplci who are apparently alive, yet. are
"dead" to all of life that goes on without them. They have eyes and see
not. ears and hear not; they have the appearance of human beings that
are alive, yet for all utilitarian purposes they are dead. They just walk
about as would so main uhosts They are dead" to the world. They are
the "dead-living."
I HAD an encounter with one such in a northern city, six years ago. To
my regret he was of the rabbinate. Let me preface my remarks by
stating that rabbinic training and even ordination does not insure that
the individual is qualified by temperament, character, or intelligence for
the rabbinic cloak of leadership. This young rabbi had forfeited the re-
spect of the members of his congregation by his own conduct, and, at the
expiration of his contract, his .services were no longer wanted. Shortly
thereafter, I had occasion to attend services in that same synagogue.
The young former rabbi of the congregation saw in me a potential
candidate for his former position a fact which was not so and he
sought every opportunity to insult me. I let it all go by me without com-
ment. Some of his supporters, who sought to force this misfit onto the
community, advised me not to occupy the pulpit, should I be invited dur-
ing my short stay in that community to preach as a guest-rabbi. I passed
all these incidents by. without commenting on them. Then, one day, I fol-
lowed my habit of long years standing to greet everyone first and with
a smile I extended my hand and said "Good Shabbos" to this rabbi who
stood beside me and my hand was Ignored. He refused to shake hands
with me. He would not acknowledge my greeting because of some guilty
knowledge within his own mind. I was not then hurt nor am I now as I
recall the incident. I ask. now. was he alive? Was he "living"? He may-
have shown physical signs of life, but he was of the "dead-living." He was
dead to life and to all that it holds. He was dead to the nobility of char-
acter that the rabbinate exemplifies. He was dead to the simple rudiments
of courtesy and decency that should be inherent in the lowest of human
beings. He defiled the rabbinate cloak by his dead carcass. If there had
been any doubt in my mind about the justice of the charges that had been
made against him. those doubts were wiped dut. He stood revealed to me
in all the nakedness of his shame. He was unfit to be the spiritual leader
of that congregation or of any other. Such a one was unfit to expound
the laws of the "living-dead" rabbis who have been dead for centuries
but who are still alive and enshrined in the hearts of Israel. That rabbi
has since left the rabbinate, and when last I heard of him, he was en-
gaged in mercantile endeavor.
WHEN you recite the "Yizkor," the Memorial prayer for the dead, your
own departed ones they are not "dead." They are the "living-
dead." They are alive in your memories. They hover about you at all times
and watch over you. They bring you only good. You need never fear any
harm from them. As you go through this plane called "life," beware of the
"dead-living" those whom you look upon as "living" but who carry about
with them the chill of the grave, the unwholesomeness of decaying matter.
SO live that, after you have been removed from this plane, you shall live
on in the memories and hearts of those left behind. Be alive to your
St. Petersburg
Notes
! farewell party at the Horowitz hotel
I for the many friends he made in
St. Petersburg, on Wednesday after-
noon. April 19. prior to his depart-
ure for home.
Friday night services at Bnai Is-
rael congregation will begin at 8 o'-
clock, and the rabbi will have as the
subject of his sermon. "Jewish Laws
of Sanitation."
Saturday morning services begin
at 9 o'clock. Sunday school classes
at 10 a.m. Sunday, and Hebrew
school classes daily at 4 p.m.
The Ladies' Auxiliary and Aid so-
ciety of Congregation Bnai Israel
gave a lovely surprise party to Belle
Goldman, president of the society,
in honor of her marriage to Mr.
Morns Hcrmer. She was also pre-
s inted with a beautiful gift.
The Judaic Council is planning a
social in the very near future.
Mr. and Mrs. Fry of Brockton. "What is absolutely certain is that
Mass., entertained Rabbi A. S. just like intelligence, stupidity is
Kleinfeld at dinner on Tuesday eve- hereditary, and "
ning. April 18.
------ That's a nice way to speak of
Mr. Theodore Weil tendered a your parents."
fullest. So live that those who have gone before you. and who are con-
stantly with you. may feel honored by your conduct. Bring blessings to
your "living-dead." Ycu can't do it by being of the "dead-living."
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AN OPEN LETTER
In becoming a candidate for the important office of City Com-
missioner of Miami I want all to know:
I am not a politician, just a plain, hard-working business
man who has never before aspired to public office. I am :',6 years
old. born in Jacksonville and my parents were pioneers of Key
West. Fla. I am vice president and secretary of the J. Y. <...... h
Company, Inc., and president and treasurer of the Miami Rock
Company. My reputation and Integrity as a business man is
open to all. I have treated all citizens honestly, fairly and
squarely, regardless of religious or political affiliation. Miami has
many Important problems that it must meet. It needs honesty,
sincerity and fearlessness in the administration of its affairs
I pledge at all times, if elected, to protect thai public against
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Your support in the coming primaries will be appreciated.
"r r"^
VOTE FOR
C. C BLAKE
for the
Miami City
Commission
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OWEN W. P1TTMAN, Jr.
Candidate for the City Commission of
Miami, wan born in (kuincy. Florida;
hi' received hi* education in Miami
grammar and high -< hnol .,r,i the
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in Miami with the late Freeman Itur-
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pant iteven year* ha* been a member
of the law Arm of Ilryant & Pitt man
in the Olympia Huildlng.
Married In 192.1 to Rosemary Mill*.
daughter of Charles A. Mill*. Nation-
al Vice Commander of the American
I <.inn. He haw two children and re-
widen In Ma own home at 1630 V W.
South River Drive. He In a director
"I the Dade County Council, Boy
Scoutn of America, a director of tat
Junior Chamber of Commerre. a |jfl.
tenant II. S. N. R. and put
Vice President of the Stale Aasocia-
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For a year and a half he u relief
Miami Municipal Judge. He U a 32nd
degree Manon and Shriner. a member
of the Sigma Nu fraternity U niter-
-ity of Florida), and a *on of Mi-
ami'* Pontmanter.
In neeking the office he i cam-
paigning on a platform which ii a
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and taxpayer.
VOTE FOR
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tn^v. April 21, 1933.
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
rage Five
SOCIETY
The Hebrew conversational class
0[ Beth David will resume its stud-
ies next Tuesday evening. April 25,
8t 8 p.m. at the Beth David Talmud
Torah under the direction of Rabbi
Max Shapiro.
*
At the meeting of the Ladies' aux-
iliary of tne Miami Jewish Ortho-
dox congregation held last Tuesday
mght. a nominating committee to
recommend officers for the coming
war was appointed by the president.
Mrs Max Kupferstein is chairman
ind Mesdames William Mechlowitz.
Max Rappaport. Moe Harris and J.
Hirsch are the remaining members
of the committee. Plans for the an-
nual picnic for the children of the
Talmud Torah and Sunday school
io be held shortly were discussed
and Will be announced shortly.
Mr.*-. Milton Weiner entertained
last Wednesday afternoon at her
Alexander Orr,Jr,
Candidate For
City Commission
of Miami
COMING TO THE
TIVOU THEATRE
RICH-FLO VANILLA
OFFERS
$25.00
IN
CASH PRIZES
It the fifteen (IS) heal letter!
"n WHY YOU LIKE AND
I BE RICH-FLO VANILLA."
I IRST PRIZE ...
BBI ONI) PRIZE .
I IIIRI> PRIZE .
I'M RTH PRIZE
ir>.oo
. 4.00
. 3.00
. 2.00
I I .EVEN PRIZES. ea. 1.00
The content in simple. Anyone
mai enter. Write letter elat-
ing, why you prefer to ue Rich-
' I" Vanilla. Encloae a label
from one of our Rich-Flo Va-
nilla hottlea. We will be the aole
Mgm.
The Vanilla may be purchaa-
"I it the following atorea: Tan-
ner Storea. Tip Top Stores. Blue
Bawl Rakeriea. Pearl A Jeaale
' ko Shop. George R. Zane.
Mammoth Storea. Shell'a. Well-
bacher Market. Wild Cat Gro-
".. Riley'a. Hauler atreet.
'iahlea Curb Market. Coral Ga-
Mea.
Mall to
< iillti .1 Dip!.
Rich-Flo Vanilla
are of Fountain at Supply Co..
"3S-928 N. Miami avenue. Mi-
ami. Florida. Contest cloaea
midnight. April SO. !J3.
home with a benefit bridge for the
Ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jew-
ish Orthodox Talmud Torah. Prizes
for high score were awarded at each
individual table and during the af-
ternoon delicious refreshments were
served.

"Joseph and Moses will be the
subject of the lesson at the Bible
study class at the home of Maj.
Kaufman Mandell. 3012 S. W Eighth
street, at 11 o'clock Sunday morn-
ing. Rabbi S. M Machtei will com-
li.iii 'hi live* of these two leaders.
The class is open to the public, both
ind Christians.

It's no news when they move a
movie troupe to a house in the
country but it's new when they
move the house in the country to
the movie troupe, if the old rule
anent the man who bites a dog still
holds good.
This bit of cinematic housemov-
ing was accomplished during the
lilming of the latest Marie Dressier-
Polly Moran comedy. "Prosperity.''
which will be shown Sunday and
Monday at the Seventh Avenue
theatre.
The plot called for the popular
comedy pair to do "location work''
in the environs of an old farm-
house. Then, instead of returning to
the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios
to build interiors matching the lo-
cation scenes. Director Sam Wood
arranged for the purchase of the
quaint house and took it along.
Thus the actual interior as well as
the exterior was photographed.
'Prosperity'' is a comedy of small-
town life with Miss Dressier and
Miss Moran as rival mothers-in-law
fighting over the affairs of their
married children and grandchildren,
with a bit of distinctive character
work for the versatile Miss Dressier
thrown in for good measure.
a
At a meeting of the Junior Coun-
cil of Jewish Women held last Tues-
day night at the Ponce de Leon
hotel, a program was presented un-
der the direction of Miss Harriet
Kanter. Ben Axelrod. prominent lo-
cal attorney, delivered the main ad-
dress of the evening. Irving and
Florence Coret were heard in violin
and piano selections, and a ventrilo-
quist act followed. A delightful so-
cial hour was then had Plans for
the girls' break dance to be held
next Sunday night, April 23. at Beth
David Talmud Torah hall were then
announced and included a number
of prominent vaudeville entertain-
ment. Miss Ruth Sontag is chairman
of this affair. The public is urged
to attend and spend an enjoyable
evening.

The physical culture group under
the direction of Mrs. Bertha B. Levy
will celebrate at a kiddie party at
the home of Mrs. Levy. 1625 S. W.
Fifteenth street, on Wednesday eve-
ning. April 26. All members have
been asked to attend.
.. --<
An important board meeting of
the Junior Council of Jewish Wom-
en will be held at the Ponce de Leon
hotel next Tuesday evening. April
25. to which all members of the
board are urgently invited to attend.
Radio Synagog
Rabbi S M. Machtei. founder and
director of the Radio Synagog. will
preach over WIOD at 10 o'clock
Sunday morning on "Electrocution
in the Bible." In addition to the ser-
mon there will be prayers, music,
hymns and a question box.
She was but the photographer's
daughter.
Yet at that she had lots of sense.
For she loved to sit with the
lights turned low
And wait on developments.
It seems as though Mr. Roosevelt
is intending that the naked truth
will helping in putting on the nude
deal.
Modern Mother: "Go to sleep now,
honey; the sandman is coming."
Modern Child: "That's all right,
mother; don't worry I won't tell
father."
"When I was at school I took the
first prize."
"Yen?"
"But teacher made me put it
back."
In a certain snooty section ot
New York City in which numerous
expensive apartment houses have
been erected there have been more
outgoing than incoming tenants due
to the continued depression. In fact,
one of the principal thoroughfares
in this section has taken on such an
air of silence that one of the door-
men remarked:
"It's so quiet on that street now
you can hear a lease break.'
Wife: "My husband has no bad
habits whatsoever. He never drinks,
and he spends all his evenings at
home. Why. he doesn't even belong
to a club.
Friend: "Does he smoke?"
Wife: "Only in moderation. He
likes a cigar after he has had a good
dinner, but I don't suppose he
smokes two cigars a month."
ft
Vote For
*1. JACKMALTZIE
fOR
p / CITY COMMISSIONER
"The Working Man's Friend'
Place The Right Men In Office
In placing the name of Robert R. Williams. bett*r known to his
many friends as "Bob." before the voters as a candidate for the Miami
City Commission, citizens of Miami urge that the city cannot re-
establish its credit and solve the bond situation unless able men. un-
selfish, and unlinked to special interests, are placets in office. Mr.
Williams, who served faithfully, honestly, impartially and ably as
justice of the peace for several years, was bom thirty-rune years ago.
is married and has four children. For a number of years he was en-
gaged in the wholesale candy and paper business as well as in the
real estate business. He is the organizer and is now the president of
the Riverside Improvement Association, one of the most potent fac-
tors for good in the city of Miami today. He was one of the original
organizers and is now a director of the Public Utilities Protective
League which has been active in the fight to reduce the utility rates
in the city. In making his campaign. Mr. Williams is urging a sane
course in adjusting the bond situation now existing here, and believes
that an honest effort to have the bondholders receive payment com-
mensurate with the city's ability to pay. without repudiation of the
bonds, will solve the problem. He favors the reduction of the Utility
rates, as evidenced by his work with the Public Utilities Protective
League, and a reduction in taxes brought about by a reduction in gov-
ernment costs. In urging the election of "Bob" Williams as city com-
missioner his friends urge
+
L^&.St-S*-**-'*
1
Flagler Poultry
Market
Wholesale and R./mI
Diatributora of
Strictly Fresh Florida Errs
Fancy Live and Dressed Poultry
s short w.i.ht. No Urn '*';'
1132 W. Fla.ler St. Phone 2-aa.A
FOR
City Commissioner
of Miami
and be assured of "representation in the city's management in the
interests of all the people."
Dr. A. T. Knowles
2936 N. W. 17th Ave. Phone I-TSM
MODERN PET HOSPITAL
Large Individual Hoarding- Run*
Effective Tick Medicine Sold
The Neu
PILOT DRAGON
AT YOI'R RADIO DEALER
Price* from $1..10 to SH'.i.'.n
On Display at
Pan-American
Radio, Inc.
I-01 N. E. 2nd Ave. Phone I-M4I
NIGELEY
Funeral Home
1111 Washington A., Miami Reach
PHONE 5-3355

William Penn
Hotel Restaurant
Now Open

I"nder the Management of _
FRED C. MAl'KER
Formerly of Sunshine Cafeteria "
Table d'Hote and a la Cart*
Popular Prices _
OPEN ALL SUMMER
Our Special
Seven Course Dinner, only 50c

OPEN FOR PARTIES a
Phone 5-3301 for Reaervationa
FROM FARM TO
CONSUMER
PERRY'S
DAIRY
WboUuie and Retail
PHONE 2-7221
The
COCONUTS
Biacayne Blvd. at 61et St.
Our ambition is to please
in Good Foods and
Courteous Service
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT
Meals, Salads, Sandwiches
served at your car or table
PHONE EDGEWATER S117
VOTE FOR
Robert R. Williams
ARE WEkeePinS
faith with those who trust us, are
we living up to our obligations if
wc risk their future happiness by
ignoring the problems that would
arise for them if, some day, we
did not come home?
Life Insurance offers the safe and
certain answer. There is no sub-
stitute.
A Southern Health & Life Insur-
ance Policy on each one is neces-
sary to protect the others from
the privation and expense caused
by the last illness and death.
A few pennies each week is the
total cost.
Southern Life &
Health Insurance
Company
T. S. Cook, Manager
810 Realty Board BldR. Phong 2-l


Page Six
THE JEWISH FLORID
IAN
Frid
y, April 21, iqtl

I
Campaign Briefs
(Continued from Page One)
lars In taxes. Particularly in meet-
ing the utility rat* problems that
Miamians are confronted with,
would his engineering knowledge be
particularly valuable. He pledges an
early solution of the bond problem,
reduction of taxes, reduction in util-
ity rates and fair play for every
citizen of the community.
1*0 P. McCready, who is waging
an active campaign for the city
commission, came to Miami about
2\ years ago. He is married, has
four children, is a home-owner and
taxpayer and has been a prominent
figure in iiu' civic and fraternal life
of Miami. He has. attained much
prominence for his devotion to un-
derprivileged children and particu-
larly by hi.- sponsorship and man-
agement of the annual Kiddies'
day for a local fraternal organiza-
tion with which he has served as
secretary for a number of years. He
was instrumental in organizing the
Elks Home for Crippled Children at
Umatilla. Fla. He is stressing a new
deal for the taxpayer of Miami by
governmental economies, reductions
in taxes, a solution of the vexing
bonding problems, the development
of varied industries and agriculture
so that Miami may have a year
around business and maintain and
re-establish prosperity. Among those
actively endorsing him is Arthur W.
Ellis of the Sunray sanitarium.
Eli McDonald, a long-time resi-
dent and active worker in commun-
al affairs In appealing for the vot-
ers' consideration on May J -aid lie
favors reduction in public utility
rates, that he worked for a deeper
.harbor with effort and money when
Adult- -'"
( hildren 10r
Box Office
openi .*> :l">
p.m. Sunday
Sunday and Monday. April 13-24
"PROSPERITY"
with
Marie Dressier Polly Moran
If uhat the roantrj ntdi i- i iod
lauch here it i.
The MAE ROS1
STUDIO of DAN< INC.
presenti the
"MAE ROSE
FOILIES"
at the
Temple Theatre
FRIDAY. APRIL 21st at
8:15 P. M.
An Kveninii of t'nekielled
Knlertainment
there was no publicity fund raised
through taxation, that he will work
to remedy unemployment, and that
he favors reduction of the city's
debt and a reduction In interest
rates.
Alexander Orr. president of the
Rotary club, active communal work-
er, resident of Miami for the past
19 years, and one of Miami's bat-
tlers for public welfare, asked that
in casting their votes the citizens
of Miami forget everything but the
importance of proper men in office
for the future welfare of the City.
In becoming a candidate lie said
that he had been influenced by a
.use of loyalty to the city. He .-aid
he felt he might be of service to Ins
fellow Miamians. Referring to the
Dade County Tax Rchei associa-
tion, of which he is president, he
said it has effected tax reductions
lit also -aid Miami's bond situation,
which is not unlike other cities
must be based upon the people'
ability to pay.
Owen w. Plttman, sun oi Miami's
postmaster and prominent attorney,
points to his record in private and
professional life, his education and
general qualifications a.- a n
for his election to the city commis-
sion. In discussing the duties of the
office, he said that within 30 days Ol
taking office he would be working
for an economic survey and reval-
uation ol all real property, abolish-
ment of the personal tax. elimina-
tion of professional bondsmen by
enactment of a driver's license law
permitting its deposit m lieu of
bond, lor first offenders of traffic
regulations, drastic reduction in
costs "i the city's lesal department,
elimination ol patronage to rela-
tives, abolishment ol price-fixing
ordinances, and other reforms.
Robert R. William*, former justice
ol the peace in the Riverside dis-
trict who is making one of the most
active campaigns In the present race
in addition to discussing hi.- own
merits for the position, has laid
tn i on the real Issues ol tin cam-
paign which he urges are bond
problems, taxation and reduction ol
utility rates He opposes taxation
for publicity purpose.-, saying tin
chamber ot commerce should handle
publicity Pointing to in.- member-
ship in the Greater Miami Public
Utilities Protective league -mce its
organization, he said the candidates
"' be elected 111 the coming election
"should oppose these special inter-
ests, which never have paid a dime
of taxes to the city."
KEEN SIGHT
129 Beybold Building
Vote for
ELI
McDonald
for
CITY COMMISSIONER
He stands four-square for Miami
neither race nor creed nor sect shall
change him.
Facing The Issue
Election time is again near and
with it the usual crop of self-
appointed leaders. At no other time
does one come in contact with indi-
viduals who CONTROL votes. Even
organizations who have no relation-
ship, even remote, with political ac-
tivitic- become the hunting grounds
ol the different candidates. Week-
lies, monthlies, bulletins, blotters
and what-nots appear so that the
candidates may be properly mulcted
under threat of loss ol votes,
A local publication in its quest for
advertisements, forgetting its very
limited circulation, the lact that II
carries no news of any local charac-
ter whatever, very graciously oilers
candidates the opportunity to pre-
sent themselves to the Jewish peo-
ple lor the sum ol $LT> each, in a
special political issue. And of course,
in approaching the candidates, the
very enterprising solicitor pointedly
suggests that unless the 125 is paid,
rather due results will occur.
So that all who read may know.
The Jewish citizens and voters el
Miami .tif a large body of Intelli-
gent and conscientious voters. They
know the facts that must be consid-
ered. No man, no paper, no organi-
zation controls their vote. The Jew-
ish voter is a business man who
realizes that in order for local bus-
iness to succeed, there must be an
intelligent and economic city com-
mission, They know and will vote
for the election of those commis-
sioners who will represent all the
citizens of this great community
without fear or favor. The Jewish,
citizen soon silts all the arguments
ol every candidate, .selects the wheat
from the chaff: studies carefully
the record of every man aspiring to
office and then with his own con-
science as his guide, casts the vote
of an intelligent, loyal and honest
citizen.
The Jewish citizen demands for
himself and his fellow Jews just
tin.- that in the selection of office-
holders, he. the Jewish applicant,
be Judged solely on his qualifica-
tions and nothing else. He denies
the right of the appointing official
to question his religious beliefs, or
hi- nationality. He decries and op-
poses bigotry of every kind whether
it be directed against his fellow
Jews or fellow citizens of other
tlS. Bigotry and prejudice is ab- |
horrant to the Jew. it is contrary
to his teachings, to his history, to
his very self.
The Jewish Floridian. as is its
right, has approached every candi-
date tor 'he purpose ol obtaining
his advertisement. Our rate.- have
not been raised We have not set
nor do we propose to set, any arbi-
trary figure which the candidate
must pay. nor do we propose to pen-
alize him n he does not patronize
the paper. The Jewish Floridian is
the only Jewish weekly m the en-
tire -tati ol Florida. It is the only
Jewish publication In Miami winch
n ache.- the homes ot I he major por-
tion of its Jewish population No
other publication carries the inti-
mate social news ol the Jewish
home, or the Jewish organization,
which necessarily makes II a wel-
come visitor to the Jewish home
every Friday morning. And yet .
all we offer the candidate is the
opportunity ol presenting his plat-
form and his record to the Jewish
Citizens in an intelligent manner, In
a paper which is near and dear lo
them. That its subscribers appreci-
ate the fact that advertisers use its
columns is inevitable. The Jewish
Floridian commands the respect of
its subscribers. Jewish and non-
Jewish, because of its policy of fair-
ness and fearlessness. When the
Jewish Floridian feels that the elec-
tion of candidates to public office
Is inimical to the Jews because of
anti-Semitic prejudices and bigotry,
it will not hesitate to state it in
terms that will be pointed and em-
phatic. And it will ask the defeat of
such candidates not because of the
fact that they do not like Jews, but
because any candidate who
IS ANTI-SEMITIC IS NOT A
TRUE AMERICAN. AND IS NOT.
UNDER THE PRINCIPLES LAID
DOWN BY THE CONSTITUTION \
OF THE UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA, AND THE FOUNDKHS
OF OUR GREAT COUNTRY. FIT !
OR QUALIFIED TO HOLD ANY |
POSITION OR OFFICE OF
TROfi I
in laying down tins principle, the
Jewish Floridian feels that it i. i x
pressing the sentiment ol every cit-
izen, be he Jew or not.
Hotel Roberts
GARAGE
Auburn and Cord Service
Wrerkcr Service
Open Day and Niuhl
OFFICIAL A. v A
Phone 2-72X1 34,s. w. M a.
Delaney & Beers
Kodak Kininhinir and Enlarging
Commercial Work and Horn,. I'rtrail,
50% OfT on All Amateur Work
212 N. E. 4th St. Phone 2-53S5
We Take the DENT
Out of ACCI-DENT
Woodwork. Tojis. lender, and Hodv
Work. Paintinit and Wrecker s,.r.
v ice.
Auto Collision
Works, Inc.
(HAS. WINKEI.MAN. Ml?
I2S-11I N. B. liiih St.
Phone I-IBM McawaUr mji.r
King Funeral 1 lome
To Serve Humanity Hitter
Operated by
FRANK <;. MeOHAN'S WIDOW
29 N. W. 3rd Are.
Phone- t-SSStl-ltsi
- +
Tuttle Garage
Miami'i Best
SUMMER RATES
NOW AVAILABLE
U 8. K. Ith St. Phone 1411]
-----+
i-
Less Politics and More Action with
TOM KELLY
as
CITY COMMISSIONER
Will Fie lit for Immediate Adjustment of
Vmir Financial Problems.
For fresh
Sea Foods
STOP AT
GAPT. TOMS
FISH MART
I l.n:ler St. and Miami River
Phone 2-5321 We Never ("loir
OUR PR1CFS ARE THE LOWEST
Our I ish arc the freshest Caught by our own boats il.ulv
If it is Sea Food, we have it at its very best, and at attractively
low prices. Our method of handling and selling Sea Food is in ob-
servance with all the sanitary rules and regulations.
7 Did You
? Know
Thai ;i noil settlement had been effected by the
Greater Miami Jewish Cemetery \im i.itiott whleh in-
jures safely and security for all Jews interred in the
it-wish Cemetery ;it Woodlawn?
Thai by arranging with (he Superintendent of Public
Education tor Dade County, all Jewish ehildren had
been excused from attending school on Passover?
A farewell banquet was being tendered Rabbi Lazarus
Axclmd til Miami Beach?
Maybe you knew those things, if you
are a JEWISH FLORIDIAN Subscriber.. .
But, you didn't read that news in any other paper, be-
cause the Jewish Floridian is the only paper carrying
your news and all Jewish news of local and state-wide
interest.
For all the Jewish news, every week,
subscribe to
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
$2
A Year
Phone your subscription
to 2-1183 or 2-6493


Full Text

PAGE 1

Page Six THE JEWISH FLORID IAN Frid %  y, April 21, iq tl I Campaign Briefs (Continued from Page One) lars In taxes. Particularly in meeting the utility rat* problems that Miamians are confronted with, would his engineering knowledge be particularly valuable. He pledges an early solution of the bond problem, reduction of taxes, reduction in utility rates and fair play for every citizen of the community. 1*0 P. McCready, who is waging an active campaign for the city commission, came to Miami about 2\ years ago. He is married, has four children, is a home-owner and taxpayer and has been a prominent figure in iiu' civic and fraternal life of Miami. He has. attained much prominence for his devotion to underprivileged children and particularly by hi.sponsorship and management of the annual Kiddies' day for a local fraternal organization with which he has served as secretary for a number of years. He was instrumental in organizing the Elks Home for Crippled Children at Umatilla. Fla. He is stressing a new deal for the taxpayer of Miami by governmental economies, reductions in taxes, a solution of the vexing bonding problems, the development of varied industries and agriculture so that Miami may have a year around business and maintain and re-establish prosperity. Among those actively endorsing him is Arthur W. Ellis of the Sunray sanitarium. Eli McDonald, a long-time resident and active worker in communal affairs In appealing for the voters' consideration on May J -aid lie favors reduction in public utility rates, that he worked for a deeper .harbor with effort and money when Adult-'" ( hildren 10r Box Office openi .*> :l"> p.m. Sunday Sunday and Monday. April 13-24 "PROSPERITY" with Marie Dressier Polly Moran If uhat the roantrj ntdi ii iod lauch — here it i. The MAE ROS1 STUDIO of DAN< INC. presenti the "MAE ROSE FOILIES" at the Temple Theatre FRIDAY. APRIL 21st at 8:15 P. M. An Kveninii of t'nekielled Knlertainment there was no publicity fund raised through taxation, that he will work to remedy unemployment, and that he favors reduction of the city's debt and a reduction In interest rates. Alexander Orr. president of the Rotary club, active communal worker, resident of Miami for the past 19 years, and one of Miami's battlers for public welfare, asked that in casting their votes the citizens of Miami forget everything but the importance of proper men in office for the future welfare of the City. In becoming a candidate lie said that he had been influenced by a •.use of loyalty to the city. He .-aid he felt he might be of service to Ins fellow Miamians. Referring to the Dade County Tax Rchei association, of which he is president, he said it has effected tax reductions lit also -aid Miami's bond situation, which is not unlike other cities must be based upon the people' ability to pay. Owen w. Plttman, sun oi Miami's postmaster and prominent attorney, points to his record in private and professional life, his education and general qualifications a.a n for his election to the city commission. In discussing the duties of the office, he said that within 30 days Ol taking office he would be working for an economic survey and revaluation ol all real property, abolishment of the personal tax. elimination of professional bondsmen by enactment of a driver's license law permitting its deposit m lieu of bond, lor first offenders of traffic regulations, drastic reduction in costs "i the city's lesal department, elimination ol patronage to relatives, abolishment ol price-fixing ordinances, and other reforms. Robert R. William*, former justice ol the peace in the Riverside district who is making one of the most active campaigns In the present race in addition to discussing hi.own merits for the position, has laid tn i on the real Issues ol tin campaign which he urges are bond problems, taxation and reduction ol utility rates He opposes taxation for publicity purpose.-, saying tin chamber ot commerce should handle publicity Pointing to in.membership in the Greater Miami Public Utilities Protective league -mce its organization, he said the candidates "' be elected 111 the coming election "should oppose these special interests, which never have paid a dime of taxes to the city." KEEN SIGHT 129 Beybold Building Vote for ELI MCDONALD for CITY COMMISSIONER He stands four-square for Miami neither race nor creed nor sect shall change him. Facing The Issue Election time is again near and with it the usual crop of selfappointed leaders. At no other time does one come in contact with individuals who CONTROL votes. Even organizations who have no relationship, even remote, with political activiticbecome the hunting grounds ol the different candidates. Weeklies, monthlies, bulletins, blotters and what-nots appear so that the candidates may be properly mulcted under threat of loss ol votes, A local publication in its quest for advertisements, forgetting its very limited circulation, the lact that II carries no news of any local character whatever, very graciously oilers candidates the opportunity to present themselves to the Jewish people lor the sum ol $LT> each, in a special political issue. And of course, in approaching the candidates, the very enterprising solicitor pointedly suggests that unless the 125 is paid, rather due results will occur. So that all who read may know. The Jewish citizens and voters el Miami .tif a large body of Intelligent and conscientious voters. They know the facts that must be considered. No man, no paper, no organization controls their vote. The Jewish voter is a business man who realizes that in order for local business to succeed, there must be an intelligent and economic city commission, They know and will vote for the election of those commissioners who will represent all the citizens of this great community without fear or favor. The Jewish, citizen soon silts all the arguments ol every candidate, .selects the wheat from the chaff: studies carefully the record of every man aspiring to office and then with his own conscience as his guide, casts the vote of an intelligent, loyal and honest citizen. The Jewish citizen demands for himself and his fellow Jews just tin.that in the selection of officeholders, he. the Jewish applicant, be Judged solely on his qualifications and nothing else. He denies the right of the appointing official to question his religious beliefs, or hinationality. He decries and opposes bigotry of every kind whether it be directed against his fellow Jews or fellow citizens of other tlS. Bigotry and prejudice is ab| horrant to the Jew. it is contrary to his teachings, to his history, to his very self. The Jewish Floridian. as is its right, has approached every candidate tor 'he purpose ol obtaining his advertisement. Our rate.have not been raised We have not set nor do we propose to set, any arbitrary figure which the candidate must pay. nor do we propose to penalize him n he does not patronize the paper. The Jewish Floridian is the only Jewish weekly m the entire -tati ol Florida. It is the only Jewish publication In Miami winch n ache.the homes ot I he major portion of its Jewish population No other publication carries the intimate social news ol the Jewish home, or the Jewish organization, which necessarily makes II a welcome visitor to the Jewish home every Friday morning. And yet all we offer the candidate is the opportunity ol presenting his platform and his record to the Jewish Citizens in an intelligent manner, In a paper which is near and dear lo them. That its subscribers appreciate the fact that advertisers use its columns is inevitable. The Jewish Floridian commands the respect of its subscribers. Jewish and nonJewish, because of its policy of fairness and fearlessness. When the Jewish Floridian feels that the election of candidates to public office Is inimical to the Jews because of anti-Semitic prejudices and bigotry, it will not hesitate to state it in terms that will be pointed and emphatic. And it will ask the defeat of such candidates not because of the fact that they do not like Jews, but because ANY CANDIDATE WHO IS ANTI-SEMITIC IS NOT A TRUE AMERICAN. AND IS NOT. UNDER THE PRINCIPLES LAID DOWN BY THE CONSTITUTION \ OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, AND THE FOUNDKHS OF OUR GREAT COUNTRY. FIT OR QUALIFIED TO HOLD ANY | POSITION OR OFFICE OF TROfi I in laying down tins principle, the Jewish Floridian feels that it i. i x pressing the sentiment ol every citizen, be he Jew or not. Hotel Roberts GARAGE Auburn and Cord Service Wrerkcr Service Open Day and Niuhl OFFICIAL A. v A Phone 2-72X1 34, s w. M a. Delaney & Beers Kodak Kininhinir and Enlarging Commercial Work and Horn,. I'„rtrail, 50% OfT on All Amateur Work 212 N. E. 4th St. Phone 2-53S5 We Take the DENT Out of ACCI-DENT Woodwork. TOJIS. lender, and Hodv Work. Paintinit and Wrecker s,. r v ice. Auto Collision Works, Inc. (HAS. WINKEI.MAN. Ml? I2S-11I N. B. liiih St. Phone I-IBM McawaUr MJI.R King Funeral 1 lome To Serve Humanity Hitter Operated by FRANK <;. MeOHAN'S WIDOW 29 N. W. 3rd Are. Phonet-SSSt—l-ltsi + Tuttle Garage Miami'i Best SUMMER RATES NOW AVAILABLE U 8. K. Ith St. Phone 1411] + iLess Politics and More Action with TOM KELLY as CITY COMMISSIONER Will Fie lit for Immediate Adjustment of Vmir Financial Problems. For fresh Sea Foods STOP AT GAPT. TOMS FISH MART I l.n:ler St. and Miami River Phone 2-5321 We Never ("loir OUR PR1CFS ARE THE LOWEST Our I ish arc the freshest — Caught by our own boats il.ulv If it is Sea Food, we have it at its very best, and at attractively low prices. Our method of handling and selling Sea Food is in observance with all the sanitary rules and regulations. 7 Did You &f Know Thai ;i noil settlement had been effected by the Greater Miami Jewish Cemetery \— IM i.itiott whleh injures safely and security for all Jews interred in the it-wish Cemetery ;it Woodlawn? Thai by arranging with (he Superintendent of Public Education tor Dade County, all Jewish ehildren had been excused from attending school on Passover? A farewell banquet was being tendered Rabbi Lazarus Axclmd til Miami Beach? Maybe you knew those things, if you are a JEWISH FLORIDIAN Subscriber.. But, you didn't read that news in any other paper, because the Jewish Floridian is the only paper carrying your news and all Jewish news of local and state-wide interest. For all the Jewish news, every week, subscribe to THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN $2 A Year Phone your subscription to 2-1183 or 2-6493



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& Jewish 'Floridtin Vol. 6. NO. It. LORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, APRIL 21, 1933. Price Five Cents In order thai the voten may acquainted with the vari tdidates for the city commission of Miami, the following ni i\ tiffcriil, without icnt, for the guidance of the i nil rs. in making his campaign for office 0 i city commissioner, c. c. Blake urged the voters in the coming municipal election to exercise their right ol suffrage in the same manner as they would attend to their own business affairs and to consider a candidate's private and business life in arriving at their decision. He itn i (! the necessity of constructive work in the future and promised a businesslike, economical and careful administration of public affairs, nch as bonding, taxation and public utility rates. Tom Kelly is making his entry into politics as a candidate for the city commission. He came to Miami about 14 years ago to recuperate from injuries received during the World war and engaged in the insurance business. Is a life member of the Harvey Seeds past. American Legion, three times captain of the world champion drum and bugle corps, now commanding officer ol the 265th coast artillery of the Florida National Guard, prominent officer of the local Elks lodge, one of the active organizers and backers of the Miami Junior Chamber of Commerce drum and bugle corps. He lias taken an active part in the local communal life and is stressing a Ian solution of the problems of the bonded indebtedness of Miami. Its utility rates, and complete reorganization of the city's administrative departments in order to reduce the cost of government. He himself to a system of district representation in city government so that each section ol the city may have a representative in 1 commission. Jack Maltzie. though a newcomer in politics is not unknown to the rank and file of Miamians. particularly tlie large number of local worker.-, with whom he has been associated for the past several years. is a native of Pittsburgh. Pa., where he received his general education and then graduated from irnegie Tech as a civil engineer. Coming to Miami about 11! years a'-'" l.e became connected with the construction firm of R. c. Huffman %  n the building of the Tamiami later helped in the construction of the Overseas highway and in '•' Homestead road. He organized the county construction forces which provided labor for the unemployed and later became connected with Hie federal Reconstruction Finance Corporation, in his work In directtog the unemployed. Maltzie atlalned the respect of the many thousand of local workers who came under him for his fairness of treatment, and many a dollar was advanced by him in numerous instances out of his personal funds to !" lp allay want in needy families. His many friends point to the fact 'hat his engineering abilities are needed by the city at this time and would help save thousands of dolContinutd on Page Six! Cantor to be Given Tribute In recognition of his many years ol service to the Jewish religious world and particularly to "Chazanui.ii.Cantors Boris 8chlachman, Louis Hayman and Nathan Wroobe! have formed a committee which Is arranging a farewell banquet to Cantor i Kaminsky ol New York City, who winter vai in Miami and Miami Beach. Cantor Kaminsky, who occupied noted po I lamin renowned synagogui this country and abroad Is particularly famous for the large number ol liturgical compositions of famous cantors which he has succeeded In recovering for the synagogue and particularly for putting into permanent form many ol the famous traditional "skarbove nigunhn" handed down from generation to generation until the present time. In addition to this research work. Cantor Kaminsky has composed a large number of original synagogue works which have been accepted by the world of "Chazanuth" not only for Its melodic beauty but for the splendid interpretation given the text by the music adapted to it. The local cantors who form the committee arranging the banquet have been studying with Cantor Kaminsky for a number of years during his stay here every winter. The affair wil be held on Sunday evening. April 23, at the Nemo hotel and reservations may be made by phoning any member of the committee. Bnai Brith Host to Large Crowd Quite a large gathering attended the meeting of the local Bnai Brith lodge last Tuesday evening with Mr. \v. L. William.presiding. Addresses were made by Mr. W. L. Williams. Adolph Freund. L. Levy of Wisconsin, Isaac Levin, and Stanley C. Myers. The membership committee reported that nme applications mi members had been filed. Plans for a joint celebration of Mother's day with the A. Z. A. (Junior Bnai Brith i were discussed and a committee consisting of Nat Williams, chairman, to be assisted by Mi William Friedman. I. Levin. Ed Friedman and A. Freund was authorized to conduct the affair which will be an event of May 14. The Palm Beach lodge of Bnai Brith will be the guests of the local organizations at this celebration. Following the business session Nal Williamas master of ceremonies. presented a musical entertainment which included orchestral selections and other entertainment. Refreshments were served at a late hour. The social meeting will be a monthly event hereafter. Noted Worker Visits Miami Harry Greenstein of Baltimore. Mel. is a visitor at the Strathhaven hotel. Miami Beach. Mr. Greenstein is a prominent attorney of Baltimore and for a number of .rat. served as the president of the Young Men's Hebrew association and as executive secretary of the Federated Jewish Chanties of Baltimore. He is recuperating from a recent illness. Rabbi is Honor Guest at Banquet One of the most impressive events of recent years was the farewel banquet held at the Nemo hotel last Tuesday night In honor of Rabbi and Mrs Lazarus Axelrod, formerly of Beth Jacob congregation. Miami Beach. The tables, set in the lorm of a horseshoe, were beautifully deci with cut flowers specially arranged. At the head of the table sat Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan of Temple Israel, who acted as toast' master. Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan ol | the Miami Jewish Orthodox congre; gation, Rabbi Max Shapiro of Beth David congregation, Cantor Boris Schlachman, Munya Zhitomerski. prominent journalist, and a number of other prominent citizens of the Greater Miami section as well as several prominent tourists. In opening his remarks. Rabbi Kaplan told of the struggles of the rabbinate, the duties imposed on the Jewish laymen, and spoke in glowing terms of the contribution to the betterment of Jewry in this district by Rabbi Axelrod. Cantor Schlachman was heard in a number of folk j songs accompanied at the piano by Moonya Zhitomersky. Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan then spoke and told of his knowledge of the constructive ac| complishments of Rabbi Axelrod during his stay here for the past two years and extended his wish for | a successful career in the future. He was followed by Rabbi Max Shapiro. I who told of the esteem that Rabbi Axelrod was held in in a number of cities that he had served and of his work in the local community as a force for the uplift of Jewry. Moonya Zhitomersky then spoke and told ol the position of the rabbi in Jewish lite throughout history and exed his hope that the sterling qualities of Rabbi Axelrod would be fittingly appreciated. A number of j tourists, including Mr. Ulin of Boston. Mrs. Jafle of Chicago, and others, told of their esteem for the rabbi gained by him because of his zeal in the interest of Judaism and the betterment of the Jewish people locally. The rabbi was then presented with a substantial sum in cash by a committee representing men and women who had worshipped at the Beth Jacob synagogue for a number of years during the rabbi's stay here. The last speaker of the evening was Rabbi Axelrod. who was introduced in very eloquent fashion by Rabbi Kaplan, the toastmaster. Rabbi Axelrod told of his arrival in Miami Beach, of his work here, of his efforts in his humble way to contribute his bit towards a better Jewry and concluded by saying that while he had felt discouraged by the struggles that a rabbi must undergo and had suffered here, the outburst of genuine friendship as evidenced by the banquet had removed every vestige of disappointment and that he would again rededicate himself to the dui ties of the profession he had chosen for his life's work. Rabbi Axelrod concluded with a blessing and thanks of appreciation to all his friends who had attended. Rabbi Axelrod is now considering a number of offers of pulpits in the North but will not make his decision until sometime in the fall. Hebrew Club Hears Speakers Attended by a large number of members, the Hebrew Athletic club held a business meeting followed by a dance program last Wednesday night at the Community centre. Murray Grossman, the president of the organization, told of the work ol the club and detailed the plans made for a number of benefit affairs. What impressed the hearers was the sincerity of the club's offer and attempt to have every Jewish organization in the Greater Miami district use its facilities without charge. A number of members spoke as did Mr. McCready, one of the candidates for the city commission, who promised to make a survey of the club's needs and to help as much as possible. In between a number of dance novelties. Robert R. Williams, president of the Riverside Improvement association and former justice of the peace, was introduced. In a very vigorous speech he discussed the issues of the present campaign and pledged himself to an intelligent solution of the bond problem, a reduction in taxes, and a reduction in utility rates. In concluding his address he pointed to his record in public office and pledged his every effort as a citizen to stamp out prejudice and bigotry in the selection of officeholders. "If elected.'' Mr. Williams said, "I pledge myself to see that every citizen receives full recognition and privilege that he may be entitled to, regardless of creed or religious affiliation.'' At the conclusion of the address he received a long and enthusiastic ovation. I Announcements! I i MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CONGREGATION (Orthodox) IMI S. W. Third Street JONAH E. CAPLAN, Rabbi The early Friday evening Bervicet be::m at 6 p.m. There will be no late services in the future until the fall, these having been discontinued immediately after Passover. Saturday morning servicebegin at

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Page Four THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN I &f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f &f &f &f&f&f &f &f&f&f &f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f &f &f &f&f &f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f &f&f &f # Edited by RABBI S. M. MACHTEI f + Poundw tnd Diraetor, Radio SyiMffOg of America & •j. SUNDAY MORNINGS + WIOD, MIAMI, FLORIDA X SUNDAY, APRIL 16, 1933. No. 19. f I Vol. 1. &f •> •:• •:• •:• •:• # •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• <• •:• •:• •:• • • • •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• • &f • • • •> • • &f • ••• "The Living-Dead and the Dead-Living" Scripture Reading, Dent. Chapter XXX, Venei 19 and 20 O N Tuesday morning, prayers will be recited in the synagogues for the souls of the departed who have gone from this physical plane for more than one year. They are -spoken of as "the dead.'" We. wlio are still moving in this plane and who are visible to one another call ourselves "the living." You and I may not agree on the meanings of these words. I want to challenge the common usage of these terms. If by "dead" you mean that the individual you and I knew is no longer here with us. I beg to differ with you. If by "dead" you mean die loss of all influence after the spark of activity and motion on this earth lias left the body. I again take a different view. If by "dead" you refer to that old bromide "dead and buried" or to its sister "dead and forgotten." I must hold an opinion that conflicts with yours A ND if. by "living" you imply that state of being Which houses a divine spark of action, of good, of locomotion, and of some contributing factor to the common weal. I must beg permission to coin hyphenated words to accurately describe the forms of "living" things —I should rather say. the degrees of "living" things. There are "living-dead" and "deadliving." A JEWISH lady, who was widowed not a year ago. is subject to attacks from a more or less chronic disease. These attacks may come at any hour of the day or night. If one should come on by day and its advent should be anticipated it is a simple matter to take the antidote and to minimize the ill effects of the attack. Should the attack come on during sleep, the patient lacks the strength to go for his medicine or even to cry out for help. A few weeks ago this lady was awakened from sleep by a dream at about 1:30 in the morning. She dreamt that her husband, who is "dead." mind you. shook her as he stood beside her bed. He sought to wake her and kept saying. "Go downstairs and take something. Hurry, wake up. Go downstairs and take something." She woke from her sleep, left her bed and walked down to the kitchen, on the floor below, and took an antidote to counteract an attack which she felt coming upon her. I saw that man lowered to his grave. You will tell me that he is dead and gone. I will tell you that he is of the living-dead." He is gone from the physical plane. Our physical eyes cannot see him and our material ears cannot hear him. but. his widow, over whom he was and is watching, heard him and saw him. To her he is very much alive and an active influence. There are many other such proofs that I could offer of "life" after death. Time will not permit. N OW I know that you can. each of you. show me proof of the "deadliving." You all know of peoplci who are apparently alive, yet. are "dead" to all of life that goes on without them. They have eyes and see not. ears and hear not; they have the appearance of human beings that are alive, yet for all utilitarian purposes they are dead. They just walk about as would so main uhosts They are dead" to the world. They are the "dead-living." I HAD an encounter with one such in a northern city, six years ago. To my regret he was of the rabbinate. Let me preface my remarks by stating that rabbinic training and even ordination does not insure that the individual is qualified by temperament, character, or intelligence for the rabbinic cloak of leadership. This young rabbi had forfeited the respect of the members of his congregation by his own conduct, and, at the expiration of his contract, his .services were no longer wanted. Shortly thereafter, I had occasion to attend services in that same synagogue. The young former rabbi of the congregation saw in me a potential candidate for his former position — a fact which was not so — and he sought every opportunity to insult me. I let it all go by me without comment. Some of his supporters, who sought to force this misfit onto the community, advised me not to occupy the pulpit, should I be invited during my short stay in that community to preach as a guest-rabbi. I passed all these incidents by. without commenting on them. Then, one day, I followed my habit of long years standing —to greet everyone first and with a smile — I extended my hand and said "Good Shabbos" to this rabbi who stood beside me and my hand was Ignored. He refused to shake hands • with me. He would not acknowledge my greeting because of some guilty knowledge within his own mind. I was not then hurt nor am I now as I recall the incident. I ask. now. was he alive? Was he "living"? He mayhave shown physical signs of life, but he was of the "dead-living." He was dead to life and to all that it holds. He was dead to the nobility of character that the rabbinate exemplifies. He was dead to the simple rudiments of courtesy and decency that should be inherent in the lowest of human beings. He defiled the rabbinate cloak by his dead carcass. If there had been any doubt in my mind about the justice of the charges that had been made against him. those doubts were wiped dut. He stood revealed to me in all the nakedness of his shame. He was unfit to be the spiritual leader of that congregation or of any other. Such a one was unfit to expound the laws of the "living-dead" — rabbis who have been dead for centuries but who are still alive and enshrined in the hearts of Israel. That rabbi has since left the rabbinate, and when last I heard of him, he was engaged in mercantile endeavor. W HEN you recite the "Yizkor," the Memorial prayer for the dead, your own departed ones — they are not "dead." They are the "livingdead." They are alive in your memories. They hover about you at all times and watch over you. They bring you only good. You need never fear any harm from them. As you go through this plane called "life," beware of the "dead-living" — those whom you look upon as "living" but who carry about with them the chill of the grave, the unwholesomeness of decaying matter. S O live that, after you have been removed from this plane, you shall live on in the memories and hearts of those left behind. Be alive to your St. Petersburg Notes —! farewell party at the Horowitz hotel I for the many friends he made in St. Petersburg, on Wednesday afternoon. April 19. prior to his departure for home. Friday night services at Bnai Israel congregation will begin at 8 o'clock, and the rabbi will have as the subject of his sermon. "Jewish Laws of Sanitation." Saturday morning services begin at 9 o'clock. Sunday school classes at 10 a.m. Sunday, and Hebrew school classes daily at 4 p.m. The Ladies' Auxiliary and Aid society of Congregation Bnai Israel gave a lovely surprise party to Belle Goldman, president of the society, in honor of her marriage to Mr. Morns Hcrmer. She was also pres inted with a beautiful gift. The Judaic Council is planning a social in the very near future. Mr. and Mrs. Fry of Brockton. "What is absolutely certain is that Mass., entertained Rabbi A. S. just like intelligence, stupidity is Kleinfeld at dinner on Tuesday eve' hereditary, and —" ning. April 18. That's a nice way to speak of Mr. Theodore Weil tendered a your parents." fullest. So live that those who have gone before you. and who are constantly with you. may feel honored by your conduct. Bring blessings to your "living-dead." Ycu can't do it by being of the "dead-living." Guaranty Title & Abstract Corporation DON PBABODT, PreaMtat ABSTRACTS, TITLE INSURANCE, ESCROWS BBCOND FLOOR SECURITY BLDO. PHONE MIHI CARTER FUNHRAL SERVICE ,11 WEST FLAGLBH STKKKT PHONES 2-HJ21—2-422 MITCHELL JACOBY, Experienced /<••>//> Attendant in Charge DR. [CATHERINE M. COLD NATIROPATIIIC PHYSICIAN Sanitarium and Maternity Hospital 825 S. W. 27th Ave. •hone 2-8639 Automobile Storage IN BONDED WAREHOUSE Special Rates for Season L. A. JONES, Inc. N. E. 20th St. and N. Miami Ave. Phone 2-6342 AN OPEN LETTER In becoming a candidate for the important office of City Commissioner of Miami I want all to know: I am not a politician, just a plain, hard-working business man who has never before aspired to public office. I am :',6 years old. born in Jacksonville and my parents were pioneers of Key West. Fla. I am vice president and secretary of the J. Y. < h Company, Inc., and president and treasurer of the Miami Rock Company. My reputation and Integrity as a business man is open to all. I have treated all citizens honestly, fairly and squarely, regardless of religious or political affiliation. Miami has many Important problems that it must meet. It needs honesty, sincerity and fearlessness in the administration of its affairs I pledge at all times, if elected, to protect thai public against confisc-atory taxes, and promise an economical and business administration of municipal affairs. Your support in the coming primaries will be appreciated. — %  %  %  "r r"^ VOTE FOR C. C BLAKE for the Miami City Commission WHITE BELT DAIRY Milk and Dairy Products Old Plantation Ice Cream A Home Institution N. W. 32nd AM) 62nd ST. PHONE KIM.KWATKR I6K6 tor a Chan Administration of Municipal Affairs Friday, April 21. m, Think Before Voting OWEN W. P1TTMAN, Jr. Candidate for the City Commission of Miami, wan born in ( k uincy. Florida; hi' received hi* education in Miami grammar and high -< hnol ., r ,i the Law College of the (nivemity f Florida. He began the practice of law in Miami with the late Freeman Iturdine and Samuel Harm, and for the pant iteven year* ha* been a member of the law Arm of Ilryant & Pitt man in the Olympia Huildlng. Married In 192.1 to Rosemary Mill*. daughter of Charles A. Mill*. National Vice Commander of the American I < %  %  inn. He haw two children and rewiden In Ma own home at 1630 V W. South River Drive. He In a director "I the Dade County Council, Boy Scoutn of America, a director of tat Junior Chamber of Commerre. a |j fl tenant II. S. N. R. and put Vice President of the Stale Aasociation of Naval Officer*. For a year and a half he u relief Miami Municipal Judge. He U a 32nd degree Manon and Shriner. a member of the Sigma Nu fraternity U niter-ity of Florida), and a *on of Miami'* Pontmanter. In neeking the office he i campaigning on a platform which ii a direct appeal to the thinking voter and taxpayer. VOTE FOR E for the Miami City Commission Royal Typewriters New and Factory Rebuilt Portables. $2950 to $60.00 B. W. THACKER, Local Dealer 210 N. E. 2nd St. Phone 2-0115 In the Heart of Your Neighborhood PIGGLY WIGGLY A Miami Institution led 15 YOVR CHEAPEST SERVANT. Useitf



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Page Two THE JEWISH FLORID' A N Friday, A pri | 2| 01 I Mr.s. Adele Vince Rose presented a resume of "Saunders Oak"' by Robert Raynolds last Tuesday evening at the home of Mrs. Alex Goldstein. 808 Euclid avenue, Miami Beach. This was the regular meeting of the Fortnightly Book Review club. A social hour followed. • • • Mr. and Mrs. William Fox of New York entertained at the Miami Biltmore hotel dinner dance Friday night, honoring their son-in-law and daughter. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Riskin. who were married here Friday, with Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan officiating. Bride's roses and lilies of the valley formed the centerpiece for the table. Guests were Mr. and Mr.s. Harry Winston. Mr. and Mrs. William B. Steinhardt. Mrs. Leonard C. Van Wye and Miss Belle Fox, all of New York; Miss Ann Kemter of Atlanta, Edward Morris of New York, Harry Fischer of Washington, Sidney de Young of Boston. Ben Kallen of New York and Roy Gindy of Cleveland. • • • Plans for the girls' break dance of the Junior Council of Jewish Women to be held at the Beth DavTIVOLI W. FlaEler at 8th Phone 2-3352 Sunday and Monday, April 23-24 "TROUBLE in PARADISE" with Kay Francis Miriam Hopkins One wan a hrunvltf. one waa blonde — but ihey both HIW red. Kl IIL'S STUDIO of DANCING presents "STARS of TOMORROW" Sons and Dance Revue FRIDAY EVE.. APRIL 28 8:15 P. M. nt the Temple Theatre Admission 50c, Children 25c PHONE 3-1559 FISHING TACKLE AT Bargain Prices TARPON TACKLE SHOP 79th Street Juat EaM of lli-.ra.vnr Blvd. HOME SERVICE LAUNDRY Mrs. Clara D. Kersey, Prop. 1225 8. W. 6th St. Phone 2-5654 SPECIAL 20 lbs. Rough Dry, $1.00 Flat Work Finished '—+ MAXWELL HOUSE There Is A Reason! We arc aervinK a dinner worth n dollar for .10r. and are running to capacity. Come out and make us prove it. Steak, chopt*. aea food, fried chicken, nmothered chicken, hot rolls, home made pics, real coffee. Special turkey dinner every Sunday. 12 noon to 8 p.m. MAXWELL HOUSE 2147 S. W. 8th St. ITamiaml Trail) Phone 2-5922 id Talmud Torah hall on Sunday. April 23. include a dramatic skit under the direction of Miss Millicent Rubin, who is coaching the play. In charge of arrangements for this dance is a committee headed by Miss Ruth Son tag. She Ls being assisted by the Misses Mildred Dreisen. Henrietta Hirsch. Charlotte Kohn. Harriet Kanter and Sara Kohn. • • The Hebrew Athletic club will hold an initiation of recently elected members next Wednesday night at the clubrooms of the organization in its Community centre, with Milton Klein as chairman of the membership committee directing the ceremonies. Full details of the gala vaudeville show to be given by the organization at Its clubrooms on May 14, under the direction of Abe Goldman, will be announced next Wednesday night. • • An important meeting of the Ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation will be held next Tuesday tllght, April 25. when election of officers will be held following the report of the nominating committee of which Mr.s. Max Kupfesrtein is chairman. All members ire urged to attpnd as very impori tant business will be transacted following the election of officers. • • • Under the direction of Mrs. Harry Oliphant and the supervision of Rabbi Max Shapiro the pupils of Beth David Sunday school and Talmud Torah presented their Passover play last Sunday morning at the I assembly of the Sunday school. The annual Passover Sader preceded the play which was witnessed by a large number of adults in addition to the pupils. • • The annual donor's tea of the Senior Hadassah will be held on Monday next. April 24. at the home of Mrs. Joseph Williamson. 1444 Meridian avenue, Miami Beach, and will be open to all who have earned their quota of funds. • • • Beth David Sunday school teachers will be hosts at a benefit bridge ; for the Beth David library fund on Wednesday evening, April 26. beginning at 8 p.m. Prizes will be awarded for high scores and re' freshments will be served. • • • The Tuttle garage is now offering special summer rates for the storage of autos in a fire and storm proof building so that the fullest protection is always assured. They are also offering extremely low rates for repair work. Live Poultry and Choice Fruits and Vegetables Prices Right MRS. A. WALL 6:,-66 City Terminal Market S. W. 2nd Ave. and 2nd St. CHOICE LIVE POULTRY HENS. FRYERS. PULLETS, DUCKS, ETC. FRESH FLORIDA EGGS at reasonable prices. ELORIDA POULTRY & EGG COMPANY Wholesale and Retail 1011-13 S. W. 8th St. Phone 2-8334 Jack Kru*. Mir. We Deliver Mrs. Philip Berkowitz returned to her home after having spent several weeks as a patient at the University hospital. • • • Word has Just been received here of the birth of a baby daughter to Mr. and Mrs. Michael Kanter of Passaic. N. J. Mrs. Kanter is the former Jane Schonfeld. the daughter of Mr. and Mrs, Joseph Schonfeld. long-time residents of Miami. • • • Ml Lillian Wucher and Mrs. Bi ssie Wernlkoff arc co chairmen of a benefit bridge for the Junior Council of Jewish Women which will be held at the home of Miss Wucher. 726 Michigan avenue. Miami Beach, next Tuesday evening. April 25. beginning at 8 o'clock. Prises will be awarded and refreshments will be served. • • • Mrs, Manuel Rippa entertained a group of friends at her home last Tuesday afternoon at bridge in honor of Mrs. R. Yunes. who will leave shortly to spend her summer vacation in Boston and nearby points. Assisting the hostess in entertaining were the Misses Ida and Mollie Engler. A beautiful prize of a crystal bead chain was presented to the guest of honor by the hostess Fust prize for high score was awarded to Mrs. Morris Dubler and the booby prize was won by Mrs. Jake Bngler, Among those attending were Mesdames Stone. Cohen. L. Weinkle. S. Schwartz, Morns Kotkin, I. i stein. Chas. Goldstein. Morris Dubler. i. Cohen. I, L. Mintzer, J. Bngler, Lewis Brown. J. Simpson, A. Neunan. Mike Kotkin. L. Bancicl and I. Fine During the afternoon Passover refreshments wenserved. • • The Mac Rose Follies will be presented by the Mae Rose Studio of Dancing, Friday. April 21. at 8:15 at the Scottish Rite Temple theatre A most diversified and entertaining program has been arranged. The dance routines, all of which were originated by Mae Rose and Bill Perks, will be executed by an array of talented Juveniles as well as advanced students, many of whom have been appearing on some of the foremast southern theatrical circuits. Among those participating are: Mae Rose. Bill Pecks. Esther Bain. Jacqueline Rosen. Betty Berney. Esther Lea Silverman. Jerry Rauzin and Bobby Reisman. a a Senior Hadassah LS now arranging a thrift luncheon, the proceeds of which will be devoted to the fund for infant welfare work in Palestine. Mrs. Sam Simonhoff is chairman of the arrangements committee and she Ls being assisted by Mrs. Louis Zeientz. The affair will be held at Kaplan hall on Tuesday. April 25. at noon. • • • Mrs. Bernard Simon will preside at the regular meeting of the Senior Council of Jewish Women on Wednesday, April 26, beginning at 2 p.m. at the Ponce de Leon hotel, when the nominating committee headed by Mrs. Isidor Cohen will present the report of the committee recommending officers for the coming year. Election will follow. All members are urged to attend. Eighteen Passover baskets were distributed to needy Jewish families by the council. • • • A regular meeting of Hadassah was held at the Miami Acacia club last Monday when announcement was made that a baby beauty show would be held shortly. Mrs. L. Roth is chairman and she is being assisted by Mesdames B. Kandel. Frances Williamson. Sam Simonhoff. Max Dobrin, M. Wesson. H. Weinberg and H. Rubin. Full details of this event will appear in our next issue. • • Mr. and Mrs. Perry Stone are being congratulated on the birth of a baby girl las) week at the Victoria hospital. The baby was named at a ceremony In the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation last Tuesday morning and a reception was tendered the worshippers immediately after the services. a a a Mr. and Mr.s. Harry I. Lipton left Is • Saturday to spend several weeks In New York City, • • • Mr, Jacob Becker, vice president of Beth Jacob congregation. Miami Beach, left last Saturday on a brief business trip to Washington. D. C. He will return the early part of next week. • • • Kay Francis, the Mine. Colet of "Trouaie in Paradise." from the play by Latzlo Aladar. coming to the four years old. her mother. Rather ine Clinton, a well-known stock acTivoli theatre on Sunday and Monday. was born in Oklahoma City of theatrical parents. When she was tress, put the child in a pr i vate school in New York, and returned to the stage. A series of private schools followed. The stage claimed her. her first role being the player queen in the modern dress version of "Hani. let." She then spent a season with Stuart Walker's stock companies in Cincinnati, Indianapolis and Davton. and, on her return to Ne York, appeared in "Venus,'' "Crime," and "Elmer the Great." Her first screen role was as Walter Huston's leading woman in "Gentlemen of the Press" since that time she has appeared in "Dangerous Curves," "The Cocoanuts." "Behind the Makeup." -street of Chance." "Let's Go Native," "The Virtuous Sin." "Street of Women.' "Jewel Robbery" and other films. • • • Plans for a theatre party for Thursday. May 4. are now being made by the Junior Council of Jewish Women. r BISGAYNE TENT & AWNING CO. INCORPORATED An nillgs for the Better Homes at Prices to l'lea\e Yon TENTS. SAILS, FLAGS. LAWN and GARDEN FURNITl'RE ANYTHING MADE OF CANVAS 241 S. W. 6th St. -:Phone 2-3602 Now you can buy 14 BILTMORE LAUNDRY SERVICE at a price that fits your pocket book! PHONE 3-3687 21 N. W. 9T1I ST. Alexander Orr, Jr., Inc. Plumbing and Heating MIAMI IIEACII II-':' I'.rh SI. I'hnnr .V.1.116 MIAMI 4.1 N. W. Jrd St. Phoiif 2-3691 "Neu Deal" the Battle Cry of McCretdy Leo F. McCready "NEW DUAL" McCRHADY My Ambition Is to Help Solve the Tax and Bond Problems My Ambition Is to Secure a New Deal at the City Hall Candidate for CITY COMMISSIONER CITY OF MIAMI Primary May 2 -:Election June 6 My Pledged Policy Is a Safe and Sane Economical Business Administration "?•* Reduction" the Battle Cry of McCready



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tn^v. April 21, 1933. THE JEW I S H FLORIDIAN rage Five SOCIETY The Hebrew conversational class 0 [ Beth David will resume its studies next Tuesday evening. April 25, 8 t 8 p.m. at the Beth David Talmud Torah under the direction of Rabbi Max Shapiro. • • At the meeting of the Ladies' auxiliary of tne Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation held last Tuesday m ght. a nominating committee to recommend officers for the coming war was appointed by the president. Mrs Max Kupferstein is chairman ind Mesdames William Mechlowitz. Max Rappaport. Moe Harris and J. Hirsch are the remaining members of the committee. Plans for the annual picnic for the children of the Talmud Torah and Sunday school io be held shortly were discussed and Will be announced shortly. Mr.*-. Milton Weiner entertained last Wednesday afternoon at her Alexander Orr,Jr, Candidate For City Commission of Miami COMING TO THE TIVOU THEATRE RICH-FLO VANILLA OFFERS $25.00 IN CASH PRIZES IT the fifteen (IS) heal letter! "n WHY YOU LIKE AND I BE RICH-FLO VANILLA." I IRST PRIZE ... BBI ONI) PRIZE I IIIRI> PRIZE I'M RTH PRIZE ir>.oo 4.00 3.00 2.00 I I .EVEN PRIZES. ea. 1.00 The content in simple. Anyone mai enter. Write letter elating, why you prefer to ue Rich' I" Vanilla. Encloae a label from one of our Rich-Flo Vanilla hottlea. We will be the aole Mgm. The Vanilla may be purchaa"I it the following atorea: Tanner Storea. Tip Top Stores. Blue Bawl Rakeriea. Pearl A Jeaale ko Shop. George R. Zane. Mammoth Storea. Shell'a. Wellbacher Market. Wild Cat Gro%  ".. Riley'a. Hauler atreet. 'iahlea Curb Market. Coral GaMea. Mall to < iillti .1 Dip!. Rich-Flo Vanilla • are of Fountain at Supply Co.. "3S-928 N. Miami avenue. Miami. Florida. Contest cloaea midnight. April SO. !J3. home with a benefit bridge for the Ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Orthodox Talmud Torah. Prizes for high score were awarded at each individual table and during the afternoon delicious refreshments were served. • • • "Joseph and Moses will be the subject of the lesson at the Bible study class at the home of Maj. Kaufman Mandell. 3012 S. W Eighth street, at 11 o'clock Sunday morning. Rabbi S. M Machtei will comli.iii 'hi live* of these two leaders. The class is open to the public, both ind Christians. • • • It's no news when they move a movie troupe to a house in the country —but it's new when they move the house in the country to the movie troupe, if the old rule anent the man who bites a dog still holds good. This bit of cinematic housemoving was accomplished during the lilming of the latest Marie DressierPolly Moran comedy. "Prosperity.'' which will be shown Sunday and Monday at the Seventh Avenue theatre. The plot called for the popular comedy pair to do "location work'' in the environs of an old farmhouse. Then, instead of returning to the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios to build interiors matching the location scenes. Director Sam Wood arranged for the purchase of the quaint house and took it along. Thus the actual interior as well as the exterior was photographed. •'Prosperity'' is a comedy of smalltown life with Miss Dressier and Miss Moran as rival mothers-in-law fighting over the affairs of their married children and grandchildren, with a bit of distinctive character work for the versatile Miss Dressier thrown in for good measure. a • • At a meeting of the Junior Council of Jewish Women held last Tuesday night at the Ponce de Leon hotel, a program was presented under the direction of Miss Harriet Kanter. Ben Axelrod. prominent local attorney, delivered the main address of the evening. Irving and Florence Coret were heard in violin and piano selections, and a ventriloquist act followed. A delightful social hour was then had Plans for the girls' break dance to be held next Sunday night, April 23. at Beth David Talmud Torah hall were then announced and included a number of prominent vaudeville entertainment. Miss Ruth Sontag is chairman of this affair. The public is urged to attend and spend an enjoyable evening. • • The physical culture group under the direction of Mrs. Bertha B. Levy will celebrate at a kiddie party at the home of Mrs. Levy. 1625 S. W. Fifteenth street, on Wednesday evening. April 26. All members have been asked to attend. .. --< An important board meeting of the Junior Council of Jewish Women will be held at the Ponce de Leon hotel next Tuesday evening. April 25. to which all members of the board are urgently invited to attend. Radio Synagog Rabbi S M. Machtei. founder and director of the Radio Synagog. will preach over WIOD at 10 o'clock Sunday morning on "Electrocution in the Bible." In addition to the sermon there will be prayers, music, hymns and a question box. She was but the photographer's daughter. Yet at that she had lots of sense. For she loved to sit with the lights turned low And wait on developments. It seems as though Mr. Roosevelt is intending that the naked truth will helping in putting on the nude deal. Modern Mother: "Go to sleep now, honey; the sandman is coming." Modern Child: "That's all right, mother; don't worry — I won't tell father." "When I was at school I took the first prize." "Yen?" "But teacher made me put it back." In a certain snooty section ot New York City in which numerous expensive apartment houses have been erected there have been more outgoing than incoming tenants due to the continued depression. In fact, one of the principal thoroughfares in this section has taken on such an air of silence that one of the doormen remarked: "It's so quiet on that street now you can hear a lease break.' Wife: "My husband has no bad habits whatsoever. He never drinks, and he spends all his evenings at home. Why. he doesn't even belong to a club. Friend: "Does he smoke?" Wife: "Only in moderation. He likes a cigar after he has had a good dinner, but I don't suppose he smokes two cigars a month." ft Vote For *1. JACKMALTZIE fOR p / CITY COMMISSIONER "The Working Man's Friend' Place The Right Men In Office In placing the name of Robert R. Williams. bett*r known to his many friends as "Bob." before the voters as a candidate for the Miami City Commission, citizens of Miami urge that the city cannot reestablish its credit and solve the bond situation unless able men. unselfish, and unlinked to special interests, are placets in office. Mr. Williams, who served faithfully, honestly, impartially and ably as justice of the peace for several years, was bom thirty-rune years ago. is married and has four children. For a number of years he was engaged in the wholesale candy and paper business as well as in the real estate business. He is the organizer and is now the president of the Riverside Improvement Association, one of the most potent factors for good in the city of Miami today. He was one of the original organizers and is now a director of the Public Utilities Protective League which has been active in the fight to reduce the utility rates in the city. In making his campaign. Mr. Williams is urging a sane course in adjusting the bond situation now existing here, and believes that an honest effort to have the bondholders receive payment commensurate with the city's ability to pay. without repudiation of the bonds, will solve the problem. He favors the reduction of the Utility rates, as evidenced by his work with the Public Utilities Protective League, and a reduction in taxes brought about by a reduction in government costs. In urging the election of "Bob" Williams as city commissioner his friends urge — +• •L^&.St-S*-**-'* 1 Flagler Poultry Market Wholesale and R./MI Diatributora of Strictly Fresh Florida ERRS Fancy Live and Dressed Poultry ••s„ short w.i.ht. No Urn %  '*';' %  1132 W. Fla.ler St. Phone 2-aa.A FOR City Commissioner of Miami and be assured of "representation in the city's management in the interests of all the people." Dr. A. T. Knowles 2936 N. W. 17th Ave. Phone I-TSM MODERN PET HOSPITAL Large Individual HoardingRun* Effective Tick Medicine Sold The Neu PILOT DRAGON AT YOI'R RADIO DEALER Price* from $1..10 to SH'.i.'.n On Display at PAN-AMERICAN RADIO, INC. I-01 N. E. 2nd Ave. Phone I-M4I NIGELEY Funeral Home 1111 Washington A., Miami Reach PHONE 5-3355 %  % % % % % % % % %  William Penn Hotel Restaurant Now Open %  I"nder the Management of FRED C. MAl'KER %  Formerly of Sunshine Cafeteria Table d'Hote and a la Cart* %  Popular Prices OPEN ALL SUMMER Our Special Seven Course Dinner, only 50c %  OPEN FOR PARTIES a Phone 5-3301 for Reaervationa FROM FARM TO CONSUMER PERRY'S DAIRY WboUuie and Retail PHONE 2-7221 The COCONUTS Biacayne Blvd. at 61et St. Our ambition is to please in Good Foods and Courteous Service OPEN DAY AND NIGHT Meals, Salads, Sandwiches served at your car or table PHONE EDGEWATER S117 VOTE FOR Robert R. Williams ARE WEkee P in S faith with those who trust us, are we living up to our obligations if wc risk their future happiness by ignoring the problems that would arise for them if, some day, we did not come home? Life Insurance offers the safe and certain answer. There is no substitute. A Southern Health & Life Insurance Policy on each one is necessary to protect the others from the privation and expense caused by the last illness and death. A few pennies each week is the total cost. SOUTHERN LIFE & HEALTH INSURANCE COMPANY T. S. COOK, Manager 810 Realty Board BldR. Phong 2-l



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tnfrv. AP"1 21. 1933. THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN PCIII.ISHED EVERY FRIDAY by iln irwISII H.ORIDIAN IM III.l.-ll I M. CO. Jt P. <>. Box 2973 Miami. Florida Phone 2-1183 EXECUTIVE OFFICES: llj.ll s.nirily Kid*. Phone 2-S493 KIIITORIAI. OFFICES: j.| s. W. I.'ilh Avenue Phone 2-1183 J. LOUIS SHOCHET, Editor EPWAKH I ARI.IN. Adverllning Manacer mill h SHOCHET. Circulation Manager Eniercl itsecond rlasa matter July 4. iMU 1 I he Pol Office at Miami. Florida. wider lh Art of March 3. 1879. VEST I'AI.M BEACH OFFICE 414 Eighth Street Mrs, M. Schrcbnick. Reprenentative Six Mnnlhi Onr Year SlBSt RII'TION 11.00 12.01 FRIDAY. APRIL 21, 1933. Vol. 6. No. 16. No Boycott An Editorial on the Nazi Front That the Germans cannot mainlain an anti-Semitic program without harming themselves is obvious. That the Jews of America and other countries cannot institute an economic war against Germany is equally clear. Under these circumstances what is to be done? A delicate and difficult question. Logically viewed, a reconciliation would seem the only solution. If Hitler were to say to world public opinion, call off your protests and I will guarantee equal treatment and equal opportunities to all Jews residing in Germany, the Jewish leadership would. we believe, be happy to engage in a serious effort to make the world realize that Germany, even Hitlerite Germany, is entitled to equal treatment and equal opportunity among the nations. But Hitler will not say the word. His followers are looking to him to keep the many promises made during his opposition days. He promised a new Germany. A Jewless Germany, He promised the end of unemployment and the beginning of an era of prosperity. He unfolded to the workers a vision of a socialist state and to the Junkers he held up :he picture of a strong and militaristic government in which the Hohenzollerns would play a leading if not the leading role. To the capitalists he pledged his unrelenting fight against the dangers of communism. Which parts of this program can he Wry out at the present time? To the Hitler mentality it appears I that the anti-Jewish and antiCommunist war is the best political maneuver. He most probably realized that Jem in foreign lands would be aroused and in their indignation challenge the present regime in Germany. But Hitler knows that the proposed Jewish boycott against German merchandise is not a serious threat. Economically it would "lean little, because the "buy at home" movements in many countries have reduced German exports 'o so low a figure that a Jewish boycott would not seriously affect the situation. Herr Hitler, however, 15 very anxious for a pretext for his anti-Jewish campaign. He wants to satisfy th e anti-Semitic wing of his Wtv without risking too much prestige in foreign lands. The Jewish boycott against German goods tomes most appropriately. It gives Herr Hitler a chance to shout selfdefense, retaliation and counterattack. Mr. Hitler does not wish for anything better than engaging in an economic war with world Jewry. World Jewry is the weakest opponent he can select, yet at the same time provides a rallying slogan of foreign aggression for the conflicting e'ements of his party. Should we proclaim a boycott we The Psychology Of Hitlerism A NEW word has been coined to express and define a mental attitude which has evolved in recent years as the result of happenings in Germany and while the history o* the Jews shows discrimination and persecution from time to time its more modern condition can best bo described by giving to the word "Hitlerism" its proper and psychological meaning and effect. Anti-Semitism has been known in Germany for many years. Quite a number of ambitious Jews have found it necessary for their purposes to disclaim their Jewish faith, a few of whom later in life as illustrated by the career of Emil Ludwig "Cohen" having been brought back should merely be falling into a political trap. An economic boycott, against whomever it may be directed, is a cruel and atrocious measure. It involves the suffering of innocent people. A boycott is not In harmony with the ethical and pacifistic Jewish outlook. We cannot decry the German economic boycott if we engage in the same nasty business. Jewish leadership cannot accept the boycott idea. Emil Ludwig. keen observer of European affairs, says: "Germany cannot continue the existence of her banks and commerce without America. If Jewish capital in New York wishes, it can force an improvement in the position of the German Jews." This statement is significant. It implies that Germany requires the assistance of American financiers in order to overcome its present difficulties. It implies also that Jewish capital is sufficiently strong in this country to influence the policy of American banks towards Germany. Political battles today are fought over the banker's conference table. A boycott would only hit the small manufacturers and small exporters of Germany in a small way. American banks, however, can dictate to German big business and politicians at the proper time. It is for the Jewish leadership to prepare as strong a Jewish case as possible for the day when American banks will have to decide the economic fate of the Reich. German Jewry is being assaulted physically and paralyzed economically. German Jewry is the victim of a ruthless anti-Semitic platform advocated since the first day Hitler began building his party. The Nazis have always been the aggressors. If we allow Herr Hitler to carry out his anti-Semitic program under cover of a counter-offensive, then he will outflank us. It is an old rule in the diplomatic game to charge the other fellow with aggression in order to have a justification for retaliation. Shall we give Nazi leaders a pretext to proceed in their economic war against the Jews? The policy of the world Jewish leadership must be one of nonresistance. At the same time we must mobilize all non-Jewish liberal elements and compel them to take up the cudgel against the injustice and atrocities perpetrated by the Nazis. A steady stream of information must be placed before public opinion, in the hope, that the time is not far when Germany wUl address itself to the world for cooperation. Then the floor will belong to the enlightened nations, who must make it a condition sine qua non to Mr. Hitler that he stop anti-Semitism or forfeit their help. It is as the victims of a premeditated assault that we must appear before the bar of public opinion, and not as the opponents of Hitler & Company in an economic battle. (Reprint) to their faith by reason of German discrimination and persecution a long time before the present antiSemitic outbreak now being witnessed in Germany. After the war Germany experienced different kinds of leadership and different forms of government before Hitler became a formidable personage in the political life of Germany. Hitler, perceiving the unrest and discontent of the German although not a native German, began an appeal fashioned to obtain the support of the different dissatisfied and discontented elements of Germany much like a candidate for political office in the United States who would invent a platform made up of planks containing promises tending to appease and gratify the wishes and prejudices of every phase of American life, our platform in this country upon which a candidate hoped to obtain his election would appeal to those opposed to the Eighteenth Amendment and would promise to secure its repeal and after his successful campaign resulting in his election he would naturally be bound to redeem his party and personal pledges and promises. If Hitler knew nothing else he cer1 tainly had a profound knowledge of %  the psychology of his people and he knew that one of the things upon which he could appeal to a considerable element in Germany was the feeling of anti-Semitism which he found present and he therefore seized upon it and developed it with the result that he succeeded in not only increasing the amount of antiJewish feeling but he also inflamed it to a high intensity and created a new kind of anti-Semitism utilizing the temper of the people disappointed in their defeat on the battlefield, their general feeling of resentment against the imposition of penalties following an unsuccessful war, the unhappy mind due to privation and hardship, the unsatisfactory forms of government and kinds of leadership experienced by the German people and a catering to the envy and jealousy of all elements who would be benefitted by the removal of the Jew from competition in the economic, industrial, political and professional life of Germany. Despite what has been said in order to appease the feeling of the German and to make a distinction between the German and Hitler in his relation to the Jew the truth is that there has been an ever-present antiJewish feeling in Germany, which, while under restraint and in the background to a more or less extent, was undoubtedly present to a more or less degree. The Germany of today has been made ready for a number of years for the present feeling of antiSemitism and the treatment the Jews are receiving in Germany is but the effect of long standing causes accentuated and developed by Hitler and his followers for purpose of political benefit, for the student of German affairs recognizes that the recent edicts against the Jews are but redemptions of pledges and promises made to the German people by those now in power. It is easy to understand the psychology of a people such as I have described and more easily understandable when we judge of it in the light of past experience and study of mob psychology. The German people are but following the experience of mob delusions of other countries. Prance had such an experience when her people became deluded with the propaganda of John Law and the Mississippi scheme. England underwent the same delusion in the insane conduct of her people in the East India bubble. The staid, phlegmatic and conservative Dutch were affected in the same manner during the Tulip mania when tulips bePage Thr THE GLOOM CHAlEi I used to read with childish pride about New England's pioneer who left his British fireside to find religious freedom here. His sturdy colleagues had a hunch that each should pray as each saw fit; but, lo, before a year, this bunch had passed religious laws that bit. He who left preachers in the lurch was fined, or spanked with heavy sticks, till Roger Williams said the church should be kept out of politics. I've often echoed Roger's views; that's what I call an honest deal. If you like prunes and Irish stews, must I throw out my grits and meal? Tom thinks the world will fall apart in nineteen hundred and thirty-eight; while Dick believes with all his heart that he was once a monkey's mate. Go on and eat your fish or ham on Sunday noon or midnight Friday; but don't forbid my leg of lamb, or try to pick my friends or pie day. If you like fishing, golf or tripe, or cobbling shoes, or bridge on Sundays, from me you'll never hear a gripe, if I may choose my toys and fun days. I never beat my breast and cry if Chinks eat rats, or lest a wop mix garlic with his chicken pie; I'll let them choose their smell and chop sticks. Likewise I have no yen to rap the views of foreign gents: why should a man get mad because a Jap reads Dix. Mahomet, Glyn or Buddha? I pick my spinach, sports and socks, my faith and fancies, fads and fuel, and if some poor, misguided ox butts in. I pull back like gem for moral growth; Dad taught me tolerance, a mule. My mother taught me how to pray, a priceless way to perfect peace; I thank them both. How many homes and heads and hearts would be intact and free from cares, if only we would do our parts to keep each nose in its affairs. There was a Jew and a Scotchman at a live stock show — the came more valuable than gold to the people of Holland. Witness the crusades and the crimes committed in religious fanaticism. Very few peoples have escaped those absurd moments of delusion. We in this country were touched by it in 1928 when the political campaign to many meant expression of religious prejudice accompanied by a bitterness and fervor hitherto unknown to us. We know that Hitler's redemption of his promises culminated in the edicts recently promulgated in Germany, the people were fed upon them, a fanaticism was created, anti-Semitism became a delusion of the mob and while extraordinary in its force and intensity was but a natural repercussion of the campaign which preceded. Hitler promised to "throw the Jews to the lions" and he fulfilled his promise, he knew his poeple would be content with nothing else than what he has granted them. Jews removed from opportunity of education, from the arts and sciences, from law and medicine, from industrial and political life of Germany would necessarily benefit those remaining in these different spheres of German life and like all mobs delusion has taken the place of reason, the present thought is all powerful, there is no vision of tomorrow, not the slightest conception of right and wrong, justice, fairness, the welfare of the German people as a whole, the affect upon the future of Germany of this action are all forgotten, not even thought of, in the insane delusion of the moment. Our people have lived through Scotchman had a horse to sell and the Jew wanted to buy it. but he didn't want to pay $300 for it, and that was the price the Scotchman made and would not come down a single penny of it —so they bargained back and forth and couldn't come to any agreement — so each went about his own business and then went back to their respective towns. A few days after the show the Jew gets a wire from the Scotchman in which he says he has thought it over and if the Jew will wire him $100 he will ship the horse to him. Which the Jew did. When the horse arrived the Jew discovered it was dead. The Scotchman waited and waited for the Jew to protest because he had sent him a dead horse —but no word came from the Jew. When the next horse show took place the Scotchman met the Jew, but decided not to say anything until the Jew would mention it first. The first day passed and the second day passed and the Jew didn't say anything about the dead horse. Finally the Scotchman could not contain himself any longer and said to the Jew: "Abie, you knew that horse I sent you was dead, didn't you?" "Sure," said Abie, "but that's all right." The Scotchman could hardly believe his ears because the Jew had gotten a dead horse for his $100 and wasn't complaining. "Well, what did you do about it?" asked the Scotchman. "Well," said the Jew, "when I saw it was dead I raffled it off and I sold 500 tickets at a dollar apiece.' "Raffled it off? How in the world could you get away with it? Why, the horse was dead!" "I know," said the Jew, "but the only one that complained was the man who won the raffle — and when he complained I gave him his dollar back." discrimination and persecution all through their history, they understand what difficulties and obstacles must be encountered and overcome, they will surmount the present situation as they have those of the past. The horror of the civilized world and the manifestation of disgust at Germany's actions will cause Hitler and his followers to recognize the force and power of world opinion and after a while will permeate through the entire German system until it reaches every walk of life and after a while the people of Germany will stand aghast at their own conduct and make them regret their intemperate and unreasonable action and when this occurs, they will turn from their false leaders as the mob always does, and destroy those who brought upon them world contempt. This may take time, our people must suffer until Germany regains her senses. In the not far distant Germany the value of an Einstein will become fixed when a Hitler will be scorned and detested. The Jew of Germany will again take his place in the life of Germany, whatever its form of government may be. The mob will recover its normality, real German leadership will bring it back, a cultural people will recover its ideals and the world will wait for the next demonstration of mob delusion because mobs everywhere go into delusions of one kind or another, they always have and always will. Hitlerism is but an incident. Judaism is a great faith —a religious faith and belief — it will survive the fanaticism of man and will live after Hitlerism has died.