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The Jewish Floridian ( March 24, 1933 )

UFJUD

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# 'Jewish flori'dff&in FLORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY Vol 6, No. 12. MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, MARCH 24, 19)3. Price Five Cents ^Situation In Ladies Sponsor rr A Benefit Supper nn Germany loday y &f •Announcements! j Protest Meeting state department Tuesday Final arrangements have been The state department xuesaay made for the conuicgational dinner ordered the American embassy „, t „ p Mjami Jewifih Qtthoim cQn L Berlin, in co-operation with gregati0 n In charge of the Ladles' United States consuls in other GerauxUlarjl hls Sun(|av eye man cities, to make a complete reMarcn „ al the synagogue bvf m „„„ 01 reported mistreatment of mng a pm The commiU( „. m j,, v s by the Hitler regime. cnarge s |u aded by ^ Nathjm this action was taken after a delA(l ,. !llKin who js ^^ ^^ by egation representing the American Me sdames William Meehlowitz wnjCTtoh congress asked Undersecrellam cl( n N Abramson s Rosen ,ary of State Phillips to look into b mn Lo||js pa |otl Max Rappaport toe anti-Jewish activities of the Hitlerites. The delegation was headed by Rabbi Stephen S. Wise ol Dei York city. The department announced -Following the visit of Rabbi Stephen S Wise the department in: the United States emb.i a: Berlin ol press reports ot the misit oi jews in Germany. Tiii' department also Informed mbassy of the deep concern reports are causing In this country. Tile department has instructed to make, in collaborah > he consuls, a complete report on the .situation." Bernard s. Deutsch ol New York City, president of the Jewish conand Max Rhoades, Washington attorney, accompanied Wise to see Phillips. Wise is the honorary pn lideni of the congress. ral days ago Ambassador Max Kupferstein and Charles Feldman. A program will be presented during the evening which will include a number of the outstanding artists now in this territory. The public is invited to attend. Beach To Hold Annual Dance The annual Spring Festival and Ball lor the benefit ol Beth Jacob Sisterhood, Miami Beach, will be held Sunday evening, March :'.' al hi Blackstone hotel and not at the Floridlan hotel. Plans include an evening ot gala entertainment in which noted -tars ol the local district will appear and help entertain the guests, included are Al Parker. Che ter, Alexander. Frances Kane. Irene and Frank Naldi and Others. CONGREGATION BETH JACOB (Orthodox) .111 Wa*hitiKtnn Avr.. Miami Beach L. AXELROD, Rabbi Early services begin at 5:45 with the late services at 8:15 when Rabbi Axelrod will preach. Cantor Boris Schlachman will direct the congregational singing and chanting. Saturday morning services begin at 8:30 and Rabbi Axelrod will preach in Yiddish on the portion of the week TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI (Reform) 137 N. K. Nineteenth Street OR. JACOB II. KAPLAN, Rabbi Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan's subject will be. 'The President. Con, gress and the People." After services a reception will be held in Kaplan hall, so that the visitors may each other and spend a pleasant stK'ial hour. Relic ions school is conducted each Sunday morning from iu to 12 in Temple Israel. BETH DAVID CONGREGATION ((onsen alive) IIS \. W. Third Avenue MAX SHAPIRO. Rabbi Will Be Held Riddle Me This Riddle Aroused by the outrages in GerSpeak a parable unto the home of Israel.— Ezekiel 17-2. Ish citizens of Miami met Wednesday at the Palatial Kosher restaurant and arranged for a protest mass meeting at Temple Israel Monday evening. March 27, beginning at 8 o'clock. Prominent non-Jewish citizens have been invited to attend and address the meeting. Rabbis of every congregation will speak and voice the sentiments of the people. The meeting in Miami will be held as one of a series of nation-wide meetings on Monday night in which the protest of the American people will be voiced against the outrages and persecution not only of the Jewish people but of the Catholics of Germany as well. The Hitler regime will be held responsible for the conditions caused by his continual incitemenl to persecution and bloodshed. Stress will be laid on the fad that it is not the Germans who are to be blamed but Hitler and his satellites. Concert To Be Feature Event THE CAVEMAN RIDDLES T HE riddle, according to the omniscient folklonsts. is probably the earliest form of humour. As soon as the primitive mind of man, these erudite delvers into antiquity maintain, began to sense the first faint glimmerings of the principle of analogy, it indulged in riddles, devising the enigmas of subtle simile and the puzzles of implied metaphor for the express bewilderment of its contemporaries. At first these conundrums constituted a sort of table amusement; when the belly was crammed with food, and the heart joyous with wine, then did the intellectuals of the Stone Age set themselves, for the delectation of the worthies "' %  the festive board, to the manufacturing of intricate riddles, Gordian knots of the intellect. Later, they developed into objects for wager, in which the partie's creatlng their respective riddles en.1 jousts. Of such a nature is the famous one of Samson. in which the giant of Israel records Regular service begin tonight at 5:30 with the late services at 8 p.m.. when Rabbi Max Shapiro will preach on "The Nazis' Abusive Attacks on Albeit Einstein." Cantor Arrangements for the annual conan exp i 0 it j n his biography in these Frederick M. Sackett in Berlin protested to the German foreign office Tl "' > n,bllc ls u, eed lo atle,ld M tne '""" > %  '"" *' lead ,ne chant Beveral attacks made on Proceeds will be used for the Taling and congregational singing, assted by the choir. Saturday mornliv.: services begin al 8:30. against in Jews by Nazi troopers. The government assured him thai these outrages would not be repeated. In talking with Phillips, however. Wise and his companions urged the state department go beyond mere Ion of American nationals. Tiny asked that the United State-. lor broad humanitarian consideration, act to protect Jews generally from persecution in Germany. declared that many German intellectual leaders were in hiding, fearful of the Hitlerites. Among these In named Dr. Theodor Wolff, editor ot the Berliner Tageblatt. and Bernhard, editor of the VosZeltung, mud Torah of the congregation. In charge of arrangements are Mrs. Barney Weinkle, president of the sisterhood, who is being assisted by H. I. Lipton. I. L. Mintzer. Harry Wasserman. Cantor Boris Schlachman and Rabbi L. Axelrod. A buffet -upper will be served during the evening. Beth David Holds Birthday Party Aroused by the storm o! protest *at ha arisen in this country oppression of Jew In tinmany, the German government day sought to mitigate the seriousness of the situation. <; rman Ambassador von Prittwltz eallc-ct at the state department to the matter with Undersecretary of state Phillips, to whom leadAmerican Jewry Tuesday proVan Prittwitz left with Phillips a ( "|).v oi an interview given to the Berlin correspondent of the Amsterlelegraaf by Reich Minister G pring. the purport of which was the Hitler government was moving to suppress anti-Jewish acand punish those responsible At the same time Secretary of StaU' Hull announced every possible m ean s was being exerted by the deBeth David's annual birthday party was held last Sunday night, with more than 200 gue ts In attendance. A two-hour program ol entertainment waprovided, with a hour and refreshments following the program. The program consisted ot a reading by Elise Bacher. songs by Cantor Louis Hayman, Yiddish Impel bj Joseph Greenberg. piano MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CONGREGATION Klrthodox) 151". S. W. Third Street JONAH E. CAPLAN, Rabbi Regular early services begin at 5:45 with the late services at 8:30. when Rabbi Caplan will preach in English. The usual chanting and congregational singing will be enjoyed. Saturday morning services begin at 9 a.m. with the afternoon services and Shalosh Saudah at 5 o'clock. The subject of the rabbi's sermon Friday night will be "We Protest." (en featuring Cantor Boris Schlachman of Beth Jacob congregation. Miami Beach, will include a number of outstanding supporting artists who will be heard in tribute to Cantor Schlachman. A program will be presented by the cantor in which traditional liturgical music and Jewish folk songs will be interpreted in the inimitable manner that has made the cantor beloved wherever he has been heard. For the past four years he has served Beth Jacob congregation, and prior to that was associated with large synagogues in Philadelphia. Georgia. Alabama and Miami. Beach Synagog Elects Officers Former Gov. SmithWillProtest Again confirming the recent choice of Philip Liberman. prominent communal worker and banker, as president, the members of the Beth Jacob congregation met and elected other officers in addition to the president. S. Finkelstein of Boston and Jacob Becker of Miami Beach were elected vice presidents; M Abrams. treasurer: M. B. Frank, secretary, and I. L. Mintzer. chairman of the board of directors. Members of the board of directors to direct the affairs of the congregation are: Harry Wasserman of Sharon The American Jewish congress announced today that Alfred E. Smith and cello duet by Mildred Greenwi n b( ol „, 0 j th e speakers at the berg and Leonard Rose, song by M a(n .son Square Garden protest Katie Markowitz. address by Rabbi mee ting against German anti-SemMax Shapiro, reading by Ida Engler. j(j m nexl Monday night. impersonation by Joseph OomiMky. Rabbi Stephen Wise, honorary Springs and Miamii Beach; Harry 'and the Waveily quartette


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Pace Two JEWISH FLORID' A N Friday, March 24, Passover and its laws will be the subject of the lesson and discussion at the meeting of the Bible study group at the home of Maj. Kaufman Mandel. 3012 S. W. Eighth street. Sunday morning at 11 o'clock. Rabbi S. M. Machtei will lead the class. A welcome is extended to all who are interested regardless of church affiliations. This Bible study group devotes itself to scripture without favor to any shade of interpretation. All who come meet on a common plane of brotherhood. • • • "Poor Apache." "The Song of Paree." and "How Are You?" are titles of three numbers sung by Maurice Chevalier in "Love Me Tonight," a Rouben Mamoulian production, his latest picture, which comes Sunday and Monday to the Tivoli theatre. Chevalier is heard in seven of the ten numbers, written for the production by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart, noted Broadway composing team. Those listed above he sings as solos. Pour others he sings with other members of the cast. Jeanette MacDonald. the leading woman in the picture, sings five numbers, one a solo. And she is heard with Chevalier in "Love Me Tonight." the theme song. Practically every member of the large cast — Charlie Ruggles. Chas. Butterworth. Myrna Loy. C. Aubrey Smith and others — sing during the TIVOLI W. I I:II:IIT at 8th Phone i-MM Sunduv and Monday. Marrh 26-27 | MAI-RICE CHEVALIER in f"Love Me Tonight" | With JBANBTTB McDONALD ( lit wan naushty, xhr watt hauifhl> — but they fell in loir. ATLANTIC SHOE SHOP Opposite Corel/ Hotel 240 N. E. FIRST AVE. ((uality Shoe Repairing All Work (iuaranteed SPECIAL Half Soles. 25c Pair Ladies' Heels, 10c Pair ... Breakfast 7 to 10 Dinner .... 5 to 8 Lunch 11 to 2:30 DAVIS CAFETERIA l| N. K. Second Ave. Oppottite Halcyon Hotel Efficient Service Boys to carry your tray .,—.;. •:• •> •:• •:• •:• *+•: •:• •:• •:• •> •:• •:• •:• CRYSTAL SPRINGS W A TER % An Ideal Table Water + t ;•; Pure, lit? lit. -parkling palatable. £ T refreshing. Awarded Silver Medal .% X St. I."inExposition and hisrhewt .;. t award for purity and excellence, •• ju Louisiana Purchaiie Exposition. •£• % | I PHONE 2-3645 £ t 92 N. E. 28th Street .j. I i $ %  ++ &f + &f&f &f&f&f &f&f &f&f&f&f&f&f • action. Titles of their numbers are: "Miml," "Lover." "A Woman Needs Something Like That." "The Man for Me." "The Son of a Gun Is Nothing But a Tailor," and "Isn't It Romantic?" • • • The Jewish Welfare Ladies' auxiliary met Monday in Kaplan hall with Mrs. Meyer Schwartz presiding and Mrs. I. Rosendorf opening the meeting with a prayer. Mrs. Sadie G. Rose, executive secretary of the Jewish Welfare bureau, gave an explanation of social service work. Plans are being made for a card party March 31 with Mrs. H. E. Kleinman as chairman. A social hour, under the direction of Mrs. J. Hartz. followed. • • Miami unit of Junior Hadassah will give a benefit bridge at the Columbus hotel at 8 p.m. Friday. This is the second similar event sponsored by the group to enable members to sell their quota of tickets so they might be guests at the five-dollar donor's luncheon. A program has been arranged and prizes will be awarded and refreshments served. Beatrice Goldenblank and Mrs. Rotfort are co-chairmen. The commitete assisting includes Lena Weinkle. Helen Yunes. Sadie Pepper, Sylvia Ray vis and Marion Blank. Any girls wishing tickets or further information are requested to call Miss Goldenblank. • <> • A large number of residents and guests attended the regular biweekly card party sponsored by the Ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation last Tuesday night at the vestry rooms of the synagogue. Acting as hostesses were Mrs. William Mechlowitz and Mrs. Louis Pallott. Prizes for high scores were awarded at each individual table. After the games refreshments were served. • • • Mr. Paul ELsenberg of Ashland. Ky.. was a visitor to Miami for several days with his cousins, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Shochet. • • • 'Maedchen in Uniform', beginning at the Paramount theatre in Miami next Monday, is a masterpiece of modern art with a universal appeal to discerning men and women," said Rabbi Louis I. Newman of | SPECIAL SHOWS at 2 & 6 p.m. | BEFORE AND AFTER THE RACES APUITJ 25< HOURIV 2-4 *M CHU.BM.nraK IIPST-IAK& RIRP ROAD CORAL GABLE5 HOME SERVICE LACS'DRY Mrs. Clara D. Kersey, Prop. 1225 S. W. 6th St. SPECIAL 20 lbs. Rough Dry, si.mi Flat Work Finished M aHiTini~a~a~i i'"li~i !" i Temple Rodelph Sholom. New York City, in an address to his congregation recently. "It holds educational and ethical lessons of profound import to parents and teachers. Its essential intent is to convey the picture of a growing girl, deprived of the love and understanding of a mother in tlic crucial period of her life as she passes from girlhood to womanhood. The new psychology once more emphasizes its teaching that stability and happiness come from normal family relationships, and that the absence of either parent, particularly the mother, handicaps the child in her effort to conront the crises as well as the ordinary situations of life. 'Maedchen in Uniform' depicts an incident typical of many schools and institutions in all countries. It throws sharp light upon the effects of separate education for girls as contrasted with coeducation, its characters are not unusual or ill-intentioned people: the headmistress, symbolic of the principle of strict discipline, acts according to traditional methods in which she has been reared moreover, she is the exemplar of an entire system which has its roots in the customs and history of her country. The : young teacher who befriends the girl perceives the hunger of her more sensitive pupils for the affection and comradeship which the home supplies. Because of the tense self. consciousness which the one-sided environment of a girls' school creates, the simples) acts "i kindness are distorted out of their true character. 'Maedchen in Uniform' gives evidence of care, patience and discrimination in the making. It has fine restraint. It is subtle without seeking to present irrelevant meanings. It has a fluency and simplicity that betoken the highest artistic skill. But its chief merit lies in the message it holds for parents. Those fathers and mothers who believe their duty is fulfilled when they enroll their children at boardingschools or summer camps in order to 'have them off their hands' must anticipate that their boys and girls will transfer their affections to others—to teachers and friends. Nothing can take the place of parental love, and those elders who hastily choose divorce, must remember that i the severest penalty is visited upon their children. Moreover parenthood without marriage likewise creates a dislocated situation with harmful effects upon the psychology of the child. It is through the poitrayal of actual human situations, similar to that which Maedchen in Uniform' depicts, that we obtain a clearer insight into the forces which effect our children and ourselves. The producers of this poignant and touching cinema have made us all their debtors." • • Opening early this coming week under a complete change of personnel, the William Penn hotel restaurant in Miami Beach will be under the direction of Fred C. Maurer, well known Miami hotel and restaurant man who formerly operated the Sunshine cafeteria in Miami. In keeping with the exacting policies of the hotel, the restaurant will, under the management of Mr. Maurer. specialize in the finest of service at the most moderate prices. Full details of the opening will appear in our next issue. • • • The next meeting of the Hebrew Athletic club will be held in the Community Center of the organization Wednesday evening. March 29. and will be featured by the initiation ceremonies of all members who have joined since February 1. Members only will be admitted during the rites and plans provide for an evening of real entertainment. In charge of the event: Milton Klein. Jack Lappin and Bob Schweitzer. Mr. and Mrs. Joe Traeger. who were married recently and spent five weeks of their honeymoon in Cuba, were the guests of honor at a reception tendered them by their parents at their Grove Park home, which was beautifully decorated for the affair. More than 100 guests attended and enjoyed a musical program that was given during the evening. At a late hour a bullet luncheon was served. • • • Carrying out a tradition of a number of years, the Palatial Kosher restaurant, under the management of Morion Pagan, will again this year observe Passover week with special Sader services both of tlie first nights oi Passover, beginning the night of Monday, April 10. Rabbi Max Shapiro of Beth David congregation will conduct the ritual, both Sader nights. Strict kashrus has been the slogan of the Palatial Kosher restaurant since its opening years ago. though other restaurants m the Greater Miami district have from time to time changed from kosher to non-kosher meals. The Junior Council of j e to Women is making arrangements i Qr a gala dance, planned to be one 0 | the highlights of the present season on Tuesday evening, April 4. al Auby's Lagoon, Miami Beach. i* charge of arrangements is a committee headed by Fay Sheldon u chairman, assisted by Millie Dreisen Bessie Wernikoff. Claire Simon May Levin, Miriam Scheinberg and Harriet Kantor. • • All members of the Junior Council of Jewish Women are urged to attend a board meeting to be held next Tuesday evening, March 28, at the Ponce de Leon hotel, beginning at 8 p.m. when important business will be discussed. Included In the evening's program is the break dance to be held the third week of April, and a theatre party the early part of May. Dr. A. T. Knowles | 29.16 N. W. 17th Art, Phone 2-7.100 I MODERN PET HOSPITAL '" % %  Individual Boarding Runs Effective Tick Medicine Sold *_„ MIAMI MOTOR TRAVEL BUREAU 1.-..1 Collin. A 160 N. K. INEW YORK $17.00 PHILADELPHIA 16.00 WASHINGTON 15.00 BALTIMORE 15.00 enue. Miami Beach r~l Strret. Miami CHICAGO ... CLEVELAND DETROIT ... CINCINNATI S17.00 17.00 17.00 15.00 %  %  %  1 %  %  %  %  %  % % % % % %  %  WINE GRAPES J %  California Win* (.ruins Fine for Juice — Keadr Now %  %  Price. Cheaper than Last Year %  KLEFEKER PRODUCE, INC. i pjN. Miami Ave. at 7th St. Phone 2-023jB % % % % % % % % % % %  J The International Film Triumph! maedchen in Uniform An Unusual Love Story The imitation of Kurope and America. In (.erman dialogue with Knk'linh titles. Critic* KO into ecHtanien! No pirlu rr in yearn ban raused M much whisper^f ed discussion f Knhhi l.nui* I. Newman Hjn "The pn> IIUMTS of thin poignant and touchirtj cinema have made us all their debtor*." THEATRE STARTING MONDAY, MAR. W MATINEE 35c SIGHT Mc f £ DR. PEPPER "Good for Life" PHONE 2-3536 INVESTIGATE THE FLORIDA SYSTEM OF ROOFING BEFORE BUYING! Robbins Roofing & Sheet Metal Co. / be Responsible Roofers ESTIMATES FREE 226 N. W. 26lh Slreel Phone 2-J"3 rOIRTII BBABON BOYS AND GIBLl The Citewty to Education CATE SCHOOL of Individual Instruction Kind..ivari..,,. All <;„„!, Hi,.), Behool OMB Air SorvU, Prl. u Tutoring Morn H,,„ r J o„ r p,,,, h "" % %  CrtJlWd talon MM to hoi Telephone 5-1779 K07 Home Book* Used n "* ..... il re-enter home elm" homes or apartment*. Collins Ave., Miami Beaci



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^ I Friday, March 24, 1933. THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY i v. I H FLORIDIAN PUBLISHING CO. Jfc P. O. Box 2S7J Miami, Florida Phone 2-1183 EXECUTIVE OFFICES: ,15.16 Security Bid*. Phone 2-6493 EDITORIAL OFFICES: Cl S. W. I5lh Avenue Phone 2-11HJ J. LOUIS SHOCIIET, Editor KIIUARD CARI.IN. Advertlaing Manager KRKI) K. SIIOCHET. Circulation Manager I as second class matter July 4. 1930, at the Post Office at Miami. Florida, under Ihe Act of March 3. 1879. WEST PALM BEACH OFFICE 414 Eighth Street Mrs. M. Schrebnlck. Representative SUBSCRIPTION Six Months S I. (ill One Year 1 2.00 FRIDAY, MARCH 24, 1933. Vol. 6, No. 12. THE TRUE SPIRIT The other night a group of workers for Palestine gathered in New York City to determine what they should do about their fund-raising efforts for the American-Palestine campaign, in view of the banking situation. To a man everyone assembled at the meeting said emphatically that they would proceed with their activities, which are to reach their climax with a dinner to Nathan Straus. Jr., on March 29. That is the true spirit which can well be emulated by every other community in America and by every other Jewish communal enterprise. Now is not the time for leadership by 'he weak and the hysterical. It does not add to the confidence or to the stability of an individual Jew or of the entire group to talk recklessly and irresponsibly of the abandonment of Jewish projects which have been nurtured for years with patient labor and the sacrifice of great means. Nothing has happened to create an atmosphere of dark pessimism. President Roosevelt, in his various messages, has given every indication that this country faces a period of sound and steady growth. We would be retarding Jewish life in America for many decades if we should listen to the advice of those who would have us throw everything overboard in a panic. The American Palestine campaign and every similar undertaking should have the maximum, immediate, fullhearted support of all Jews who have any understanding of how Important it Is, in face of the threat of Hitlerism in Germany and other lands, to preserve every vestige of a strong Jewish life. THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page Three MOW TO HANDLE HITLER German Jewry should be the master of its own destiny. Whatever action is undertaken in this country to exercise diplomatic pressure on the German government for a better and more tolerant treatment of its religious and racial minority groups, must come from one authoritative source. During the last few weeks Jewish newspapers and organizations, in their eagerness to be of service to German Jewry, have taken steps with a view to influencing— or rather, warning —the Hitler government. Jewish editors have addressed memoranda to the state department of the United States asking it to keep a watchful eye on the situation. Jewish organizations have passed resolutions against Hit%  er. Of course, these actions are motivated by the great concern which all of us feel for our brethren 'n Germany. But as far as practical results are concerned, such disconnected action Is merely evidence of Riddle Me This Riddle [Continued from Page OneJ Greeks called the Poet par excellence is alleged to have died from vexation at not having been able to solve a conundrum which fisherfolk had put to him. We may interject here that if such was the ignoble end of Homer, let all crossword puzzlers, last-line-of-limerick writers, and riddle-solvers beware. The same dismal demise, it should be added, befell the grammarian and poet, Philetas of Chios. Not only the versifiers of antiquity, but also the philosophers of Greece, the magic of Chaldean, the necromancers of Egypt, and the sages of Persia, fell prey to the fad of the riddle. Witness the famous riddle of the Sphinx: What animal walks at dawn on four feet, at noon on two and at dark on three? Many were the virgins of Thebes who lost their lives because they could not think of that answer which should have been uppermost in their minds: Man. This same riddle appears in the Talmud when Simon ben Halafta, excusing himself for not calling on the rabbi, said: Rocks become high ihe was growing old); the near are at a distance ihis eyes had grown dim; two are turned into three the needed a staff to walk). Shabbos 152b. The Persian, too, posed the following riddle: A tree with twelve brandies; every branch has thirty leaves; and every leaf is white on one side and black on the other. What is its name? Answer: The year, months, and days i white) and nights


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Page lour THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Friday, March 24. i 9JJ 1 .:..;..:.. : ..^.;..;..;..;..;..:..;..;. .;..>.;. + + + + t + + Edited by KABBI S. M. MACHTE1 + I .. I Din ffOS of America §• ISa&in ^gnagng Sullrtitt SUNDAY MORNINGS Synaicov of America VI'IOD, MIAMI, I LORJDA St. Petersburg Notes APPEARING AT T1VOU Till ATM. NEXT WEEK Vol. 1. SUNDAY, .MARCH 19, 1933. No. 15. + •>•>*<• •> •<• •:• %  > •:• •:• •:• -:• •:• •:• •:• -:• •> •:• •:•> •:• •> •:• •> •:• •:• •:•:• •:• •:• •:• •: %  •:• -:• •:• •:• -:•:-•: %  %  :• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •: %  •:• •> CULTS Si ripturt Reeding, Exodus, Cbtptet XXX, Veru • l1-16 incl., and ~r; Chapter XXXII, Veru 1-6, nui. iJIow truly and iaiuhlully people follow the precedents of the Torali! Even though they neglect to observe the general laws for their own welfare and for the common good. they, nevertheless, repeat in their daily lives the practice which was established by the Israelites in the wilderness recorded in the scripture reading for today, which is taken from the eekly portion read in thi ues yesterday. For the sacred Tabernacle they contributed each a half-shekel. For the Idol — the Golden Calf, they gave all their jewels. For the perpetuation of the religion of Truth, of the Everliving God, they gave mcageriy. For the temporary cult — the image of the calf — they gave most liberally. A PPROACH a Jew or a Christian for some contribution to the Church the synagogue fund and. if he gives at all, it is with reluctance and in a small way. Interest the same individual in some cult headed by Oom the Omnipotent or some other such foolish-sounding name with heathenish practices, secret rites, idolatrous and demoralizing forms of worship — licentious and menacing the common weal — and the contributions pour in for the construction of the Golden Calf. Human nature was > .': thus. Because the preacher ol the Truth, the Prophet of Truth, admits that the ways of God are inscrutable and past man's understanding, his followers are skeptical, But, when the lal.se prophet arises and claims, in the language of the charlatan and the confidence-man. that his cult can solve all the problems that confront man. thl elfMessiah LS showered with gold for hit promisi •• .i for a glimpse of God barnum was right. Y OU may rightiully a.sk why Aaron took any part in the molding of the Golden Calf, .since it was contrary' to the law prohibiting the construction of idols. Scripture offers no excuse for Aaron's act. From the Hebrew record we learn much and infer more. Many explanations are given by the rabbis. I detect that Aaron was guided in his actions by a dead man. Let me illustrate. A lion, a fox. and a donkey were strolling through the forest in search ol food. They iound the carcass of a horse. The lion turned to the donkey and said, "Will you please serve us?" The donkey cut the body of the horse into three equal parts and set a portion before each ol them. The lion flew into a rage and exclaimed, "Is that how you respect my rank as king of all the beasts?" While the trembling donkey gazed in wonder and awe at the lion, the lion struck the donkey and killed him. The lion then turned to the fox and said, "Now, will you please do the honors?" The fox placed the dead donkey and two-thirds of the horse's body before the lion and took one-third of the horse for himself. The lion smiled at the fox and asked, "Who taught you to serve so well?" The fox hung his head and replied. "The dead donkey." W HEN the mob surrounded Aaron and demanded that he make them a God, Hur, who had been appointed by Moses to help Aaron in his absence, bi Ban to scold the mob. A group surged about him and killed Hur. They turned to Aaron and ai ked Now. will you make us a God?" Aaron looked at the body of Hur -and h e asked the people to bring him their jewels, in the hope that they would refuse. It was the dead Hur who advised Aaron to accede to the wishes ol the mob. It was a mute message—the law ol self-preservation. T HIS is no defense ol Aaron because idol-worship is one of the three laws which demands martyrdom rather than violation. The other two are murder and adultery. The rule is "Ya' horaig ve'ol ya'avore" — be killed but do not transgress. The mob did not request an idol or a god. They asked for a leader to take the place of Moses who had failed to return. That same psychology still holds good in the minds of ault-followers. They do not, consciously, desert true religion for the worship of idols. They merely substitute a form of leadership and interpretation of God's word which claims to have knowledge hitherto unknown to the long line of Inspired prophets who have led mankind. Therein lies the danger. By slow stages and easy degrees the principles of true religion are forsaken and the adherents of the cult find themselves enmeshed in practices that have debauched them and have drained them ol will power to extricate themselves from these Chains of bondage. W HY should anyone join a cult? Because true religion teaches selfrestraint and advocates mastery over the baser emotions and passions, the person revolts. The beastly inclinations seek expression. Although religion holds one in check against his will he will not bolt and give his animal-being free reins. He lacks the courage to go ojt alone against established standards. But, along comes the leader of a cult and says, "You needn't torture yourself. God doesn't want you to suffer agony. I have had a vision. I have been told that you mast give vent to all your emotions. Worship God in joy. If it gives you pleasure to be drunk, to be immoral, to grant your body all its cravings, why, that's how you should worship God." Then, your conscience awakes and you say, "But, that has been forbidden by my religion." To which the false prophet replies, "So it has. But this is a new religion. In my religion It is permitted." Obviously, the weakling follows the easiest course, the one requiring the least sacrifice. And, because this cult gives him so much satisfaction, he is generous with his gifts for its upkeep. I LAY no claim for any religion that it has the only meaas of salvation. But, any creed whose practices are unwholesome in their effects upon the Individual or are against public policy is not a true religion. God can Friday night services at Congregation Bnai Israel begin at 8 o'clock with Rabbi Kleinfeld preaching on "The Doctrines of Orthodox and Reform Judaism." Saturday morning service begins at 9 o'clock. Sunday school classes at 10 a.m.. and Hebrew school daily at 4 p.m. Everyone enjoyed the ceremonies at the presenting of the Safer Torah" to the synagogue on las'. Sunday evening. A substantial amount raised through the loyalty of members and tourist friends. The Ladies' Auxiliary and Aid Society of congregation Bnai Israel held an interesting meeting last Tuesday evening. Plans are being completed for a community sader. The Young Maccabeans are giving a card party at the congregation this Sunday evening for the benefit of the building fund. A large crowd Is expected. nD, -nas^ "LOVE ME TONIGHT" The Judaic Council held their regular meeting at the home of Mrs. Ella Weinstein, last Monday evePlans are being made for a ntei tainment to Id Sunday evening, April 2. IN HONOR of PASSOVER On Possover Ihe choicest of everything distinguishes Ihe Jewish Home. Manischewttz Malzo and Matzo products are the choicest of their kind produced in Ihe largest Kosher Matzo Bakery in the world. In demand everywhere. not possibly want us to hate each other —we. who are all his children. Where scriptun In terms of hatred, it is the scribe's voice and not word of God. Where Instances ol injustice an recorded they portray mar. and his weaknesses In his climb towards something higher. These meant for our own benefit. Viewing the episodes in all their ugliness, we turn to good actions. Religion is the ladder by which man climbs from the beastly towards the godly. Cults remind me of the flights of stairs used in motion picture comedies. You know, the ones that suddenly collapse and fling you down again to the lowest landing. You not only must start climbing again, but, you are brursed and broken, oftimes unable to rise. Climb the ladder. Don't use the trick stairs. Avoid cults. Remain staunch in your religious faith. FROM FARM TO CONSUMES PERRY'S DAIRY —+ For Quality Meats Call Dave Gottfried NORTHERN MARKET Whoh -ale and Retail PHONE 2-7221 N. K. Plrsl AstnutI'hune t-ltll Sou you can hn\ BILTMORE LAUNDRY SERVICE at a price that fi/s your pocket bonk'. PHONE 3-3687 2 1 N. W. 9TII ST. L s MATZO i 'NO OTHER MATZO LIKE IT' Oldeat Repair Shop in Miami AMERICAN SHOE SHOP Miami's Bat for Shoe Repairing 15 S. MIAMI AVENUE C. E. BARRETT. Prop. Delaney & Beers Kodak I nil-Inn.: and Enlaminr < "iiiinini.l Work and Home Portraits 50% Off on All Amateur Work 212 N. E. tils St. Phone 2-S38S NECVCLS? DRINK MA-TAY 5 r Fountains and Bottles C, „.,... -J < It 18. M. TANNBNBAVM. For fresh Sea Foods snip AT CAPT. TOM'S FISH MART Hagler St. and Miami River • hone 2-5321 W, N,.„ flo., OUR PRICES ARE THE LOWEST Our I-,sh arc the freshest Caught by our own boats daily -servance with all the sanitary rule/and|JStt d ta ,n ob In the Heart of Your Neighborhood PIGGLY WIGGLY A Miami Institution led IS YOUR CHEAPEST SERVANT lUeib! 0 CIINSHINC 3FRVICL sCpMPAHt



PAGE 1

prfday, March 24, 1933. THE JEWISH FLORIDI AN i-age Five PLAYING AT NEW 7TII AVENUE THEATRE Love-making as a high art is being taught audiences at the Seventh Avenue theatre Sunday and Monday. In "Bird of Paradise." the sensational RKO drama which has electrified even blase Hollywood. The Aery Latin temperament of Dolores del Rio as the heroine permits her to give one of the most impassioned performances of her career. As an excellent foil for her, Joel McCrea rises to new heights of virile impressiveness. From the first'Strange tenderness of love for a god-like white man. •he brown-skinned princess of "Bird of Paradise" is seen in the full gamut of infatuation, then develops the pathos of the situation to its fullest possibilities. How she triumphs in sacrificing herself to the barrier of civilization forms the climax of this undying romance of the South Seas. With a background of sensuous Hawaii, where the principals of the cast went to film the picture, realism is lent to the play by Richard Walton Tully. King Vidor, who wielded the megaphone, made a lavish production. • • • An important meeting of the board of directors of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation was held last Tuesday night at the synagogue when plans for intensive work in connection with the Sunday school and Talmud Torah of the congregation were made. These will be announced shortly. Mr. Joseph Oreenberg, prominent merchant of hicity, and formerly president of the Coney Island Talmud Torah, was elected to fill a vacancy on the board. Following the business meeting a social hour was spent with the officers of the Ladies' auxiliary as the hosts. • • • Phyllis Jean Rosenthal, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. A. E. Rosenthal, 2150 S. W. Sixteenth street, celebrated her sixth birthday anniversary with a party recently. Her guests were: Adele Stone, Lovey Friedman, Allen Mason, Philip Mason, Russell Wilson, Margaret Lee Ellis, Harvey Bogen, Richard Bogen, Frederic Friedman, Gilbert Friedman, Albert Weintraub, Marjorie Rosengarten, Martin Goodman. Joan Fillinger, Joyce Rosengarten and Pearl Sapero. • • • Under the auspices of the Fellowship club and sisterhood of Temple Israel a series of Sunday night suppers and entertainments will be held in Kaplan hall, the first of which will be on Sunday evening, March 26, at 6]po. All members are cordially invited. • • • Markowitz & Resnick. Inc., of the Plumbing Department Store of Miami, are nowfeaturing a sale of the famous Magic Chef ranges at remarkably low prices with the added advantage of easy time payments. To the Jewish housewife preparing for Passover it is an opportunity that should be taken advantage of. • • • The Junior Council of Jewish Wo nen met Tuesday night in the Spanish room of the Ponce de Leon h(tel with Miss Betty Greenberg in charge of the program. Thee appearing on the program includi 1 Miss Evelyn Marks, who played "Prelude" by Eduard Shutt, and "Prelude in C Minor" by Chopin. Rabbi Max Shapiro spoke. Helen Wroobel. who sang a group of Spanish songs accompanied by Mildred Greenberg. and a talk on astrology by Dave Fisher. • • • An important meeting of the Senior Council of Jewish Women will be held at the i once de Leon hotel Wednesday. Mar h 29. A nominating committee w:'l be appointed by the president at this meeting to name officers for Oil coming year. All members are urgeu attend. A social hour will follow. Live Poultry and Choice Fruits and Vegetables Prlce Right MRS. A. WALL SS-41 City Terminal Market B. W. 2nd Ave. and 2nd St. +— Miami Stationery Company 72 N. E. Flrat Street MIAMI. FLORIDA t NEW LOCATION Kckroad's Garage 1156 S. W. 5th St. Authorized Runco Brake Service Union Batteriea Our Guarantee In Your Insurance "IKS DAY AND NIGHT CAPTAIN METSHEL'S Glass In Bottom Boat Daily 2 p.m. — Fare $1.00 See the Submarine Gardena and the Hooded Diver at Work LEAVES PIER NO. 8, CITY YACHT BASIN, MIAMI 1 Where Choice Groceries, Fresh Vegetables and Passover Oil Ready for you at prices that will make you call again! MIAMI BEACH GROCERY CO. 1129-1131 LINCOLN KOAD MIAMI BF.ACH PALATIAL KOSHER RESTAURANT 26.-. N. E. SECOND ST. Announces that Beautiful Sader Services Beginning April Tenth Will he Conducted by Rabbi Max Shapiro Make your reservations immediately for the entire Passover week or for the sader. Breakfast, dinner and supper will be served during the entire week. SHEETS OAl.I.ACilll It From present indications the Hebrew Athletic club will have a team in the diamondball league of the Miami and Miami Beach tournaments. A practice session of the team will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock at Flamingo park, and all members who desire will be given a try-out. The team will be rimited to 15 men. • • • Mr. E. Howett, prominent travel expert directing the activities of the Miami Motor Travel bureau, announces that complying with a general demand Miami Beach offices have been opened at 453 Collins avenue, to take care of the increasing demands for travel service in charge of reputable and responsible bonded firms. • • An important meeting of the Ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation will be held at the synagogue next Tuesday evening. March 28. when important business will be discussed. Plans for the annual Children's Sader will be announced. All members and friends are urged to attend. • • • Mr. and Mrs. B. Chertkoff will celebrate their thirtieth wedding anniversary Sunday evening. March 26. at the Workmen's Circle hall, 701 N. W. Fifth avenue, and will welcome their friends there. Senior Hadassah will hold its monthly card party at the Strath i. ven hotel. 411 Ocean drive. Miami Beach, Tuesday evening, March 28. at 8:30 p.m. instead of Monday evening as originally scheduled, in deference to the protest meeting being held that night. Prizes will be awarded for high score and refreshments will be served. The public is invited. • • • Tourists who come to spend the season here are doing themselves an injustice, and residents do the same, by failing to see the wonderful submarine gardens on the coral reef. A trip to see the wonders of deep sea vegetation and animal life, coral and sponge formations on the GlassIn-Bottom boat in charge of Captain Metshel which leaves Pier 8 every afternoon is well worth taking. It is a sight that one remembers for years to come. Nothing like it may be seen in the North. • • • An important meeting of the offiA SWIMMING POOL ODER MIKVE (Tmulltention <


PAGE 1

Page Six THE JEWISH FLORID' A N Friday, March 24, 1933 I "Ask and Ye Shall Learn" Q —The Book of Jonah which is read on the afternoon of the Day of Atonement always puzzles me. What is its real meaning? A.— Of all the books which make up the Bible, the Book of Jonah is perhaps the most misunderstood one. It is. however, one of the best known stories which gives frequent occasion for jest to the mocker, and is a cause of bewilderment to the literalist believer but offers reason for joy to the critic Those who insist on the literal interpretation of the story of Jonah generally play into the hands of the skeptical critics who maintain that all religion is founded on irrational emotionalism and superstition. Jonah's whale and Balaam's ass are the two creatures mentioned in the Bible which offer them opportunity for delightful but futile derision. The author of the Book of Jonah is unknown, but its intrinsic value makes the writer one of Israel's well Qivc Sensibly We help by trusting sou. I i-\ payment] from Passover to Rosh Hashona Buy Gas Stoves T -^~^1 -U-I^JJ. M-n ; 1 1 %  1 f> J i I 'NLESS ihe dot Rangt hat a RED WHEEL it it NOT a t.OHAIN ONLY $49.50 vuh Raralalor Ml-M Thrifty housewives appreciate sensible, useful gilts. They want something they cm use for years. You can nothing finer or better than .1 Magic Chef Gas Range, fully insulated, with regulator and new style adjustable broiler pan. Burners save 2 5 per cent on gas. May also be used for bottled gas. Stoies in Whilr and Hl.uk Trim. Grata and Ivor.. Plumbing Dep't Store MARKOWITZ & RESNICK. INC. Plambinc Repair Trnrka All Over Town 839 W. FLAGLER STREET PHONE 2-3153 known prophets. If Jonah himself were the author, the date would at once be plausibly settled, for Jonah, the son of Amittai. lived under Jeroboam II. to whom he prophesied victory under the Arameans isee II Kings. 14. 251. But the book nowhere claims to have been written by Jonah. It is a story about him. not by him, and every argument is against so early a date. "Jonah" is purely a fictitious character, the offspring of the author's imaginary powers just as "Hamlet" is in Shakespeare's play. The book was apparently written at a time when nationalism reigned supreme in the life of the Hebrews and. therefore, the need of emphasizing the universallstic teachings of the prophets of Israel more pressing They taught that God's interest extends to all the nations of the world. He punishes sin wherever he finds it. among the nations as well as m Israel. But he does not desire the death of the sinner but that he reand live. The anonymous author presented Jonah as a character who personifies the then prevailing notions of God and of His relation to the nations of the world. Although God ; commanded him. Jonah did not to Nineveh. He did not Ion and hoped it ild tail. He preached to the peo[ Ninei thai would reject his message, but when %  pointed. .HE ol ai'. Irst of all. that God has no favorite In thi h ;:nan family and that HLS purpose had been totl rstood The Book of Jonah was en lor work: not for The loving kind: God know no bounda: His tender mercies are over all works. The whale that swallowed Jonah and the gourd that grew up and died down in a few hours are 24-2IN7MIAMI AVENUE I i FAYMUS FAY'S MIAMI MADE NOVELTY WASH FROCKS yieu// I *BAQE BACK DRESS 1 tenth \oocux to toa/cfi •RED •BLUE •OROWN^ •BLACK 77laiX QAd&ui, POSTAGE -10? .Sun-"Rail 1 nitar runt. ^S-, \ \&*fC/iro/itc Cases RATES-£ea.Maa^-i/K/j6r BOOKLET Miami -^ Florida wmmmm + i 1 Dr. Neuenschwander OPTOMETRIST A First ( hi %  ()j'h, id Seriii < 11/ a Reasonable Price al Rhodes Jewelry Store IS So. Miami AM-. A Jew of Nobility By Edith Ella Davis It is a noble thing to be a Jew, The scion of a priesthood rich in lore, A heritage whose wealth the sages knew. With banners that the mighty prophets bore. The law with its stern beauty bound within. Its precepts kept in dutiful accord; A record since creation did begin; The deep significance own word. of Gods It is a noble thing to be a peer In family of Israel's honored sons; 1 Is a great tradition to revere 1 hi memory oi the ancient holy ones Who.-. •:.. never wavered, H10 in plight, Who in the darkness dreamed the glory thru; Who kept to God thruout the endless night — It is a noble thing to be a Jew. — Chicago Jewish Sentinel. •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •> •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:••:• •:• •:• %  : %  •: 4* In-i-i on your Graear giving you + NEW YORK BREAD & CAKE % COMPANY % % BREAD AND CAKES 471 S. W. Sth St. Phona 2-78S2 .;. Branrh Slorr: III N. W. Sth St. •> + %  ***** •:• •:• •:•:••:• The popularity of the cape suits at the winter resorts indicates thai ire going to be prime favorites throughout the land when spring truly makes her bow Cape suitare almost universally becoming and have an air ol 1 ink that all good sport things havi And then is no one length or capes, which ike them difficult to wear for some. 'I I apes, short and capes in between sc may be suited mo •: %  As previously explained in these fashion notes may l Utilized intensively. That is I ire in three and the skirt reversand the little jacket working for contrast or harmony as desired, when worn either with or without the cape. The sketch shows a checked tweed which fairly shouts spring spoil wear, as illustrated. The capi and the skirt are both reversible, plain on the other side. They are in greens, blues, tans greys, navy and black and whiU — —— mere accidentals, inserted by the author to brighten the interest and emphasize the central aim of his work. The Book oi Jonah is appropriately read in the synagogue c. the Das lot Atonement in order '.0 illustrate the effects of sincere repentance, NOTE Tile Jewish Floridian takes pleaar.re in announcing that its e\e'Uti\e offices are now located a* 115-416 Security building, opposite the post office; phone 2-6493. Editorial offices remain .11 621 S. \V. Fifteenth avenue. We had thought a little ol a Hie city was ready to scrip tor action, but thought better of it. We Never Close! The Food ( annol be Better The Srrtfci Uncxa lied The Price Satisfactory to thou and* omc In on 1 iino* W, Sea Vi.u Dill] BISHOP & BLAIR 224 BST FLAGLBR Some people are making SuCh thorough preparation for rainy days that they aren't enjoying todays sunshine. It's Just as well that some of us business men are not required to pass high school examinations | n arithmetic. We dislike lecturers who conceal their manuscript, thus preventing us from knowing how much longer e will have to keep quiet. "One of our well-known New Haven broadcasters," says the Register of that place, "invited listeners to send in requests for what they wanted played. The first one received, said; 'Play checkers or dominoes'." ARE WEaZj faith with those who trust us, are we living up to our obligations if wc risk their future happiness by ignoring the problems that would arise for them if, some day, we Jul not come home? Life Insurance offers the safe and certain answer. There is no substitute. A Southern Health & Life Insurance Policy on each one is nccess.uv to protect the others from the privation and expense caused by the last illness and death. A few pennies each week is the total cost. SOUTHERN LIFE & I [EALTH INSURANCE COMPANY T. S. COOK, Manager 610 Realty Board Bid* Phona. 2-JIU —* Alexander Orr, Jr., Inc. Plumbing and I [eating Ml I Ml ItKAl II 1121 !Mh SI. I'honr MHI MIAMI I.-, N. W. .Ird SI. Phone 2-.16S1 _._+ FUEL OILS The Economy Fuel \<>\ Hotels and Apartments BELCHER OIL COMPANY MIAMI, FLORIDA -t I Entire NEW WAREHOUSE STOCK of Moniand and Miller Office Furniture Company PRICK!) TO SELL SINGLE I I V I TOP DESKS link, w alnnl or Mahocan) 17.50, sin, 112.50 Up 1 Keyulnr I'ri, i-s. <:[', |'p) n PKWRITER DISKS si;..in. sir. Up 1 Hi k'uLir I'ri* < %  -.. <"ll I'pi III II III.K FLAT TUP DESKS Oak. Walnut or Mahouani SKI. tlZM, S15 Up iRccalar Prteea, %>'• i' Alt I METAL STKKI. DESKS Mahofanj or Grain Finn* S19.50 I'p 1 K,. ni.ir Pricaa, Mi i'P) I'M he Chain, Side (hair.. Arm Chairs, Swivel Chair-. Typewriter (hairs, Oak, Walnut or Mahogany -I SO 82.50 SI. Mi S7.50 and I'p SALE ( IIMII Slr 11I the Wafffhauaa < TED ll\ J.M h CATBBB *) N.W. e.l. ST Takr BaraWf 10 3rd Kl"">" Don't Be Fooled! The SEABOARD SANITARY DAIRY ; (1.111 is JACOBSKIND) Is the Only Dairy that (an Furnish Milk. Butter. Sweet Cream, Sour Cream and Cheese KOSHER FOR PASSOVER I'naVr Ihe Suprrvi.ion of Kahhi Jonah K. (apian In-ure Your Supply by Phoning Your Order Now to 2-3749


MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
March 24, 1933

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00213

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
March 24, 1933

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00213

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text
#'Jewish flori'dff&in
FLORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY
Vol
6, No. 12.
MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, MARCH 24, 19)3.
Price Five Cents
^Situation In Ladies Sponsor
rr A Benefit Supper nn
Germany loday _y ?------
Announcements!
j Protest Meeting
state department Tuesday
Final arrangements have been
The state department xuesaay made for the conuicgational dinner
ordered the American embassy tp Mjami Jewifih Qtthoim cQn.
L Berlin, in co-operation with gregati0n In charge of the Ladles'
United States consuls in other Ger- auxUlarjl ,hls Sun(|av eye
man cities, to make a complete re- Marcn al the synagogue bvf,m_
01, reported mistreatment of mng a, pm The commiU(. m
j,,v.s by the Hitler regime. cnarge ,s |u,aded by ^ Nathjm
this action was taken after a del- A(l,.!llKin who js ^^ ^^ by
egation representing the American Mesdames William Meehlowitz wn-
jCTtoh congress asked Undersecre- llam cl(,n N Abramson s Rosen.
,ary of State Phillips to look into b,mn Lo||js pa,|otl Max Rappaport
toe anti-Jewish activities of the
Hitlerites. The delegation was head-
ed by Rabbi Stephen S. Wise ol
Dei York city.
The department announced
-Following the visit of Rabbi Ste-
phen S Wise the department in-
: the United States emb.i
a: Berlin ol press reports ot the mis-
it oi jews in Germany.
Tiii' department also Informed
mbassy of the deep concern
reports are causing In this
country.
Tile department has instructed
. to make, in collabora-
h > he consuls, a complete re-
port on the .situation."
Bernard s. Deutsch ol New York
City, president of the Jewish con-
and Max Rhoades, Washing-
ton attorney, accompanied Wise to
see Phillips. Wise is the honorary
pn lideni of the congress.
ral days ago Ambassador
Max Kupferstein and Charles Feld-
man. A program will be presented
during the evening which will in-
clude a number of the outstanding
artists now in this territory. The
public is invited to attend.
Beach To Hold
Annual Dance
The annual Spring Festival and
Ball lor the benefit ol Beth Jacob
Sisterhood, Miami Beach, will be
held Sunday evening, March :'.' al
hi Blackstone hotel and not at the
Floridlan hotel. Plans include an
evening ot gala entertainment in
which noted -tars ol the local dis-
trict will appear and help entertain
the guests, included are Al Parker.
Che ter, Alexander. Frances Kane.
Irene and Frank Naldi and Others.
CONGREGATION BETH JACOB
(Orthodox)
.111 Wa*hitiKtnn Avr.. Miami Beach
L. AXELROD, Rabbi
Early services begin at 5:45 with
the late services at 8:15 when Rabbi
Axelrod will preach. Cantor Boris
Schlachman will direct the congre-
gational singing and chanting. Sat-
urday morning services begin at 8:30
and Rabbi Axelrod will preach in
Yiddish on the portion of the week
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI
(Reform)
137 N. K. Nineteenth Street
OR. JACOB II. KAPLAN, Rabbi
Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan's sub-
ject will be. 'The President. Con-
, gress and the People." After ser-
vices a reception will be held in
Kaplan hall, so that the visitors may
each other and spend a pleas-
ant stK'ial hour. Relic ions school is
conducted each Sunday morning
from iu to 12 in Temple Israel.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
((onsen alive)
IIS \. W. Third Avenue
MAX SHAPIRO. Rabbi
Will Be Held
Riddle Me
This Riddle
Aroused by the outrages in Ger-
Speak a parable unto the home of
Israel. Ezekiel 17-2.
Ish citizens of Miami met Wednes-
day at the Palatial Kosher restau-
rant and arranged for a protest
mass meeting at Temple Israel Mon-
day evening. March 27, beginning at
8 o'clock. Prominent non-Jewish
citizens have been invited to attend
and address the meeting. Rabbis of
every congregation will speak and
voice the sentiments of the people.
The meeting in Miami will be held
as one of a series of nation-wide
meetings on Monday night in which
the protest of the American people
will be voiced against the outrages
and persecution not only of the Jew-
ish people but of the Catholics of
Germany as well. The Hitler regime
will be held responsible for the con-
ditions caused by his continual in-
citemenl to persecution and blood-
shed. Stress will be laid on the fad
that it is not the Germans who are
to be blamed but Hitler and his sat-
ellites.
Concert To Be
Feature Event
THE CAVEMAN RIDDLES
THE riddle, according to the om-
niscient folklonsts. is probably
the earliest form of humour. As
soon as the primitive mind of man,
these erudite delvers into antiquity
maintain, began to sense the first
faint glimmerings of the principle
of analogy, it indulged in riddles,
devising the enigmas of subtle sim-
ile and the puzzles of implied meta-
phor for the express bewilderment
of its contemporaries. At first these
conundrums constituted a sort of
table amusement; when the belly
was crammed with food, and the
heart joyous with wine, then did the
intellectuals of the Stone Age set
themselves, for the delectation of
the worthies "' the festive board, to
the manufacturing of intricate rid-
dles, Gordian knots of the intellect.
Later, they developed into objects
for wager, in which the partie's cre-
atlng their respective riddles en-
.1 jousts. Of such a
nature is the famous one of Samson.
in which the giant of Israel records
Regular service begin tonight at
5:30 with the late services at 8 p.m..
when Rabbi Max Shapiro will
preach on "The Nazis' Abusive At-
tacks on Albeit Einstein." Cantor
Arrangements for the annual con- an expi0it jn his biography in these
Frederick M. Sackett in Berlin pro-
tested to the German foreign office Tl"' >n,bllc ls u,'eed lo atle,ld M tne '""" >'"" *' lead ,ne chant-
Beveral attacks made on Proceeds will be used for the Tal- ing and congregational singing, as-
sted by the choir. Saturday morn-
liv.: services begin al 8:30.
against
in Jews by Nazi troopers.
The government assured him thai
these outrages would not be repeat-
ed.
In talking with Phillips, however.
Wise and his companions urged the
state department go beyond mere
Ion of American nationals.
Tiny asked that the United State-.
lor broad humanitarian considera-
tion, act to protect Jews generally
from persecution in Germany.
declared that many German
intellectual leaders were in hiding,
fearful of the Hitlerites. Among
these In named Dr. Theodor Wolff,
editor ot the Berliner Tageblatt. and
Bernhard, editor of the Vos-
Zeltung,
mud Torah of the congregation. In
charge of arrangements are Mrs.
Barney Weinkle, president of the
sisterhood, who is being assisted by
H. I. Lipton. I. L. Mintzer. Harry
Wasserman. Cantor Boris Schlach-
man and Rabbi L. Axelrod. A buffet
-upper will be served during the
evening.
Beth David Holds
Birthday Party
Aroused by the storm o! protest
*at ha arisen in this country
oppression of Jew In tin-
many, the German government
day sought to mitigate the
seriousness of the situation.
<;' rman Ambassador von Prittwltz
eallc-ct at the state department to
the matter with Undersecre-
tary of state Phillips, to whom lead-
American Jewry Tuesday pro-
Van Prittwitz left with Phillips a
("|).v oi an interview given to the
Berlin correspondent of the Amster-
lelegraaf by Reich Minister
Gpring. the purport of which was
the Hitler government was
moving to suppress anti-Jewish ac-
and punish those responsible
At the same time Secretary of
StaU' Hull announced every possible
means was being exerted by the de-
Beth David's annual birthday par-
ty was held last Sunday night, with
more than 200 gue ts In attendance.
A two-hour program ol entertain-
ment wa- provided, with a
hour and refreshments following the
program.
The program consisted ot a read-
ing by Elise Bacher. songs by Cantor
Louis Hayman, Yiddish Impel
bj Joseph Greenberg. piano
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION
Klrthodox)
151". S. W. Third Street
JONAH E. CAPLAN, Rabbi
Regular early services begin at
5:45 with the late services at 8:30.
when Rabbi Caplan will preach in
English. The usual chanting and
congregational singing will be en-
joyed. Saturday morning services
begin at 9 a.m. with the afternoon
services and Shalosh Saudah at 5 o'-
clock. The subject of the rabbi's
sermon Friday night will be "We
Protest."
(en featuring Cantor Boris Schlach-
man of Beth Jacob congregation.
Miami Beach, will include a number
of outstanding supporting artists
who will be heard in tribute to Can-
tor Schlachman. A program will be
presented by the cantor in which
traditional liturgical music and
Jewish folk songs will be interpreted
in the inimitable manner that has
made the cantor beloved wherever
he has been heard. For the past four
years he has served Beth Jacob con-
gregation, and prior to that was as-
sociated with large synagogues in
Philadelphia. Georgia. Alabama and
Miami.
Beach Synagog
Elects Officers
Former Gov.
SmithWillProtest
Again confirming the recent choice
of Philip Liberman. prominent com-
munal worker and banker, as presi-
dent, the members of the Beth Jac-
ob congregation met and elected
other officers in addition to the
president. S. Finkelstein of Boston
and Jacob Becker of Miami Beach
were elected vice presidents; M
Abrams. treasurer: M. B. Frank,
secretary, and I. L. Mintzer. chair-
man of the board of directors. Mem-
bers of the board of directors to di-
rect the affairs of the congregation
are: Harry Wasserman of Sharon
The American Jewish congress an-
nounced today that Alfred E. Smith
and cello duet by Mildred Green- win b(, ol, 0j the speakers at the
berg and Leonard Rose, song by Ma(n.son Square Garden protest
Katie Markowitz. address by Rabbi meeting against German anti-Sem-
Max Shapiro, reading by Ida Engler. j(j,m nexl Monday night.
impersonation by Joseph OomiMky. Rabbi Stephen Wise, honorary Springs and Miamii Beach; Harry
'and the Waveily quartette artist-1 m songs. Mildred Green- pubr,c the former governor's prom-
bim was the accompanist for all the jse to address the meeting, also
solo numbers j made public the protest of the In-
Guests at this party paid admis- : ternational Catholic Truth society.
slon of one penny for each year of ^rnt to the state department.
The Catholic Truth society, in a
Levitt, Charles Tobin. John Meyer.
Ignatz Wohl, L. Abramowitz. J. Feig- WOrk:
terms: Out of the eater came forth
meal, and out of the strong came
forth sweetness. And the Philistines,
whose name has become a synonym
for denseness. were supposed to un-
dertand that the long-haired one
had slain a lion in whose carcass
bees had honeyed.
The primitive character of the rid-
dle is further emphasized by the
fact that even today, amongst the
barbarian tribes of Africa, where no
other form of culture is current, this
form of intellectual acrobatics is
singularly popular. Thus the Woloffs
ask: What flies forever and rests
never? Answer: The wind. The Ba-
sutos put this riddle: What is wing-
less and legless, yet flies fast and
cannot be imprisoned? Answer: The
voice. As Dr. H. Bradley declares,
"The riddle is an interrogatory form
of the fable, and like the fable orig-
inates among rude people, and is
perpetuated in the folklore of peas-
antry ."
It seems, too. that in our own
Book of Proverbs, certain verses
were originally in the form of rid-
dles, but were later refashioned in a
more literary style. Thus:
There are three things that are
never satisfied, yea, four things, say
not. It is enough.
Answer: The grave; and the bar-
ren womb; the earth that is not
filled with water; and the fire that
saith not. It is enough.
Or again one of the most beauti-
ful passages in this utterly poetic
their age. A tidy sum was realized,
which will be used for the Talmud
Torah fund of Beth David.
In charge of arrangements were
PWtment to hasten reports from the Mrs. M. J. Kopelowitz assisted by
American embassy and American Mesdames L. Brown. I. Cohen. J.
consulates in Germany called for in- Engler. L. Hayman. C. Markouitz. H.
Auctions dispatched Tuesday for Markowitz. S. Myers. 1B. KandeU
"'" information on the recent wave Katz, I. Orovitz, T. Cohen. A. Rubin.
<* Jewish oppression. Spector and S Welntraub
message to Rabbi Wise informing
him of its action, said the recent
nationalistic madness of Hitler, di-
recting its fury against thousands of
native born German Jews, should
arouse the righteous indignation of
every lover of humanity and of ev-
ery believer in the brotherhood of
man throughout the world."
cnbaum of Cleveland, Ohio, B.
Brown cf New York. P. Silverman of
Newark. N.J.. A. Heimlich of New
York. Nathan Smith of Toronto, J.
Poliakewitch of Bedford. Me.. M.
Koppelman and Sam Steiner of
Chicago.
There be three things which are
too wonderful for me. yea, four
which I know not.
Answer: The way of an eagle in
the air; the way of a serpent upon
a rock; the way of a ship in the
midst of the sea; and the way of a
Installation of the officers will be man with a maid.
held soon with appropriate cere-
monies. Non-resident officers and
members of the board of directors
are noted for active communal work
in their home cities as well as in
Miami Beach.
How Homer Died
That the riddle, based as it is
upon an implied simile, is closely
akin to poetry, is further confirmed
by the fact that he whom the
(Continued on Page Three)
'
t t


Pace Two
JEWISH FLORID'AN
Friday, March 24,
Passover and its laws will be the
subject of the lesson and discussion
at the meeting of the Bible study
group at the home of Maj. Kaufman
Mandel. 3012 S. W. Eighth street.
Sunday morning at 11 o'clock. Rabbi
S. M. Machtei will lead the class. A
welcome is extended to all who are
interested regardless of church af-
filiations. This Bible study group
devotes itself to scripture without
favor to any shade of interpre-
tation. All who come meet on a
common plane of brotherhood.

"Poor Apache." "The Song of Pa-
ree." and "How Are You?" are titles
of three numbers sung by Maurice
Chevalier in "Love Me Tonight," a
Rouben Mamoulian production, his
latest picture, which comes Sunday
and Monday to the Tivoli theatre.
Chevalier is heard in seven of the
ten numbers, written for the pro-
duction by Richard Rodgers and
Lorenz Hart, noted Broadway com-
posing team. Those listed above he
sings as solos. Pour others he sings
with other members of the cast.
Jeanette MacDonald. the leading
woman in the picture, sings five
numbers, one a solo. And she is
heard with Chevalier in "Love Me
Tonight." the theme song.
Practically every member of the
large cast Charlie Ruggles. Chas.
Butterworth. Myrna Loy. C. Aubrey
Smith and others sing during the
TIVOLI
W. I I:ii:Iit at 8th Phone i-MM
Sunduv and Monday. Marrh 26-27
| MAI-RICE CHEVALIER in
f"Love Me Tonight"
| With JBANBTTB McDONALD
(lit wan naushty, xhr watt hauifhl>
, but they fell in loir.
ATLANTIC
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Opposite Corel/ Hotel
240 N. E. FIRST AVE.
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Half Soles. 25c Pair
Ladies' Heels, 10c Pair
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Breakfast 7 to 10
Dinner .... 5 to 8
Lunch 11 to 2:30
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action.
Titles of their numbers are:
"Miml," "Lover." "A Woman Needs
Something Like That." "The Man
for Me." "The Son of a Gun Is
Nothing But a Tailor," and "Isn't
It Romantic?"

The Jewish Welfare Ladies' aux-
iliary met Monday in Kaplan hall
with Mrs. Meyer Schwartz presiding
and Mrs. I. Rosendorf opening the
meeting with a prayer. Mrs. Sadie
G. Rose, executive secretary of the
Jewish Welfare bureau, gave an ex-
planation of social service work.
Plans are being made for a card
party March 31 with Mrs. H. E.
Kleinman as chairman. A social
hour, under the direction of Mrs. J.
Hartz. followed.
*
Miami unit of Junior Hadassah
will give a benefit bridge at the Co-
lumbus hotel at 8 p.m. Friday. This
is the second similar event sponsored
by the group to enable members to
sell their quota of tickets so they
might be guests at the five-dollar
donor's luncheon. A program has
been arranged and prizes will be
awarded and refreshments served.
Beatrice Goldenblank and Mrs. Rot-
fort are co-chairmen. The commit-
ete assisting includes Lena Weinkle.
Helen Yunes. Sadie Pepper, Sylvia
Ray vis and Marion Blank. Any girls
wishing tickets or further informa-
tion are requested to call Miss Gold-
enblank.
<>
A large number of residents and
guests attended the regular bi-
weekly card party sponsored by the
Ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jew-
ish Orthodox congregation last
Tuesday night at the vestry rooms
of the synagogue. Acting as host-
esses were Mrs. William Mechlowitz
and Mrs. Louis Pallott. Prizes for
high scores were awarded at each
individual table. After the games
refreshments were served.

Mr. Paul ELsenberg of Ashland.
Ky.. was a visitor to Miami for sev-
eral days with his cousins, Mr. and
Mrs. J. L. Shochet.

" 'Maedchen in Uniform', begin-
ning at the Paramount theatre in
Miami next Monday, is a master-
piece of modern art with a universal
appeal to discerning men and wom-
en," said Rabbi Louis I. Newman of
| SPECIAL SHOWS at 2 & 6 p.m. |
BEFORE AND AFTER
THE RACES
APUITJ 25< HOURIV 2-4 *M CHU.BM.nraK
IIPST-IAK&
RIRP ROAD
CORAL GABLE5
HOME SERVICE LACS'DRY
Mrs. Clara D. Kersey, Prop.
1225 S. W. 6th St.
SPECIAL
20 lbs. Rough Dry, si.mi
Flat Work Finished
m aHiTini~a~a~i-i'"li~ii
Temple Rodelph Sholom. New York
City, in an address to his congrega-
tion recently. "It holds educational
and ethical lessons of profound im-
port to parents and teachers. Its es-
sential intent is to convey the pic-
ture of a growing girl, deprived of
the love and understanding of a
mother in tlic crucial period of her
life as she passes from girlhood to
womanhood. The new psychology
once more emphasizes its teaching
that stability and happiness come
from normal family relationships,
and that the absence of either par-
ent, particularly the mother, handi-
caps the child in her effort to con-
ront the crises as well as the ordin-
ary situations of life. 'Maedchen in
Uniform' depicts an incident typical
of many schools and institutions in
all countries. It throws sharp light
upon the effects of separate educa-
tion for girls as contrasted with co-
education, its characters are not
unusual or ill-intentioned people:
the headmistress, symbolic of the
principle of strict discipline, acts ac-
cording to traditional methods in
which she has been reared moreover,
she is the exemplar of an entire sys-
tem which has its roots in the cus-
toms and history of her country. The :
young teacher who befriends the girl
perceives the hunger of her more
sensitive pupils for the affection and
comradeship which the home sup-
plies. Because of the tense self.
consciousness which the one-sided
environment of a girls' school cre-
ates, the simples) acts "i kindness
are distorted out of their true char-
acter.
" 'Maedchen in Uniform' gives ev-
idence of care, patience and discrim-
ination in the making. It has fine
restraint. It is subtle without seek-
ing to present irrelevant meanings.
It has a fluency and simplicity that
betoken the highest artistic skill.
But its chief merit lies in the mes-
sage it holds for parents. Those
fathers and mothers who believe
their duty is fulfilled when they en-
roll their children at boarding-
schools or summer camps in order
to 'have them off their hands' must
anticipate that their boys and girls
will transfer their affections to oth-
ersto teachers and friends. Noth-
ing can take the place of parental
love, and those elders who hastily
choose divorce, must remember that i
the severest penalty is visited upon
their children. Moreover parenthood
without marriage likewise creates a
dislocated situation with harmful ef-
fects upon the psychology of the
child. It is through the poitrayal of
actual human situations, similar to
that which Maedchen in Uniform'
depicts, that we obtain a clearer in-
sight into the forces which effect our
children and ourselves. The produc-
ers of this poignant and touching
cinema have made us all their debt-
ors."

Opening early this coming week
under a complete change of person-
nel, the William Penn hotel restau-
rant in Miami Beach will be under
the direction of Fred C. Maurer,
well known Miami hotel and restau-
rant man who formerly operated the
Sunshine cafeteria in Miami. In
keeping with the exacting policies
of the hotel, the restaurant will, un-
der the management of Mr. Maur-
er. specialize in the finest of service
at the most moderate prices. Full
details of the opening will appear in
our next issue.

The next meeting of the Hebrew
Athletic club will be held in the
Community Center of the organiza-
tion Wednesday evening. March 29.
and will be featured by the initiation
ceremonies of all members who have
joined since February 1. Members
only will be admitted during the
rites and plans provide for an eve-
ning of real entertainment. In
charge of the event: Milton Klein.
Jack Lappin and Bob Schweitzer.
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Traeger. who
were married recently and spent five
weeks of their honeymoon in Cuba,
were the guests of honor at a recep-
tion tendered them by their parents
at their Grove Park home, which
was beautifully decorated for the af-
fair. More than 100 guests attended
and enjoyed a musical program that
was given during the evening. At a
late hour a bullet luncheon was
served.

Carrying out a tradition of a
number of years, the Palatial Kosh-
er restaurant, under the manage-
ment of Morion Pagan, will again
this year observe Passover week
with special Sader services both of
tlie first nights oi Passover, begin-
ning the night of Monday, April 10.
Rabbi Max Shapiro of Beth David
congregation will conduct the ritual,
both Sader nights. Strict kashrus
has been the slogan of the Palatial
Kosher restaurant since its opening
years ago. though other restaurants
m the Greater Miami district have
from time to time changed from
kosher to non-kosher meals.
The Junior Council of jeto
Women is making arrangements iQr
a gala dance, planned to be one 0|
the highlights of the present season
on Tuesday evening, April 4. al
Auby's Lagoon, Miami Beach. i*
charge of arrangements is a com-
mittee headed by Fay Sheldon u
chairman, assisted by Millie Dreisen
Bessie Wernikoff. Claire Simon
May Levin, Miriam Scheinberg and
Harriet Kantor.

All members of the Junior Council
of Jewish Women are urged to at-
tend a board meeting to be held
next Tuesday evening, March 28, at
the Ponce de Leon hotel, beginning
at 8 p.m. when important business
will be discussed. Included In the
evening's program is the break
dance to be held the third week of
April, and a theatre party the early
part of May.
Dr. A. T. Knowles |
29.16 N. W. 17th Art, Phone 2-7.100 *
I MODERN PET HOSPITAL
'" Individual Boarding Runs
Effective Tick Medicine Sold
*_
MIAMI MOTOR TRAVEL BUREAU
1.-..1 Collin. A
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PHILADELPHIA ..... 16.00
WASHINGTON ...... 15.00
BALTIMORE ......... 15.00
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KLEFEKER PRODUCE, INC. i
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J
The International
Film Triumph!
maedchen
in Uniform
An Unusual Love Story
The imitation of
Kurope and Amer-
ica. In (.erman di-
alogue with Knk'-
linh titles. Critic*
ko into ecHtanien!
No pirlu rr in
yearn ban raused
M much whisper- ^f
ed discussion f
Knhhi l.nui* I. Newman Hjn "The pn>
iIumts of thin poignant and touchirtj
cinema have made us all their debt-
or*."
THEATRE
STARTING MONDAY, MAR. W
MATINEE 35c SIGHT Mc
f
DR. PEPPER
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PHONE 2-3536
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K07
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homes or apartment*.
Collins Ave., Miami Beaci


^ I Friday, March 24, 1933.
THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY
i v. I H FLORIDIAN PUBLISHING CO.
Jfc P. O. Box 2S7J
Miami, Florida Phone 2-1183
EXECUTIVE OFFICES:
,15.16 Security Bid*. Phone 2-6493
EDITORIAL OFFICES:
Cl S. W. I5lh Avenue Phone 2-11HJ
J. LOUIS SHOCIIET, Editor
KIIUARD CARI.IN. Advertlaing Manager
KRKI) K. SIIOCHET. Circulation Manager
I as second class matter July 4.
1930, at the Post Office at Miami. Florida,
under Ihe Act of March 3. 1879.
WEST PALM BEACH OFFICE
414 Eighth Street
Mrs. M. Schrebnlck. Representative
SUBSCRIPTION
Six Months.......SI.(ill
One Year.......12.00
FRIDAY, MARCH 24, 1933.
Vol. 6, No. 12.
THE TRUE SPIRIT
The other night a group of work-
ers for Palestine gathered in New
York City to determine what they
should do about their fund-raising
efforts for the American-Palestine
campaign, in view of the banking
situation. To a man everyone as-
sembled at the meeting said em-
phatically that they would proceed
with their activities, which are to
reach their climax with a dinner to
Nathan Straus. Jr., on March 29.
That is the true spirit which can
well be emulated by every other
community in America and by every
other Jewish communal enterprise.
Now is not the time for leadership
by 'he weak and the hysterical. It
does not add to the confidence or to
the stability of an individual Jew
or of the entire group to talk reck-
lessly and irresponsibly of the aban-
donment of Jewish projects which
have been nurtured for years with
patient labor and the sacrifice of
great means. Nothing has happened
to create an atmosphere of dark
pessimism. President Roosevelt, in
his various messages, has given ev-
ery indication that this country fac-
es a period of sound and steady
growth. We would be retarding Jew-
ish life in America for many dec-
ades if we should listen to the advice
of those who would have us throw
everything overboard in a panic. The
American Palestine campaign and
every similar undertaking should
have the maximum, immediate, full-
hearted support of all Jews who
have any understanding of how Im-
portant it Is, in face of the threat
of Hitlerism in Germany and other
lands, to preserve every vestige of a
strong Jewish life.
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page Three
MOW TO HANDLE HITLER
German Jewry should be the mas-
ter of its own destiny. Whatever ac-
tion is undertaken in this country
to exercise diplomatic pressure on
the German government for a bet-
ter and more tolerant treatment of
its religious and racial minority
groups, must come from one author-
itative source. During the last few
weeks Jewish newspapers and or-
ganizations, in their eagerness to be
of service to German Jewry, have
taken steps with a view to influenc-
ing or rather, warning the Hit-
ler government. Jewish editors have
addressed memoranda to the state
department of the United States
asking it to keep a watchful eye on
the situation. Jewish organizations
have passed resolutions against Hit-
er. Of course, these actions are
motivated by the great concern
which all of us feel for our brethren
'n Germany. But as far as practical
results are concerned, such discon-
nected action Is merely evidence of
Riddle Me
This Riddle
[Continued from Page OneJ
Greeks called the Poet par excel-
lence is alleged to have died from
vexation at not having been able
to solve a conundrum which fisher-
folk had put to him. We may inter-
ject here that if such was the ig-
noble end of Homer, let all cross-
word puzzlers, last-line-of-limerick
writers, and riddle-solvers beware.
The same dismal demise, it should
be added, befell the grammarian and
poet, Philetas of Chios.
Not only the versifiers of antiq-
uity, but also the philosophers of
Greece, the magic of Chaldean, the
necromancers of Egypt, and the
sages of Persia, fell prey to the fad
of the riddle. Witness the famous
riddle of the Sphinx: What animal
walks at dawn on four feet, at noon
on two and at dark on three? Many
were the virgins of Thebes who lost
their lives because they could not
think of that answer which should
have been uppermost in their minds:
Man. This same riddle appears in
the Talmud when Simon ben Hal-
afta, excusing himself for not call-
ing on the rabbi, said: Rocks become
high ihe was growing old); the near
are at a distance ihis eyes had
grown dim; two are turned into
three the needed a staff to walk).
Shabbos 152b.
The Persian, too, posed the fol-
lowing riddle: A tree with twelve
brandies; every branch has thirty
leaves; and every leaf is white on
one side and black on the other.
What is its name? Answer: The
year, months, and days i white) and
nights our weakness and lack of unity. The
German government is very much
interested in keeping up good rela-
tions with our country. It will not
hesitate to adopt a fairer policy to-
wards Jews if it feels that such a
move will give it a better standing
in the United States. Such is Real-
politik. Under these circumstances
American Jewry should strive to es-
tablish a board of Jewish leaders,
representative of the most influen-
tial personalities in this country.
This board and no one else should
deal with the Jewish situation in
Germany. It should have a person-
nel which can command the ready
ear of the secretary of state and if
need be of the president. Men of
the calibre of Justice Brandeis, Jus-
tice Cardozo, Felix M. Warburg, Ste-
phen S. Wise. Felix Frankfurter.
Morris Rothenberg, Cyrus Adler aad
the Morganthaus, senior and junior,
not to forget Abraham Elkus and
other men of this type, should get
together to handle the German Jew-
ish situation las it permits itself to
be handledfrom here, without un-
necessarily involving our govern-
ment) in a skillful manner and in a
disciplined way that will insure
united action. Baltimore Jewish
Times,
UNDYING SPIRIT
While the world is groaning under
the most weighty economic ailments
of all times, descendants of the
great Biblical and Talmudical com-
mentator, Rashi, who lived in
France from 1045 to 1105, are now
organizing a society to be known as
an Association of the Descendants
of Rashi. What peculiarity in a
people which persists in perpetuat-
ing its history and its heritage!
What an undying spirit of an an-
cient race! Detroit Jewish Chron-
icle.
The Queen of Sheba Asks Questions
Many riddle in our folklore center
about the visit of the Queen of She-
ba to Solomon whose wisdom she
tested chiefly by propounding enig-
mas. A stenographic report of the
conversation between them, inter-
esting though it might be. is not
extant; but three of Sheba s riddles
are given in the second Targum to
Esther and in a Yemen manuscript
published by Solomon Schecter.
Among the Queen's most difficult
propositions are the following:
Without movement while living, it
moves' when its head is cut off?
Answer: A tree which when its top
is removed can be made into a mov-
ing ship.
In a rational age, it is somewhat
trying to follow Her Majesty's reas-
oning, inasmuch as the tree can be
made into a thousand things other
than a mast. But to Solomon in his
wisdom this was no handicap. Her
riddle, indeed, is like the one posed
by the wiseacre: What is it that's
green, hangs on a wall, and squeaks?
When his auditor, on the verge of
madness, gave up, the philosopher
answered: "A painted herring hung
on a wall." "But why does it
squeak?" "O, that is to make the
riddle harder."
The other questions posed by the
Queen are of too intimate a nature
for a gentleman to repeat them
here. .
An outstanding example of alle-
gory verging on the riddle form is
Chapter 12 of Ecclesiastes, in which
Koheleth, in oraculour language, de-
scribes the ravages of old age: The
keepers of the house larmsi shall
tremble; the grinders cease because they are few ... Or
ever the silver cord be loosed, or the
golden bowl be broken "the spinal
column and the skull).
The complete interpretation of
this chapter has not yet been made.
A Rabbi Orders Breakfast
The Talmud contains a number of
riddles but these only as obiter dic-
ta: What animal has one voice liv-
ing and seven voices dead? Answer:
The ibis, from whose carcass seven
different musical instruments are
made.
Even more original is the poetic
menu ordered by a rabbi who de-
sired two chickens for breakfast. He
commanded: Give the coals an or-
ange colour, let the glimmer of gold
appear like an expanse of heaven
and prepare me two heralds of the
darkness. In mediaeval times, many of the
Hebrew Spanish poets write riddles
in verse. Thus Moses ibn Ezra ask-
ed: "What is the sister of the sun,
though made for the night? The
fire causes her tears to fall, and
when she is near dying they cut off
her head." Answer: A taper.
Jehuda ha-Levi, too, took time off
his Zionides to pen the following:
What is it that's blind with an eye
in its head,
But the race of mankind its use can
not spare;
Spends all its time in clothing the
dead.
But always itself is naked and bare?
After such a description the read-
er must be particularly thick-
skinned not to know that Halevi is
giving him needles.
The Ghetto Has Fun
There is, too. a vast number of
riddles current in the Yiddish of a
later day. In them one find the ref-
utation of Dr. Bradley's statement
quoted abofe; not a rude people
coined them, nor are they the folk-
lore of a peasantry. On the con-
trary, a good number of these co-
nundrums exhibit not only a sophis-
tication and wit, but also a definite
flair for satire. A thousand Chas-
sidim in a single belt! Answer: A
broom.
TH
Looking back, we can't recall a
semester when the tuition in the
school of experience was so high.
Amazed correspondents in Wash-
ington are throwing away their per-
petual calendars and timing the new
congress with split-second watches.
One trouble with the nation is
that not enough growing boys are
sending 25 cents to Philadelphia for
a book on how to play shortstop.
In 21 borings in an east Texas
field, drillers struck oil in 20 cases,
which augurs well.
For two years, the government re-
veals, it has kept tab on gold hoard-
ing. In the old days it would simply
have asked the burlesque queen to
say "Ah."
We were thinking recently, what
if the chap who imitates the cow's
moo in the canned milk company's
broadcast became discontented!
Dwellers of the airy spaces,
Though we never see you play,
Find we often fairy traces
Of your frolics far away.
Some blithe dancer, lightly gliding
On this very afternoon.
With the soft clouds slightly hiding
It, tossed up a great balloon.
Scarlet, spheral, shining, splendid!
Then, at sundown, when the dance
And the day, declining, ended,
From the boundless blue expanse
She, of the far drifing ether,
Downward drew her ball of flame.
She. who. vapors shifting 'neath her,
Treads and tosses all the same.
Then, to check my nightly dreaming
Such a little while ago,
Yellow, round and brightly gleaming
One more gay balloon rose O
Lovely sight!the pearly curtain
Of the star-sown sky behind.
Seeing, I was early certain
She, with others of her kind
Mayhap, trod a merry measure.
While to flee this bubble chanced
From that scene of fairy pleasure.
From the dancers as they danced!
Who wears seven gaberdines?
Answer: An onion.
In the market place he stands,
when you give him a hand-clasp, he
weeps.
Answer: A water pump.
What food is at first parvc, then
trefa, then meat?
Answer: An egg.
Upon a red line, there hangs white
laundry?
Answer: Teeth.
A board lies in water, and never
gets rotten?
Answer: The tongue.
There stands two poles; upon
them a tub; upon the tub a jug;
upon the jug a loaf of bread; upon
the bread grows grass?
Answer: Legs, body, throat, head,
hair.
Four brothers wear one hat.
Answer: A table.
As smooth as samite, as white as
snow, you peer therein and you see
two.
Answer: A mirror.
A live one beats a dead one; the
dead one cries, his shouting flies.
Answer: A man sounding a bell.
What does a rabbi hold higher
than his brains?
Answer: His yarmulka.
Twentieth century progress: Clos-
ing the banks; making haste to open
the saloons.
An injunction Is asked in Mil-
waukee against a German band that
plays at night. Meanwhile, a doubt
arises whether it is really healthful
to sleep with an open window.
A scientist entertains an Oslo
gathering with his theory that life
on this planet began in hot water.
If so, we would .seem ideally situated
for a fresh start.
If Europe were as sympathetic
now as it ought to be, and as sym-
pathetic as America usually is, it
would declare a moratorium on non
payment of debts.
"There are no gangsters In Rus-
sia." retorts G. Bernard Shaw. But
what, after all. is the use ol putting
over a racket in a place where no-
body else has any more than you
have'.'
The penalty of bigamy is an ex-
cess of mothers-in-law.
The majority may rule if the mi-
nority Isn't made up of women.
When a public official imagines
himself a big gun it's time to fire
him.
When a man is resigned to his
fate the resignation is usually ac-
cepted.
There is usually a vast difference
between a man's worth and what he
is worth.
When money talks a man seldom
troubles himself to investigate the
truth of its remarks.
After a man gets into a good, fat
office he begins to advise his friends
not to have anything to do with pol-
itics.
It's sometimes difficult for a girl
to find her ideal man. but she's
nearly always willing to accept a
substitute.
"I hate telephones, automobiles,
airplanes and anything that makes
a noise." declares Frances Perkins,
secretary of labor, cutting her list
short at that point and allowing
congressmen to draw their own con-
clusions.
The depression could be cured in
24 hours, declares a New York min-
ister, by an old fashioned prayer
meeting in which financiers and cor-
poration heads would get down on
their knees and confess their sins.
I don't quite see how that could be,
when confessing their sins would
right at the start take 24 days.
What's the idea of teaching a boy
to play golf before he's learned how
to make a living?
You probably think you'll never
again go to anybody's house for
scrambled eggs at 4 a.m., but you
will.
One of New York's sovereign vot-
ers is found to have cast 160 bal-
lots in an election. The attitude
that we Americans lack civic en-
thusiasm seems singularly ill-in-
formed.
, J
I


Page lour
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Friday, March 24. i9JJ
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Edited by KABBI S. M. MACHTE1 +
I .. I Din ffOS of America
ISa&in ^gnagng Sullrtitt
Sunday Mornings
Synaicov of America
VI'IOD, Miami, I lorjda
St. Petersburg
Notes
APPEARING AT T1VOU
Till ATM. NEXT WEEK
Vol. 1. SUNDAY, .MARCH 19, 1933. No. 15. +
>>*< > < : > : : : -: : : : -: > : :- > : > : > : : :- : : : : : : -: : : -:- :-: : : : : : : : : >
CULTS
Si ripturt Reeding, Exodus, Cbtptet XXX, Veru l1-16 incl., and
~r; Chapter XXXII, Veru 1-6, nui.
iJIow truly and iaiuhlully people follow the precedents of the Torali!
Even though they neglect to observe the general laws for their own wel-
fare and for the common good. they, nevertheless, repeat in their daily
lives the practice which was established by the Israelites in the wilderness
recorded in the scripture reading for today, which is taken from the
eekly portion read in thi ues yesterday. For the sacred Taber-
nacle they contributed each a half-shekel. For the Idol the Golden
Calf, they gave all their jewels. For the perpetuation of the religion of
Truth, of the Everliving God, they gave mcageriy. For the temporary cult
the image of the calf they gave most liberally.
APPROACH a Jew or a Christian for some contribution to the Church
the synagogue fund and. if he gives at all, it is with reluctance
and in a small way. Interest the same individual in some cult headed by
Oom the Omnipotent or some other such foolish-sounding name with
heathenish practices, secret rites, idolatrous and demoralizing forms of
worship licentious and menacing the common weal and the contribu-
tions pour in for the construction of the Golden Calf. Human nature was
> .': thus. Because the preacher ol the Truth, the Prophet of Truth, ad-
mits that the ways of God are inscrutable and past man's understanding,
his followers are skeptical, But, when the lal.se prophet arises and claims,
in the language of the charlatan and the confidence-man. that his cult
can solve all the problems that confront man. thl elf- Messiah ls
showered with gold for hit promisi .i for a glimpse of God
barnum was right.
YOU may rightiully a.sk why Aaron took any part in the molding of the
Golden Calf, .since it was contrary' to the law prohibiting the con-
struction of idols. Scripture offers no excuse for Aaron's act. From the
Hebrew record we learn much and infer more. Many explanations are
given by the rabbis. I detect that Aaron was guided in his actions by a
dead man. Let me illustrate. A lion, a fox. and a donkey were strolling
through the forest in search ol food. They iound the carcass of a horse.
The lion turned to the donkey and said, "Will you please serve us?" The
donkey cut the body of the horse into three equal parts and set a portion
before each ol them. The lion flew into a rage and exclaimed, "Is that
how you respect my rank as king of all the beasts?" While the trembling
donkey gazed in wonder and awe at the lion, the lion struck the donkey
and killed him. The lion then turned to the fox and said, "Now, will you
please do the honors?" The fox placed the dead donkey and two-thirds
of the horse's body before the lion and took one-third of the horse for
himself. The lion smiled at the fox and asked, "Who taught you to serve
so well?" The fox hung his head and replied. "The dead donkey."
WHEN the mob surrounded Aaron and demanded that he make them
a God, Hur, who had been appointed by Moses to help Aaron in his
absence, bi Ban to scold the mob. A group surged about him and killed
Hur. They turned to Aaron and ai ked Now. will you make us a God?"
Aaron looked at the body of Hur--and--he asked the people to bring
him their jewels, in the hope that they would refuse. It was the dead
Hur who advised Aaron to accede to the wishes ol the mob. It was a
mute messagethe law ol self-preservation.
THIS is no defense ol Aaron because idol-worship is one of the three
laws which demands martyrdom rather than violation. The other
two are murder and adultery. The rule is "Ya' horaig ve'ol ya'avore" be
killed but do not transgress. The mob did not request an idol or a god.
They asked for a leader to take the place of Moses who had failed to re-
turn. That same psychology still holds good in the minds of ault-follow-
ers. They do not, consciously, desert true religion for the worship of idols.
They merely substitute a form of leadership and interpretation of God's
word which claims to have knowledge hitherto unknown to the long line
of Inspired prophets who have led mankind. Therein lies the danger. By
slow stages and easy degrees the principles of true religion are forsaken
and the adherents of the cult find themselves enmeshed in practices that
have debauched them and have drained them ol will power to extricate
themselves from these Chains of bondage.
WHY should anyone join a cult? Because true religion teaches self-
restraint and advocates mastery over the baser emotions and pas-
sions, the person revolts. The beastly inclinations seek expression. Al-
though religion holds one in check against his will he will not bolt and
give his animal-being free reins. He lacks the courage to go ojt alone
against established standards. But, along comes the leader of a cult and
says, "You needn't torture yourself. God doesn't want you to suffer
agony. I have had a vision. I have been told that you mast give vent to
all your emotions. Worship God in joy. If it gives you pleasure to be
drunk, to be immoral, to grant your body all its cravings, why, that's how
you should worship God." Then, your conscience awakes and you say,
"But, that has been forbidden by my religion." To which the false prophet
replies, "So it has. But this is a new religion. In my religion It is per-
mitted." Obviously, the weakling follows the easiest course, the one re-
quiring the least sacrifice. And, because this cult gives him so much
satisfaction, he is generous with his gifts for its upkeep.
I LAY no claim for any religion that it has the only meaas of salvation.
But, any creed whose practices are unwholesome in their effects upon
the Individual or are against public policy is not a true religion. God can
Friday night services at Congre-
gation Bnai Israel begin at 8 o'-
clock with Rabbi Kleinfeld preach-
ing on "The Doctrines of Orthodox
and Reform Judaism."
Saturday morning service begins
at 9 o'clock. Sunday school classes at
10 a.m.. and Hebrew school daily at
4 p.m.
Everyone enjoyed the ceremonies
at the presenting of the Safer Tor-
ah" to the synagogue on las'. Sunday
evening. A substantial amount
raised through the loyalty of mem-
bers and tourist friends.
The Ladies' Auxiliary and Aid So-
ciety of congregation Bnai Israel
held an interesting meeting last
Tuesday evening. Plans are being
completed for a community sader.
The Young Maccabeans are giving
a card party at the congregation
this Sunday evening for the benefit
of the building fund. A large crowd
Is expected.
nD, -nas^
"LOVE ME TONIGHT"
The Judaic Council held their reg-
ular meeting at the home of Mrs.
Ella Weinstein, last Monday eve-
Plans are being made for a
ntei tainment to
Id Sunday evening, April 2.
IN HONOR of
PASSOVER
On Possover Ihe choicest of
everything distinguishes Ihe
Jewish Home. Manischewttz
Malzo and Matzo products
are the choicest of their
kind produced in Ihe larg-
est Kosher Matzo Bakery in
the world. In demand
everywhere.
not possibly want us to hate each other we. who are all his children.
Where scriptun In terms of hatred, it is the scribe's voice and not
word of God. Where Instances ol injustice an recorded they portray
mar. and his weaknesses In his climb towards something higher. These
meant for our own benefit. Viewing the episodes in all
their ugliness, we turn to good actions. Religion is the ladder by which
man climbs from the beastly towards the godly. Cults remind me of the
flights of stairs used in motion picture comedies. You know, the ones
that suddenly collapse and fling you down again to the lowest landing.
You not only must start climbing again, but, you are brursed and broken,
oftimes unable to rise. Climb the ladder. Don't use the trick stairs. Avoid
cults. Remain staunch in your religious faith.
FROM FARM TO
CONSUMES
PERRY'S
DAIRY
+
For Quality Meats
Call
Dave Gottfried
NORTHERN
MARKET
Whoh -ale and Retail
PHONE 2-7221
N. K. Plrsl Astnut-
I'hune t-ltll
Sou you can hn\
BILTMORE
LAUNDRY SERVICE
at a price that fi/s your pocket bonk'.
PHONE 3-3687 21 N. W. 9TII ST.
L
s
MATZO
i
'NO OTHER MATZO LIKE IT'
Oldeat Repair Shop in Miami
AMERICAN
SHOE SHOP
Miami's Bat for
Shoe Repairing
15 S. MIAMI AVENUE
C. E. BARRETT. Prop.
Delaney & Beers
Kodak I nil-Inn.: and Enlaminr
< "iiiinini.l Work and Home Portraits
50% Off on All Amateur Work
212 N. E. tils St. Phone 2-S38S
NECVCLS?
DRINK
MA-TAY
5r Fountains and Bottles C,
.,... -J
< It 18. M. TANNBNBAVM.
For fresh
Sea Foods
snip AT
CAPT. TOM'S
FISH MART
Hagler St. and Miami River
hone 2-5321 W, N,. flo.,
OUR PRICES ARE THE LOWEST
Our I-,sh arc the freshest Caught by our own boats daily
-servance with all the sanitary rule/and|JStt *d ta ,n ob"
In the Heart of Your
Neighborhood
PIGGLY
WIGGLY
A Miami Institution
led
IS YOUR
CHEAPEST
SERVANT
lUeib!
0CIINSHINC
3FRVICL
sCpMPAHt


prfday, March 24, 1933.
THE JEWISH FLORIDI AN
i-age Five
PLAYING AT NEW
7TII AVENUE THEATRE
Love-making as a high art is be-
ing taught audiences at the Seventh
Avenue theatre Sunday and Mon-
day. In "Bird of Paradise." the sen-
sational RKO drama which has
electrified even blase Hollywood. The
Aery Latin temperament of Dolores
del Rio as the heroine permits her
to give one of the most impassioned
performances of her career. As an
excellent foil for her, Joel McCrea
rises to new heights of virile im-
pressiveness.
From the first'Strange tenderness
of love for a god-like white man.
he brown-skinned princess of "Bird
of Paradise" is seen in the full gam-
ut of infatuation, then develops the
pathos of the situation to its fullest
possibilities. How she triumphs in
sacrificing herself to the barrier of
civilization forms the climax of this
undying romance of the South Seas.
With a background of sensuous
Hawaii, where the principals of the
cast went to film the picture, real-
ism is lent to the play by Richard
Walton Tully. King Vidor, who
wielded the megaphone, made a lav-
ish production.

An important meeting of the
board of directors of the Miami Jew-
ish Orthodox congregation was held
last Tuesday night at the syna-
gogue when plans for intensive work
in connection with the Sunday
school and Talmud Torah of the
congregation were made. These will
be announced shortly. Mr. Joseph
Oreenberg, prominent merchant of
hi- city, and formerly president of
the Coney Island Talmud Torah,
was elected to fill a vacancy on the
board. Following the business meet-
ing a social hour was spent with the
officers of the Ladies' auxiliary as
the hosts.

Phyllis Jean Rosenthal, daughter
of Dr. and Mrs. A. E. Rosenthal,
2150 S. W. Sixteenth street, cele-
brated her sixth birthday anniver-
sary with a party recently. Her
guests were: Adele Stone, Lovey
Friedman, Allen Mason, Philip Mas-
on, Russell Wilson, Margaret Lee
Ellis, Harvey Bogen, Richard Bogen,
Frederic Friedman, Gilbert Fried-
man, Albert Weintraub, Marjorie
Rosengarten, Martin Goodman. Joan
Fillinger, Joyce Rosengarten and
Pearl Sapero.

Under the auspices of the Fellow-
ship club and sisterhood of Temple
Israel a series of Sunday night sup-
pers and entertainments will be held
in Kaplan hall, the first of which
will be on Sunday evening, March
26, at 6]po. All members are cor-
dially invited.

Markowitz & Resnick. Inc., of the
Plumbing Department Store of Mi-
ami, are now- featuring a sale of the
famous Magic Chef ranges at re-
markably low prices with the added
advantage of easy time payments.
To the Jewish housewife preparing
for Passover it is an opportunity
that should be taken advantage of.

The Junior Council of Jewish
Wo nen met Tuesday night in the
Spanish room of the Ponce de Leon
h(tel with Miss Betty Greenberg in
charge of the program.
Thee appearing on the program
includi 1 Miss Evelyn Marks, who
played "Prelude" by Eduard Shutt,
and "Prelude in C Minor" by Cho-
pin. Rabbi Max Shapiro spoke. Hel-
en Wroobel. who sang a group of
Spanish songs accompanied by Mil-
dred Greenberg. and a talk on as-
trology by Dave Fisher.

An important meeting of the Sen-
ior Council of Jewish Women will
be held at the i once de Leon hotel
Wednesday. Mar h 29. A nominat-
ing committee w:'l be appointed by
the president at this meeting to
name officers for Oil coming year.
All members are urgeu attend. A
social hour will follow.
Live Poultry and Choice
Fruits and Vegetables
Prlce Right
MRS. A. WALL
SS-41 City Terminal Market
B. W. 2nd Ave. and 2nd St.
+ -
Miami Stationery
Company
72 N. E. Flrat Street
MIAMI. FLORIDA
t-----------------------------------
NEW LOCATION
Kckroad's Garage
1156 S. W. 5th St.
Authorized Runco Brake Service
Union Batteriea
Our Guarantee In Your Insurance
"IKS DAY AND NIGHT
CAPTAIN METSHEL'S
Glass In Bottom
Boat
Daily 2 p.m. Fare $1.00
See the Submarine Gardena and the
Hooded Diver at Work
LEAVES PIER NO. 8,
CITY YACHT BASIN,
MIAMI
1
Where Choice Groceries,
Fresh Vegetables and
Passover Oil
Ready for you at prices that
will make you call again!
MIAMI BEACH
GROCERY CO.
1129-1131 LINCOLN KOAD
MIAMI BF.ACH
PALATIAL
KOSHER
RESTAURANT
26.-. N. E. SECOND ST.
Announces that Beautiful
Sader Services
Beginning April Tenth
Will he Conducted by
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Make your reservations im-
mediately for the entire Pass-
over week or for the sader.
Breakfast, dinner and supper
will be served during the en-
tire week.
SHEETS OAl.I.ACilll It
From present indications the He-
brew Athletic club will have a team
in the diamondball league of the
Miami and Miami Beach tourna-
ments. A practice session of the
team will be held Sunday afternoon
at 2 o'clock at Flamingo park, and
all members who desire will be given
a try-out. The team will be rimited
to 15 men.

Mr. E. Howett, prominent travel
expert directing the activities of the
Miami Motor Travel bureau, an-
nounces that complying with a gen-
eral demand Miami Beach offices
have been opened at 453 Collins ave-
nue, to take care of the increasing
demands for travel service in charge
of reputable and responsible bonded
firms.

An important meeting of the Lad-
ies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish
Orthodox congregation will be held
at the synagogue next Tuesday eve-
ning. March 28. when important
business will be discussed. Plans for
the annual Children's Sader will be
announced. All members and friends
are urged to attend.

Mr. and Mrs. B. Chertkoff will
celebrate their thirtieth wedding an-
niversary Sunday evening. March
26. at the Workmen's Circle hall,
701 N. W. Fifth avenue, and will
welcome their friends there.
Senior Hadassah will hold its
monthly card party at the Strath
i. ven hotel. 411 Ocean drive. Miami
Beach, Tuesday evening, March 28.
at 8:30 p.m. instead of Monday eve-
ning as originally scheduled, in de-
ference to the protest meeting being
held that night. Prizes will be
awarded for high score and refresh-
ments will be served. The public is
invited.

Tourists who come to spend the
season here are doing themselves an
injustice, and residents do the same,
by failing to see the wonderful sub-
marine gardens on the coral reef.
A trip to see the wonders of deep
sea vegetation and animal life, coral
and sponge formations on the Glass-
In-Bottom boat in charge of Cap-
tain Metshel which leaves Pier 8 ev-
ery afternoon is well worth taking.
It is a sight that one remembers for
years to come. Nothing like it may
be seen in the North.

An important meeting of the offi-
A SWIMMING POOL ODER
MIKVE
(Tmulltention < ly ,li.|il: GrtttnlMraTJ
A shayne geschichte hot mir der-
zehlt.
Mein freind Chayim Yankel Allein,
A neiem president hot Amerika er-
vehlt,
Und hert was es iz geshehn.
Wle ihr weist iz der president a
grosser man
Ober keiner is nisht mit alle maylos,
Darf dcrbei ein umglik sein.
Nu fregt nisht keine shaylos.
Mit yohren zurick is dos gewen
Wen an epidemye hot existirt
1/ mit ihm an umglick geshen
Es hot ihm bayde fiss paralyzirt.
Ober wen der mensh is gross in zin
fun wort
Meg er hoben sonim fihl
Fihrt es ihm tzum richtigen ort
Am ende erreicht er zein shtreb-
enden ziel.
Mit frayd und muzik hot men ihm
gekront
Yeder hoft auf bessere zeiten
In der shehner White House er yetzt
wohnt
Und er versichert unz sein gleich
mit layten.
Bequem zich gemacht in zein nayer
haym
Pluzim derzeht az eppes fehlt
A swimming pool Oder mikvo ruft
es wie ihr wilt.
Die zeitungen hoben es allemen der-
zehlt.
Ver wet sich obzogen fun tzu geben
Az unzer president soil sein gesund
Matonos und gelt abee tzum leben
Alle shiken anile a kind.
A swimming pool fund tut men es
nifen
Und es halt shon take bald nit weit
Ihr megt zein sicher mit a zieg
Dos garantirt Amerika dos gold-
ene land.
Einer shikt geld, a zweiter sein zeit.
Abee di mikve zoll auszehn shehn
Und es halt shon taken bald nit weit
Alle arbeiten gross urtd klein.
Zigel. zement, zamd und laym.
Inzheniren. architeckten giben zayer
zeit,
Idishe kinder giben zayer shalach
monos geld
Weil Amerika git unz iden a gute
haym.
Passover Help
To Be Extended
In carrying out the traditional
special aid for needy families of
"Mo'os Chitim," the Jewish Welfare
bureau urges all who need aid be-
cause of Passover to apply to the
bureau immediately. Those knowing
of any families who are in need arc
urged to report their names immed-
iately. Everything will be kept in
the strictest confidence.
Those who desire to help in the
worthy cause in the spirit of the
true observance of Passover may
send their contributions to the bu-
reau for this special fund.
Radio Synagog
Rabbi S. M. Machtei, founder and
director of the Radio Synagog, will
preach over WIOD at 10 o'clock
Sunday morning on "True Love."
Leonard Tobin will deliver the ser-
monette on "Always the Same." In
addition to the sermon there will be
prayers, hymns, scripture reading
and a question box.
FREE
Bring this ad with
you and get 1-oun-
tain Pen or Pencil with five gal-
lons of regular Gas at posted
price. Ciet acquainted with the
GARLICK
STATIONS
These Pens and Pencils arc guar-
anteed for life. Drive in at any
of the following stations and get
your gift from Garlick:
20'JO llixcayne Blvd. lat 2lt Street!
Biacarna Itlvd. and 1.1th St.
I Fast Side Circle!
1377 S. W. Fiuhth Street
:tol(l N. W. Seventh Avenue
IMI N. W. Seventh Airnue
Km.ii West I l.n-l. r Street
Garlick for Quality
+
NEW 7TH AVENUE THEATER
3033 N. W. 7th Av*. Phone 2-3352
ADULTS 20c CHILDREN 10c
Sunday and Monday. March 26-27
"Bird of Paradise"
with DOLORES del RIO
A drama of forbidden love beyond the
pale of white man'a moral*.
Boi Office Opena 5:43 Sunday
cers and directors of the Greater
Miami Jewish Cemetery association
will be held next Wednesday eve-
ning. March 29, at Beth David Tal-
mud Torah hall, when matters of
importance will be discussed. All
members are urged to attend.
RED CROSS
DRUG
DEPARTMENT
I STORE
51E FLiolfr
51 E. Flafler St. I'hone 2-810*
Fret Delivery in Greater Miami
..........
IK YOI REALLY WANT
l FRESH BEEF "
and VEAL u
BTOP AND SHOP AT
Farmer's Meat Market;
" 71 Norlhweat Fifth Street
B (One-half Block Weat of
Miami Avenue)
Veal Shoulder, 2 lbs........25c
I Legs of Veal, lb............15c m
m Veal Chops, lb.............15c y
Beef Steaks and Boneless
1 Beef, lb..................15c
Scalded Calves' Heads and
Calves' Feet
aa Formerly 5 Yeara at Farmer*
City Curb Market
All Meats Fresh Killed


Gautier Funeral
Service, Inc.
514 W. Flagler St.
PHONES 2-8421 2-8422
R. A. Gautier, President
E. E. Carter, Sec'y and Treas.
Leeds Institute Physical Correction
Natural Health Builders
Incorporated
Successfully treating Arthritis, Colitis, Acidosis. Rheumatism,
Sciatica. Lumbago, Stomach and Intestinal Disorders Eye
Treatments, Spine and Foot Corrections Mineral Salt, Vapor,
Colonic and Reducing Baths.
Scientific Massage Graduate Attendants
DR. V. L. SINGI.EY, President
Phone 2-3434. 2080 BUcayne Boulevard. Miami, and
llreakera Hotel. Miami Beach Phone 5-3215



b4


Page Six
THE JEWISH FLORID'AN
Friday, March 24, 1933
I
"Ask and Ye Shall
Learn"
Q The Book of Jonah which is
read on the afternoon of the Day of
Atonement always puzzles me. What
is its real meaning?
A. Of all the books which make
up the Bible, the Book of Jonah is
perhaps the most misunderstood one.
It is. however, one of the best known
stories which gives frequent occas-
ion for jest to the mocker, and is a
cause of bewilderment to the literal-
ist believer but offers reason for joy
to the critic Those who insist on
the literal interpretation of the
story of Jonah generally play into
the hands of the skeptical critics
who maintain that all religion is
founded on irrational emotionalism
and superstition. Jonah's whale and
Balaam's ass are the two creatures
mentioned in the Bible which offer
them opportunity for delightful but
futile derision.
The author of the Book of Jonah
is unknown, but its intrinsic value
makes the writer one of Israel's well
Qivc Sensibly
We help by trusting sou.
I i-\ payment] from Pass-
over to Rosh Hashona .
Buy
Gas Stoves
T
-^~^- 1 -U-I^JJ.
M-n ;
------ --------1
1 .. 1 f> J i
I 'NLESS ihe dot Rangt hat a RED
WHEEL it it NOT a t.OHAIN
ONLY
$49.50
v- uh Raralalor Ml-M
Thrifty housewives appreci-
ate sensible, useful gilts.
They want something they
cm use for years. You can
nothing finer or better
than .1 Magic Chef Gas
Range, fully insulated, with
regulator and new style ad-
justable broiler pan. Burn-
ers save 2 5 per cent on gas.
May also be used for bot-
tled gas.
Stoies in Whilr and Hl.uk Trim.
Grata and Ivor..
Plumbing
Dep't Store
MARKOWITZ &
RESNICK. INC.
Plambinc Repair Trnrka
All Over Town
839 W. FLAGLER STREET
PHONE 2-3153
known prophets. If Jonah himself
were the author, the date would at
once be plausibly settled, for Jonah,
the son of Amittai. lived under Jero-
boam II. to whom he prophesied vic-
tory under the Arameans isee II
Kings. 14. 251. But the book no-
where claims to have been written
by Jonah. It is a story about him.
not by him, and every argument is
against so early a date. "Jonah" is
purely a fictitious character, the off-
spring of the author's imaginary
powers just as "Hamlet" is in Shake-
speare's play.
The book was apparently written
at a time when nationalism reigned
supreme in the life of the Hebrews
and. therefore, the need of empha-
sizing the universallstic teachings of
the prophets of Israel more pressing
They taught that God's interest ex-
tends to all the nations of the world.
He punishes sin wherever he finds
it. among the nations as well as m
Israel. But he does not desire the
death of the sinner but that he re-
and live.
The anonymous author presented
Jonah as a character who personi-
fies the then prevailing notions of
God and of His relation to the na-
tions of the world. Although God
; commanded him. Jonah did not
to Nineveh. He did not
Ion and hoped it
ild tail. He preached to the peo-
[ Ninei thai
would reject his message, but when

pointed.
.he ol ai'.
Irst of all. that God has no favor-
ite In thi h ;:nan family and
that Hls purpose had been totl
rstood The Book of Jonah
. was
en lor work: not for
The loving kind-
: God know no bounda:
His tender mercies are over all
works. The whale that swallowed
Jonah and the gourd that grew up
and died down in a few hours are
' 24-2IN7MIAMI AVENUE I
i FAYMUS !
FAY'S
MIAMI MADE
! NOVELTY WASH FROCKS
yieu//
I *BAQE
BACK
DRESS
1 tenth
\oocux
' to
toa/cfi
RED
BLUE
OROWN^
BLACK
77laiX QAd&ui,
POSTAGE -10?

.Sun-"Rail
1 nitar runt.
^S-,__
\ \&*fC/iro/itc Cases
RATES-ea.Maa^-i/K/j6r BOOKLET
Miami -^----- Florida
wmmmm
+
!
i
1
Dr. Neuenschwander
OPTOMETRIST
A First ( hi ()j'h, id Seriii <
11/ a Reasonable Price
al
Rhodes Jewelry Store
IS So. Miami Am-.
A Jew of Nobility
By Edith Ella Davis
It is a noble thing to be a Jew,
The scion of a priesthood rich in
lore,
A heritage whose wealth the sages
knew.
With banners that the mighty
prophets bore.
The law with its stern beauty bound
within.
Its precepts kept in dutiful accord;
A record since creation did begin;
The deep significance
own word.
of Gods
It is a noble thing to be a peer
In family of Israel's honored sons;
1 Is a great tradition to revere
1 hi memory oi the ancient holy
ones
Who.-. :.. never wavered, H10
in plight,
Who in the darkness dreamed the
glory thru;
Who kept to God thruout the end-
less night
It is a noble thing to be a Jew.
Chicago Jewish Sentinel.
: : : : : : > : : : : : : : : :: : : : :
4* In-i-i on your Graear giving you
+ NEW YORK BREAD & CAKE *
% COMPANY %
% BREAD AND CAKES *
* 471 S. W. Sth St. Phona 2-78S2 *
.;. Branrh Slorr: III N. W. Sth St. >
+
***** * * * : : :- ::
The popularity of the cape suits
at the winter resorts indicates thai
ire going to be prime favorites
throughout the land when spring
truly makes her bow Cape suit-
are almost universally becoming and
have an air ol 1 ink that all
good sport things havi And then
is no one length or capes, which
ike them difficult to wear
for some. 'I I apes, short
. and capes in between sc
may be suited mo
:
As previously explained in these
fashion notes
may l Utilized intensively.
That is I ire in three
and the skirt revers-
and the little jacket working
for contrast or harmony as desired,
when worn either with or without
the cape.
The sketch shows a checked tweed
which fairly shouts spring spoil
wear, as illustrated. The capi and
the skirt are both reversible, plain
on the other side. They are in
greens, blues, tans greys, navy and
black and whiU
----------------------------------------------
mere accidentals, inserted by the
author to brighten the interest and
emphasize the central aim of his
work.
The Book oi Jonah is appropriate-
ly read in the synagogue c. the Das
lot Atonement in order '.0 illustrate
the effects of sincere repentance,
NOTE
Tile Jewish Floridian takes
pleaar.re in announcing that its
e\e'Uti\e offices are now located
a* 115-416 Security building, op-
posite the post office; phone
2-6493. Editorial offices remain
.11 621 S. \V. Fifteenth avenue.
We had thought a little ol a
Hie city was ready to scrip tor ac-
tion, but thought better of it.
We Never Close!
The Food ( annol be Better
The Srrtfci Uncxa lied
The Price Satisfactory
to thou and*
omc In on 1 iino* W,
Sea Vi.u Dill]
BISHOP & BLAIR
224 BST FLAGLBR

Some people are making SuCh
thorough preparation for rainy days
that they aren't enjoying todays
sunshine.
It's Just as well that some of us
business men are not required to
pass high school examinations |n
arithmetic.
We dislike lecturers who conceal
their manuscript, thus preventing us
from knowing how much longer e
will have to keep quiet.
"One of our well-known New Ha-
ven broadcasters," says the Register
of that place, "invited listeners to
send in requests for what they
wanted played. The first one re-
ceived, said; 'Play checkers or dom-
inoes'."
ARE WEaZj
faith with those who trust us, are
we living up to our obligations if
wc risk their future happiness by
ignoring the problems that would
arise for them if, some day, we
Jul not come home?
Life Insurance offers the safe and
certain answer. There is no sub-
stitute.
A Southern Health & Life Insur-
ance Policy on each one is ncces-
s.uv to protect the others from
the privation and expense caused
by the last illness and death.
A few pennies each week is the
total cost.
Southern Life &
I [ealth Insurance
Company
T. S. Cook, Manager
610 Realty Board Bid* Phona. 2-JIU
*
Alexander Orr, Jr., Inc.
Plumbing and I [eating
Ml I Ml ItKAl II
1121 !Mh SI. I'honr MHI
MIAMI
I.-, N. W. .Ird SI. Phone 2-.16S1

_._+
FUEL OILS
The Economy Fuel \<>\ Hotels and Apartments
BELCHER OIL COMPANY
MIAMI, FLORIDA
-t
I
Entire NEW WAREHOUSE STOCK
of Moniand and Miller Office Furniture Company
PRICK!) TO SELL
SINGLE I I V I TOP DESKS
link, w alnnl or Mahocan)
17.50, sin, 112.50 Up
1 Keyulnr I'ri, i-s. <:[', |'p)
n PKWRITER disks
si;..in. sir. Up
1 Hi k'uLir I'ri* <-.. <"ll I'pi
IIIII III.K FLAT TUP DESKS
Oak. Walnut or Mahouani
SKI. tlZM, S15 Up
iRccalar Prteea, %>' i'
Alt I METAL STKKI. DESKS
Mahofanj or Grain Finn*
S19.50 I'p
1 K,. ni.ir Pricaa, Mi i'P)
I'M he Chain, Side (hair.. Arm Chairs, Swivel Chair-.
Typewriter (hairs, Oak, Walnut or Mahogany
-I SO 82.50 SI.Mi S7.50 and I'p
SALE ( IIMII
Slr 11I the
Wafffhauaa
< TED ll\ J.M h CATBBB
*) N.W. e.l. ST
Takr BaraWf
10 3rd Kl"">"
Don't Be Fooled!
The SEABOARD SANITARY DAIRY ;
(1.111 is JACOBSKIND)
Is the Only Dairy that (an Furnish Milk. Butter.
Sweet Cream, Sour Cream and Cheese
KOSHER FOR PASSOVER
I'naVr Ihe Suprrvi.ion of Kahhi Jonah K. (apian
In-ure Your Supply by Phoning Your Order Now to 2-3749