The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00212

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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
0eJewi$li Florid Ian
feu. x"- "
J LORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY
MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, MARCH 17, 1933.
Price Five Cents
Statewide
News
.Petersburg, Fla.
National Effort Ladies Sponsor Charity Ball
Making Headway Synagog Dinner Is Gala Event
Announcements!
i
t
.iii set vIces begin al 8
Rabbi a. 8. Klelnfeld
[ the subject ol his ser-
loll ;.. i Qolden Precepts obii-
1 and Duty." Saturday morn-
Is services begin at 9 o'clock, Sun-
Lv s,i.. c lasses at io a.m. sun-
[ Hebrew school daily at 4
The musical drama "Queen Es-
I .11 at the Elks hall last
ir.clay i verting drew a large crowd.
I ryone enjoyed .same im-
Lnsely. Credit must be given to
Lbbi Kleinfeld. who composed the
Lmc and directed the play.
[Members ol Congregation Bnai
krad and friends are invited to at-
c.d the ceremonies to be held on
joday evening. March 19. of pro-
fiting a Sefer Torah to the syna-
gue. Notable .speakers will be pre.s-
m and refreshments will be served.
happ i Is hi store for every-
i sic ikes.- will be hostess
| social hour, after Friday
ei \ices.
[acksonvillc, Fla.
Ladies' Hebrew Shelterini
lid Son. iv and Home toi the Aged
held an anniversarj social
I .iiion ni officers at the
liter.
for the evening were
labbi Morris D. Margolis ol the
ewi>li Community Center. Rev
later. Rev. D. Kasachkolf. Nathan
I ph Wilensky and Abe
Iranian Mr. SchevitZ was toast -
I
On thi entertainment program
I il numbers by Mrs. A.
f ompanled by Mrs M. b.
: Lucille Weslerlield. ac-
fttpanl d by Mr. Meyer; Bernie
(erman, accompanied by Mrs. Wii-
(>n; readings by Miss Fannie Horo-
i violin solo by Miss Mice
ompanled by Mrs. Archie
Mdy. Mrs. Wilson was program
I Other chairmen in charge
arran cements were Mrs. Fred
| refreshments, and Mrs.
L. Blattner, tables.
JOBicers installed were headed by
\ renkO as president, and
as honorary past presi-
It-m.
T1' anlzatlon is the only Jew-
rellel organization In Jackson-
f 1 surrounding territory and
pcentlv took as its objective the e -
' of a home for aged de-
li WSi and the housing of
Why .Jewish transients. It is pro-
| this institution will have
' wn home and will be statewide
it ure. Many of the cities of
Jorthein Florida and even adjoining
[ I Georgia have enthusiastic-
| domed the project. Mrs. Sof-
Rnko. who is president, is devoting
111 of her time to the fulfillment of
r's worthy object.
i i anlzatlon ol local drives in
connection with the national appeal
ol the Joint Distribution committee
is proceeding rapidly in many com-
munities throughout the country,
Dr. Wise reported, and a sympathet-
ic Interest Is being manifested in the
plight ol eastern European Jews ai
well as a willingness to aid in pro-
viding emergencj reliel measun
necessary al this tune.
"While the response to our appeal
has thus far been most satisfac-
tory," Dr. Wise declared, "I must
urge the necessity of immediate ac-
tion in making relief funds avail-
able. The -situation ol millions of '
our brethern overseas is critical.
Any delay or withholding of relief
at this time cannot but react dan-
gerously. It is imperative that we
rush them the relatively modest
amount necessary to support contin-
ued child feeding and to keep their
own relict agencies from collapse."
The National Advisory Campaign
committee, now in process of forma-
tion, already lists over a hundred .
outstanding Jewish leaders who
have accepted sponsorship of the
appeal. Dr. Wise revealed, and many
national Jewish organizations and
societies have offered their support
and cooperation.
A congregational dinner will be
sponsored by the Ladies' auxiliary
oi the Miami Jewish orthodox con-
gregation at t hi ii o ue on Sun-
vening, March L'li. beginning at
7 p.m. in addition to the supper a
pro'.'.ram ol entertainment will be
provided for the entertainment of
the guest-. In chai'je of arrange-
ments is a committee headed by
Mrs. Nathan Adelman as chairman
and Mrs. William Klein, assistant
chairman, Reservations for this af-
fair may be made by calling 2-7930
or _'-0879.
Hadassah Holds
Purim Festival
Cantor to Appear
In Concert Soon
One ol the finest concerts ol the
current season will be the concert to
be held at the Beth Jacob syna-
Miaml Beach, on Sunday
evening, April L'. when Cantor Boris
Schlachma'n ot the congregation will
be heard m a repertoire of tradi-
tional liturgical music, and Jewish
folk songs. Cantor Schlachman has
served a number oi congregations in
Philadelphia. Georgia, Alabama and
for several years was cantor of Belli
David congregation, Miami. He has
acted as cantor for the past four
years at Beth Jacob congregation,
where he has been greatly admired
and praised for the splendid manner
ol ins rendition of the traditional
services at his congregation. During
i ne season he has been in great de-
mand at every Jewish affair in this
locality
Beach to Hold
Spring Festival
Last Monday afternoon Hadassah
celebrated the twenty-first anniver-
sary of its founding with a Purim
celebration at the Miami Acacia club
in the Congress building. Mrs.
Freda Lutzky. president of the sen-
ior chapter, presided. The club-
rooms were decorated in the blue
and white Jewish national colors.
Among the speakers of the after-
noon were Rabbi Mux Shapiro of
Beth David congregation, who spoke
on "Jewish Women of Today," Mrs.
Max Dobrin read an essay on Pal-
estine which was heard with great
interest. Cantor Boris Schlachman
of Beth Jacob congregation. Miami
Beach, sang a number ot Jewish se-
lections. Thi musical entertainment
was provided by Mrs. F. Ross of
Brooklyn. N. Y.. and Miss Myra
Mirsky, who rendered several piano
solos. The social hour was in charge
of Mrs. Frances Williamson and
Mrs Belle Wesson. Refreshments in-
cluded the traditional Ii i-coi ncied
"Hainan Ta-hen,"
One of the gala events of the cur-
rent season was the sixth annual
Chanty ball sponsored for the ben-
efit ol the Jewish Welfare bureau
Though confronted with the diffl-
CUlties caused by the banking holi-
day the committee In charge, head-
ed by Mrs. Bertha B. Levy, deter-
mined that they would carry on be-
cause ol the necessity confronted m
meeting with the relief of the poor
and needy wards of the organiza-
tion. Their good judgment was vin-
dicated by the more than 350 guests
who attended and spent one of the
most enjoyable evenings of the year
Bert Reisner. in addition to being
master of ceremonies, sang a num-
ber of vocal selections and kept the
entertainment moving from begin-
ning to end. A rapid kaleidoscopic
picture was kept going. Between
dancing to the tunes of the Florid-
ian orchestra, under the direction of
Mickey Cherep, Danny Sheehan.
Betty Lanzer, Albert Robertson. Al
Parker, Frances Kane, the Farr Sis-
ters, Chester Alexander and other
of the star artists now showing in
the different night clubs, enter-
tained with a number of vaudeville
acts.
Sunday Schools
Observe Purin
CONGREGATION BETH JACOB
(Orthodox)
311 H ., !.! .-inn Aiis. Miami lirarh
L. AXELROD, Rabbi
Earlj services bi gin at 5:45 with
the late services at 8:30 when Rabbi
Axelrod will preach a sermon on
"The Golden Calf of 1933." Satur-
day morning the rabbi will deliver
a discourse in Yiddish on "Parsho
Poro." Cantor Boris Sclilacliman
will conduct all services and lead
the congregational singing.
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI
(Reform I
137 N. K. Nineteenth Street
DR. JACOB H. KAPLAN, Rabbi
Services begin at 8:15 and the
rabbi will have as the subject of his
sermon "Religion, Like Banks, Un-
less Reconstructed Must Fail." After
the services a reception will be held
in Kaplan hall so that visitors may
meet each other.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
(Concervative)
139 N. W. Third Avenue
MAX SHAPIRO, Rabbi
Jewish Worker
Is Club Delegate
Mrs Lena Simon, prominent com-
munal worker of Miami and presi-
dent oi the Senior Council ol Jewish.
Women, left last Wednesday to at-
tend the convention ot the State
Federation of Women's Clubs which
Is being held at Avon Park this
week. Mrs. Simon was named as
' one of the delegates to represent the
| Miami Woman's club. She will re-
turn to the city the latter part ol
this week.
Final preparations have been
made lor what promises to be one
,ii the outstanding events ol the
current season by Beth Jacob Sis-
terhood, The event which is the
annual spring festival sponsored by
the organization, will be held at the
Floridian hotel, Miami Beach, on
Sunday evening, March 26, begin-
ning at 9 p.m.. and in addition to
the dancing will feature an evening
of entertainment In which many of
the stars oi the local night dubs
will participate. Mrs. Barney Wein-
kle is chairman ol the committee di-
recting the affair and she is being
aided by Rabbi L. Axelrod. Cantor
Boris Schlachman, I. L. Mintzer. H.
I. Lipton and Harry Wasserman.
Club To Hold
Open House
In line with its announced policy
of welcoming all Jews of Miami
within its quarters, the Hebrew Ath-
letic club will sponsor a house party
at the Community Center Sunday
evening. March 19. Card games,
billiards, ping pong and all other fa-
cilities of the club will be placed at
the disposal of guests free of charge.
A program of entertainment will be
provided. The public is urged to at-
tend.
Purim was observed last Sunday
morning m the Sunday schools of
Miami's synagogues with programs
and entertainment-, a: Temple Is-
rael the program under the direction
ot Rabbi Dr. J. H. Kaplan and the
religious committee ol the temple
sisterhood consisted ot a Purim cos-
tume party. Following the program
Hainan Tashen" were distributed
to the children. At the Miami Jew-
ish Orthodox congregation a spon-
taneous Purim play was presented
in which all the children took part
under the direction ol Rabbi Jonah
E. Caplan. Alter the singing of
SOngS, a committee ol the Ladies'
auxiliary presented each child with
a "Hainan Draycr." candy and a
Ham.in Tash." At Beth David con-
lon each Child was presented
with candy and a "Hainan Tash" by
the sisterhood alter the pn
which was eiven under the direction
ol Rabbi Max Shapiro of the con-
gregation, A mask party was held
and prizes awarded for the besi
tnines to Marcella Schwartz, Stan-
ley Hayman and Ellse Backer, Prizes
I r the best entertainers were
awarded to Lovey Friedman. Sarah
Rose Schwartz and Anna Feldman.
At the Beth Jacob congregation.
Miami Beach. Mrs. Freda Lutzky
directed the program at a Purim
concert in which the following par-
ticipated: June Rase Toursh. Syd-
ney Besvinick. Jean Weinberg. Irv-
ing Goldstein. Lionel Ginsler. Irene
Fixler. Dorothy Goldstein. The an-
gel dance featured Jean Miller, Bea-
trice Dansky and Lillian Marcus.
Recitations, dances and piano solos
were offered during the entertain-
ment. Assisting Mi's. Lutzky were
Miss Marion Levy and Miss Belle
Siegel.
The regular early services begin
at 6 p.m. with the late services at
8 p.m. when Rabbi Shapiro will
preach on "Damaged Souls in Is-
rael," based on the recent novel by
Leon ZolotkofT. "Vilna to Holly-
wood." Cantor Louis Hayman will
chant the services, assisted by the
choir. A social hour will follow.
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION
(Orthodox)
l.-.l.-. S. W. Third Street
JONAH E. CAPLAN, Rabbi
Regular services begin at 5:45 with
the late services at 8:30 when Rabbi
Caplan will preach a sermon on
"Purity, the People's Aim." The us-
ual chanting and congregational
singing will be had. Saturday mom-
. lei b. nil at 9 a.m. Mincha
services begin at 5 pan. with the
sh.ilnsh Saudah following at 5:30
and the1 Marriv service immediately
after
Synagog to Hold
General Meeting
A general meeting of the members
ol the Miami Jewish Orthodox con-
gregation to which the members of
its Ladies' auxiliary have been in-
vited will be held at the synagogue
Monday evening. March 20. begin-
ning at 8:30 p.m. A number of
prominent guest speakers will be
heard in a discussion of vital prob-
lems affecting the Jews of today.
Following the business meeting a
social program will be presented and
refreshments will be served. All
members and their friends are urg-
ed to attend.

;
I
i


Page Two
FLOR I D I AN
I-'riday, March
I
17. 19)1
The intlurnre oi the patriarchs ot
scripture upon future generations
will be the subject of the Bible les-
son which Rabbi S. M. Machtci will
discuss with the Bible study class
at 11 o'clock Sunday morning at the
home of Maj. Kaufman Mandel,
3012 S. W. Eighth Street. The tone
of the lessons is non-sectarian and
everyone is Invited to attend these
(hisses regardless ol church affilia-
tions.

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Traeger
are spending their honeymoon In
the interior of Cuba on the Las
Llanos banana plantation on the
southeast coast where tiny are the
house guests of Senor Jose Ramon
Fernandez.
They will remain at the haeen-
dado for one month and then re-
turn to Miami via steamer.
Mr. Traeger is the general mana-
ger for the Cuban American Export-
ing Company with offices at Miami.
Fla.
A regular meeting nt the Junior
Hadassah will be held on Monday
evening. March 21, beginning at 8
pin. in the Spanish room of the
Ponce de Leon hotel. All members
are urged to attend. In char [( I :
the program that will be presented
during the evening are the Misses
r-
ATLANTIC
SHOE SHOP
Opposite Corcti Hotel
240 N. E. FIRST AVE.
(Juality Mm. Kepairinic
All Work (.uarnnti ed
SPECIAL
Half Soles. 25c Pair
Ladies' Heels, 10c Pair
TOURS CRUISES
STEAMSHIP TICKETS
TRAVELERS CHEQUES
Remittances to All Foreign
Countries
\rr.inr. your PUHW Trip
to Pali -Inn through
American Express
Company
330 E. FLAGLER ST.
Miami Tel. 3-3178
Droakfut 7 t.. 10
IlitilMT .... .". In S
Lunch 11 to S iSO
DAVIS ("AFEThRIA
:i:t N. K. S......n.I v..
Oppo !'< Halcyon Hotel
Efficient Service
Boy] to carry your tray
:
, < *.' -i- ; *. ;* > > : *; > ; *.> ; :* !-
CRYSTAL
SPRINGS
WATER
An Ideal Table Water
T Pure, litcht, aparklinir. palatable.
X refrenhinK. Awarded Silver Medal
... St. I.inn- I'|i...ii Inn and highest
,;. award for purity and excellence,
v l.ouuiana Purrhane Kxpoiiition.
+
PHONE 2-3645
92 N. E. 28th Street
The physical culture class directed
by Mrs. Bertha B. Levy met at the
grounds of the Hebrew Athletic club
last Monday morning for the first
time and will continue to meet there
every clay of the week excepting Sat-
urday and Sunday. All interested in
the work of this class may join any
morning at 9 a.m. The charge is a
nominal one and the proceeds are
devoted to local welfare work.
*
Mrs. Pauline Scheinberg will en-
tertain with a bridge luncheon at
her home this afternoon for the
benefit of the Jewish Welfare bu-
reau. Prizes will be awarded for
high scores. The public is urged to
attend as a very enjoyable afternoon
Is promised.
*
The social order ot Mt. Olivet
Beatitudes met at the home ol Bea
Proctor for their first meeting. The
meeting was in charge of Ida Eng-
ler. Light of Uie East. Officers
lei led were president. Martha Fiel-
der; vice president, Blanche Seai>.
and secretary-treasurer, Bea Proc-
tor. Jig saw puzzles were played af-
ter the meeting and refreshments
i served The nexl meeting was
held at the home of Miss Ida Eng-
ler, 1637 s. w. Eleventli street on
i hursday evening.

Mr. M. siiverman oi the Jackson-
ville Journal was a visitor m Miami
ast week, spending his vacation
with his sister and brother-in-law,
Mr. and Mis Philip Berkowitz of
this city
6
Mr and Mrs Stanley C Myers
are being congratulated upon the
birth of a baby boy last Saturday
at the Victoria hospital. The bris
will be celebrated next Sunday
morning. Mother and baby are do-
ing nicely.
NEW 7TH AVENUE THEATRE
303.1 N. W. 7th Ave. Phone 2-.1.1.12
ADULTS 20c CHILDREN 10c
Sunday and Monday, March 19-30
NORMA SHEARER in
"SmiliiV Throuoh"
lh mo-t h< .mill ul slory ewr screened.
Box Office Open* ,"t:l."i Sunday
A (OMI'LKTK
DINNER
~"(i,l Bverj Da) iiml Evening
II :.'lll to III p.m. and
All Da) Sunday
25c
Uilh Soup. Mint or Ki-h. Salad.
Poflatoca, Green Vegetable*, Tea
ir Coffee, Demit, lloi Hull- and ,
' orn Muffin.. Open 6 a.m.
lo Ml p.m.
CIVIC LINCII.
,h---------------
Incorporated
10 N. W. First Street
*
I
DR. I. 11. YARHOROUGII
VETERINARIAN
Dogs (.'lipped, Plucked
and Bathed
26.13 N. W. 36th St. Phone 2-ISIS
+-+++++*****->** ******* >+*
HOME SERVICE LAUNDRY
MRS. CLARA l). KER8ET, Prop.
1225 S. W. 6th St.
Mending and buttons sewed on
free of charge. Called for and
delivered.
One of the besi entertainments oi
the season was the show sponsored
by the Hebrew Athletic club lasl
Wednesday night at Kaplan hall
when Lesta the magician featured
the program. About a hundred
[uests attended and enjoyed the
splendid teats ol magic and the
sleight of hand nicks performed by
Tommy Martin. The proceeds of
the show will be used towards the
furnishing of the Community Cen-
ter of the club.

A birthday party will be given in
the Bith David Talmud Torah aud-
it oi-niui at 8 p.m. Sunday. Sponsors
include Mr.-. L. Iirown. Mis. Isidor
Cohen. Mrs. J. Engler. Mr.-. L. Hay-
man. Mis M .1. KopelOWltZ, Mrs C.
Markowltz, Mi.- 8. Myers, Mrs. B.
Kandel, Mis ,1 Katz, Mrs. A Rubin.
Mrs. s. Spector, Mr.- Sydney I-.
Weintraub. Proceeds will go toward
the Talmud Torah. Guests are re-
quested to bring in as many pennies
a.- they are \c ari old.

Celebrating tin eighty seventh
birthday of Adolph iDaddyi Freund.
one hi the oldest living members '>:
Bnai Bi it h. i he Miami branch ol
A. Z. A. i Junior Bnai Brit hi gath-
ered at the home ot Mr Isaac Levin
lasl Tuesdaj night, An informal
Jolly gathering In whn-h group songs
wen rendered by '.he boys, and the
activities oi the organization dis-
cussed followed addresses by Mr.
Freund and Mi. Levin, a meeting
oi the organization will i>.
next Sunday morning hi
10:30 a.m. at Kaplan hall, when
plan- tor the future ol I
zation will be discussed, m
day on May 14, will be celebrated
with a gala event, details ol which
will be discussed at Sunday- meet-
ing. Following the program, re-
freshments were served
Mrs. Jonah E. Caplan will enter-
tain the members of the Books-In-
Brief club next Monday evening,
March 20. at her home, 1466 S. W.
First street. Mrs. Mike Kotkin will
review "Poets Tale.-" by Edgar Al-
len Poe. a ten-minute talk on an
Interesting subject will be given by
Mrs George Goldberg.
Jewish day oi Educational Wei k
for the Blind was observed lasl
Tuesday when a number ol Jewish
organizations helped in an.
luncheon and tea. and aided in the
sale ot articles produced by the
blind. Mrs. Lena Simon v
charge ol -ales, ami Mrs, isuior Co-
in n in charge ol the tea room. Aid-
ing in the work wen representatives
oi the different oi ns in-
cluding Beth David, Temple Israel,
Beth Jacob, Miami j : ,; ortho-
dox. Emunah Chapter. Bisterhi
Chesed Shel Ernes, Ladles' auxiliary
i i tin- ,i. wl li Wi Ifare bureau, Coun-
cil of Jewish Women and
Hadassah.

A call has been issued by the ath-
letic director ol the Hebrew Ath-
letic club for the first diamond ball
practice of I he si ason at Flamingo
park. Miami Beach, this coming
Sunday. March 19. at 2 p.m. All in-
terested are urged to report at the
field promptly.

The University of Miami spring
term will open March 27 with the
addition of many new courses, it
was announced by university offi-
cials.
Re i-tiation for the new term will
be conducted March 22 and 23 in
iniverslty auditorium and ex-
aminations for the winter term will
be laid March 20 and 21.
The department nl philosophy will
be reopened this spring under the
din nion of Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan.
A Chinese supper and bridge W8S
given by the Junior Council of Jew-
ish Women last Tuesday at the Tok-
io Root Garden. Alter supper a pro-
gram was given and cards were
played.
A mu.-icai revue was staged dur-
ing the evening The program in-
cluded Kitty Culbreath, Carolyne
Deason in an acrobatic dance; Alice
Shelton, blui s singer; Madge Deeker,
tap dancer: Helen Deeker, Fay Hut-
cher and Margarel Annsell in a
wait/ clog; Fay Hutcher. tap dan-
Ci : Manila Annsell. acrobatic
dance; Carolyne Dea-nli. sum: and
dance.
During the evenlg fortunes were
Id M: Bessie Wernikofl was
chairman ot arrangements, assisted
by Mrs, M.ie Levin.
longest .-eric.- of big laughs
assembled in one motion pic-
ture sequence, are credited to Har-
old Lloyd's latesi production "Movie
with Constance Cummings,
the flrsl ihe bespectacled comedian
iia. released In two years, winch
comes Sunday and Monday in the
rivoli theatn
Eight minutes ol consecutive
laugh producing incident.- have
been rolled 111 one "faction" of
Movie Crazy," according to reports
ot the picture at different previews
en the Pacific coast, giving Lloyd, as
wi] ,,, every other comedian.
ord 10 shoot at In the future.
Previous to the magician's coat
sequence In 'Movie Crazy" winch
sets the new lauch-making figures.
j Lloyd rated hi- greatest -cries ol
I continuous laughter, the football
scenes and the basted suit episodes
in the "Freshman."
In "Movie Crazy," one '_ag rolls
Into another, and to the satisfied
amazement 01 Lloyd, neither dia-
nor music is heard in Hie en-
tire ball room situation, which runs
virtually the length ol an entire
reel.
There are three, among the nu-
merous laugh factions in "Movie
which stand nut in relief,
and it 1- goum to bedifficull to find
any two persons who will agree
to which is the funniest.
There is a lest scene which \A
novelty and laughs, will be difTicii
to surpass; the magicians coat epl
sode and the fight which climax
ihe story, any one ot which wou
have been sufficient to carry a le
lure length comedy to successful rd
suits.
The annual May Day dance spor^
sored by Junior Hadassah will
held on Sunday, April 30. accordirJ
to an announcement made by jiJ
Lena Weinkle, president ol the oj
ganizatlon. Full details will be aj
nounced in an early Issue.

An important meeting of the LaJ
les' auxiliary of the Jewish Wellar]
bureau will be held at Kaplan
next Monday. March 20. begjnmn
at 2 p.m. All members are urged I
attend.

Mrs. B. Kandel entertained
number of friends for the benefit!
Senior Hadassah when a chickei
,\a- awarded as a prize to Mr.- Fir.ej
gold of New York City.
t
The Junior Com. j
Women will meet at the Ponce
Leon hotel next Tuesday evenind
March 21, at 8:30 p.m All niembej
and friends are urged to attend
FEET HURT?
Dr. Jones' parfait composition irrhl
MPgr1<, a* liuht a* "china." a* Mronrl
at uteel. No leather or ruhher to rot:l
ran he washed. May he worn in any!
typ< 'hoe or slipper. ThMM *upportrr|
are made especially for your fool con-f
ditinn. from a wax and planter impre*-!
-mil of both feel. My profe*Hional rrp-l
ulalion behind this supporter a*.uff*|
>ou tvirv satisfaction. The fee i* S1 .*--1
However, for 10 days thi* adv*rti*fm*ntl
and $10.00 will be accepted in full pay-l
in-"iii. ThU i- a special rash iff".I
|*lea*e phone for appointment 3-2"**.|
DR SIDNEY R. JONES
210 E. Flagler Street
Dr. A. T. Knowles
L".i:in X. W. 17th Ave. Phone I-7JM
MODERN PET HOSPITAL
l.ariie hi.liviilii.il lloarilim Kun-
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SERVING MILLIONS OF PEOPLE ALL OVER THE UNITED BTATBB
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March 17, 1933.
THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
'----WJBIISHKD EVERY FRIDAY
by the
MM KI.ORIDIAN PUBLISHING CO.
Jt 621 S. W. Fifteenth Avenue
[ [(HIS s
P. c
Miami. Florida
i LOUIS SHOCHET, Editor
p, 0. Bo* 2973
Phone 2-1183
Entercil
KM. \'
<>n ,u. potl office at Miami. Florida.
.' !,r
h(. Act "f Mar.h 3, 1879.
' WFST PALM BEA4I1 OFFICE
414 Eihlh Street
Mr-. M. S.hrebnirk. Repreaentative
SUBSCRIPTION
b Mon.h......
UN Vr .------
FRIDAY. MARCH 17, 1933.
Vol. 6, No. 11.
12.00
ST
Fooling the Public
Once again, simple honesty has
prevailed. Dealing with the banking
situation, unparalleled as it was in
recent history, our courageous pres-
ident. Franklin D. Roosevelt, hesi-
tated not one bit. He plunged into
:he facts and in simple, every-day
English told the country that what
:: needed was plain honesty. He hid
behind no veil of meaningless words!
And in the same manner he acted!
In his every act he has determined
:hat .simple honesty must be the
watchword of his administration. He
has taken the American people into
his confidence and they have held
faith with him.
Once amun the Jewish people are
shortly to celebrate that festival
which created the Jewish people,
turned them from a mass of slaves
into a nation of free men. Passover
is just a short time away. Why not
simple honesty in connection with
its observances and customs. Matzo
lids are already appearing in every
Jewish paper throughout the land.
Other articles specially prepared for
hoover use are being offered for
sale, with the assurance that it is
Pesachdig.'' Its use for the Pass-
wer period by many families is be-
ing un;ed with the assurance that
rabbis have been careful in the pre-
paration of these goods.
And yet. in Miami, God's own
tountry. as it has so often been
tailed, preparations are again being
made for Passover. Not. in the spirit
of honesty or fair dealing but with
'he simple thought In mind that
'he public likes to be fooled and the
Public must be gratified that wish.
Stores in this Greater Miami section
are now ordering their wares for the
Passover holidays. Additional char-
Ses are being made because of the
assurance to the public that the ar-
mies that will be offered for sale
are "Pesachdig." Our grocers and
delicatessen stores will soon offer
Pesachdig" cakes for sale that they.
and the bakers who make them,
know are prepared with the ordi-
nary flour and baked in a manner
hat is offensive to everyone who de-
!lres to observe the Passover holiday
>n keeping with the age-old tradi-
;'ons. u is not a matter of religion
"one. it is a matter of simple hon-
'% When cake or any other ar-
:ic'e of food is being offered to the
I Public as "Pesachdig," the baker
[ ind the vendor should be honest
enugh to ascertain that the truth
15 'old. if rt is an article that is not
pesachdig it should be told to the
customer in plain every-day lang-
"*** Signs in the stores should so
"ate.
Thus far we know of no provision
10 Protect the observing public as
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
JEWISH FLORIDIAN-
"Well, I done somethin' about it.
I took another Job. Ifs clerkin
and I guess it ain't gonna bring in
any real dough in the beginnin'.
Forty bucks a week right now. Do
you think we could manage on
that?"
Sadie pulled her man close to her.
"Jeez. Joe. you frightened me. I
thought you had somethin' serious
on your mind. Listen, feller. I love
you. Id live with you if we had to
park in a cell and I had to take in
washin'. You're swell, and I'm nuts
about you."
The boy smiled happily.
"That's great, honey," he replied
softly. "That makes us both pretty
happy. I guess I'm pretty lucky,
baby. It ain't every guy who can
find a clean and decent girlie like
you. I'm lucky all right."
A strange look came into Sadie's
eyes. She started to speak. She
stopped .
They were married. They strug-
gled along in a fairly happy fashion
in a small Brooklyn apartment. But
when the first flush of romance had
passed, Sadie nursed an incessant
gnawing at her conscience.
Day after day and night after
night, an insistent voice whispered
to her that she hadn't been square
with Joe. It told her that he de-
served a decent woman of his own
standard and that when he married
her, he had been cheated.
Not that Sadie hadn't been strictly
on the up-and-up since the day she
had first met Joe. She had been as
decent as any woman could be. It
was simply the fact that she should
have told Joe all about herself be-
fore they were married. And the
thought that her man might now
find out something about her murky
past, haunted the girl and number
her heart with fear.
As the weeks went by. the condi-
tion of the girls mind grew worse
and worse. The thing was torturing
her. Her kLsses were fervent but her
manner was evasive.. The moment
he returned, she searched his eyes
for the one thing she was afraid of
finding. Her nights were sleepless,
her days endless.
Sadie finally decided Uiat she had
to do one of two things. Either she
had to tell him everything at this
stage of the game or she had to
run away from it all. And in her
regards milk. It may be that an at-
tempt will be made to serve the con-
sumer with the usual milk in the
hope that he will not think of ask-
ing the query "Is it Pesachdig?"
Jews, and observant ones, so far as
the home is concerned, are numer-
ous in this section. They should de-
mand that their requirements be
met by those supplying them with
the article all through the year. It
is being done throughout the coun-
try and Miami should be no excep-
tion. It is a matter of simple hon-
esty and nothing else.
Last but not least: We believe
that every synagogue in this section,
particularly Beth David, Beth Jacob
and the Miami Jewish Orthodox
congregation, should take cogniz-
ance of the situation. Yes what
about their rabbis? We know they
are honest and would mislead no
one. Are they courageous? Will
they take the lead? Will they as
true conservators of the Jewish faith
demand that their people be given
what they pay for? Will they de-
mand simple honesty?
frame of mind, escape seemed the
easiest way to beat the rap.
She took the subway to New York
shortly after Joe left for work one
morning and looked around for
some sort of work. A cigarette girl,
perhaps, in some out-of-the-way
speakeasy where none of her old
friends would be liable to see her.
It would never pay to go back to
the old dance hall. Not only would
the girls give her the merry ha-ha,
but Joe would surely find her in no
time.
In the second spot she visited, she
ran into a man she had known very
well in the old days. She tried to
dodge him, but she was too late. The
man came right over to her.
"Hello, kid." he grinned. "Don't
know what you're doin' around here
but I'm glad to see you. Hear you
turned respectable and got married.
Joe B------, wasn't it? Well. I guess
he must have got it bad. too. I never
knew a guy who landed on the up-
and-up with such a bump before.
You certainly musta done him a lot
of good."
The girl's mouth opened.
"Done him good?" she repeated.
"What are you talkin' about?"
The man waved a hand.
"Aw, come off it, kid. You know
as well as I do what Joe's racket
was before he met you."
Sadie's eyes flashed. Her fists
clenched. She was the Sadie of old.
"Listen, you. Another crack like
that and I swear I'll kill you. Joe's
a straight guy. Clean. Honest. Real.
You get that?"
The man waxed sarcastic. "Oh,
yeah? Well, I ain't sayin' what he
is now. From what I been hearin',
you made that much of a monkey
outa him that he's liable to turn
religious or somethin'.
"I'm just tellin' you what he was;
the niftiest safe-cracker this side of
paradise. What he couldn't do with
a safe and the right explosive was
nobody's business. He ."
The man went on with his recita-
tion but Sadie was deaf to the rest
of it. Memory brought back the
night that Joe told her of his change
of jobs: "Had a job Uiat was kind
of dangerous, workin' with explos-
ives like Kinda tough if you got
hitched to a guy who was liable to
be blown to blazes any day Took
another job Forty per Think
v.e could manage on that?" And
the man who was still talking never
knew why Sadie's eyes suddenly be-
came brilliant and she cried:
"Gee, that makes us almost even!"
And a traffic cop, a bunch of
newsboys and a hundred passersby
never knew why a girl suddenly ap-
peared on the street and fledhalf
crying and half laughing into the
nearest subway for Brooklyn .
7ArFACT FINDER
Origin of Panic
Although the word "panic" is now
applied to period of severe financial
distress, it originated on the battle-
field of Marathon. It will be re-
membered in that famed encounter,
that a mere handful of Greeks put
a vast multitude of Persians to
flight, and the honor of the victory
was all given to the god Pan, who
smote the Persians with sudden and
unaccountable fright. They lost all
sense of reason and this condition
of affairs took its name from the
god who was supposed to have
caused it
Glowing with febrile gloom, the city
lies.
Thrusting its bloody tombstones to
the skies,
Threshing about with fever-red-
dened eyes,
And loudly crying.
Through its red streets no milk-
white lamb may stray,
Peace in its blue eyes at the close of
day,
For in the heat the arms of God
decay
And love lies dying.
He: "Have you ever kissed a man
before?"
She: "Y-yes."
He: "Tell me his name so that I
can thrash him."
She: "But but he might be
too many for you."
A writer in one of the house mag-
azines that come to my desk, tells
about a little lesson in punctuation
given him in his youth by an old
schoolmaster.
"Let me show you." said the
schoolmaster, "what a lot of differ-
ence the placing of a comma
makes." And he wrote on the board:
"There's a divinity that shapes
our ends, rough hew them how we
will."
Then he rubbed out the comma
after "ends" and moved it one word
farther along in the sentence with
a result that made the class giggle:
"There's a divinity that shapes
our ends rough, hew them how we
will."
"Sometimes," adds the magazine
writer, "one feels that Shakespeare's
version is correct, and then again
there are times when the old school-
master's punctuation seems more to
the point!"
Remnant of conversation over-
heard in an office building elevator:
"It used to be staple."
"Oh, yeah, it used to be. But noth-
ing is staple these days."
Seems to me there's material for a
business sermon in that remark.
Times change. People change.
Things change. Customs change.
Yesterday's marvels are todays com-
monplaces. If we stand still, we'll be
staple which means we'll quickly
be out of date. We must go on!
The Kansas senate has passed a
bill authorizing the organization of
the Kansas Naval Militia and nam-
ing the governor as admiral.
"Senate, may I go out to sail?"
"Yes, what a pretty notion!
Speed along on a corn-fleld gale.
But don't go near the ocean!"
A girl never objects to the cold
treatment or a young man who or-
ders ice cream.
The rum runners are doing their
bit to brighten the world. But for
their activities at the place we might
never have heard, through the dis-
patches, of the town of Sippiwissett,
Mass.
The upstate golfer, whose ball hit
a running rabbit and killed it.
thinks the ball might drop into the
hole occasionally, too. if the hole
would move around like that. But
a sitting hole never cooperates.
Many a good detective makes light
of his ability as a shadow.
A man is deceiving only himself
when he thinks he is deceiving his
wife.
Most accidents happen in the
home, statistics show, "and are due
to carelessness." I wouldn't have
said carelessness. Sometimes a man
simply has to be in his home, and
there is no way to help it.
Why isn't a lawyer's offer of mar-
riage a legal tender?
Tailors say the best lining for
pockets is cold cash.
A stiff lower jaw is sometimes just
as useful as a stiff upper lip.
Time may be money, but some
men spend a lot of money in trying
to have a good time.
When it comes to matrimonial en-
gagement, every girl thinks she is a
self-appointed board of strategy.
The only prospect some young
men seem to have is that of securing
a wealthy man for their father-in-
law.
Whenever some husbands and
wives agree it is to the effect that
they made a serious mistake in
marrying.
Baseball players as a rule are not
superstitious, but most of them be-
lieve that a home run in time saves
the nine.
Although folks say that Washington
Could never tell a lie,
The fact remains, it can be done.
Perhaps George did not try.
For me it is an easy thing
To juggle with the truth.
For truth quite often has a sting.
A fact I've known since youth.
One thing I've learned as years go
by.
Though great falsehoods I tell.
Only a fool will tell a lie
When the truth will do as well.
If folks can't lie. no credit's due
To them because they don't;
All credit's due the brave chap who
Can lie like heck but won't.
When circumstances bind me hand
and foot.
And sympathy alone is mine to
give,
I wonder what reward there be for
good
Intent. I feel as empty as a sieve
When I would be a vessel, clear and
full
Of water, cooling to your parched
throat.
What good, to sew a patch of bright
blue wool
Upon a beggar's grey and thread-
bare coat?
Now, I have written poetry and
I've tried the essay, too.
The novel, no. But stories, yes;
Although the last are few.
And all the stuff that I have penned
(Except the things I've burned>
Have all been sent to editors
And most of it returned.
I do not know who said it
But what he said was true.
"GTve to the world the best you have
And the best will come back to
you."
'I
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Page lour
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Friday, March 17, \9J)
I
?????????????? + ? : > : ? : > > # ? ? ? ? : ? : ? # 4* *
! 2Ja&i0 ^gnagng Sullrtin
* Edited by KABBI S. M. MACHTEI
4 Founder and Director, Radio Synui:"i- of America
% Sunday Mornings WIOD, Miami, Ilorida
* Vol. 1. SUNDAY, MARCH 12, 1933. No. 14.
The Spirit of Hainan
Scripture Reading, Esther, Chapter 111.
TODAY, the fourteenth Of Actar, we observe the Feast of Esther, Purini,
the Feast of Lots. Jews everywhere rejoice at the recollection of the
downfall of Hainan, the arch-enemy of Israel, and at the failure of his
plot to put to death all the Jews in the Persian Empire of his day
about 485 B. C. E. The Book ol Esther has made the name of Hainan
immortal. Two of his contemporaries have also earned immortality.
Gautama Buddha and Confucius, at the time when Hainan was preach-
ing hatred in Persia, were spreading the gospel of love and humanitarian-
ism on the same Asian continent. All three have influenced later gener-
ations. Buddha and Confucius have been deified by posterity and are
worshipped as Prophets of Divine Truth. Hainan's name is synonymous
with treachery and Intrigue. The former two are spoken of with rever-
ence. Haman is spoken of with scorn and derision. The followers of the
teachings of the Divine Seers and those who live in accordance with their
principles are the beloved of the human race. Those who live by the prin-
ciples of Haman are despised among men.
HAMAN and his sons were hanged. The spirit of Hamanism still lives
on and rears its ugly head from time to time to inject its venom into
the harmonious atmosphere that builds a belter race. As a child, study-
ing literature. I was taught by my teacher that Tago is the example of
the greatest villainy in all literature because he stood to gain nothing by
his treachery to Othello and Desdemona. I have since given that place
of dishonor and infamy to Hainan. He had nothing to gain from his
attack on the Jews. He already held the highest office in Persia. Haman
exemplified villiany in its lowest form and in its highest degree. In the
religious simile of the day, in the Zoroastrian faith of ancient Persia,
I would say that Haman was truly a tool of Ahrimon, the Spirit of
Darkness.
LET us study the reasons that Haman gave to the king for requesting
permission to destroy the Jews: ". and their laws are diverse from
all people neither keep they the king's laws ." This despised people
had the audacity to be different. Their laws, their religious laws, were
diverse from all people. The charge that they did not keep the king's
laws was a false Charge. It was based on the refusal of Mordechai to bow
down to Haman. Because one man refused to prostrate himself before
another human being in a gesture which he reserved for his God alone,
Hainan's perverted mind saw in that sufficient reason to exterminate
an entire people, though Jews with less courage than Mordechai did bow-
down to Hainan.
HAMAN was unfortunate. His plot fell through and he was hanged.
Lesser Hamans in other lands, in later years, have hurled the same
charges against the Jew. The Jew is different. He is not rtatriotic."
These and similar charges have been disproven. The innocence of the
Jew has been acknowledged. The Hamans have survived but the countries
they sought to defend against this Imaginary menace have gone down to
oblivion. Czanst Russia and monarchial Spain are mute evidences of the
truth that the real danger lay in the propagandists and not in the perse-
cuted Jews. Of course the Jews were different. Light is different from
darkness. Harmony is diverse from discord. The laws ot the Jews teach
enlightenment and harmony. The Hamans thrive under cover of dark-
ness and behind a .smoke-screen ol discord. When a political adventurer
and opportunist directs the attention of his nation to the Jews of his
country as a menace it Is a stratagem which seeks to divert the eyes of
the people from his acts in another direction. He rings a fire alarm in a
distant part of the city that all eyes may be centered there while he
plunders the public at a point that is left unprotected during the alarm.
WE celebrate, today, the victory over the Persian Haman. Do you
want to see how really vicious and different we are? Observe our
celebration. We read Uie Book of Esther which recites the entire episode.
At the mention of the name "Haman," children shout and deride him.
But, in accordance with the edict of Mordechai, ". And Mordechai
wrote these things ... To establish this among them, that they should
keep the fourteenth day of the month Adar ... As the days wherein the
Jews rested from their enemies, and the month which was turned unto
them from sorrow to joy, and from mourning into a good day: that they
should make them days of feasting and joy, and of sending portions one
to another, and gifts to the poor ." We celebrate the victory over Evil
by practicing Good. The poor arc remembered on this day and a general
exchange of gifts between friends and neighbors marks the Purim festival.
The local Jewish charity organization has selected this day for its annual
Charity ball which will be held tonight. Purim is the .spiritual antithesis
of Hamanism. The spirit of Haman is destructive. The spirit of Purim is
constructive. Haman advocated plunder. Mordechai preached charity.
Certainly the laws of the Jews were diverse. The evil in Hainan's nature
could not tolerate such goodness. He owed his rise in the king's favor to
his feeding the king's vanity and to his flattering the king's baser emo-
tions and passions.
THE spirit of Haman will ever be in conflict with the spirit of God's
law unto Israel. The bestial will always resent the pure and noble.
The victory will always be with the principles that Israel exemplifies, but,
only as long as the Mordechais refuse to pay homage to the Hamans.
There can be no such compromise with evil. There can be no submission
to the forces of wickedness. If Israel encounters a condition which per-
mits evil to triumph it is indicative of a diseased state within the fold.
Recipes for the
Jewish Family
Cheese Cake
Roll out puff pastry, cut into
rounds, put them on a baking sheet,
brush over with egg. Cut some more
rounds and take centers out with a
small cutter. Place the rings on top
of the rounds, brush the top over
with egg and bake in a quick oven
10 to 15 minutes, or until thoroughly
set. Fill.
Cocoa Cheese Cakes
Line patty pans with good short
paste and put a small quantity of
apricot or green gage jam in the
middle of each. Beat up once ounce
butter and one and one-half ounces
sugar to a cream, add one egg and
one and one-half ounces flour, one
tablespoon milk, one teaspoon cocoa,
a few drops lemon or vanilla es-
sence and a small teaspoon baking
powder. Put a spoonful of this mix-
ture over the jam and cover with
a lattice cross of paste. Bake 10 oi-
ls minutes.
Chocolate Brownies
One cup sugar, one-half cup but-
ter, two eggs, three tablespoons boil-
ing water, three-fourths cup flour,
one cup chopped nut meats, one tea-
spoon vanilla, two ounces chocolate.
Cream butter and sugar together
i a scant half cup of butter is better
than accurate measurement in this
case). Add well beaten eggs, flour;
melt bitter chocolate in the boiling
water and add to mixture. Add flav-
oring and nut meats. Spread thin
on greased cookie sheets. Bake from
14 to 20 minutes in moderate oven.
Cut in squares while hot. Nut meats
may be omitted, if desirable.
Chocolate Nut Fudge Cake
One-half cup fat, one and one-
half cups sugar, one cup milk, one
teaspoon vanilla, one-fourth tea-
spoon salt, two squares chocolate,
melted, one-half cup nuts meats,
broken, two and one-half cups flour.
HON. J. MARK WILCOX
New congressman of the fourth
congressional district.
two teaspoons baking powder, one-
half teaspoon soda, three eggs,
beaten.
Cream fat and sugar. Add rest of
ingredients, beat two minutes. Pour
into loaf pan lined with waxed pap-
er. Bake 50 minutes in moderately
slow oven. Cool and frost.
Irish Koscttes
One-fourth cup mayonnaise, two
packages isix ounces> cream cheese,
one loaf sandwich bread, sweet
pickles.
To mayonnaise, add cream cheese
and blend thoroughly. Remove the
crusts and slice loaf of bread length-
wise. Spread lightly with cream
cheese and mayonnaise mixture.
Place a whole sweet pickle across
end of each slice and roll bread
around pickle. Wrap tightly in wax-
ed paper and put in ice box. When
ready to serve, cut in slices like a
jelly roll.
Cherry Spice Cake
One-half cup butter or lard, one
cup sugar, one teaspoon soda, two
eggs, one cup sour cherries, four
tablespoons sour cream, one tea-
spoon cinnamon, one-hall teaspoon
cloves, one-hall teaspoon nutmeg or
allspice as preferred, two cups flour.
Cream the butter, add sugar and
eggs. Blend well. Add the cherries,
cream, flour with soda and spices.
Nuts may be added. Bake in a layer
or loaf pan in moderate oven.
Look for the root of the evil within the lold. Obey the law which com-
mands "U'viortah ha'raah mikkirbecho" and thou shalt eradicate the
evil from thy midst. Let us be as ready to condemn and to cast out the
evil from within as we are to battle the spirit of Haman from without.
The Torah demands that we be pure and holy. Let us rid ourselves of
Uie impurities.
NOTICE
THE CITY OF MIAMI
Is accepting cither local or out-of-town checks to be applied
as payment of any and all accounts whenever banking facil-
ities will permit payment of checks.
1932 City of Miami taxes become delinquent April l
193 3, and unless checks clear prior to this date taxes will
necessarily be considered as delinquent and property will be
advertised for non-payment of taxes. It is preferable that
all taxes be paid in cash.
Breece's Fish Market
242 N. E. 13th Street Phone 2-7153
IV OUR OWN FISHKKMKS
Now you can buy
\4> f ATTlvBIrrIMORK
LAUNDRY SERVICE
PHONE ,.& **' ""' *"**"
21 N. W. 9TH ST.
tiDS -nsjfc
IN HONOR of
PASSOVER
On Passover the choices! of
everything distinguishes the
Jewish Home. Manischewitz
Motzo and Matzo products
are the choicest of their
kind produced in the larg-
est Kosher Matzo Bakery in
the world. In demand
everywhere.
L MATZO
I
'WOOTHtR MATZO LIKE IT1
in.I, -i Repair Shop in Miaaii
AMERICAN
SHOE SHOP
Miami's Best for
Shoe Repairing
15 S. MIAMI AVENUE
C. E. BARRETT. Prop.
Delaney & Beers
Kodak p'ininhinit and P.nlumlni
( "inim-n ml Work and Honu' Portraits
50% Off on All Amateur Work
212 N. E. Ilh St. Phonr 2-S38S
In the Heart of Your
Neighborhood
PIGGLY
WIGGLY
A Miami Institution
is yovr
CHEAPEST
SERVANT
Useib!


Friday, March 17, 1933.
THE JEWISH FLORIDI AN
rage Five
Tl' Fellowship club of Temple Is-
rael, of which Abe Aronowitz is
ent, will hold open house at
n hall every Sunday night.
Tlir lirst open house will be held
this coming Sunday evening. Bridge,
pinochle and other games will be
enjoyed. The public is invited to
attend. A light lunch will be served.
*
With Norma Shearer as its star,
and one of the most brilliant sup-
posing casts yet assembled for the
speaking screen. Metro-Goldwyn-
MayiT's lavish production of "Smil-
m Through" will be seen Sunday
and Monday at the Seventh Avenue
re.
Miss Shearer in the feminine lead
in the footsteps of Jane
Cowl, who achieved one of her
i successes in the record -
l,n iikmg New York stage run of the
play Horn which the screen produc-
tion was acjapted. Opposite her is
Fredrlc March, borrowed from Par-
mount to play the dual role of
Jeremy Wayne in the mid-Victorian
sequences of the story and Kenneth
B, his son. in the modern
: '
le Howard and O. P. Heggie.
who left the screen to fulfill Btage
mints on Broadway during
past season, were brought back
'ci Hollywood to add further lustre
to Miss Shearer's cast. Both these
distinguished players have appeared
previously with the star. Howard, in
A Free Soul'" and Heggie in "The
. .." The cast also includes
Ralph Forbes, Beryl Mercer. David
Torrence, Margaret Scddon and
+ -
------+
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+
FROM FARM TO
CONSUMER
PERRY'S
DAIRY
Wholesale ami Retail
PHONE 2-7221
Forrester Harvey, under the direc-
tion of Sidney Franklin, who pro-
duced -Private Lives."
"Smilin' Through" is the story of
an old man who seeks to shed the
relentless bitterness of his blighted
romance on a pair of young lovers.
The colorful background provides a
contrast between the England of
1868 and modern day-
Last Wednesday a large number
of tourists and residents attended
the bridge given by the Junior Ha-
dassah at the William Penn hotel.
-Miami Beach. Prizes for high score
were won by Selma Merson, Eliza-
beth Sinsheimer of New York. Rose
(loodmark, Sophie Zonn, L. Block of
Newport News. Va.. Mr.-. Singer, I.eo
Chaikin, and Selma Spoont. In
charge of arrangements were Mrs,
:i Solen, chairman; Ida Cohen.
Betty Greenberg, Selma Spoont.
Marion Blank. Essie Rosenuarlen.
Helen Yunis and Mrs. Ruth Dubbin.
The regular bi-weekly card party
sponsored by the Ladies' auxiliary
ol the Miami Jewish Orthodox con-
gregation will be held Tuesday eve-
ning, March 21. at the vestry rooms
oi its synagogue, 1545 S. W. Third
Street, with Mrs. William Mechlo-
wltz and Mrs. Louis Pallott as the
hostesses. Prizes will be awarded for
high scores and refreshments will
be served. The public is invited to
attend.
*
At a special meeting of the board
of directors of the Junior Chapter
of Hadassah a bridge was planned
for Wednesday. March 29, at a place
to be announced in our next issue.
In charge of arrangements is a com-
mittee headed by Mrs. Jennie Rot-
fort and Miss Bode Goldenblank as
co-chairmen.
Very Latest
NEW LOCATION
Bckroad's Garage
1156 S. W. 5th St.
Authorized RUCO Brake Ser*iee
I'nion Batteries
our i.ii.. i..i.i" Is Your Innuraner
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT
+
+
Drs. Hart & Hart
(Of I'hiraitnl
DR. JOHN J. BART
DR. MARY A. HART
CHIROPODISTS
Nint Years in Miami
Suites 5 and 7
36 East Flagler Street
Phone 2-8538
Radio Synagog
Rabbi S. M. Machtei. founder and
director of the Radio Synagog. will
preach over WIOD Sunday morning
at 10 o'clock on "Cults." In addi-
tion to the sermon there will be
music, hymns, prayers, and a ques-
tion box. The soloist will be Cantor
Nathan Wroobel.

I M'TAIN METSIIEL'S
Glass In Bottom
Boat
Daily 2 p.m. Fare $1.00
See ii,, Submarine (;rd>ns and the
. Hooded Diver at Work
LEAVES PIER NO. 8,
CITY YACHT BASIN.
MIAMI
j DO YOU APPRECIATE
COURTESY
I GOOD FOOD
COMFORT
THEN TRAVEL VIA
saboa&S
Double Daily Through
Sleeping Car Service North
For Information and
Reservations consult agents
or
T. W. LI CKETT. D. P. A.
|M E. Flagler St.. Miami, Fla.
Phones 2-8161 2-6104
+ .
CENTRAL BUSINESS
COLLEGE
Censrem Building
|U N. K 2nd Miami. Fl-
,.,,,-., tuition rate* in history. Pri-
vate tutoring in Spam.h. r rench and
all Commercial .ubjecU. Expert in-
structors. _______________
In the great temperate zone for-
c Bts of South America where the
Gauchos c South American cowboys i
rule undisturbed, the tremendous
pine trees resembling Chinese um-
brellas sway supreme. But around
them are groves of the low growing
smooth-barked, glassy-leafed mate
tree.
To the average American thus tree
means little. To the initiated and
the South American native it means
B delightful gift of nature. It is the
famous Brazilian tea tree. Of the
holly family, it often attains a
height of thirty feet and produces
the drink and the beverage used by
more than twelve million people.
Uruguay gets fourteen thousand
tons of it. Argentina takes 50,000
urns. Paraguay supplies its people
from its own northern forests. Chili.
Bolivia, even Europe uses quantities
ol it. No other tea, to one acquaint-
ed with it. can faintly approach it.
I' is non-habit forming, dispels
hunger, takes the place of bread and '
vegetables, tones up the system and
Invigorates the body, it releases In-
tense subconscious strength. Abso-
lutely alone and used as a tea. II
will support life for weeks on end.
it is nannies to the heart and
nerves, and because of the small
percentage of tannin it is far better
lor the kidneys than any other bev-
erage.
The Bureau of Foreign and Do-
mestic Commerce, Washington. D.
C. recently reported: "Fortunately,
however, there are a few products
ol nature, that when properly pre- ]
pared, will largely satisfy the crav-
ing for exhiliration or stimulation
without inducing intoxication and '
without injurious effect attendant
upon the more powerful drinks
above alluded to. Among the vari-
ous stimulants whose effects are
really beneficial there is Paraguay
tea. a plant of South American ori-
gin from which the aborigines pre-
pared a drink long before Columbus
discovered America. This drink is
not so well known throughout the
world, although it is now the favor-
ite drink of perhaps 25.000.000 people
in South America."
The Jesuits who helped build
South America, soon discovered this
remarkable product of nature and
began to develop its cultivation. In
recent years it has been ground and
dried to enable the product to be
shipped.
In this country we knew but little
of it until recently. Then when it.s
medicinal and stimulative qualities
bi '.in to become known its use has
increased and today in one form or
another it is gradually becoming one
of the most popular fountain drinks.
In our own Miami, hard working
Dr. Charles Tannenbaum. who has
been winning his way into trie
hearts of the Shenandoah section
for many years, began to experi-
ment with the mate tea. Because of
his long experience with the ills of
the people, and his pharmaceutical
knowledge, he soon arrived at the
proper method of preparing the
drink. And then the romance of
MA-TAY finally budded. Only the
] best of the South American herb
! would do in the American "Ma-Tay"
j that "Doc," as he is best known, or-
| iginated. Now already continually
in demand at the best soda foun-
tains, the tea itself will soon be
supplied to every grocer so that it
CD I?C Bring this ad with
M. IVJL/JLy you and get Foun-
tain Pen or Pencil with five gal-
lons of regular Gas ,u posted
price. Get acquainted with the
GARLICK
STATIONS
j These Pens and Pencils are gu&r-
anteed tor life. Drive in at any
I of the following stations and get
! your gift from Garlick:
I 2090 iliarayne Blvd. Cat 1IM Street!
Hi-, ITM Blvd. and 1.1th St.
I Kant Side Circle)
1.177 S. W. Kiuhlh Slr,-.-t
.1010 N. W. Seventh Avenue
1501 N. W. Seventh Avenue
im.'i West Flatter Street
Garlick for Quality

GAUTIKR FlJNKRAL
Service, Inc.
514 W. Flagler St.
PHONES 2-8421 2-8422
R. A. Gautier, President
E. E. Carter, Sec'y and Treas.
Two spring frocks that are much
alike and yet so different. They are
alike in the bell-shaped short sleeve,
in waist and in neck lines. On the
left, however. Is a frock of two-
toned crepe, on the right a silk
print jacket-suit dress that will be
gay for the bright sunshine oi late
April and early May.
There is a slight pull to the bod-
ice of the crepe frock. From the
bowed neck-line to top of the in-
verted V of skirt top there Is a full-
ness remindful of Gibson-girl days.
The sleeve tells its own story, a full-
ness at elbow which makes for com-
fort. An "Eleandore" blue with
white crepe bodice, worn with a
jaunty blue bow and hat make a
most interesting spring appeal.
The silk-print suit may be worn
with or without the jacket. There
are short, slightly puffed, three-
quarter sleeves in the dress. The
jacket fastens at the neck with a
bow tie of self material. It may be
in as bright patterns as the wearer
wishes in ushering in the new sea-
son.
may be taken cold or hot. just as
the individual taste demands.
The Jewish people, long known as
a tea-drinking people, like their tea
strong. That wish may be gratified
with the added satisfaction that it
will aid in building health, rather
than injure it. To the Jew, its nerve
comforting qualities will be a real
boon.
THE
MACCABEES
Insurance With a Heart
writes
Ordinary Life
o
Twenty Payment Life
o
Income at Sixty
o
Income at Sixty-five
o
Endowment
Certificates
o
Complete Protection
Single Premium Certificates for
Men, Women and Children .
Child's Certificate pays full ben-
efit at age four in case of death.
Openings for district managers
at St. Petersburg. Palm Beach
and other cities.
Where you will find the
verj latest styles and prise.
to satisfy you and everyone
of the family.
GROVE'S SHOE
COMPANY
44 \. Miami Ave.
(Col "'it anil mall)
A. II. COFFIN, State Manauer.
The MaeeabeeM.
it( S.vhold Bids., Minmi. l-'la.
I am interested in knowing more ahout
llu Mi, i ill,.-,. I trtltcatra. My acre in.....
Name

Leeds Institute01 Physical Correction
Natural Health Builders
Incorporated
Successfully treating Arthritis, Colitis. Aridosis. Rheumatism,
Sciatica. Lumbago, Stomach and Intestinal Disorders Eye
Treatments. Spine and Foot Corrections Mineral Salt. Vapor,
Colonic and Reducing Baths.
Scientific Massage Graduate Attendants
DR. V. L. SINGI.EY, President
rii,hi,- 2-34.14. 20K0 I;.....mi Boulevard. Miami, and
Brcakera Hotel, Miami Bearh Phone 5-3215



Paj;e Six
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Iriday, March 17, 1935
'
"Get Rid of The
Gangsters"
PRESIDl NT Of JEWISH
WELFARE BUR1 AV
Reprint from Philadelphia Record,
I ebruary 26. 1933.
Fifteen thousand people were
crowded 111 and around Miami's
Bayfront park when Gutseppi Zan-
gara attempted to assassinate Pr -
ldent-elect Roosevelt, six times the
would-be as as In Bred, and five in-
nocent spectators, Including; Mayor
Ccrmak of Chicago, and Mrs Joe
Gill, a prominent society woman,
wounded.
In that wild crowd was Dan Har-
die. Dade county sheriff. This 54-
year-old official was on the plat-
form. 50 feet from the assassin.
Without any hesitation he sprang
from his seat, hurtled hlmsell
through the screaming mob and
threw himsell on the gunman. Both
went down and were .subjected to
the kicks and blows ot the angry
crowd that was demanding a lynch-
ing.
But Hardie was tin- sheriff. His duty
was to enforce the law. to protect
his prisoner. He arose from the
ground, guarded his captive, carried
him to the rear of an automobile
and placed him on the trunk rack.
and then planted himsell on top of
the man so that the mob wouldn't
wreak it.s vengeance. And thus Zan-
gara went to jail.
They call Dan Hardie the best
sheriff in America Twenty years
ago he served two terms as sheriff.
The people ot Dade county, desiring
a change, recalled him to again take
the job. He took office on January
1.
Born in St. Louis, he ran away
from home at 13. He became an ad-
venturous wanderer. He took to
beating his way about North Amer-
ica. He shipped before the mast. He
fought in wars, and even attempted
to smuggle men into Alma '
the H'" r in heir struggle against
North Miami district. The opera-
tors of the dives gave him six weeks
to get. They ot.
Single-handed, he has captured
bank-robbers, cattle rustlers and
mail robbers. He put law and order
the workings ol Dan Hardie's mind.
1 arrive at what Is In this sher-
iff! mind, and what lie's lighting
almost single-handed as far as of-
. and the presi are con-
M med carrj out bis plans, one
must ;at away Horn the past tew
ami consider condition 01
n.in .1 u rntory that was nearl;
large as the state ol New Jersey, yeal
And he practically did 1. single- for. [0vernment went to the high-
, esl bidder and beiorc racketeering
J lit IlUt'G.
The background ol Sheriff Har- and gamblin th got sostrom
Not alone is it that tlay could control cities, coun-
die 1. pectacular.
romantic, but ii gave to him vision-
ary powers and an insight Into hu-
man nature that lew officials ever
possi ss.
In one ol his 'rips around the
world he gave lectures 111 Japan.
India and the Philippine Isl-
ands
,, : and 1 vi i. reach out into
.1 rnment.
lie built a home on Palm Island.
aj:, thi tree! was the home ol
friend. John Orr, now dead
a block away was the home of A!
see Hardie put out of the way. There
are gangsters who growl and threat-
en, newspapers that speak of the in.
jury that has happened to the win-
ter visitors who want to play and
gamble, and indignation meeting,
among certain crowds that find the
money isn't to be had any
more.
Here is a sheriff who takes over
an olficc that formerly was held by
a man who committed suicide be-
cause- graft and corruption not tn(,
upper hand. An office that was held
a lew years before by a sheriff that
was charged with murder.
But there is a growing
among the common people in Dade
Capone, while three blocks further county and throughout the

rnvoLi;
W. Hauler al Mh Phone 2-3.15:
Sunda> ami Monday, Mar. h 1'' -"
HAROLD I.I.OYD in
I
!
"Movie Crazy" !
The
i ii-at inn of th*1 >var.
I
: : : : : : : : : : : : : : *+*
.-. Inaiafl >n ><>ur Grocer giving you
: NEW YORK BREAD & CAKE
* COMPANY
j BREAD AND CAKES
J ITI B. w. Mh St. Phone 1-7851
X Branch Store: ISS V W. Sth St.
::::::.
- +
BARGAINS
I in mothl i" country.
Hardie arrived in Florida when
that stale wa.s the last frontier. It
was just a trick of fate and his love
ol adventure that brought him
there He had stopped in Jackson-
ville and was trying to find a boat
on which to go to Africa. "They say
It's a wild country, and I'd like to
see It." he told a steamship man.
"If you are looking lor a wild
country, go to Fort Pierce. Fla.." re-
plied the steamship man. "It's the
wildest place m the world." And
the youngster, alter he landed there
and looked around, admitted it. For
two years he beachcombed around
Hillsboro Inlet. For five weeks he
and a companion subsisted on noth-
ing but gophers and palmetto buds.
Both were practically naked.
a passing boa; gave Hardie the
chance to get out ol the beach-
combing business. He shipped and
landed in Nassau. Bahamas. 'Hun
he worked for two years on the old
: hotel. He heard the call ol
the Spanish-American war. and en-
in Company P ol I he Fust
Infantry.
ii* erved seven months m Cuba,
and then shipped on a boat that
wove in and out ol the West Indies
Ix months. He left the ship and
managed to secure a small craft for
himsell. in that boat he readied
Miami, anchoring the Aral night In
where his home now stands.
In Miami he helped (hop down
the trees on Plagler street, Hi i ol
a dollar a day for that. He pushed
a wheelbarraw for the famous Royal
Palm hotel. He received ST a week
for that. He then learned the paint-
ing busines became a contractor
and built the first Are station In
Miami.
Entering politics, Hardie was
elected sheriff 111 1908. He promised
an out a hell hole known as
+---------------------------------------+
,,,. ,,,.,..,, ,] SUb. he South'i and They feel that here is om
exclusive gambling casinos. who has something else n.
on- was attacked by racki aln while In ollice. An official who
believes the best way to cut out
graft is to stop Its source, to cut out
the cankers and give the rest a
chance u> heal.
And it is not without the realm of
reasoning to hand the credit to thi-
sheriff, so honest that when a few
weeks ago a group of gamblers 0(-
fered to take off the load of $39,-
000 that he owes, provided he gave
them the right to operate, he turned
it down. It is estimated that Hardie
could have taken in $150,000 in grali
during his term if he had so de-
sired.
"Stop the rackets and you stop
the graft. Stop the graft and you'll
get better men for public office. Un-
der present political conditions, al-
most every man who seeks public
oil ice is called a crook before the
election is Jield. They can call me
whatever they like, but when they
do. take a look at who is doing the
talking."
ject of honesty In government.
He astonished other officials when
ira claimed i.e couldn't speak
English. Hardie spoke to him In
Italian. He !>' IK \cial Othei
languages, all ol winch he picked
up while roving and seeking adven-
ture.
This background not alone pro-
vided the sheriff with an under-
standing of men. but it gave him
something on which to fathom the
mysteries that surround the govern-
ment oi men. For he typifies, de-
spite his years and he's hale and
hearty what pioneer stock really
contains.
To fathom this man and the rea-
sons he Is both popular and unpop-
ular, one has to glance further into
the scheme oi government.
When Dan Hardie was campaign-
ing last year for sheriff, he stood
firmly on a platform that was not
alone startling, but one that put
fear Into the hearts oi both a cer-
tain class ol officeholders and a cer-
tain class ot men that dominate!
officeholders, ^
South Florida lias been a play- |
ground lor tourist.-. Its climatic con- |
dilicms attracted the wealthy. With |
the arrival ol the wealthy, came the .
crowd- that live by their wit! Coi
fidence men. wire-tappers, racki
eei ind i angsters pushed In and
fastened themselves to the commun-
breedlng crime and corrup- >
'ion. and opening up an era ol graft
that brought lucrative returns to
thi i officials and fixers who got in
the know.
"Why." commented in. heriff,
"should a lew dishonest Of]
out their whole communities?"
in that statement one can read
right in front oi Hardie's home, and
Hardie who picked him up
arried him home. Orr n pre-
sented a type ol business man that
could see things m the ,-amc huh:
as the sheriff. They both paid tax-
es They weri' both overburdened
with debts. They wen1 both honest.
mething must be wrong," .-aid
heriff. "Why should the peo-
n\ei burdened with taxes? We
have plenty ol |ail We have plen-
ty ol tourists, new homes, new ho-
tels, new apartments, Yet the cos:
Hi government increases, and we do
nut uc the government we pay for."
The answer was that government
has entwined itself with commer-
cialized vice. Out-of-town gamblers,
by putting SO much money on tIn-
line, were allowed to operate Gam-
bling and vice were protested The
very thing that Officials were sworn
to abolish ua- allowed to live.
There are many who would like to
DENTISTRY
50 Per Cent Off
8PEI I \l. PRO! ESS l-l \TK
Hiuh-nrade leeth, good qoalitj Veil
mil*, regular -I value, onlj IS
lr Ml.
Ill c l II I Will' MM \| I
I nbreahablf plates, 151 value
-i: ,ii
U l.so\ IN
(ienuine S. S. While, guaranteed
not i hanai c olor. arp breali
in" value. 133.0a.
Kea-ulat 12 Silver Filllnei si.cm
1'ainleni Extraction as l<,* a- S0c
I .
r----------------------------------------
We Never Close!
The I n.1,1 Cannot be /! The S, 11 k Unexcelled
The Price \.i//'lii< tory
lo Hi
l >nn In On. > and w H III
See v ,u Dallj
BISHOP & m. air
.'Jl WEST PLAGLER
Extra Special
CRYSTALLIZED FRUIT
Beautiful 1-lb. baskets
Beg. price 7,a: box ....
FLORIDA PECAN ROLLS
7.1c;
I I
50c
50c
Regular price
1 Bos .........
I WHOLE CRYSTALLIZED
I GRAPE FRUITS
I Killed with Crystallised
Fruits .................
20-I.lt. DELUXE BOX
Consisting of assorted Florida
Fruits, l><>\ of Candies, bag of pp- I
cans and jar of
.telly, only......
50c
l l
l l
l l
l
I
I
$2.25
Meet the Gang
at
W< )LPERT'S
GRILL
'ill IK KAN DRIVE
MIAMI BBAI II
QRAND
OPENINQ
Dr. Neuenschwander
OPTOMETRIST
A First < lass Optical Seriici
al .i Reasonable Price
Rhodes Jewelry Store
IK So. Miami Ale
"I I ITT lloi us a io e
11 mi- ,,. |. ... .,,,,1 v, ted
Dr\ Sanborn
103 N. E. SECOND ST.
Opposite i alholli i nun h
Phone .'-i n.ii
+-----------------------------------

Miami Plating
Works. Inc.
Chromium, Nickel. Tin. Silver
and Gold Plating
I I II N. I), 2nd Avc. Phone MM!
-+
I I
I I
Alexander Orr, Jr., Inc.
Plumbini
Wisteria Fruit
& Pres'g Go.
Iluy nnd Sate Mnnev al
Manufacturer..
10 S. E. FIRST AVENUE
\.\i to Holland Inn ltVUurant
I l
l I
l l
I I
I I
l I
+ +
Saturday,
March 18
ICE CREAM CONES
FREE ALL DAY
Look til Your Complexion
F K E E
One Jar of
WONDER
HI cue It Cream
with order
I iimi and Me the demonstration nI
hnih of llu- Tip Top Groeerj Storea.
Wonder lllearh Cream will give llu*
Mifi ajon uf milurnl beauty to your
.kin. I'ur personal attention, rail at
1ST N. E. I'Hh Street, from 1:30 to
' p.m.
PHONE 2-4981.
miwii iii:\i n
11-'-' 16th St. I'h..... : ill
'
and I [eating
MIAMI
IS N. \v. :inl si. Phone ': II
OPEN
li Ml \
A Nil
SI XI. \ 1
SEE THE PR/M/r/1 / / VERGLADES AT
MUSA ISLE
Seminole Indian Village
OPEN
DAIL1
A Nil
SIMI.M
Go Weal
I I \u EK8HIP c Mill WILLIAM OSCBOLA
v \\ i..,i,.i,mi, am,,,,, ..,,, suteenth street
yn Klaxler Streel lo Twenij nevenlh Avenue, Turn North
LARGEST COLLECTION OF CAPTIVE ALLIGATORS
AND CROCODILES
COMPLETE FLORIDA SWAMP ZOO AND MUSEUM
TO GET THKRR r!2' "'"' '' :' !' lml ,IM Wr'-">' ,hl' Alltartor
on I ., .,,niir, '"', '" '"r' '" "' >!< tal ..n Flaaler and north
I, .,, J h Avenue. ..r ,a.hl "Mi.ru.hla" !.>.-. Pier f.. City V.rht
- p. m. tall) i,i. or, peedboal "Speedee" fn.m Kli.ridian .....k.
Miami Beach.

T\ Sanitarium.
\ \s"KfC/iro/itc Cases
fZATES-K.casonaMc-Sec/6rBO0M.U
Miami -^---- Ftorida
NCCVOLS?
DRINK
MA-TAY
.<
Fountains and Bottles
1 A& n, | INNENBAI M, Oriflrwtoi
5'


Full Text

PAGE 1

0 e Jewi$li Florid Ian feu. x ""• J LORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, MARCH 17, 1933. Price Five Cents Statewide News .Petersburg, Fla. National Effort Ladies Sponsor Charity Ball Making Headway Synagog Dinner Is Gala Event Announcements! i t .iii set vIces begin al 8 Rabbi A. 8. Klelnfeld [ the subject ol his serl oll %  ••;.. i Qolden Precepts obii1 and Duty." Saturday mornIs services begin at 9 o'clock, SunL v s ,i.. c lasses at io a.m. sun[ Hebrew school daily at 4 The musical drama "Queen EsI .11 at the Elks hall last ir.clay i verting drew a large crowd. I ryone enjoyed .same imLnsely. Credit must be given to Lbbi Kleinfeld. who composed the LMC and directed the play. [Members ol Congregation Bnai krad and friends are invited to atc.d the ceremonies to be held on %  joday evening. March 19. of profiting a Sefer Torah to the synague. Notable .speakers will be pre.sm and refreshments will be served. happ i Is HI store for everyi sic ikes.will be hostess | social hour, after Friday ei \ices. [acksonvillc, Fla. Ladies' Hebrew Shelterini lid Son. iv and Home toi the Aged held an anniversarj social I .iiion ni officers at the liter. for the evening were labbi Morris D. Margolis ol the §ewi>li Community Center. Rev later. Rev. D. Kasachkolf. Nathan I ph Wilensky and Abe Iranian Mr. SchevitZ was toast I On thi entertainment program I il numbers by Mrs. A. f ompanled by Mrs M. B. : Lucille Weslerlield. acfttpanl d by Mr. Meyer; Bernie (erman, accompanied by Mrs. Wii(>n; readings by Miss Fannie Horoi violin solo by Miss Mice ompanled by Mrs. Archie Mdy. Mrs. Wilson was program I Other chairmen in charge arran cements were Mrs. Fred | %  refreshments, and Mrs. L. Blattner, tables. JOBicers installed were headed by \ renkO as president, and %  as honorary past presiIt-m. T1 anlzatlon is the only Jew rellel organization In Jacksonf 1 surrounding territory and pcentlv took as its objective the e of a home for aged deli WSi and the housing of Why .Jewish transients. It is pro| this institution will have wn home and will be statewide •it ure. Many of the cities of Jorthein Florida and even adjoining [ I Georgia have enthusiastic| domed the project. Mrs. SofRnko. who is president, is devoting 111 of her time to the fulfillment of r's worthy object. i i anlzatlon ol local drives in connection with the national appeal ol the Joint Distribution committee is proceeding rapidly in many communities throughout the country, Dr. Wise reported, and a sympathetic Interest Is being manifested in the plight ol eastern European Jews ai well as a willingness to aid in providing emergencj reliel measun necessary al this tune. "While the response to our appeal has thus far been most satisfactory," Dr. Wise declared, "I must urge the necessity of immediate action in making relief funds available. The -situation ol millions of our brethern overseas is critical. Any delay or withholding of relief at this time cannot but react dangerously. It is imperative that we rush them the relatively modest amount necessary to support continued child feeding and to keep their own relict agencies from collapse." The National Advisory Campaign committee, now in process of formation, already lists over a hundred outstanding Jewish leaders who have accepted sponsorship of the appeal. Dr. Wise revealed, and many national Jewish organizations and societies have offered their support and cooperation. A congregational dinner will be sponsored by the Ladies' auxiliary oi the Miami Jewish orthodox congregation at t hi %  ii o ue on Sunvening, March L'li. beginning at 7 p.m. in addition to the supper a pro'.'.ram ol entertainment will be provided for the entertainment of the guest-. In chai'je of arrangements is a committee headed by Mrs. Nathan Adelman as chairman and Mrs. William Klein, assistant chairman, Reservations for this affair may be made by calling 2-7930 or _'-0879. Hadassah Holds Purim Festival Cantor to Appear In Concert Soon One ol the finest concerts ol the current season will be the concert to be held at the Beth Jacob synaMiaml Beach, on Sunday evening, April L'. when Cantor Boris Schlachma'n ot the congregation will be heard m a repertoire of traditional liturgical music, and Jewish folk songs. Cantor Schlachman has served a number oi congregations in Philadelphia. Georgia, Alabama and for several years was cantor of Belli David congregation, Miami. He has acted as cantor for the past four years at Beth Jacob congregation, where he has been greatly admired and praised for the splendid manner ol ins rendition of the traditional services at his congregation. During i ne season he has been in great demand at every Jewish affair in this locality Beach to Hold Spring Festival Last Monday afternoon Hadassah celebrated the twenty-first anniversary of its founding with a Purim celebration at the Miami Acacia club in the Congress building. Mrs. Freda Lutzky. president of the senior chapter, presided. The clubrooms were decorated in the blue and white Jewish national colors. Among the speakers of the afternoon were Rabbi Mux Shapiro of Beth David congregation, who spoke on "Jewish Women of Today," Mrs. Max Dobrin read an essay on Palestine which was heard with great interest. Cantor Boris Schlachman of Beth Jacob congregation. Miami Beach, sang a number ot Jewish selections. Thi musical entertainment was provided by Mrs. F. Ross of Brooklyn. N. Y.. and Miss Myra Mirsky, who rendered several piano solos. The social hour was in charge of Mrs. Frances Williamson and Mrs Belle Wesson. Refreshments included the traditional Ii i-coi ncied "Hainan Ta-hen," One of the gala events of the current season was the sixth annual Chanty ball sponsored for the benefit ol the Jewish Welfare bureau Though confronted with the difflCUlties caused by the banking holiday the committee In charge, headed by Mrs. Bertha B. Levy, determined that they would carry on because ol the necessity confronted m meeting with the relief of the poor and needy wards of the organization. Their good judgment was vindicated by the more than 350 guests who attended and spent one of the most enjoyable evenings of the year Bert Reisner. in addition to being master of ceremonies, sang a number of vocal selections and kept the entertainment moving from beginning to end. A rapid kaleidoscopic picture was kept going. Between dancing to the tunes of the Floridian orchestra, under the direction of Mickey Cherep, Danny Sheehan. Betty Lanzer, Albert Robertson. Al Parker, Frances Kane, the Farr Sisters, Chester Alexander and other of the star artists now showing in the different night clubs, entertained with a number of vaudeville acts. Sunday Schools Observe Purin CONGREGATION BETH JACOB (Orthodox) 311 H ., !.!• .-inn Aiis. Miami lirarh L. AXELROD, Rabbi Earlj services bi gin at 5:45 with the late services at 8:30 when Rabbi Axelrod will preach a sermon on "The Golden Calf of 1933." Saturday morning the rabbi will deliver a discourse in Yiddish on "Parsho Poro." Cantor Boris Sclilacliman will conduct all services and lead the congregational singing. TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI (Reform I 137 N. K. Nineteenth Street DR. JACOB H. KAPLAN, Rabbi Services begin at 8:15 and the rabbi will have as the subject of his sermon "Religion, Like Banks, Unless Reconstructed Must Fail." After the services a reception will be held in Kaplan hall so that visitors may meet each other. BETH DAVID CONGREGATION (Concervative) 139 N. W. Third Avenue MAX SHAPIRO, Rabbi Jewish Worker Is Club Delegate Mrs Lena Simon, prominent communal worker of Miami and president oi the Senior Council ol Jewish. Women, left last Wednesday to attend the convention ot the State Federation of Women's Clubs which Is being held at Avon Park this week. Mrs. Simon was named as one of the delegates to represent the | Miami Woman's club. She will return to the city the latter part ol this week. Final preparations have been made lor what promises to be one ,ii the outstanding events ol the current season by Beth Jacob Sisterhood, The event which is the annual spring festival sponsored by the organization, will be held at the Floridian hotel, Miami Beach, on Sunday evening, March 26, beginning at 9 p.m.. and in addition to the dancing will feature an evening of entertainment In which many of the stars oi the local night dubs will participate. Mrs. Barney Weinkle is chairman ol the committee directing the affair and she is being aided by Rabbi L. Axelrod. Cantor Boris Schlachman, I. L. Mintzer. H. I. Lipton and Harry Wasserman. Club To Hold Open House In line with its announced policy of welcoming all Jews of Miami within its quarters, the Hebrew Athletic club will sponsor a house party at the Community Center Sunday evening. March 19. Card games, billiards, ping pong and all other facilities of the club will be placed at the disposal of guests free of charge. A program of entertainment will be provided. The public is urged to attend. Purim was observed last Sunday morning m the Sunday schools of Miami's synagogues with programs and entertainment-, A: Temple Israel the program under the direction ot Rabbi Dr. J. H. Kaplan and the religious committee ol the temple sisterhood consisted ot a Purim costume party. Following the program Hainan Tashen" were distributed to the children. At the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation a spontaneous Purim play was presented in which all the children took part under the direction ol Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan. Alter the singing of SOngS, a committee ol the Ladies' auxiliary presented each child with a "Hainan Draycr." candy and a Ham.in Tash." At Beth David conlon each Child was presented with candy and a "Hainan Tash" by the sisterhood alter the pn which was eiven under the direction ol Rabbi Max Shapiro of the congregation, A mask party was held and prizes awarded for the besi tnines to Marcella Schwartz, Stanley Hayman and Ellse Backer, Prizes I r the best entertainers were awarded to Lovey Friedman. Sarah Rose Schwartz and Anna Feldman. At the Beth Jacob congregation. Miami Beach. Mrs. Freda Lutzky directed the program at a Purim concert in which the following participated: June Rase Toursh. Sydney Besvinick. Jean Weinberg. Irving Goldstein. Lionel Ginsler. Irene Fixler. Dorothy Goldstein. The angel dance featured Jean Miller, Beatrice Dansky and Lillian Marcus. Recitations, dances and piano solos were offered during the entertainment. Assisting Mi's. Lutzky were Miss Marion Levy and Miss Belle Siegel. The regular early services begin at 6 p.m. with the late services at 8 p.m. when Rabbi Shapiro will preach on "Damaged Souls in Israel," based on the recent novel by Leon ZolotkofT. "Vilna to Hollywood." Cantor Louis Hayman will chant the services, assisted by the choir. A social hour will follow. MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CONGREGATION (Orthodox) l.-.l.-. S. W. Third Street JONAH E. CAPLAN, Rabbi Regular services begin at 5:45 with the late services at 8:30 when Rabbi Caplan will preach a sermon on "Purity, the People's Aim." The usual chanting and congregational singing will be had. Saturday mom. %  lei b. nil at 9 a.m. Mincha services begin at 5 pan. with the sh.ilnsh Saudah following at 5:30 and the 1 Marriv service immediately after Synagog to Hold General Meeting A general meeting of the members ol the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation to which the members of its Ladies' auxiliary have been invited will be held at the synagogue Monday evening. March 20. beginning at 8:30 p.m. A number of prominent guest speakers will be heard in a discussion of vital problems affecting the Jews of today. Following the business meeting a social program will be presented and refreshments will be served. All members and their friends are urged to attend. ; I i



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Paj;e Six THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Iriday, March 17, 1935 "Get Rid of The Gangsters" PRESIDl NT Of JEWISH WELFARE BUR1 AV Reprint from Philadelphia Record, I ebruary 26. 1933. Fifteen thousand people were crowded 111 and around Miami's Bayfront park when Gutseppi Zangara attempted to assassinate Pr ldent-elect Roosevelt, six times the would-be as as In Bred, and five innocent spectators, Including; Mayor Ccrmak of Chicago, and Mrs Joe Gill, a prominent society woman, wounded. In that wild crowd was Dan Hardie. Dade county sheriff. This 54year-old official was on the platform. 50 feet from the assassin. Without any hesitation he sprang from his seat, hurtled hlmsell through the screaming mob and threw himsell on the gunman. Both went down and were .subjected to the kicks and blows ot the angry crowd that was demanding a lynching. But Hardie was tinsheriff. His duty was to enforce the law. to protect his prisoner. He arose from the ground, guarded his captive, carried him to the rear of an automobile and placed him on the trunk rack. and then planted himsell on top of the man so that the mob wouldn't wreak it.s vengeance. And thus Zangara went to jail. They call Dan Hardie the best sheriff in America Twenty years ago he served two terms as sheriff. The people ot Dade county, desiring a change, recalled him to again take the job. He took office on January 1. Born in St. Louis, he ran away from home at 13. He became an adventurous wanderer. He took to beating his way about North America. He shipped before the mast. He fought in wars, and even attempted to smuggle men into Alma the H'" r in %  heir struggle against North Miami district. The operators of the dives gave him six weeks to get. They ot. Single-handed, he has captured bank-robbers, cattle rustlers and mail robbers. He put law and order the workings ol Dan Hardie's mind. 1 arrive at what Is In this sheriff! mind, and what lie's lighting almost single-handed as far as of. ,„ and the presi are conM med carrj out bis plans, one must ;at away Horn the past tew ami consider condition 01 n.in .1 u rntory that was nearl; large as the state ol New Jersey, yeal And he practically did 1. singlefor. [0 vernment went to the high, esl bidder and beiorc racketeering J lit IlUt'G. The background ol Sheriff Harand gamblin th got sostrom Not alone is it that tlay could control cities, coundie 1. pectacular. romantic, but ii gave to him visionary powers and an insight Into human nature that lew officials ever possi ss. In one ol his 'rips around the world he gave lectures 111 Japan. India and the Philippine Islands ,, : and 1 vi i. reach out into .1 rnment. lie built a home on Palm Island. AJ : thi tree! was the home ol %  friend. John Orr, now dead A block away was the home of A! see Hardie put out of the way. There are gangsters who growl and threaten, newspapers that speak of the i n jury that has happened to the winter visitors who want to play and gamble, and indignation meeting, among certain crowds that find the money isn't to be had any more. Here is a sheriff who takes over an olficc that formerly was held by a man who committed suicide becausegraft and corruption not t n( upper hand. An office that was held a lew years before by a sheriff that was charged with murder. But there is a growing among the common people in Dade Capone, while three blocks further county and throughout the rnvoLi; W. Hauler al Mh Phone 2-3.15: Sunda> ami Monday, Mar. h 1'' -" HAROLD I.I.OYD in I "Movie Crazy" The i II -at inn of th* 1 >var. I •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• *+* .-. Inaiafl >n ><>ur Grocer giving you •:• NEW YORK BREAD & CAKE COMPANY j BREAD AND CAKES J ITI B. w. Mh St. Phone 1-7851 X Branch Store: ISS V W. Sth St. :• %  : % %  :• %  : %  •: %  •:•••. + BARGAINS I in mothl i" country. Hardie arrived in Florida when that stale wa.s the last frontier. It was just a trick of fate and his love ol adventure that brought him there He had stopped in Jacksonville and was trying to find a boat on which to go to Africa. "They say It's a wild country, and I'd like to see It." he told a steamship man. "If you are looking lor a wild country, go to Fort Pierce. Fla.." replied the steamship man. "It's the wildest place m the world." And the youngster, alter he landed there and looked around, admitted it. For two years he beachcombed around Hillsboro Inlet. For five weeks he and a companion subsisted on nothing but gophers and palmetto buds. Both were practically naked. A passing boa; gave Hardie the chance to get out ol the beachcombing business. He shipped and landed in Nassau. Bahamas. 'Hun he worked for two years on the old : hotel. He heard the call ol the Spanish-American war. and enin Company P ol I he Fust Infantry. ii* erved seven months m Cuba, and then shipped on a boat that wove in and out ol the West Indies Ix months. He left the ship and managed to secure a small craft for himsell. in that boat he readied Miami, anchoring the Aral night In • where his home now stands. In Miami he helped (hop down the trees on Plagler street, Hi i ol a dollar a day for that. He pushed a wheelbarraw for the famous Royal Palm hotel. He received ST a week for that. He then learned the painting busines became a contractor and built the first Are station In Miami. Entering politics, Hardie was elected sheriff 111 1908. He promised an out a hell hole known as + + ,,,. ,,,.,..,, ,]„ SU b. he South'i and They feel that here is om • exclusive gambling casinos. who has something else n. onwas attacked by racki aln while In ollice. An official who believes the best way to cut out graft is to stop Its source, to cut out the cankers and give the rest a chance u> heal. And it is not without the realm of reasoning to hand the credit to thisheriff, so honest that when a few weeks ago a group of gamblers 0 (fered to take off the load of $39,000 that he owes, provided he gave them the right to operate, he turned it down. It is estimated that Hardie could have taken in $150,000 in grali during his term if he had so desired. "Stop the rackets and you stop the graft. Stop the graft and you'll get better men for public office. Under present political conditions, almost every man who seeks public oil ice is called a crook before the election is Jield. They can call me whatever they like, but when they do. take a look at who is doing the talking." ject of honesty In government. He astonished other officials when ira claimed i.e couldn't speak English. Hardie spoke to him In Italian. He •!>' IK %  \cial Othei languages, all ol winch he picked up while roving and seeking adventure. This background not alone provided the sheriff with an understanding of men. but it gave him something on which to fathom the mysteries that surround the government oi men. For he typifies, despite his years and he's hale and hearty what pioneer stock really contains. To fathom this man and the reasons he Is both popular and unpopular, one has to glance further into the scheme oi government. When Dan Hardie was campaigning last year for sheriff, he stood firmly on a platform that was not alone startling, but one that put fear Into the hearts oi both a certain class ol officeholders and a certain class ot men that dominate! officeholders, ^ South Florida lias been a play| ground lor tourist.-. Its climatic con| dilicms attracted the wealthy. With | the arrival ol the wealthy, came the crowdthat live by their wit! Coi fidence men. wire-tappers, racki eei ind i angsters pushed In and fastened themselves to the communbreedlng crime and corrup> 'ion. and opening up an era ol graft that brought lucrative returns to thi i officials and fixers who got in the know. "Why." commented in. heriff, "should a lew dishonest Of] out their whole communities?" in that statement one can read right in front oi Hardie's home, and Hardie who picked him up arried him home. Orr n presented a type ol business man that could see things m the ,-amc huh: as the sheriff. They both paid taxes They weri' both overburdened with debts. They wen 1 both honest. mething must be wrong," .-aid heriff. "Why should the peon\ei burdened with taxes? We have plenty ol |ail We have plenty ol tourists, new homes, new hotels, new apartments, Yet the cos: Hi government increases, and we do nut uc % %  the government we pay for." The answer was that government has entwined itself with commercialized vice. Out-of-town gamblers, by putting SO much money on tInline, were allowed to operate Gambling and vice were protested The very thing that Officials were sworn to abolish uaallowed to live. There are many who would like to DENTISTRY 50 Per Cent Off 8PEI I \l. PRO! ESS l-l \TK Hiuh-nrade leeth, good qoalitj Veil %  mil*, regular -I value, onlj IS l„r Ml. Ill c l II I Will' MM \| I I nbreahablf plates, 151 value -i: ,ii U l.so\ IN (ienuine S. S. While, guaranteed not i„ hanai c olor. arp • %  • breali •in" value. 133.0a. Kea-ulat 12 Silver Filllnei si.cm 1'ainleni Extraction as l<,* aS0c I r We Never Close! The I n.1,1 Cannot be /!<•//. i The S, 1 1 K • Unexcelled The Price \.i//'lii< tory lo Hi l >nn In On. > %  and w %  H III See v ,u Dallj BISHOP & m. AIR .'Jl WEST PLAGLER Extra Special CRYSTALLIZED FRUIT Beautiful 1-lb. baskets Beg. price 7,a•: box .... FLORIDA PECAN ROLLS 7.1c; I I 50c 50c Regular price 1 Bos I WHOLE CRYSTALLIZED I GRAPE FRUITS I Killed with Crystallised Fruits 20-I.lt. DELUXE BOX Consisting of assorted Florida Fruits, l><>\ of Candies, bag of ppI cans and jar of .telly, only 50c l l l l l l l I I $2.25 Meet the Gang at W< )LPERT'S GRILL 'ill IK KAN DRIVE MIAMI BBAI II QRAND OPENINQ Dr. Neuenschwander OPTOMETRIST A First < lass Optical Seriici al .i Reasonable Price Rhodes Jewelry Store IK So. Miami Ale "I I ITT lloi us a io e 11 mi,,. |.„„ ... .,,,,1 v, ted Dr\ Sanborn 103 N. E. SECOND ST. Opposite i alholli i nun h Phone .'-i n.ii + Miami Plating Works. Inc. Chromium, Nickel. Tin. Silver and Gold Plating I I II N. I), 2nd Avc. Phone MM! -+ I I I I Alexander Orr, Jr., Inc. Plumbini Wisteria Fruit & Pres'g Go. Iluy nnd Sate Mnnev al Manufacturer.. 10 S. E. FIRST AVENUE \.\i to Holland Inn ltVUurant I l l I l l I I I I l I + + Saturday, March 18 ICE CREAM CONES FREE ALL DAY Look til Your Complexion F K E E One Jar of WONDER HI cue It Cream with order I iimi and Me the demonstration nI hnih of lluTip Top Groeerj Storea. Wonder lllearh Cream will give llu* Mifi ajon uf milurnl beauty to your .kin. I'ur personal attention, rail at 1ST N. E. I'Hh Street, from 1:30 to '• p.m. PHONE 2-4981. MIWII III:\I n 11-'-' 16th St. I'h : ill and I [eating MIAMI IS N. \v. :inl si. Phone ': II OPEN li Ml \ A Nil SI XI. \ 1 SEE THE PR/M/r/1 / / VERGLADES AT MUSA ISLE Seminole Indian Village OPEN DAIL1 A Nil SIMI.M Go Weal I I \u EK8HIP c Mill WILLIAM OSCBOLA v \\ I..,„I,.I,MI, AM,,,,, ..,,„, suteenth street yn Klaxler Streel lo Twenij nevenlh Avenue, Turn North LARGEST COLLECTION OF CAPTIVE ALLIGATORS AND CROCODILES COMPLETE FLORIDA SWAMP ZOO AND MUSEUM TO GET THKRR r!2' "'"' '' : lml ,IM Wr '-">' ,hl Alltartor on I .,„ .,,niir, '"' '" '" r '" "' >!•< %  tal ..n Flaaler and north I, .,, J £ !" h Avenue. ..r ,a.hl "Mi.ru.hla" !. %  >.-. Pier f.. City V.rht p. m. tall) i,i.„ or, %  peedboal "Speedee" fn.m Kli.ridian k Miami Beach. T\ Sanitarium. \ \s"KfC/iro/itc Cases fZATES-K.casonaMc-Sec/6rBO0M.U Miami -^ Ftorida NCCVOLS? DRINK MA-TAY .<• Fountains and Bottles 1 A& N, | INNENBAI M, Oriflrwtoi 5'



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March 17, 1933. THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN WJBIISHKD EVERY FRIDAY by the •MM KI.ORIDIAN PUBLISHING CO. Jt 621 S. W. Fifteenth Avenue [ [(HIS s P. c Miami. Florida i LOUIS SHOCHET, Editor p, 0. Bo* 2973 Phone 2-1183 Entercil KM. \' <>nn keeping with the age-old tradi; 'ons. u is n ot a matter of religion "one. it is a matter of simple hon'%• When cake or any other ar:ic 'e of food is being offered to the I Public as "Pesachdig," the baker [ in d the vendor should be honest en ugh to ascertain that the truth 15 'old. if rt is an article that is not p esachdig it should be told to the c ustomer in plain every-day lang"*** %  Signs in the stores should so "ate. Thus far we know of no provision 10 Protect the observing public as JEWISH FLORIDIAN JEWISH FLORIDIAN"Well, I done somethin' about it. I took another Job. Ifs clerkin — and I guess it ain't gonna bring in any real dough in the beginnin'. Forty bucks a week right now. Do you think we could manage on that?" Sadie pulled her man close to her. "Jeez. Joe. you frightened me. I thought you had somethin' serious on your mind. Listen, feller. I love you. Id live with you if we had to park in a cell and I had to take in washin'. You're swell, and I'm nuts about you." The boy smiled happily. "That's great, honey," he replied softly. "That makes us both pretty happy. I guess I'm pretty lucky, baby. It ain't every guy who can find a clean and decent girlie like you. I'm lucky all right." A strange look came into Sadie's eyes. She started to speak. She stopped They were married. They struggled along in a fairly happy fashion in a small Brooklyn apartment. But when the first flush of romance had passed, Sadie nursed an incessant gnawing at her conscience. Day after day and night after night, an insistent voice whispered to her that she hadn't been square with Joe. It told her that he deserved a decent woman of his own standard and that when he married her, he had been cheated. Not that Sadie hadn't been strictly on the up-and-up since the day she had first met Joe. She had been as decent as any woman could be. It was simply the fact that she should have told Joe all about herself before they were married. And the thought that her man might now find out something about her murky past, haunted the girl and number her heart with fear. As the weeks went by. the condition of the girls mind grew worse and worse. The thing was torturing her. Her kLsses were fervent but her manner was evasive.. The moment he returned, she searched his eyes for the one thing she was afraid of finding. Her nights were sleepless, her days endless. Sadie finally decided Uiat she had to do one of two things. Either she had to tell him everything at this stage of the game —or she had to run away from it all. And in her regards milk. It may be that an attempt will be made to serve the consumer with the usual milk in the hope that he will not think of asking the query "Is it Pesachdig?" Jews, and observant ones, so far as the home is concerned, are numerous in this section. They should demand that their requirements be met by those supplying them with the article all through the year. It is being done throughout the country and Miami should be no exception. It is a matter of simple honesty and nothing else. Last but not least: We believe that every synagogue in this section, particularly Beth David, Beth Jacob and the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation, should take cognizance of the situation. Yes what about their rabbis? We know they are honest and would mislead no one. Are they courageous? Will they take the lead? Will they as true conservators of the Jewish faith demand that their people be given what they pay for? Will they demand simple honesty? frame of mind, escape seemed the easiest way to beat the rap. She took the subway to New York shortly after Joe left for work one morning and looked around for some sort of work. A cigarette girl, perhaps, in some out-of-the-way speakeasy where none of her old friends would be liable to see her. It would never pay to go back to the old dance hall. Not only would the girls give her the merry ha-ha, but Joe would surely find her in no time. In the second spot she visited, she ran into a man she had known very well in the old days. She tried to dodge him, but she was too late. The man came right over to her. "Hello, kid." he grinned. "Don't know what you're doin' around here but I'm glad to see you. Hear you turned respectable and got married. Joe B wasn't it? Well. I guess he must have got it bad. too. I never knew a guy who landed on the upand-up with such a bump before. You certainly musta done him a lot of good." The girl's mouth opened. "Done him good?" she repeated. "What are you talkin' about?" The man waved a hand. "Aw, come off it, kid. You know as well as I do what Joe's racket was before he met you." Sadie's eyes flashed. Her fists clenched. She was the Sadie of old. "Listen, you. Another crack like that and I swear I'll kill you. Joe's a straight guy. Clean. Honest. Real. You get that?" The man waxed sarcastic. "Oh, yeah? Well, I ain't sayin' what he is now. From what I been hearin', you made that much of a monkey outa him that he's liable to turn religious or somethin'. "I'm just tellin' you what he was; the niftiest safe-cracker this side of paradise. What he couldn't do with a safe and the right explosive was nobody's business. He ." The man went on with his recitation but Sadie was deaf to the rest of it. Memory brought back the night that Joe told her of his change of jobs: "Had a job Uiat was kind of dangerous, workin' with explosives like Kinda tough if you got hitched to a guy who was liable to be blown to blazes any day Took another job Forty per Think v.e could manage on that?" And the man who was still talking never knew why Sadie's eyes suddenly became brilliant and she cried: "Gee, that makes us almost even!" And a traffic cop, a bunch of newsboys and a hundred passersby never knew why a girl suddenly appeared on the street and fled—half crying and half laughing — into the nearest subway for Brooklyn 7ArFACT FINDER Origin of Panic Although the word "panic" is now applied to period of severe financial distress, it originated on the battlefield of Marathon. It will be remembered in that famed encounter, that a mere handful of Greeks put a vast multitude of Persians to flight, and the honor of the victory was all given to the god Pan, who smote the Persians with sudden and unaccountable fright. They lost all sense of reason and this condition of affairs took its name from the god who was supposed to have caused it Glowing with febrile gloom, the city lies. Thrusting its bloody tombstones to the skies, Threshing about with fever-reddened eyes, And loudly crying. Through its red streets no milkwhite lamb may stray, Peace in its blue eyes at the close of day, For in the heat the arms of God decay And love lies dying. He: "Have you ever kissed a man before?" She: "Y-yes." He: "Tell me his name so that I can thrash him." She: "But —but —he might be too many for you." A writer in one of the house magazines that come to my desk, tells about a little lesson in punctuation given him in his youth by an old schoolmaster. "Let me show you." said the schoolmaster, "what a lot of difference the placing of a comma makes." And he wrote on the board: "There's a divinity that shapes our ends, rough hew them how we will." Then he rubbed out the comma after "ends" and moved it one word farther along in the sentence with a result that made the class giggle: "There's a divinity that shapes our ends rough, hew them how we will." "Sometimes," adds the magazine writer, "one feels that Shakespeare's version is correct, and then again there are times when the old schoolmaster's punctuation seems more to the point!" Remnant of conversation overheard in an office building elevator: "It used to be staple." "Oh, yeah, it used to be. But nothing is staple these days." Seems to me there's material for a business sermon in that remark. Times change. People change. Things change. Customs change. Yesterday's marvels are todays commonplaces. If we stand still, we'll be staple —which means we'll quickly be out of date. We must go on! The Kansas senate has passed a bill authorizing the organization of the Kansas Naval Militia and naming the governor as admiral. "Senate, may I go out to sail?" "Yes, what a pretty notion! Speed along on a corn-fleld gale. But don't go near the ocean!" A girl never objects to the cold treatment or a young man who orders ice cream. The rum runners are doing their bit to brighten the world. But for their activities at the place we might never have heard, through the dispatches, of the town of Sippiwissett, Mass. The upstate golfer, whose ball hit a running rabbit and killed it. thinks the ball might drop into the hole occasionally, too. if the hole would move around like that. But a sitting hole never cooperates. Many a good detective makes light of his ability as a shadow. A man is deceiving only himself when he thinks he is deceiving his wife. Most accidents happen in the home, statistics show, "and are due to carelessness." I wouldn't have said carelessness. Sometimes a man simply has to be in his home, and there is no way to help it. Why isn't a lawyer's offer of marriage a legal tender? Tailors say the best lining for pockets is cold cash. A stiff lower jaw is sometimes just as useful as a stiff upper lip. Time may be money, but some men spend a lot of money in trying to have a good time. When it comes to matrimonial engagement, every girl thinks she is a self-appointed board of strategy. The only prospect some young men seem to have is that of securing a wealthy man for their father-inlaw. Whenever some husbands and wives agree it is to the effect that they made a serious mistake in marrying. Baseball players as a rule are not superstitious, but most of them believe that a home run in time saves the nine. Although folks say that Washington Could never tell a lie, The fact remains, it can be done. Perhaps George did not try. For me it is an easy thing To juggle with the truth. For truth quite often has a sting. A fact I've known since youth. One thing I've learned as years go by. Though great falsehoods I tell. Only a fool will tell a lie When the truth will do as well. If folks can't lie. no credit's due To them because they don't; All credit's due the brave chap who Can lie like heck —but won't. When circumstances bind me hand and foot. And sympathy alone is mine to give, I wonder what reward there be for good Intent. I feel as empty as a sieve When I would be a vessel, clear and full Of water, cooling to your parched throat. What good, to sew a patch of bright blue wool Upon a beggar's grey and threadbare coat? Now, I have written poetry and I've tried the essay, too. The novel, no. But stories, yes; Although the last are few. And all the stuff that I have penned (Except the things I've burned> Have all been sent to editors And most of it returned. I do not know who said it But what he said was true. "GTve to the world the best you have And the best will come back to you." • 'I I



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Friday, March 17, 1933. THE JEWISH FLORIDI AN rage Five Tl' Fellowship club of Temple Israel, of which Abe Aronowitz is ent, will hold open house at n hall every Sunday night. Tlir lirst open house will be held this coming Sunday evening. Bridge, pinochle and other games will be enjoyed. The public is invited to attend. A light lunch will be served. • • With Norma Shearer as its star, and one of the most brilliant supposing casts yet assembled for the speaking screen. Metro-GoldwynMayiT's lavish production of "Smilm Through" will be seen Sunday and Monday at the Seventh Avenue •re. Miss Shearer in the feminine lead in the footsteps of Jane Cowl, who achieved one of her i successes in the record l,n iikmg New York stage run of the play Horn which the screen production was acjapted. Opposite her is Fredrlc March, borrowed from Parmount to play the dual role of Jeremy Wayne in the mid-Victorian sequences of the story and Kenneth B, his son. in the modern %  : le Howard and O. P. Heggie. who left the screen to fulfill Btage • mints on Broadway during past season, were brought back 'ci Hollywood to add further lustre to Miss Shearer's cast. Both these distinguished players have appeared previously with the star. Howard, in A Free Soul'" and Heggie in "The .." The cast also includes Ralph Forbes, Beryl Mercer. David Torrence, Margaret Scddon and + •+ I I I I I I + + FROM FARM TO CONSUMER PERRY'S DAIRY Wholesale ami Retail PHONE 2-7221 Forrester Harvey, under the direction of Sidney Franklin, who produced -Private Lives." "Smilin' Through" is the story of an old man who seeks to shed the relentless bitterness of his blighted romance on a pair of young lovers. The colorful background provides a contrast between the England of 1868 and modern dayLast Wednesday a large number of tourists and residents attended the bridge given by the Junior Hadassah at the William Penn hotel. -Miami Beach. Prizes for high score were won by Selma Merson, Elizabeth Sinsheimer of New York. Rose (loodmark, Sophie Zonn, L. Block of Newport News. Va.. Mr.-. Singer, I.eo Chaikin, and Selma Spoont. In charge of arrangements were Mrs, :i Solen, chairman; Ida Cohen. Betty Greenberg, Selma Spoont. Marion Blank. Essie Rosenuarlen. Helen Yunis and Mrs. Ruth Dubbin. The regular bi-weekly card party sponsored by the Ladies' auxiliary ol the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation will be held Tuesday evening, March 21. at the vestry rooms oi its synagogue, 1545 S. W. Third Street, with Mrs. William Mechlowltz and Mrs. Louis Pallott as the hostesses. Prizes will be awarded for high scores and refreshments will be served. The public is invited to attend. • • At a special meeting of the board of directors of the Junior Chapter of Hadassah a bridge was planned for Wednesday. March 29, at a place to be announced in our next issue. In charge of arrangements is a committee headed by Mrs. Jennie Rotfort and Miss Bode Goldenblank as co-chairmen. Very Latest NEW LOCATION Bckroad's Garage 1156 S. W. 5th St. Authorized RUCO Brake Ser*iee I'nion Batteries our i. II.. i..i.i" Is Your Innuraner OPEN DAY AND NIGHT + + Drs. Hart & Hart (Of I'hiraitnl DR. JOHN J. BART DR. MARY A. HART CHIROPODISTS Nint Years in Miami Suites 5 and 7 36 East Flagler Street Phone 2-8538 Radio Synagog Rabbi S. M. Machtei. founder and director of the Radio Synagog. will preach over WIOD Sunday morning at 10 o'clock on "Cults." In addition to the sermon there will be music, hymns, prayers, and a question box. The soloist will be Cantor Nathan Wroobel. I M'TAIN METSIIEL'S Glass In Bottom Boat Daily 2 p.m. — Fare $1.00 See ii,, Submarine (;rd>ns and the Hooded Diver at Work LEAVES PIER NO. 8, CITY YACHT BASIN. MIAMI j DO YOU APPRECIATE COURTESY I GOOD FOOD COMFORT THEN TRAVEL VIA saboa&S Double Daily Through Sleeping Car Service North For Information and Reservations consult agents or T. W. LI CKETT. D. P. A. |M E. Flagler St.. Miami, Fla. Phones 2-8161 2-6104 + CENTRAL BUSINESS COLLEGE Censrem Building |U N. K 2nd *•• Miami. Fl ,.,,„,-., tuition rate* in history. Private tutoring in Spam.h. r rench and all Commercial .ubjecU. Expert instructors. In the great temperate zone forc Bts of South America where the Gauchos c South American cowboys i rule undisturbed, the tremendous pine trees resembling Chinese umbrellas sway supreme. But around them are groves of the low growing smooth-barked, glassy-leafed mate tree. To the average American thus tree means little. To the initiated and the South American native it means B delightful gift of nature. It is the famous Brazilian tea tree. Of the holly family, it often attains a height of thirty feet and produces the drink and the beverage used by more than twelve million people. Uruguay gets fourteen thousand tons of it. Argentina takes 50,000 urns. Paraguay supplies its people from its own northern forests. Chili. Bolivia, even Europe uses quantities ol it. No other tea, to one acquainted with it. can faintly approach it. I' is non-habit forming, dispels hunger, takes the place of bread and vegetables, tones up the system and Invigorates the body, it releases Intense subconscious strength. Absolutely alone and used as a tea. II will support life for weeks on end. it is nannies to the heart and nerves, and because of the small percentage of tannin it is far better lor the kidneys than any other beverage. The Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Washington. D. %  C. recently reported: "Fortunately, however, there are a few products ol nature, that when properly pre] pared, will largely satisfy the craving for exhiliration or stimulation without inducing intoxication and without injurious effect attendant upon the more powerful drinks above alluded to. Among the various stimulants whose effects are really beneficial there is Paraguay tea. a plant of South American origin from which the aborigines prepared a drink long before Columbus discovered America. This drink is not so well known throughout the world, although it is now the favorite drink of perhaps 25.000.000 people in South America." The Jesuits who helped build South America, soon discovered this remarkable product of nature and began to develop its cultivation. In recent years it has been ground and dried to enable the product to be shipped. In this country we knew but little of it until recently. Then when it.s medicinal and stimulative qualities bi '.in to become known its use has increased and today in one form or another it is gradually becoming one of the most popular fountain drinks. In our own Miami, hard working Dr. Charles Tannenbaum. who has been winning his way into trie hearts of the Shenandoah section for many years, began to experiment with the mate tea. Because of his long experience with the ills of the people, and his pharmaceutical knowledge, he soon arrived at the proper method of preparing the drink. And then the romance of MA-TAY finally budded. Only the ] best of the South American herb would do in the American "Ma-Tay" j that "Doc," as he is best known, or| iginated. Now already continually in demand at the best soda fountains, the tea itself will soon be supplied to every grocer so that it CD I?C Bring this ad with M. IVJL/JLy you and get Fountain Pen or Pencil with five gallons of regular Gas ,u posted price. Get acquainted with the GARLICK STATIONS j These Pens and Pencils are gu&ranteed tor life. Drive in at any I of the following stations and get your gift from Garlick: I 2090 iliarayne Blvd. Cat 1IM Street! Hi-, ITM Blvd. and 1.1th St. I Kant Side Circle) 1.177 S. W. Kiuhlh Slr,-.-t .1010 N. W. Seventh Avenue 1501 N. W. Seventh Avenue IM. 'i West Flatter Street Garlick for Quality GAUTIKR FlJNKRAL SERVICE, INC. 514 W. Flagler St. PHONES 2-8421 2-8422 R. A. Gautier, President E. E. Carter, Sec'y and Treas. Two spring frocks that are much alike and yet so different. They are alike in the bell-shaped short sleeve, in waist and in neck lines. On the left, however. Is a frock of twotoned crepe, on the right a silk print jacket-suit dress that will be gay for the bright sunshine oi late April and early May. There is a slight pull to the bodice of the crepe frock. From the bowed neck-line to top of the inverted V of skirt top there Is a fullness remindful of Gibson-girl days. The sleeve tells its own story, a fullness at elbow which makes for comfort. An "Eleandore" blue with white crepe bodice, worn with a jaunty blue bow and hat make a most interesting spring appeal. The silk-print suit may be worn with or without the jacket. There are short, slightly puffed, threequarter sleeves in the dress. The jacket fastens at the neck with a bow tie of self material. It may be in as bright patterns as the wearer wishes in ushering in the new season. may be taken cold or hot. just as the individual taste demands. The Jewish people, long known as a tea-drinking people, like their tea strong. That wish may be gratified with the added satisfaction that it will aid in building health, rather than injure it. To the Jew, its nerve comforting qualities will be a real boon. THE MACCABEES Insurance With a Heart writes Ordinary Life o Twenty Payment Life o Income at Sixty o Income at Sixty-five o Endowment Certificates o Complete Protection Single Premium Certificates for Men, Women and Children Child's Certificate pays full benefit at age four in case of death. Openings for district managers at St. Petersburg. Palm Beach and other cities. Where you will find the verj latest styles and prise. to satisfy you and everyone of the family. GROVE'S SHOE COMPANY 44 \. Miami Ave. (Col "'it anil mall) A. II. COFFIN, State Manauer. The MaeeabeeM. it( S.vhold Bids., Minmi. l-'la. I am interested in knowing more ahout llu Mi, i ill,.-,. I trtltcatra. My acre in Name LEEDS INSTITUTE 0 1 PHYSICAL CORRECTION Natural Health Builders Incorporated Successfully treating Arthritis, Colitis. Aridosis. Rheumatism, Sciatica. Lumbago, Stomach and Intestinal Disorders — Eye Treatments. Spine and Foot Corrections — Mineral Salt. Vapor, Colonic and Reducing Baths. Scientific Massage — Graduate Attendants DR. V. L. SINGI.EY, President rii, HI,2-34.14. 20K0 I; mi Boulevard. Miami, and Brcakera Hotel, Miami Bearh — Phone 5-3215



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Page Two FLOR I D I AN I-'riday, March I 17 19)1 The intlurnre oi the patriarchs ot scripture upon future generations will be the subject of the Bible lesson which Rabbi S. M. Machtci will discuss with the Bible study class at 11 o'clock Sunday morning at the home of Maj. Kaufman Mandel, 3012 S. W. Eighth Street. The tone of the lessons is non-sectarian and everyone is Invited to attend these (hisses regardless ol church affiliations. • • • Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Traeger are spending their honeymoon In the interior of Cuba on the Las Llanos banana plantation on the southeast coast where tiny are the house guests of Senor Jose Ramon Fernandez. They will remain at the haeendado for one month and then return to Miami via steamer. Mr. Traeger is the general manager for the Cuban American Exporting Company with offices at Miami. Fla. A regular meeting nt the Junior Hadassah will be held on Monday evening. March 21, beginning at 8 pin. in the Spanish room of the Ponce de Leon hotel. All members are urged to attend. In char [( I : the program that will be presented during the evening are the Misses rATLANTIC SHOE SHOP Opposite Corcti Hotel 240 N. E. FIRST AVE. (Juality Mm. Kepairinic All Work (.uarnnti ed SPECIAL Half Soles. 25c Pair Ladies' Heels, 10c Pair TOURS CRUISES STEAMSHIP TICKETS TRAVELERS CHEQUES Remittances to All Foreign Countries \rr.inr. your PUHW Trip to Pali -Inn through American Express Company 330 E. FLAGLER ST. Miami Tel. 3-3178 Droakfut 7 t.. 10 IlitilMT .... .". In S Lunch 11 to S iSO DAVIS ("AFEThRIA :i:t N. K. S n.I v.. Oppo !'< %  Halcyon Hotel Efficient Service Boy] to carry your tray ••:• •, %  • <• •*.' -i•; •*.• •;* •! •> •> •:• *;• •> •;• •!• •*.> •;• •:* •!CRYSTAL SPRINGS WATER An Ideal Table Water T Pure, litcht, aparklinir. palatable. X refrenhinK. Awarded Silver Medal ... St. I.innI' |i...ii Inn and highest ,;. award for purity and excellence, v l.ouuiana Purrhane Kxpoiiition. + PHONE 2-3645 92 N. E. 28th Street The physical culture class directed by Mrs. Bertha B. Levy met at the grounds of the Hebrew Athletic club last Monday morning for the first time and will continue to meet there every clay of the week excepting Saturday and Sunday. All interested in the work of this class may join any morning at 9 a.m. The charge is a nominal one and the proceeds are devoted to local welfare work. • • Mrs. Pauline Scheinberg will entertain with a bridge luncheon at her home this afternoon for the benefit of the Jewish Welfare bureau. Prizes will be awarded for high scores. The public is urged to attend as a very enjoyable afternoon Is promised. The social order ot Mt. Olivet Beatitudes met at the home ol Bea Proctor for their first meeting. The meeting was in charge of Ida Engler. Light of Uie East. Officers lei led were president. Martha Fielder; vice president, Blanche Seai>. and secretary-treasurer, Bea Proctor. Jig saw puzzles were played after the meeting and refreshments i served The nexl meeting was held at the home of Miss Ida Engler, 1637 s. w. Eleventli street on i hursday evening. • Mr. M. siiverman oi the Jacksonville Journal was a visitor m Miami ast week, spending his vacation with his sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mis Philip Berkowitz of this city 6 • • Mr and Mrs Stanley C Myers are being congratulated upon the birth of a baby boy last Saturday at the Victoria hospital. The bris will be celebrated next Sunday morning. Mother and baby are doing nicely. NEW 7TH AVENUE THEATRE 303.1 N. W. 7th Ave. Phone 2-.1.1.12 ADULTS 20c — CHILDREN 10c Sunday and Monday, March 19-30 NORMA SHEARER in "SmiliiV Throuoh" lh mo-t h< .mill ul slory ewr screened. Box Office Open* ,"t:l."i Sunday A (OMI'LKTK DINNER ~" (i, l Bverj Da) iiml Evening II :.'lll to III p.m. and All Da) Sunday 25c Uilh Soup. Mint or Ki-h. Salad. Poflatoca, Green Vegetable*, Tea %  ir Coffee, Demit, lloi Hulland orn Muffin.. Open 6 a.m. lo Ml p.m. CIVIC LINCII. h Incorporated 10 N. W. First Street I DR. I. 11. YARHOROUGII VETERINARIAN Dogs (.'lipped, Plucked and Bathed 26.13 N. W. 36th St. Phone 2-ISIS +-+++++*****->** ******* •>+* HOME SERVICE LAUNDRY MRS. CLARA l). KER8ET, Prop. 1225 S. W. 6th St. Mending and buttons sewed on free of charge. Called for and delivered. One of the besi entertainments oi the season was the show sponsored by the Hebrew Athletic club lasl Wednesday night at Kaplan hall when Lesta the magician featured the program. About a hundred [uests attended and enjoyed the splendid teats ol magic and the sleight of hand nicks performed by Tommy Martin. The proceeds of the show will be used towards the furnishing of the Community Center of the club. • A birthday party will be given in the Bith David Talmud Torah audit oi-niui at 8 p.m. Sunday. Sponsors include Mr.-. L. Iirown. Mis. Isidor Cohen. Mrs. J. Engler. Mr.-. L. Hayman. Mis M .1. KopelOWltZ, Mrs C. Markowltz, Mi.8. Myers, Mrs. B. Kandel, Mis ,1 Katz, Mrs. A Rubin. Mrs. s. Spector, Mr.Sydney I-. Weintraub. Proceeds will go toward the Talmud Torah. Guests are requested to bring in as many pennies a.they are \c ari old. • • Celebrating tin eighty seventh birthday of Adolph iDaddyi Freund. one HI the oldest living members '>: Bnai Bi it h. i he Miami branch ol A. Z. A. i Junior Bnai Brit hi gathered at the home ot Mr Isaac Levin lasl Tuesdaj night, An informal Jolly gathering In whn-h group songs wen rendered by '.he boys, and the activities oi the organization discussed followed addresses by Mr. Freund and Mi. Levin, A meeting oi the organization will i>. next Sunday morning hi 10:30 a.m. at Kaplan hall, when plantor the future ol I zation will be discussed, M day on May 14, will be celebrated with a gala event, details ol which will be discussed at Sundaymeeting. Following the program, refreshments were served Mrs. Jonah E. Caplan will entertain the members of the Books-InBrief club next Monday evening, March 20. at her home, 1466 S. W. First street. Mrs. Mike Kotkin will review "Poets Tale.-" by Edgar Allen Poe. A ten-minute talk on an Interesting subject will be given by Mrs George Goldberg. Jewish day oi Educational Wei k for the Blind was observed lasl Tuesday when a number ol Jewish organizations helped in an. luncheon and tea. and aided in the sale ot articles produced by the blind. Mrs. Lena Simon v charge ol -ales, ami Mrs, isuior Coin n in charge ol the tea room. Aiding in the work wen representatives oi the different oi ns including Beth David, Temple Israel, Beth Jacob, Miami j : ; orthodox. Emunah Chapter. Bisterhi Chesed Shel Ernes, Ladles' auxiliary i i tin,i. wl li Wi Ifare bureau, Council of Jewish Women and Hadassah. • • • A call has been issued by the athletic director ol the Hebrew Athletic club for the first diamond ball practice of I he si ason at Flamingo park. Miami Beach, this coming Sunday. March 19. at 2 p.m. All interested are urged to report at the field promptly. • • The University of Miami spring term will open March 27 with the addition of many new courses, it was announced by university officials. Re i-tiation for the new term will be conducted March 22 and 23 in iniverslty auditorium and examinations for the winter term will be laid March 20 and 21. The department nl philosophy will be reopened this spring under the din nion of Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan. A Chinese supper and bridge W8S given by the Junior Council of Jewish Women last Tuesday at the Tokio Root Garden. Alter supper a program was given and cards were played. A mu.-icai revue was staged during the evening The program included Kitty Culbreath, Carolyne Deason in an acrobatic dance; Alice Shelton, blui s singer; Madge Deeker, tap dancer: Helen Deeker, Fay Hutcher and Margarel Annsell in a wait/ clog; Fay Hutcher. tap danCi : Manila Annsell. acrobatic dance; Carolyne Dea-nli. sum: and dance. During the evenlg fortunes were Id M: Bessie Wernikofl was chairman ot arrangements, assisted by Mrs, M.ie Levin. longest .-eric.of big laughs assembled in one motion picture sequence, are credited to Harold Lloyd's latesi production "Movie with Constance Cummings, the flrsl ihe bespectacled comedian iia. released In two years, winch comes Sunday and Monday in the rivoli theatn Eight minutes ol consecutive laugh producing incident.have been rolled 111 one "faction" of •Movie Crazy," according to reports ot the picture at different previews en the Pacific coast, giving Lloyd, as wi] ,,, every other comedian. ord 10 shoot at In the future. Previous to the magician's coat sequence In 'Movie Crazy" winch sets the new lauch-making figures. j Lloyd rated higreatest -cries ol I continuous laughter, the football scenes and the basted suit episodes in the "Freshman." In "Movie Crazy," one '_ag rolls Into another, and to the satisfied amazement 01 Lloyd, neither dianor music is heard in Hie entire ball room situation, which runs virtually the length ol an entire reel. There are three, among the numerous laugh factions in "Movie which stand nut in relief, and it 1goum to bedifficull to find any two persons who will agree to which is the funniest. There is a lest scene which \A novelty and laughs, will be difTicii to surpass; the magicians coat epl sode and the fight which climax ihe story, any one ot which wou have been sufficient to carry a le lure length comedy to successful rd suits. The annual May Day dance spor^ sored by Junior Hadassah will held on Sunday, April 30. accordirJ to an announcement made by JIJ Lena Weinkle, president ol the oj ganizatlon. Full details will be aj nounced in an early Issue. • • • An important meeting of the LaJ les' auxiliary of the Jewish Wellar] bureau will be held at Kaplan next Monday. March 20. begjnmn at 2 p.m. All members are urged I attend. • • %  Mrs. B. Kandel entertained number of friends for the benefit! Senior Hadassah when a chickei ,\aawarded as a prize to Mr.Fir.ej gold of New York City. • t The Junior Com. j Women will meet at the Ponce Leon hotel next Tuesday evenind March 21, at 8:30 p.m All niembej and friends are urged to attend FEET HURT? Dr. Jones' parfait composition irrhl MPgr1<, a* liuht a* "china." a* Mronrl at uteel. No leather or ruhher to rot:l ran he washed. May he worn in any! typ< 'hoe or slipper. ThMM *upportrr| are made especially for your fool con-f ditinn. from a wax and planter impre*-! -mil of both feel. My profe*Hional rrp-l ulalion behind this supporter a*.uff*| >ou tvirv satisfaction. The fee i* S1 .*-••-1 However, for 10 days thi* adv*rti*fm*ntl and $10.00 will be accepted in full pay-l in-"iii. ThU ia special rash iff".I |*lea*e phone for appointment 3-2"**.| DR SIDNEY R. JONES 210 E. Flagler Street Dr. A. T. Knowles L".i:in X. W. 17th Ave. Phone I-7JM MODERN PET HOSPITAL l.ariie hi.liviilii.il lloarilim KunBffectlra Tick Mtiktaf StM %  % % % % % % % % %  %  WINE GRAPES %  California Wine (irapej Fine for Juire — RMdJ V> %  PrlCM Cheaper than Lul >' %  %  KI.EFEKER PROM'CE. INC •J. Miami AT* at 7th St. PhoM Mgj %  % % % % % % % % %  ... • N ""'" Em Lost ii Dollar of Savings or Interest in a Morrh Plan Bank" PIONEERS OF INDUSTRIAL BANKING 5 Per Cent Interest Paid On Savings I SERVING MILLIONS OF PEOPLE ALL OVER THE UNITED BTATBB MORRIS PLAN COMPANY \ ...MI 4 f MIAMI



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Page lour THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Friday, March 17, \ 9J) I &f&f&f &f &f&f&f&f &f &f&f&f&f&f + &f •:• •> •:• &f •:• •> •> # &f &f &f &f •:• &f •:• &f # • 4* < &f 2Ja&i0 ^gnagng Sullrtin Edited by KABBI S. M. MACHTEI 4 Founder and Director, Radio Synui:"iof America % SUNDAY MORNINGS WIOD, MIAMI, ILORIDA Vol. 1. SUNDAY, MARCH 12, 1933. No. 14. The Spirit of Hainan Scripture Reading, Esther, Chapter 111. T ODAY, the fourteenth Of Actar, we observe the Feast of Esther, Purini, the Feast of Lots. Jews everywhere rejoice at the recollection of the downfall of Hainan, the arch-enemy of Israel, and at the failure of his plot to put to death all the Jews in the Persian Empire of his day — about 485 B. C. E. The Book ol Esther has made the name of Hainan immortal. Two of his contemporaries have also earned immortality. Gautama Buddha and Confucius, at the time when Hainan was preaching hatred in Persia, were spreading the gospel of love and humanitarianism on the same Asian continent. All three have influenced later generations. Buddha and Confucius have been deified by posterity and are worshipped as Prophets of Divine Truth. Hainan's name is synonymous with treachery and Intrigue. The former two are spoken of with reverence. Haman is spoken of with scorn and derision. The followers of the teachings of the Divine Seers and those who live in accordance with their principles are the beloved of the human race. Those who live by the principles of Haman are despised among men. H AMAN and his sons were hanged. The spirit of Hamanism still lives on and rears its ugly head from time to time to inject its venom into the harmonious atmosphere that builds a belter race. As a child, studying literature. I was taught by my teacher that Tago is the example of the greatest villainy in all literature because he stood to gain nothing by his treachery to Othello and Desdemona. I have since given that place of dishonor and infamy to Hainan. He had nothing to gain from his attack on the Jews. He already held the highest office in Persia. Haman exemplified villiany in its lowest form and in its highest degree. In the religious simile of the day, in the Zoroastrian faith of ancient Persia, I would say that Haman was truly a tool of Ahrimon, the Spirit of Darkness. L ET us study the reasons that Haman gave to the king for requesting permission to destroy the Jews: ". and their laws are diverse from all people — neither keep they the king's laws ." This despised people had the audacity to be different. Their laws, their religious laws, were diverse from all people. The charge that they did not keep the king's laws was a false Charge. It was based on the refusal of Mordechai to bow down to Haman. Because one man refused to prostrate himself before another human being in a gesture which he reserved for his God alone, Hainan's perverted mind saw in that sufficient reason to exterminate an entire people, though Jews with less courage than Mordechai did bowdown to Hainan. H AMAN was unfortunate. His plot fell through and he was hanged. Lesser Hamans in other lands, in later years, have hurled the same charges against the Jew. The Jew is different. He is not rtatriotic." These and similar charges have been disproven. The innocence of the Jew has been acknowledged. The Hamans have survived but the countries they sought to defend against this Imaginary menace have gone down to oblivion. Czanst Russia and monarchial Spain are mute evidences of the truth that the real danger lay in the propagandists and not in the persecuted Jews. Of course the Jews were different. Light is different from darkness. Harmony is diverse from discord. The laws ot the Jews teach enlightenment and harmony. The Hamans thrive under cover of darkness and behind a .smoke-screen ol discord. When a political adventurer and opportunist directs the attention of his nation to the Jews of his country as a menace it Is a stratagem which seeks to divert the eyes of the people from his acts in another direction. He rings a fire alarm in a distant part of the city that all eyes may be centered there while he plunders the public at a point that is left unprotected during the alarm. W E celebrate, today, the victory over the Persian Haman. Do you want to see how really vicious and different we are? Observe our celebration. We read Uie Book of Esther which recites the entire episode. At the mention of the name "Haman," children shout and deride him. But, in accordance with the edict of Mordechai, ". And Mordechai wrote these things ... To establish this among them, that they should keep the fourteenth day of the month Adar ... As the days wherein the Jews rested from their enemies, and the month which was turned unto them from sorrow to joy, and from mourning into a good day: that they should make them days of feasting and joy, and of sending portions one to another, and gifts to the poor ." We celebrate the victory over Evil by practicing Good. The poor arc remembered on this day and a general exchange of gifts between friends and neighbors marks the Purim festival. The local Jewish charity organization has selected this day for its annual Charity ball which will be held tonight. Purim is the .spiritual antithesis of Hamanism. The spirit of Haman is destructive. The spirit of Purim is constructive. Haman advocated plunder. Mordechai preached charity. Certainly the laws of the Jews were diverse. The evil in Hainan's nature could not tolerate such goodness. He owed his rise in the king's favor to his feeding the king's vanity and to his flattering the king's baser emotions and passions. T HE spirit of Haman will ever be in conflict with the spirit of God's law unto Israel. The bestial will always resent the pure and noble. The victory will always be with the principles that Israel exemplifies, but, only as long as the Mordechais refuse to pay homage to the Hamans. There can be no such compromise with evil. There can be no submission to the forces of wickedness. If Israel encounters a condition which permits evil to triumph it is indicative of a diseased state within the fold. Recipes for the Jewish Family Cheese Cake Roll out puff pastry, cut into rounds, put them on a baking sheet, brush over with egg. Cut some more rounds and take centers out with a small cutter. Place the rings on top of the rounds, brush the top over with egg and bake in a quick oven 10 to 15 minutes, or until thoroughly set. Fill. Cocoa Cheese Cakes Line patty pans with good short paste and put a small quantity of apricot or green gage jam in the middle of each. Beat up once ounce butter and one and one-half ounces sugar to a cream, add one egg and one and one-half ounces flour, one tablespoon milk, one teaspoon cocoa, a few drops lemon or vanilla essence and a small teaspoon baking powder. Put a spoonful of this mixture over the jam and cover with a lattice cross of paste. Bake 10 oils minutes. Chocolate Brownies One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, two eggs, three tablespoons boiling water, three-fourths cup flour, one cup chopped nut meats, one teaspoon vanilla, two ounces chocolate. Cream butter and sugar together i a scant half cup of butter is better than accurate measurement in this case). Add well beaten eggs, flour; melt bitter chocolate in the boiling water and add to mixture. Add flavoring and nut meats. Spread thin on greased cookie sheets. Bake from 14 to 20 minutes in moderate oven. Cut in squares while hot. Nut meats may be omitted, if desirable. Chocolate Nut Fudge Cake One-half cup fat, one and onehalf cups sugar, one cup milk, one teaspoon vanilla, one-fourth teaspoon salt, two squares chocolate, melted, one-half cup nuts meats, broken, two and one-half cups flour. HON. J. MARK WILCOX New congressman of the fourth congressional district. two teaspoons baking powder, onehalf teaspoon soda, three eggs, beaten. Cream fat and sugar. Add rest of ingredients, beat two minutes. Pour into loaf pan lined with waxed paper. Bake 50 minutes in moderately slow oven. Cool and frost. Irish Koscttes One-fourth cup mayonnaise, two packages isix ounces > cream cheese, one loaf sandwich bread, sweet pickles. To mayonnaise, add cream cheese and blend thoroughly. Remove the crusts and slice loaf of bread lengthwise. Spread lightly with cream cheese and mayonnaise mixture. Place a whole sweet pickle across end of each slice and roll bread around pickle. Wrap tightly in waxed paper and put in ice box. When ready to serve, cut in slices like a jelly roll. Cherry Spice Cake One-half cup butter or lard, one cup sugar, one teaspoon soda, two eggs, one cup sour cherries, four tablespoons sour cream, one teaspoon cinnamon, one-hall teaspoon cloves, one-hall teaspoon nutmeg or allspice as preferred, two cups flour. Cream the butter, add sugar and eggs. Blend well. Add the cherries, cream, flour with soda and spices. Nuts may be added. Bake in a layer or loaf pan in moderate oven. Look for the root of the evil within the lold. Obey the law which commands "U'viortah ha'raah mikkirbecho" — and thou shalt eradicate the evil from thy midst. Let us be as ready to condemn and to cast out the evil from within as we are to battle the spirit of Haman from without. The Torah demands that we be pure and holy. Let us rid ourselves of Uie impurities. NOTICE THE CITY OF MIAMI Is accepting cither local or out-of-town checks to be applied as payment of any and all accounts whenever banking facilities will permit payment of checks. 1932 City of Miami taxes become delinquent April l 193 3, and unless checks clear prior to this date taxes will necessarily be considered as delinquent and property will be advertised for non-payment of taxes. It is preferable that all taxes be paid in cash. Breece's Fish Market 242 N. E. 13th Street Phone 2-7153 %  IV OUR OWN FISHKKMKS Now you can buy \4> f ATTlv B Irr IMORK LAUNDRY SERVICE PHONE ,.& ** %  ""' *"**" 21 N. W. 9TH ST. tiDS -nsjfc IN HONOR of PASSOVER On Passover the choices! of everything distinguishes the Jewish Home. Manischewitz Motzo and Matzo products are the choicest of their kind produced in the largest Kosher Matzo Bakery in the world. In demand everywhere. L MATZO I 'WOOTHtR MATZO LIKE IT 1 in. I, -i Repair Shop in Miaaii AMERICAN SHOE SHOP Miami's Best for Shoe Repairing 15 S. MIAMI AVENUE C. E. BARRETT. Prop. Delaney & Beers Kodak p'ininhinit and P.nlumlni ( "inim-n ml Work and Honu' Portraits 50% Off on All Amateur Work 212 N. E. Ilh St. Phonr 2-S38S In the Heart of Your Neighborhood PIGGLY WIGGLY A Miami Institution is YOVR CHEAPEST SERVANT Useib!


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