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The Jewish Floridian ( February 24, 1933 )

UFJUD

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* e Jewish Floncti'am J LORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY Vol. 6. No. 8. MIAMI. II.ORIDA, IRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 19)3. 1'ricc Five Cents SCIENGH in the TALMUD Annual Purim Final Charity Ball Wednesday Drive Now On Given Synagog Holy Scroll Is i( ontinued from Last Week) The fourth annual Purim ball of \ Dispensing with the regular weektne Ladies' auxiliary of the Miami ly luncheon meetings in order to MUiK !" SteToT heTra? T^ ^"^ "Won will devote the extra tregained to the fZ TZTZ1ZZZ' hCW al thC MaJ Sh,ine lem ^ W f <*ets and solicitation for ,1Ce T T,;71Z1ZITZ ^ BiSCaVne b UleVard nCXt Wed ^ lor %  —enir program, the lU0 „ „f clean and unclean meat. In ne sday evening, March 1, beginning arrangements committee directing tnc Tracta e Chulm there ,s a comal 9:3 o p. m P.ans announced for the annual charity bal. of the Jewplete description of the aesophagus. this event include entertainment jlmentary canal is fully defrom many of the night clubs of the scribed. Rab Hisdai mentions the greater Miami district including muscle. The operation for imthose who appeared at the dance perforated anus in the new-born is given by the auxiliary last month. [bed in Shabbos 134b. CrutchA complete floor show will be given es are mentioned in the same tracduring the evening and every effort ish Welfare bureau is making a whirlwind drive to raise funds for the organization. Realizing that sufficient funds must be raised by the ball to take care of the urgent calls being made on the Jewish Welfare bureau daily, the committee us One of the most impressive ceremonies held in Miami Beach in recent years was that of last Sunday night when Mr. and Mrs. P. Silverman of Newark. N. J., presented a Safer Torah to Beth Jacob congregation. Many tourists and residents ol Miami and Miami Beach gathered at the home of the Silvermans and in procession marched to the Beth Jacob synagogue accompanied by a band of music. As the procession approached the synagogue Rabbi Lazarus Axelrod, Harry Wasserman and Rev. M. B. Herman, each ?: 1 •Announcements! i i BETH DAVID CONGREGATION (ConwiTvativi' i 139 N. W. Third Avenue MAX SHAPIRO. Rabbi Regular services begin at 5:45 with the late services at 8 o'clock when Rabbi Max Shapiro will preach the sermon on "America's Immortal Presidents — Have They Lived in Vain?" Cantor Louis Hayman and his choir will chant the uu, Dislocation of joints, amputawll] be made to make this one of the impressing this fact on both resi. UOD and trephining are discussed, gala events of the season. Novelties. dents and tourists of the greater carrying a Safer Torah. came from services and lead the congregational in Baba Mitzia there is mention of Punm eircct.s. and booths will help I Miami district. Representing every the synagogue to greet the new Safsinging. Refreshments will be servsomekindof anaesthetic a sleepcarry out and heighten the enjoyJewish organization in the district er Torah. To the tunes of tradimg potion-administered to pament to be provided for the guests. are their respective officers or deletional hymns the entire procession. dents during a major operation. Several stunts will be provided durgate s who are members of the genI headed by the rabbi and others carEmbryology, that science to which, ing the evening, the exact nature of eral welfare committee. Mrs. R.' rying the Scrolls, entered the svualegend asserts. King David, evidentwinch will not be divulged by the Yunes was named a member of this | gog ue. A word of welcome to all asly as a good provider for his son, committee in charge of this part of committee recently. The ball will | sembled was then given in a brief devoted a great deal of his time, the program until a few minutes was not neglected by the Talmudbefore the stunts are put on. Prizes ists. Rabbi Samuel, for example, will be awarded for the most unique costumes depicting Jewish charac.1,1able to tell the exact age of a Niddah 25b. He maintained, however, that it was impossible to utiate sex before the end of the fourth month, which, indeed, is the opinion of modern embryoloEn passant, too, we must mention that most egregious of characters, Abba Saul, symbol of philosophy, who was at once embryologist and grave-digger. It is remarkable, too, that hydrophobia, a puzzle to scientists until Pasteur discovered the treatment of anti-toxins, is indicated in the Traclate Yoma. and is cured almost precisely in the manner which inediiince Pasteur has adopted. For ters linked with the history of Purim. Mrs. Nathan Abramson is chairman of the arrangements committee and she is being assisted by Mrs. Louis Pallott, co-chairman. Mrs, Morris Rappaport. Mrs. Jacf: Hirsch and Mis Max Rappaport in charge of cakes and candies: Mrs. Max Kupfersteln in charge of drinks: Mis. Nathan Adelinan m charge of sandwiches; Mrs. Charles Feldman and Mrs. Moe Harris in charge ol Dowers; Mis. diaries Taunenbaum in charge of tickets; Mrs. J. L. ShOChet m charge of entertainment. be held at the beautiful Floridian hotel. Miami Beach, on Sunday evening. March 12. Artists appearing in all of the night clubs will be on hand to entertain the guests. During the evening relreshments will be i rved without additional charges. Famous Cantors Will Appear Here Interest in the first all Yiddish talking and singing picture to be exhibited in thus disirict la increasln every day. "The Voice of Israel." which Is a picturization of delicious refreshments were served. the struggle of a nation whose life message by the chairman of the evening. City Councilman Baron de Hirsch Meyer. Rabbi E. Lazarus Axelrod spoke in Yiddish, and was followed by Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation, who delivered the only address in English. Rabbi Samuel M. Machtei of the Radio Synagog. and Rabbi Uri Langer of Hungary, i hen .spoke in Yiddish. The honors of filling in the unfinished letters of the Scroll were then sold by Harry Wasserman, who was assiSed by Cantor Boris Schlachman ol the congregation. Assisting in the arrangements was I. L. Mintzer. secretary of Beth Jacob. At the close of the ceremonies ed in the Talmud Torah hall following the services. TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI (Reform) 1.17 N. K. Nineteenth Street DR. JACOB II. KAPLAN. Rabbi Services will begin tonight at 8:15 when Dr. Kaplan's subject will be "Washington. Lincoln and Franklin D. Roosevelt. Three Epochs in American History, a New Constitution, a New Union and a New Deal." After services a reception will be held in Kaplan hall, so that the visitors may meet each other and spend a pleasant social hour. Religious school is conducted each Sunday from 10 to 12 in Temple Lsrael. the Tana. Matya ben Cheresh de, He who is bitten by a mad HadaSSah tO Hold dog is fed with a mad dog's liver," which, though trefa, is full of blood toxin. Dentistry The drawers of teeth and the hewers of molars are not forgotten in the Talmud. We glean, for example, that pepper, cinnamon, ginger and clotes—all common ingredients employed In treatment in science in the Talmud — Gal Three modern times — were used by the afflicted of the Gemara times. Reference is also made to gold teeth, and silver plates. Even that most modern of ailments — ubiquitous halitosis is, according to the Tractate Sabbath 65a. curable by a grain of pepper and a mouth-wash of salt. Geology An original interpretation of Rabbi Abbahu's statement that "The Lord successively created worlds and destroyed them, saying that these used Him, and these pleased Him not, until our Earth appeared," is given by Rabbi Israel Lifshitz. He maintained —much to the shocked astonishment of his contemporaries — that this was a reference to geologic strata! It is impossible, in a sketch of this nature, to be exhaustive. Like Hillel, one must be merely laconic and teach Talmud while standing on one leg. The scientific utterances in the Talmud, it now appears, are of that type where, to use Milton's Phrase, more is meant than merely meets the ear. It can bear re-reading. But alas, the Talmud is a classic, and a classic, by definition, is a book about which everybody talks and nobody reads throbs with endless tragedy and (llama seethes with their plight in Egypt under the taskmasters of Pharaohs their freedom their Miami chapter of Senior Hadasstarvation the rise of the Jewish sah will present one of the most inpeople from a tribal Musical and Tea ( ONGREGATION BETH JACOB I Orthodox l 111 Haohinitton Ave.. Miami Reach L. AXELROD. Rabbi teresting programs of the current season at a musicale and tea next Wednesday afternoon, March 1, at 3 o'clock at the home of Mrs. Joseph Williamson. 1415 Meridian avenue. Miami Beach. Among the artists who will appear on the program are the noted tenor. Joseph Kallini. the Junior Symphony Trio of the University of Miami, Rosemary Klemtner in several vocal selections, and nation to a j kingdom and commonwealth in their own land the fall of Jerusalem the rebuilding of the Temple .. and their wanderings down to the present time. The voices of present-day Jewry's most famous cantors symbolize the priests of old and are heard in liturgical music which has made them famous the noted Zionist, lecturer and trav, throughout the world. Cantor Shiiseler. The public is invited to attend kv sin?s unsane Tokef. Cantor RosLocal Worker Elected Officer ___ Mrs. Freda Lutzky, president of the Miami Senior Hadassah and active Zionist worker here for a number of years, was elected first vice president of the southern region of Hadassah at the regional convention held in Atlanta. Ga. several weeks ago. She will also act as chairman of the infant welfare committee of Hadassah for the southern region. Mrs. Lutzky, prior to her becoming president of the senior Miami Ha, tne congregational singing and will dassah. was for a number of years | ch ant the services. Saturday mornpresident of the local Junior Hadassah. and may phoning 5-1331. be served. make reservations by Refreshments will Biscayne Track Attracts Crowds enblatt is heard in his famous Adonoy Zchoronu," Cantor Hershman in the age-old "Hayom Haras Olom." Cantor Roitman in "Av Horachamim," and such famous cantors as Joseph Shapiro, Louis Waldman, the venerable Seidel Rover, dean of the world's cantors, and Regular services will begin at 5:30 with the late services at 8 p. m. when Rabbi Lazarus Axelrod will preach a sermon on "Broken Laws." Mr. M. Suvotkin. of Saratoga Springs. N. Y.. an active communal worker and a director of the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan yeshiva will speak briefly on his travels in Palestine. Cantor Boris Schlachman will lead ing Rabbi Axelrod will preach in Yiddish on the portion of the week. The largest crowds ever attending ^ h ^^ ^ heard dog races have been in evidence at j the beautiful plant of the Biscayne Kennel club since its opening. Completely renovated since last year, the new management in charge of Joe Adams and Carson Bradford have spared no efforts or money to make it a thing of beauty and enjoyment to the patrons. Some of the fastest dogs have in selections that touch one's heart and bring back memories of old. The famous boy cantor, Sheiele Engelhardt. is heard in a Sabbath hymn which endeared him to many throughout the country. Abraham Machtenberg's choir appears in full in "Yismachu." which is sung by Singer To Give Concert Sunday Making his second and final appearance in this section of the country, Solomon Small tSchmulewitz). famous Yiddish poet, composer and singer, will be heard in a concert Sunday night at the Beth Jacob congregation. Miami Beach. Cantor Boris Schlachman will act as chairman of the evening and will introduce the artist. Mr. Small is the author of "Der Talisel," a "Brivele Der Mamen" and thousands of other folk songs which have been famous throughout the entire Yiddish speaking been entered in the different races nis all male cnolr Md which de| ^ ^ ^^ yearg ^ Q[ ^ nightly and they have been so wen hghted count iess audiences in recent matched that it is hard to pick £ | ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ghown at winner with any certainty, large prices have been paid in many (ConUnued on Page Five) compositions have been played on the radio by such famous stars as the Biscayne Plaza theatre. Miami | Eddie Cantor. George Jessel and Al Beach, three times only on March 5. [ Jolson. MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CONGREGATION (Orthodox) 1(41 S. W. Third Street JONAH E. CAPLAN. Rabbi The regular early services begin at 5:45 p. m. with the late services at 8:30 when Rabbi Caplan will preach a sermon on "Laws and Their Moral Influence." The regular weekly current Jewish news topics will be discussed by the rabbi and is being met with much favor by those attending. A social hour will follow. Saturday morning services begin at 9 a. m. and a sermon will be preached in Yiddish by the rabbi in observance of "Shabbos M'Vorchin." Mincha services and Shalosh Saudah services begin Saturday at 5 p. m. I •



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% %  Page Two THE JEWISH FLOR ID'AN Friday, February 24. 193, f Those who have attended recent lectures by Mrs. Van Dyke at 44 S. E. First street, are urging all their female friends not to miss them because of the splendid lessons taught them. The lectures are illustrated and living models are used. Mrs. Van Dyke, who is an authority, talks of women obtaining happiness through the study of female hygiene, and a small fee Is charged for admission. Those attending have term these lectures inspiring and educational. • • • Mrs. Isaac Levin, president of Temple Israel Sisterhood, will entertain the executive board of the sisterhood and out-of-town guests at a Sabbath tea in the beautiful Bellevue hotel at 407 N. E. Seventeenth terrace. An intimate Sabbath spirit will prevail. • • • The annual donors luncheon sponsored by the Miami chapter of Senior Hadassah scheduled for February 27 has been postponed and will be held on Monday, March 13. at the Floridian hotel. Miami Beach. This will mark the twenty-first anniversary of the founding of Hadassah. All those who have not yet tilled the quota to entitle them to attend are urged to communicate with Mrs. Barney Weinkle. chairman of the committee. Splendid entertainment and a delightful program has been prepared. %  a • As we go to press the annual Purim ball and bazaar of Beth David Sisterhood is being held at the Mahl Shrine temple. A full account of this event will appear in our next issue. • • • Mr. and Mrs. Philip Berkowitz and a party of friends left for a brief tour of Florida, during which time they will visit Tampa. Jacksonville and other Florida cities. • • • Samuel Wax. 48, formerly of West Palm Beach, died in the Jackson Memorial hospital Tuesday. He had been in Palm Beach and here for more than 25 years. He leaves a son, Charles, of Palm Beach; two brothers, Morris of Montelair. N. J., and Benjamin, West Palm Beach; three sisters, Mrs. B. Weinnan, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Mrs. Roy Wax, Brooklyn, and Mrs. D. Dickson. Washington. He was a member of the West Palm Beach Elks lodge and an Odd Fellow. The body was shipped to West Palm Beach Wednesday night by the Gautier funeral home for burial. Interment will be in the Jewish cemetery at West Palm Beach, Sunday, February 26, at 3 p. m. from the Ferguson funeral home. Rabbi S. M. Machtei of the Radio Synagog will officiate. • • • Gathering in the beautiful home of Mrs. William Lewin at Miami lie ach, members and friends of Temple Israel Sisterhood enjoyed the Washington's birthday bridge sponsored by the sisterhood last ruesday afternoon. The home was lavishly decorated for the event with cut flowers and potted palms which enhanced the natural beauty and ettlngs of the home. After bridge was played delicious refreshments were served which were enjoyed by all. Prices were awarded for high scores to Mis. H. H. Miller. Mlu Bertie Harrison of Roanoke. Va.. and several others. Assisting the hostess Mrs. Lewin were Mesdames Jacob H. Kaplan, Bert Reisner and Isaac Levin. • • • Quite a tidy sum was realized last Tuesday night at the regular card party of the Ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation when Mrs. Jack Hirsch was %  ess. About 20 tables of bridge were in play and individual prizes were awarded to highest scores at 1 ach table. Delicious refreshments served during the evening. • • • The annual spring festival of Beth Jacob Sisterhood for the purpose of raising funds for its Talmud Torah will be held on Sunday evening. March 26. at the Floridian hotel. Miami Beach. A complete floor show will be given. Mrs. Barney Weinkle, president of the sisterhood. is chairman of the general committee in charge of this annual event. A sisting Miss Mildred Greenberg, popular Miami pianiste. in her recital March 5 at the University of Miami recital hall on N. E. Second avenue and Fourteenth street will Use Fresh Milk Ask Your (iriMir fur GRAHAMS Pasteurized Milk 10c Light (ream 13c Heavy (ream 20c GRAHAM'S DAIRI I'hune Canal 2.~,.*>-J PENN8UCO, FLA. VISIT TUB ROMA Restaurant Italian Dinners l.-IO N. K. 2nd AT*. First Class Food at Moderate Prlcei \Love is a bond often broken through ignorance A1 tend thv*v I 1 nlii. fit. %  111m; Itctorw ELIZABETH VAN DYKE on IV mi nine Power. She Will (harm You! If rb formula! free f'r unmrn'. ;,ilmenta, ikln trouble* and other ill*. Tuesday ( enetlpation and llalanied Meal*. Wednesday Beaut) Make-up, CouMtica Thursday feminine Power and (harm Friday Fond Sail.. Vitamin*. Calorie* Saturday Trpee of u ,,,„,.„ M ,,, : ,,,,,. ,„ I A "Golden Opportunity" for real Health Kduration for only 25 cents. DAILY 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. II S. K. FIRST STREET Oppaelte Hear llurdine'a Living Model I'sed Girle I'nder I" Not Admitted be Leonard Rase, popular young cellist, and Louis Eley, violinist. A very excellent musical program has been arranged, designed to show the ability of the talented artist. • a An important meeting of the Ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation will be held at the synagogue on next Tuesday evening. February 28, when important business will be transacted. All members are urged to attend, as this is the night before the annual Purim ball and final arrangements for the ball will be announced at this meeting. Following the social meeting a social hour will be spent. • • • Mr and Mrs. J. S. Field entertained recently with a dinner for their nieces. Mrs. Paul E. Siglei and Mrs. Abbott Lippman of New York, Mrs. Irving Frankinstein of Savannah, Ga.. and Mrs, P. Pearlman of New York. • a • Mrs. Harry Rosen and sister. Miss Evelyn Bhrllch, of New York, are -pending the winter here. • • E, Ehrlich of Brooklyn. N. Y.. and daughter, Mrs. Helen Kaplan, of Flatbush. N. Y.. are spending the winter at the home of Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Hull on Brickell avenue. They are dividing their time between the races and Miami Beach. With them 1Mrs. Kaplan's daughter. Joan. • • • I. Finkcnberg. New York City, was a guest at a birthday party given at the Hollywood Beach hotel recently by Mrs, Finkenberg. Included among the guests were Mr. and Mrs. Sam Ungerleider. Mr. and Mrs. John Sherman, Mr. and Mrs. I. Isaacs, ; Mr. and Mrs. D. Bernstein all of New York City, and Mr. and Mrs. O. Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. D. Janover, Mr. and Mrs. A. Block of Brooklyn. • • • Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Scheer gave a a. party Saturday at the Seville apartments, Miami Beach, in honor of the birthday anniversaries of their grandchildren, J. Leonard Scheer, 8. and Bernice Scheer. 13. Their birthday anniversaries fell on the same date. The children attending were Elaine and Edgar Feldman. Doris and Maurice Solomon, Christina Hill. Evelyn Schwartz. Joyce Diamond, Lucille Green. Dolores Covert and Howard Dowman. • • • j. j. Simmons, executive director of the Hebrew Orphan's asylum of New York, addressed the Jewish Welfare auxiliary meeting yesterday afternoon In Kaplan hall with the president, Mrs. Meyer .Schwartz, in charge, He spoke on "Social Service Work and What It Signifies." Capt. M. F. Tobias used social service work as the theme of his talk and Mrs. Max Dobrin spoke in behalf of the Community Chest. A banquet cloth, donated by Maj. K. Mandel, will be sold at the charity ball on March 12 at the Floridian hotel. Mrs. Morris Dubler was hostess during a social hour. • • • Tent Hive No. 22 of the Maccabees celebrated George Washington's birthday Tuesday night at their hall. 2100 W. Flagler street. Jerry Johnson represented George Washington. He was dressed in the style of the colonial days and wore a white powdered wig. Ho gave a monologue of the life of George Washington from boyhood through i to his retirement of his presidency. Piano solos of music of the seventeenth century was rendered by Mrs. Martha Kretzschmar. who was dressed as Martha Washington. Cello solo by Paul Jewett; reading was given by Miss Frances Saco; a whi s tling solo by Sue Ernest Hewli,^ piano duet of colonial numbers bv Mrs. Kretzschmar and Miss Sac A. M. Coffin, state manager, g ave description of localities in the south. em part of Florida, which have been inspected by himself and C. A Avant, chairman of the executive committee, for the location of th e proposed hotel and golf links for the Maccabees recreation center, it was announced that the next meeting would be held at the time of the visit of the supreme board of trustees. Ice cream and cake was served by Mrs. A. M. Coffin, assisted by Miss Betty Searing, Miss lino Waldron. George T. Mann and J. |[ Huffman. • • • The regular Bnai Brith meeting scheduled for last night was not held, having been postponed because of the Purim ball of Beth David Sisterhood. The meeting will be held at the community centre of the Hebrew Athletic club Thursday evening, March 2, and a program will be presented in addition to the usual business meeting. • • The marriage of Sally Lee Rosenfeld of Chicago, 111., to Mr. Averon Allan Ziegler of the London Arms hotel took place at the home ol Rabbi S. M. Machtei of the Radio Synagog last Wednesday afternoon. + j The New S100.000.00 Museum i "SOUTH SKAS" 1 MONSTERS of the DEEP The Mil) I ,„ ks 10 A.M. Till 11 l'.M. Daily Total Admission ADULTS 25c CHILDREN 10c Thin Exhibition made po*ihle hy the FLORIDA YEARROUND CLUBS, Incorporated gti Edna La France *• rJ beauty r ~ salon An Aid for Eer> lleautv Need Specializing in Kaeial and Hair Tinting in MCALLISTER ARCADE Phnne 2-72l Say "Howdy" to the Folks back Home with "Sunshine Fruits" LIVE POII.THY AND < HOICE FRIITS AND VEGETABLES Prires Itiirht MRS. A. WALL •Ml (it, Terminal Market s. W. 2nd Ave. and 2nd Si. Crystallized or fresh, .1 Rift of Burdinc "Sunshine" Fruit is a fjift that's typically tropical ... chosen for its incomparI able blossom freshness, purity I and quality. Crystallized SI to j $4 Fresh Fruit $ 1 to S9. I MAIN STORE STREET FLOOR Express Rate' are reduced! Burdino's MIAMI and MIAMI BEACH j No One Ever Lost a Dollar of Swings or Interest hi a Morris Plan Rank" PIONEERS OK INDUSTRIAL BANKING S Per Cent Interest Paid On Savings BBRVINO MILLIONS OF PEOPLE ALL OVER THE UNITED STATES MORRIS PLAN COMPANY of MIAMI IU N. B. Plral Arena Vincent R. Ilriee. Manager



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c,iH..v. February 24, 1933. THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page Three THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN PTBLISHBD KVKKY FRIDAY by the % %  WISH H.OKIUMN PUBLISHING CO. 1 IJ1 S. W. I'ifteenth Avenue i I.Ol'IS SIIOCHET, Editor P. O. Box 2 !" Miami. Florida Phone 2-1183 ourselves. All sorts of methods have been proposed to relieve the situation, but thus far none seem practical. We say again that the best fin a nc i a l minds of the country's congregations should meet and work out jointly some plan by which our '• religious Institutions can carry on How old is the charge against without asking rabbis and teachers U, Talmud that it allows all kinds "Ask and Ye Shall Learn" ,..,„:,I ,l:i-. mailer July 4. ..„. !•..., Offlca at Miami. Florida. *"' %  ... ..f M,.r„h I IST'I ., \.. : of M.rch 8, 1879. WEST PALM BBACH OFFICE III Kiuhlh Street Mr-. M. Srhrebniek. I!. i.i ntnl i\ %  SUBSCRIPTION Our V.„r t 0 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24. 1933. Vol. 6. No. 8. Propose Tax Dr Herbert S. Goldstein recently suggested that a dollar tax be levied on every seat holder in every Orthodox Jewish congregation in the country, believing by this means the 3.000 congregations would contribute ,i million and a quarter dollars. Dr. Goldstein painted a very dark picture to the Union of Orthodox conHons meeting two weeks ago. He .-aid that spiritual despair has tripped many communities, that rabbis and teachers have been drastically cut in salaries, but, even more serious, they don't receive any pay because of the distressed situation in which congregations find Ives, While some money may be raised by the I ax plan we think it won't amount to very much. A great many cannot afTord to pay much more than a dollar, let alone an additional a dollar. We know of no more uniortunate situation in Jewin this country than that in our religious institution:, find elves. We have overbuilt, of Every group needed a synaand a rabbi all its own. Well, now they have them, with a headthrown in for good measure, irs the philanthropies tended more and more to centralization. ; In every possible plan to eliminate useless and wasteful duplication. But the synagogues evidently to see, or if they saw. to heed ns of the times. They went blithely ahead, building and building and mortgaging, and now at a time when, whether we wish it or not. interest in things spiritual Ls at %  low ebb, and the very last tiling anyone lias money for is a religious Institution, we find ourselves in desperate straits. The greatest burden falls upon 'he rabbi. We are speaking of rabbis who don't get paid. They make 'he greatest sacrifice, and, after all. we must consider them as human beings first and rabbis second. They "e entitled to a living for themselves and their families. There is no reason in all the wide world why •• men should continue to work for nothing. It is true it is not to be expected that they can or should dr aw salaries as large as in years gone by. But it Is also true that hey should be PAID for their services. Dr. Cyrus Adler says that no Jewish religious or educational institution should be built with a mortgage. That may be all right for the 'uture, but we have our present buildings and our mortgages and *e have obligations that can't be ^t. That is the immediate probiem with which we have to concern to work without pay— (Reprinti Signal Honor Departing from a 50-year-old tra' clition. the Actors' Fund of America has selected a non-English play for Its benefit performance in "Yoshe Kalb." Maurice Schwartz's widely acclaimed spectacle, Daniel Frohman, president ol the Actors' Fund HI America, lias announced. Explaining the unprecedented choice ol a foreign-language play, Mr. Prohman said: "This is the Brat time in the history of the Actors' Fund oi America, now in its fiftyfirst year, thai a play In a language other than English has been selected for a benefit performance of the fund. I am very proud of it. Tins gives me an opportunity to sponsor a play which I consider one of the outstanding dramatic achievements of our time. 'Yoshe Kalb' is the nearest approach to a Shakespearean drama written in the twentieth century. The production represents a milestone in the history of the American stage." Daniel Frohman is the dean ol American theatrical producers. He Ls a man of eighty and by no means in the habit ol exaggerating or propagandizing. His estimate Of "Yoshe Kalb'' is therefore a significant tribute to the genius ol I. J. Singer, author ol the novel "Yoshe Kalb." and to the talent Of Maurice Schwartz, the dramatist, director and actor. ill UIID 11(111of dishonest dealings Jeii •? The first to accuse the Talmud that it permits the Jews to perform all sorts of dishonest acts in their dealings With Christians was Nicholas Donin of La Rochelle, France, a convert from Judaism to Christianity, who lived in Paris in the liist hall ol the thirteenth century. Ii was in revenge for his having been publicly excommunicated, with the usual ceremonies, by Rabbi Jeeliiel of Paris, because of doubts he had expressed concerning the validity of Talmudical tradition, that he embraced Christianity and joined the Franciscan order. In 1238 Donin formulated 35 charges against llie teachings ol the Talmud and personally presented them to Pope Gregory IX. In his charges he mainTHE A scarcity of calls for acrobats has kept many Arabs out of work, says a Broadway scout. If disarmament gets farther along, we could have them fold tents. A housewife was sent to a Detroit hospital when pounced upon by a folding bed. You trust them for years and then they turn on you. One trouble with technocrats was that when they said a mouthful it was loo big for our ears. New York finds it costs as much to keep a man in prison as in college. Nevertheless, we must refuse to buy magazines to help an ambitious young forger through Sing 1 Sing. We are again reminded by his vistained that the Talmud was full of I it that the poet. Masefleld, got his gross errors, blasphemous representations of Clod, and numerous Insulting expressions regarding Jesus and the Virgin Mary. He also maintained that the followers of Talmudic teachings are permitted by the Talmud to act dishonestly with Christians. He even went as far as to allege that according to the Talmud the killing of a Christian was considered a meritorious act. Apparently the Pope must have been com meed oi the truth of these But February's cold is best start in a saloon. At the time it was easily dorie, if not on beer then on a double Scotch. March 5 would seem the best da\ for an alert brush salesman to pull the White House bell and ask. %  Could I interest you in a new broom?" For some a holiday is June, For some, the month of May. I ulgarizing Religion A preference ol quality to quantTalmud, the charges a true and unmistakable ligi intiated, the book.were to be since he promptly issued an order to seize all copies of the Talmud for deposit with the Dominicanand Franciscans. If, after an examination of the text of the of Donin be For banks, the bankers say. They seem to like the winter sports When chill winds freeze your bones. I sues.-it comes from fussing with So many frozen loans. burned The Talmud was then rigTo get a little rest they take orously prosecuted. Under pain of Vacation with no pay. he Jews of France were compelled to surrender their copies of the Talmudlc text and by order of Louis IX four distinguished rabbis Experience is the comb a man acol Prance were compelled to answer | quires after he loses his hair. ol refinement. The higher we the scale of values the more pronounced and prominent becomes the Importance of quality. In ethics and aesthetics, In art, science and literature, it is quality and not quantity that counts. The only place where quantity is stressed is in the Donin in a public disputation, which I material world. There, volume and was held in Latin, in the presence nol worth forms the basis ol figurol many royal dignitaries and The only other place where church prelates. It took place in quantity is stressed to the neglect ol Paris on June 25-27, 1240. Despite quality Is in the held ol religion. II the tavorable Impression created by hardly requires a keen observer to the Jewish disputants and the internotice that both church and svnacession of the Archbishop of Sens. gceue are placing the strongest emthe Talmud was condemned to be phasls upon quantity. That is a burned. Twenty-four carloads of the Talmud were subsequently consigned to the flames in 1242. It is curious that even nowadays a good many of the unfounded accusations of Donin against the Jews and against the Talmud are often repeated, but fortunately not always taken as seriously as when they were originally made. Does the "Talmud" actually tbeak of thirteen tribes taking possession of Palestine? In the Babylonian Talmud cBaba Bathra 122a it is said: "The land of Israel is in the future to be divided among thirteen tribes, and And what a Valentine it was. This Bankers Holiday! great denomination which draws a large following even though the follow nn; consists of an ignorant and | superstitious lot. That one is a fine j church to which many people flock. even though these be blockheads. And who is an excellent preacher? Why, of course, he who can reach the masses, who can attract the crowd, even though he disgust and repel every person with the least inI telligence and self-respect. But. while this sort of standard | may not be inconsistent in the church, in the synagogue it has no 1 place. Christianity has from the very beginning opposed this quantitative icreedal standard to the qualitative : viaea among "^ !" "dtura. standards of the classic anj not. as at first, among twelve. cients. In contrast to the efforts of — the most advanced nations of an! era. bribes and threats-all these tiouity who were bent on the deepj may not be out of keeping with the ening culture, Christianity was ac. intent and purpose of the church. rutted bv the one desire of widening i In the synagogue, however, such !u One need not be surprised. methods and measures are deplor| conclusion Chat the board was mistherefore to see the tragic effort able. Judaism has always striven to taken, the church is making to have many raise the quality of worshippers and largely attended services. A farather than to enlarge their quantnatical and hypocritical advocacy of tity. Knowledge was always placed "nngent Sunday laws, sensational above faith, study preferred to praymThods of dragging people or ener. If there is any one thing against %  tiring them into the house of praywhich Judaism has always guarded er. newspaper advertising, bill pastit is vulgarizing religion. Adversity Is the only scale thai gives the correel weight of our friend). If gossips would slop to think. their tongues would get a muchneeded rest. The man who tells you that all men are equal, really believes that he Ls a little more so. Patent medicine men fill their almanacs with ancient jokes in order to show their skill in prolonging life. Tlie man who expresses his willingness to obey a woman's slightest wish usually draws a line —at a large sized one. A radio studio gives out the information that crooners croon with their eyes closed. They could not do that on the stage, where it would be necessary to dodge. Say not last while memory lingers. Though the years have slipped away; Time will point with magic fingers Back where shines a happy day. Life's sweet cycle in its turning Cannot hide a Joy once known; Memories' fires forever burning Make the long past still our own. "What did they teach you at school today, sonny?" "Oh, teacher told us all about Columbus, who went 2,000 miles on a galleon." She did, did she? Well, don't believe all she tells you about those American cars, my boy." A national publicist pleads for more of the spirit of '76, and almost anyone will concede that whisky 57 years old should be mellow. We read of an actor in Paris being chased by an angry mob. Although he usually appears in a minor role he was on this occasion a leading man. It was fortunate, perhaps, that the attempt of German magicians last summer to change a goat into a man was a failure. The man, after going through what men have had to go through since then, would have been awful sore. Or maybe they did succeed in changing a goat into a man. and the man is Hitler. A goat, though otherwise qualified for the position, couldn't be made Chancellor, unless he at least looked something like a man. The temporary closing of banks is no new thing in this world. Glancing over the writings of the great authors. I deduce that nearly all of them were caught at some time or other with only a few cents change in their pockets, and no way of getting more. I quote: "Put money in thy purse." — Shakespeare. "How pleasant it is to have money '—Arthur Clough. "He that wants money, means and content. Ls without three good friends."—Shakespeare. "Can any one remember when times were not so hard and money not scarce?"—Emerson. "And no one shall work for money."—Kipling. "Get money, still get money, boy, no matter by what means."—Johnson. "Tis money makes the man."— Laertius. "We don't want to fight, but by jingo if we do, We've got the ships, we've got the men, we've got the money, too." (O yeah?) At the opening of the Civil war an Iowa man was rejected by the examination board as too frail for military service. As he celebrated his 102nd birthday in California recently, he had almost reached the The chins of our public men have grown smaller in the last hundred years, a physiognomist declares, the exercise of this organ having lessened. I suppose, as men talked more and more through their hats. Honeymoon is a word left us, while the custom giving it its name is a thing of the past. It had its origin among the ancient Germans whose newly married couples drank mead with honey for thirty days after the wedding. %  4 • i



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T E E .% S >ICR D I AN Friday, February 24. i 9J St. Petersburg Notes • r ... :: %  %  S %  M ... %  s DANGER WITHIN OM LS-C. T^C Wt*f I • > • -~ tt ISf 7TilHE.Hl Mi' ; : W Mrrr> Go R ? a i %  %  : %  %  %  %  %  • i nitting quest for a reconoce with religion. It jee how this almost me should trouble ad intellect. As Kani did not conclusj hundred years ago Ebc idea of God be practical rea%  -.he sphere D. If deD because of all science has years, the German physramus ran today. D that isti of .'.:::..E re bewo pro%  %  • %  -.. prived %  :i It :: %  %  %  '...reAPPEARING AT THE TtVOU THEATRE '•• %  ''*'. Harlene Dietrich and C ary Grant in "Blonde Venus." DR. J. H. YARBOROUGH VETERINARIAN Dor* CUpped. Plucked and Bathed :-: N W. 14th st. Ph..n. :-.-;. | proper %  rovm 9 • %  ?u: %  .;-••. V HAVANA Ml \NY ROME B*air \ %  Rail s 45.50 The-^ T-nir"* iri-ludiround :np InUM •-.. tax. hotel meals and rifMwetaf, MITCHELLS TOURS. .... .. iih i Beach I :\i u riRH co. US. EVANS VI V V BII UBS v>' S a. u>i pM*it i Wo irr.. N ^ i-lU I r i n i • i i %  i i in "i : R. S. EVANS %  ON. ,H."i7 ---. tCVM>-' • ~ -C^ 1H .•%  *•' • -^ -_%  ^ • Kind's Garage \ Makes ta m %  For fresh Sea Foods STOP Vt CAPT. TOMS FISH MART F'j<(er >txad Hiami B "wm : IK *i >*r "• %  -* '1-. • %  -. %  r— %  I S THE LOW ws — mxac i • %  •: %  %  tam I II Mi %  "rr' >-*. ud at attariM 1 ** "" s ''-" ni-.i'in n ia.ntlin< aad 4tlin


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iFridiy February 24, 1933. THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN rage Five SOCIETY Mrs. Bernard Simon was appointI second vice president of the Milanii Woman's club, Tuesday, at their I gU i„ r board meeting. Mrs. Simon [holds seven offices in different orI a nizaiions at the present time. • • • A ne w mode in eyebrows lias been Introduced by Marlene Dietrich. In "Blonde Venus," her latest picture, which comes to the Tivoli l-hpatre Sunday and Monday, she I,...,::: displays the slanting, oriental [eyebrow makeup that she wore in 1-Shanghal Express." Though orig[:r.ally she intended It only for the lone picture, her own liking for the I innovation was seconded so heartily |bv movie fans that she decided to I:etam it. In "Blonde Venus" she is cast as I the wife of an ailing scientist, whose I only chance for life is in a visit to Ian expert abroad. To raise the mon|ey. she goes to work in a night club. | There she attracts the attention of | a wealthy young politician. He falls in love with her, and provides her FAYMUS FAY'S FOR TROPICAL WEAR BME BACK DRESSES PIQUES FANCIES AND SEERSUCKER SEE OUR NOVELTY ^ PAJAMAS IMPORTED g\ g\ BERETSJJC 24 N. MIAMI AYE. with the money necessary to send her husband abroad. Meanwhile, she discovers that she loves him! and when the husband, cured, returns and discovers the situation, she faces a decision which leads to a dramatic climax. Cary Grant, considered one of the most promising of the new crop of young male players, plays the role of the lover, with Herbert Marshall, well-known star of the dramatic stage, as the husband. • • • The next general meeting of the Hebrew Athletic club will be held next Wednesday, March 1, beginning at 8 p. m. when Mr. W. L. Williams, president of the local Bnai Brith, will urge a plan for the amalgamation of the club with the Bnai Brith lodge. All members are urged to attend. • • • Fortnightly Book Review club held its regular meeting Tuesday evening at the home of Mrs. Samuel Weissell, 200 Coral way, Coral Gables. Mrs. Albert E. Rosenthal reviewed Sinclair Lewis' newest book, "Ann Vickcrs." A social hour followed. Several out-of-town guests were introduced. Famous Cantors Who Will Appear Here These will be heard in "The Voice of IsraeL" New Gas Service Is Offered All Rabbi S. M. Machtei. founder and director of the Radio Synagog, will preach over WIOD at 10 o'clock Sunday morning on "Refuge." Leonard Tobin will deliver the Junior Radio Synagog sermonette on "God's Country." The rabbi's sermon will be dedicated to Director of Public Safety S. D. McCreary, and his efforts to reduce the number of automobile accidents. In addition to the sermon there will be prayers, hymns and music. PENINSULAR LIFE INSURANCE GO. h .. r L ...r: %  i. .i b> thf State nf Florida Hume Office: Jacksonville. Fl. MAIN OFFICE 236 Lorraine Arcade Drop a line to K. J. Morlock or phone 2-fi:l37 for a representative who will explain w-hy /'/>, %  Peninsular Life is the Best IPAN-AMER1CAN COLLEGE of COMMERCE INCORPORATED 210 East Flagler Street (2nd Floor Tatum llldg.) 'Only the Best Is Good Enough" Biscayne Klectric Supply Go. Electrical Appliances of every description. Phone and we will do the rest at very reasonable prices. 41 W. FLAGLER STREET Phone 2-3024 Biscayne Track Attracks Crowds ( "liti nii.ci from Page One) cil the races because of the uncertainly of the results, and particularly in the quinellas and daily doubles. Last night the crowds were entertained with the monkey jockeys riding the dogs. These clever little riders were extremely popular at the West Flagler Kennel club recently and have been an added attraction, giving considerable entertainment to the patrons in special races for such events. These monkeys originally came from California, and when shown cause the crowds to pack the capacity of the track to the limit. One desiring a real evening of enjoyment and an opportunity to get real play for his money should attend the nightly races at the Biscayne Kennel club track. It is easy to reach by bus or by auto. What we need is not a new conception of God to meet cosmic, atomic, behavioristic and God knows what not theories, we need rather a living spiritual idea, a religious inspiration tor a humanity dominated by the machine and engrossed in materialism. The indifference or the masses and of the so-called intellectual group towards organized religion is not due to the lack of rationalism in religion, as so many rabbis would make us believe, but to the contrary, to the overdose of rationalism. People do not go to churches and synagogues to satisfy their need for intellectual searching, but rather to satisfy their emotional and spiritual yearning. They are little concerned with metaphysical argumentations and theological definitions of God. The God man's heart is seeking and yearning for, the God of daily religious experience, is the product of man's consciousness of his insignificance and impotency as he faces the universe plus the practical demands of human needs and human after it has been shorn of that inheritance which alone explains and made its existence possible to this day. For almost two thousand years we suffered persecution and martyrdom for the sake of ideals, all originating and culminating in Israel's unique idea of God. We are the apostles of the Oneness of God in the midst of the polytheistic pagan world of antiquity, we contrasted our ideal of truth to the Hellenic ideal of beauty, our ideal of Justice to the Roman ideal of might. We held on uncompromisingly to our monotheism as opposed to the Christian trinity. We taught the belief in man's free-will in contrast to Islam's fatalism. What justification is there to continue as a small minority and to continuously being discriminated against and even persecuted, for the sake of a shallow humanism which advocates the worship of man. It is a strange coincidence that our Jewish humanists are Zionists. As Zionists, they could justify the separate identity of the Jewish people on purely nationalistic grounds. But, what about the vast majority of Jews who refuse to accept Zionism as the sole solution of the Jewish problem? Should they continue the martyrdom? What a strange spectacle of humanist leaders seeking the fulfillment of their human ideal in limited nationalism, while the much maligned Religionist still prays and works for the realization of that all-embracing prophetic universalism. Dr. Kaplan claims that it was just as important to teach people to give up their idols and false beliefs as it was to be in possession of the true religion. How paradoxical for a Humanist! If pure monotheism and ethical prophetism are the great achievements which the Jewish people gave to humanity, there is still some justification in our preservation in the face of the fact that more than two thousand million of men and women still adhere to what even humanists must concede to be a lower conception of the deity, such as the Christian trinity, the CathThe Florida Bottled Gas Service are offering a service that is enabling many to enjoy comforts and conveniences of cooking, lighting and heating with gas wherever they live by furnishing natural bottled gas. Through the services of this concern suburban life in this section of Florida has been made much" more attractive, and now, because of their services, there is no home which cannot enjoy a modern system of cooking and heating with a natural gas fuel. This firm offers natural gas which gives you a natural gas fuel. It has been approved by the National Board of Underwriters. It can be secured with complete system with ranges, heaters and other gas appliances. Thus gas can be used for practically every purpose for which natural gas is employed, and, in fact, it is just like having a gas well in the back yard. Save for the fact that the installation is extremely simple and does not involve tearing up the lawn for mains, nor the floor and walls for plumbing, because their tanks can be installed quickly and easily without fuss or dirt. The system comes in tanks and at the end of the month they charge your tanks and only charge for what has been used. In fact it is like having the meter read. One pound of this dry gas is equal to 6.35 kilowatt hours of electricity in heat units. For any information concerning their service call 2-2637."" GAUTIER FUNERAL SERVICE, INC. 514 W. Flagler St. PHONES 2-8421 2-8422 R. A. Gautier, President E. K. Carter. Set y and Treat %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  WINE GRAPES I I t'alifornia Wine (irapes Fine for Juice — Ready Now %  I Prices Cheaper than Last Year %  M.I.I I KI i; PRODUCE, INC. I N. Miami Ave. at 7th St. Phone 2-02335 %  % % % % % % % % % %  a aspirations. Because the public fails olic belief in the infallibility of the The Best in Travel and Our Rates Will Please You See Vt Before Booking Anywhere Have you a trip to Cuba in mind? Our Hotel in Havana, the Hotel Packard, serves strictly Kosher Meats. Prices and Sen ice Right DAVIS TOURS, INCORPORATED 3(1 F.ast Flagler Street Phone 3-1722 to find that atmosphere which universally appeals to human emotions and which satisfies the human heart as religion did in what modernists indulge in calling the dark ages, is one of the principal reasons for the empty spaces in churches and synagogues. Another puzzling problem for our Jewish humanists should be how to justify the separate existence of the Jewish people as a distinct group HOME SERVICE LAUNDRY MKS. CI.ARA n. KERSEY. Prop. 1225 S. W. 6th St. Mending and buttons sewed on free of charge. Called for and delivered. %  % % % % % % % % % % % %  I Popular Price* Open All Night %  i SHORELAND GRILL 115 East Flagler Street (Next to First National Bank) : Special Meala 20c Table d'Hote Dinner§| Steaks. Chops. Sea Foods, — Sandwiches. Waffles %  % %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  Pope. Mohammed's conversations with angel Gabriel, etc., etc. There is no special privilege involved in remaining Jews in order to establish the worship of man, even of the superman. (To be Continued Next Week) TOURS CRUISES STEAMSHIP TICKETS TRAVELERS CHEQUES Remittances to All Foreign Countries Arrange your Passover Trip to Palestine through American Express Company 330 E. FLAGLER ST. Miami Tel. 3-3178 YOU NEED A DENTIST! You Need a GOOD DENTIST! want the opportunity to prove my professional ability at prices to please you. DR. HARRY E. FRY DENTIST 36 East Flagler Street Phone 2-7215 MARINE HARDWARE YACHT SUPPLIES FISHING TACKLE PAINTS & OILS DISTRIBUTORS OF DEVOE PAINTS & VARNISHES Prices Now Much Lower PHILLIPS HARDWARE CO. 301-303 N. Miami Avenue Phone 2-8445 t I •



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( PastSix THE JEWISH FLORID! AN Friday, February 24. 1> }J + &f •:• •:• <• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •> •> •:• •:• * •:• •> &f .;. .U.MMV MORNINGS W1UU, MIAMI. ILOR1DA •S. yttagng SulUtitt Edited by RABBI S. M. MACHTEI Pounder and Director, Radio Bynagog of Ameriea Si M)AV MOKMNI.S WIOl), MIAMI. FLORIDA Vol. 1. FEBRUARY 19, 1933 No. 11. £ •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •: %  •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• Too Many Laws j-r Scripture Reading, Exodus, Chapter XX, Versa 1-16. incl. ^>1IK weekly portion read in the synagogues yesterday contained the Decalogue. Some English translations of the Bible give .slightly different ins. Moses, in reporting it. in Deuteronomy, uses different words in several of the Commandments. I am not concerned, this morning, with the relative merits of the several versions. I AM interested 111 the merits of the charge, by many people, that there are "too many laws." A Jew knows that he has "Toryog mitSVOS" — 613 commands. He knows, also, that that's too much to expect Horn anyone. Believing that lie can't possibly obey them all. he starts with the thought of making no effort to obey any of them. He feels that, as lie must fall far short of the mark and be considered a sinner, he may just as well sin all the way. However, having some sort of a conscience, the individual selects a group of laws that he believes it possible for him to obey and these laws he defends as being "essential." Many men and women have told me, "Well, 1 obey the Ten Commandments. That's enough lor anyone." I agree. Nay. I go further. I say, "Even that's too much." I have my doubts as to the exact number of people who observe the Decalogue. It would not require much ink — not many drops of it — to write the numerical figure that denotes the total number of human beings that obey all the Ten Commandments. I make no accusations. I suggest that each of you make an honest appraisal of yourself. Check over the full list of ten laws and eliminate those that you have violated. Most people look at the Ten Commandments as did Willie. Willie's Sunday school teacher had just finished lecturing the class on the punishment for sin. Anxious to determine the extent to which her lesson had impressed the class, she asked. "What would happen if you broke one of the Ten Commandments?" Willie's hand shot up into sight. The teacher called on him. He said. "Teacher, there'd be nine left." Using that as a basis for my own computations and for my estimate of the observance of the Decalogue by the people who claim to obey these ten laws. I should say that there are less than nine left, considerably less. O H. I've stepped on someone's corns. I've touched a sensitive spot. I can almost see the scowls. The anger reaches me through the microphone. How da re I accuse so many fine and upright people of being so derelict as to disobey the Ten Commandments? Well, let's figure this out. together. Do you mind if I do it 111 reverse order? 1 have a reason for it. My reason is not. as some may claim, that. I have a natural Inclination to do things backwards. Nor is it that as some believe Jews write backwards and. therefore, our Commandments must be read from the last to the lust. My reason is based on my desire to have a means ot gauging. Ii you tell me that you are rich, I can check you at the bank. If you say that you tron 1 can gi\e you a weight to hit. 11 you lay claims to a know-lot music, % %  : lence, I can engage you In a conversation to deli linn.r the extent of your knowledge. But. should you tell me that you have faith, that you believe in God and love Him, I have no known medium for testing your religiosity. So. were I to start with the first Commandment, you would have an unfair advantage. Can you pass 'in Examination} Arc you fulh cot ered? Permit a (iulf Life Rcpre%  entative to rail and i<• 11 you Mlecl a program of Life Insurance TODAY Gulf Life Insurance Co. SM Beybold Building hone 8-4911 .1. I*. Alexander. Inc. iii E. Firel Avenge Porter lilik.i Phoi HIGH GRADE SHOE REPAIRING 1 ripple ami Corrective Pool w.irk our Special!) ^fg% BILTMORE *& LAUNDRY SERVICE • ir-fcl! %  '/ .1 price that fits your pocketbnok! PHONE 3-3681 M \. \\. 9TH ST. rL ET us begin at the last Commandment. 110' Have you overcome 1 ousness? Are you free from envy? Do you ever cast longii. 1 upon that which is forbidden m the last Commandment? Have you never expressed a desire for that which Is, Impliedly, forbidden you by the last word in the Decalogue? (9) Have you never lied about another? Have you never borne false witness by slandering another? Have you ever been silent when, in your presence, the reputation of another was maligned? By your silence you bore false witness. You should have defended the innocent. <8> Now, as to the eighth Commandment: you've never put a gun up to a man's head to compel him to give you his wallet, so you've not violated the eighth Commandment. Nonsense! Have you ever misrepresented an article you were selling to the purchaser? That's stealing, within the law. Have you ever made an excessive and unfair profit? Have you ever delivered an interior article to that ordered and paid for? Well, do you call that honesty? 17> The seventh Commandment: You never seduced your neighbor's wife so you're innocent of violating the seventh Commandment. That's very fine of you. But. have you kept your mind out of the "gutter"? Has your conversation been free from lewdness? Have you shunned all unclean references to sex? 161 Of course you haven't committed murder, or you would be in the penitentiary. That's no proof for me. You may have shed human blood by the bloodless method. How? Have you ever drained the blood from anyone's face through an insult that humiliated that person? Have you ever compelled an employee to jeopardize his health in your service? That hasn't added any to his | length of life. Have you ever pressed a debtor to the wall, figuratively, ** to the degree where he contemplates suicide or a crime against another? That hasn't added to his life's span. These acts are as murderous as the actual shedding of blood. <5> I won't insult you by charging you with violating the fifth Commandment. You love your father and mother. You have shown them every possible deference and have accorded them all honor. You have always avoided bringing them a moment of unhappiness. Never have they, even for a day, had occasion to worry because of some act by you. Of course, you have cared for them in their old age as well as they have cared for and provided all your wants when you were a child dependent on them. If you haven't. I can't quite understand that you have obeyed the fifth Commandment. (4) Now, I have no foundation for any charge that you have violated the fourth Commandment. Rest? Why. you enjoy a day of rest. The Sabbath is a blessing. Yes, but have you spent it as a holy day? And, by the way, it's a common error to believe EVERYTHING /OR THE BEACH BATHING Sins Catalina end Queen Knll BEAI II ROBES and PAJAMAS Por Men, Women and children 100-ios N. 1:. -M> AVENCE "THE SHOP of QUALITY" IIQVINE'S '""' North ol Bail Flatlet Street ItO-lM N. K. 2ND AVENI'E that the fourth Commandment speaks only of resting. It express* says. "Six days sha.t thou labor." How about it? Have you been at *orkto support your dependents.Alright, how about pnor to he ^n Have vou put your best into your work to make it productive? (3 Have you ever taken the name of C,od in vain? Have you ever sworn needlessly or falsely? Have you ever associated the name of God m a profane way With anything inappropriate? So much for the third Commandment. .2. You do not worship any idols or any graven images. You worship God in the abstract. You do not place your business or your career above God. No. of course not. You wouldn't hurt a fellow human being, one of God s child.. 1 could make an extra dollar, would you? You wouldn t suspend the'operation of one of the laws Inspired by God if by so doing vou stood to gain, would you? In other words, you wouldn't put anything else above God? You wouldn't worship, honor, or serve some pet hobby with greater zeal Hum you worship God? And if you did. it wouldn t be worshipping an idol, would it? You tell me. What would it be? .1) Now, we come to the first Commandment. It's a statement ol fact. You re so broad-minded that you wont argue with God. He says Hi 1 and you accept His word. That'.-very fine and noble of you. You have a great deal ot faith, How do 1 know.' Why, • t can't ma sin itThus, you've proven to me that you obey the Ten Commandments. Of course. so busy m the observance of the Decalogue, you have no time to consider the other laws. That's just too bad. Y OU think me terribly sarcastic. I appear to be an awful cynic. IS' ging your pardon, you are slightly mistaken. 1 am neither. I just walk about with open eyes. Just so long as the human race will be satisfied to eliminate the laws of life from its practice, we shall be confronted with the spectacles ol misery and suffering. When we learn that we an not the sources of wisdom, when we realize that the laws of God are not obstacles to success and happiness but that they are aids, we shall put them into practice and insure happiness lor all men. There are not too many laws. There arc too few observers of the law. The Torah Is a "Toras Chayim" — a law of life — and all that life implies. 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Friday February 24, 1933. THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page Seven ETY M the meeting of the Book In brief clllb Mondav nl 8 ht at th e paw Ijeisner. of its president, Mrs. I. L. Mrs. David Solomon reI : Earth Horizons," by Mary liustin. and Mrs. Jonah Caplan gave ling on "Segregation." A sort hour followed. • • Rabbi S. M. Maehtei will conduct Ike Bible Study group at 11 o'clock I morning at the home of I Kaufman Mandel, 3012 s. w. • :.•!. street. The lesson for the %  r will d''" 1 with Abraham and the trowth of I lie idea of Monotheism. I :;im will discuss the question 1 Kashruth laws and the practice oi observing the Jewish dietary lavis in the home. The Bible class L conducted for the benefit of those I ted In the study of scripture be .source and the application i; religious laws in the daily life of [itrj individual regardless of reL::oiis alfiliation. The attendance 1 e classes is representative of l:; denominations and creeds with enphasis laid on anything but spiritual value of scripture. Jews ir.d Christians mingle and meet on I common plane of brotherhood. • • • The high water mark of the talkathon, now' in progress the I cth day at the Cinderella lallroom and 1320 hours, was reachpi -o far this season, Monday night. ihis was due to the wedding of the iTIVOLI W. Flaclrr at Kth Phone 2-3352 Simla] iind .Monday. Feb. 26-27 Continaeai 2 in 11 j MATINEE :•<• EVENING SSc "Blonde Venus" j iih MARLENE DIETRICH | Attention, Visitors! The policy of this store, to meet all advertised prices, alihourii well-known and wellOtabUshed among lo<'al folks i s Rood news to Miami's visitors. Think of the hours of Mopping time you can save by Mining here where stocks are complete and where you know liriics are guaranteed to be as 'w or lower than anywhere rise. MMIV Su-.If St Amerc Wrjrst RED CROSS I DRUG DEPARTMENT STOREf 51 E. Flakier %  KFlatlet St. I'hone 2-819 ft* Delivery in Greater Miami By This Sign You are assured of the BEST Electrical Work Jj**trk BtOTM and Refrigerators In* Service You Will Appreciate George La Vigne Company, Inc. II'. Iriial Contractor* and Engineer!* 12 N. E. Third Avenue I'hone 2-7838 popular sweetheart couple, No. 1, Millie Rosen and Jesse Putch, of Jacksonville, Pla. The largest and most appreciative audience of the season turned out and the large ballroom was crowded to capacity. Jack Negley, popular master of ceremonies, gave the bride away, Wally Adams was best man and Marjorie Poster, maid of honor. Rudy, jr., was ring-bearer and Jack Bentley, jr., train-bearer. The other feature was I he entrance of the 10 championship teams from Jacksonville, In compctition against the local contestants. The newcomers wore black sweaters With orange letters on them and the Miami favorites wore blue with white figures. Dr. Pepper, the favOrite beverage of the Walkathoners. furnished the sweaters to the local entries, The "grinds" have proven the most thrilling events staged up to date and on each occasion someone goes out. The girls have proven a bit more hardy than the boys in the early days but when Beulah Sapp and Joan Miller fell by the wayside, it left only one girl solo, Cleo Clifford. Jack Negley and his Alimony Jumpers have scored In a big way With the fans, and this band of musicians have already won their way into the hearts of the patrons. Negley has long been the outstanding master of ceremonies of this mode ol entertainment. a a a A most delightful meeting of the Junior Hadassah was held in the Spanish room of the Ponce de Leon hotel. Plans for a bridge were voted on, DRS. HART & HART Kir Chicago) DR. JOHN H. HART l>K. MARY A. HART Chiropodists Nine Yeun in Miami Suites 5 and 7 36 East Klagler Street Phone 2-8538 ARE WE k pi „ s faith with those who trust us, arc we living up to our obligations if we risk their future happiness by ignoring the problems that would arise for them if, some day, we did not come home? life Insurance offers the safe and certain answer. There is no substitute. A Southern Health & Life Insurance Policy on each one is necessary to protect the others from the privation and expense caused by the last illness and death. A few pennies each week is the total cost. SOUTHERN LIFE & HEALTH INSURANCE COMPANY T. S. COOK, Manager 6! Realty Beard Bide;. I'hone 2-3419 CENTRAL BUSINESS COLLEGE Congress Building 111 N. E. 2nd kit. Miami. Fla. ,,,1,1,,,, m.


PAGE 1

Page Eight THE JEWISH FLORID'AN Friday, February 24 f Recipes for the Jewish Family Brain Salad Scald brains with boiling hot water to cleanse thoroughly. Boil until tender in fresh cold water, being careful to remove from water while it is yet firm. Slice lengthwise and lay in dish. Pour over one-half cup of vinegar, which has been sweetened with a pinch of sugar to remove sharp taste, pinch of salt and pepper. Garnish with parsley and serve cold. Can also be served with mayonnaise. Swcotbread Salad Take cucumbers and cut lengthWise to .serve the salad in; scrape out the inside and salt well, then squeeze and use this to mix with the filling. Take a pair of sweetbreads or calf's brains, wash well, and boil; when done, throw in cold water at once and skin them; chop fine, add bunch of celery, one can of peas, scraped part of cucumber; mix all together and season. Mix mayonnaise with it and fill the cucumber shells; keep all cold and serve on lettuce leaf. Neapolitan Salad Take some white meat of a turkey, cut up fine, cut up a few pickles the same way. a few beets, one or two carrots, a few potatoes (the carrots and potatoes must be parboiled), also a few stalks of asparagus; chop up a bunch of crisp white celery; a whole celery root (parboiled), sprinkle all with fine salt and pour mayonnaise dressing over it. Line the salad bowl with lettuce leaves or white cabbage leaves. Add a few hard boiled eggs and capers; garnish with sprigs of fresh parsley. Sandwich Fillings with Honey Honey in sandwich fillings brings extra goodness to the lunch. Blend with cream cheese, chopped nuts. raisins and celery, chopped carrots, peanut butter, dates chopped (with or without nuts), and many other combinations. You'll find them all different and delicious; easy to make — yet most appetizing. In sandwiches — plain. roTied. ribbon or tier — honey assures additional flavor, keeps the sandwich moist and holds crumbly bread together. Honey retan Bread Roll Thoroughly blend one cup finely cut salted pecans with one-half cup -lightly warmed honey to form spreading paste. Cut bread in slices full length of loaf "ordinary loaf cuts live lengthwise slices). Spread with butter, then with honey-pecan paste, and roll as for jelly roll. Wrap each in waxed paper and tie to keep intact. Let stand an hour or longer; remove paper and cut each roll in three slices —each loaf used makes 15 rolled slices. Vegetables with Honey Vegetables, with their appetizing salts and health promoting vitamins, are digestive aids and important WANTEDDistributors for northern and eastern states. We (five you local and national advertising and guarantee U> sell your first |j order in less than sixty days. [j Nan's Beauty Creations 161 -N. W. ITtfa St. VERY LATEST Here is a charming dress for school girl age in early spring fashion showings. It is the semi-suspender guimpe and exceedingly practical. It may be worn with a variety of guimpes. As shown in the sketch, it is a light navy blue wool crepe, the sep"Ask And Ye Shall Learn" arate guimpe being a red and white gingham. A plain yellow guimpe with a vivid wool crepe would also make a .smart change. 1'laided woolens, rayon mixtures and cotton tweeds are also suitable and lend themselves to original color combinations. Size 8 requires one and one-half yards of 39-inch material for the skirt with one and three-fourths yards of 35-inch material lor the blouse. 'protective" loods. To bring out their best fresh flavor, add a teaspoon ol mild honey for each cup of ble when adding butter and salt. I'ilaf (Russian Style) Follow recipe below but substitute cooked lamb for the chicken, and add chicken livers fried and cut m small pieces. I I'ilaf (Turkish Style) Soak one cup of rice in cold water for one hour. Pour off the water. and put the rice with two cups of soup stock and one-quarter of a white onion on to boil. Stew until the rice absorbs all the stock. Stew one-half can ol tomatoes thoroughly and season with olive oil or chicken fat. salt and pepper. Mix it with rice. Saute in chicken fat to a light color, a jointed chicken slightly parboiled, or slices of cold cooked chicken or turkey. Make a depression in the rice and tomato, put in the chicken and two tablespoons of olive oil or chicken fat. and stew all together for 20 minutes. Serve on a platter in a smooth mound, the red rice surrounding the fowl. 1< it true that Philo Judaeus, the Hellenistic Jewish philosopher of tinfust century, denounced deserters of the Faith in the I.n ing GodPhilo Judaeus, the leading JudeoAlexandrlan philosopher, in his work. -On Repentance II.," discusses Apostates and proselytes. In comparing the two he says: "It is necessary that, as in the sun shadow follows the body, so also a participation in all other virtues must inevitably follow the giving due honour to the living God; for those who come over to this worship become at once prudent, and temperate, and modest, and gentle, and nn rcil'ul. and humane, and venerable, and just, and magnanimous, and lovers of truth, and superior to all considerations of money or pleasure; just as, on the contrary, one may see that those who forsake the holy laws of God are intemperate, shameless, unjust, disreputable, weak minded, quarrelsome, companions of falsehood and perjury, willing to sell their liberty for luxurious i ing. for strong wine, for sweetmeats, and for beauty, for pleasures of the belly and of Uie parts below the belly; the miserable end of all which enjoyments is ruin to both body and soul." "Works of Philo Judaeus. Translated by C. D. Yonge. vol. 3, London. 1855. p 455.) An eiangelical preacher in a rei i /;/ >c i II/IIII in ;//i / %  in, h said that tin • \pulsion nf ih,Hebreu • from Palestine in the days of the Prophets meant that the Cod of Israel -iiiii,/ hirelation with the peopU w bo u ere supposed to worship him. /> this claim based on fait? Among the ancient Semites the deportation of a people from its land was viewed as a severance from ngod. For the ancient Hebrews it was one of the bitterest ingredients in their cup to hear the heathen taunt: "These are the people of the Lord, and yet, out of His land are they gone forth" (Ezekiel 36,20). In the religion of the ancient Semites illy each nation had not only Its own land but its own god. The god was as closely associated with the land as with the nation. A god had a vested right, so to speak, in his land. Irrespective of his relation inhabitant.-. Thus even in the i •., n| ol the removal of his worshippers, the land was still theoretically rid. The new settlers drafted into Samaria by the king of Assyria utter the deportation ol the 10 tribes, imported their own gods; but avoc wrought among them by led them u> acknowledge "the : the land" 'II Kings 17. 241T.). On the other hand, it was an accepted principle that a god could not be fitly worshipped outside of Ins own land (Joshua 22, 19; II Sam. 26. 19: Hosea 9. 3ff.). This idea finds expression even in connection with the worship of the God of Israel. Naaman asks for two mules' burden of Palestinian soil in order to render possible the worship of the God of Israel at Damascus. The exiles in Babylon were at a loss howto sing the Lord's song in a strange land (Psalm 1371. The land of a god corresponded with the land U1 worshippers (see William Rofcn Smith's "Lectures on the fta of the Semites." third edition „ A. Cook, London. 1927, pp g,,"' is this primitive Semitic cone of the relation of a god to his u and to his land that underlies claim cited in the above inquiry Who of the Anglo. Jnji preachers was the first t„ c „. the English language fur h„ ing? The credit of first preaching! English in the Jewish p u i plI claimed for more than one Jewish minister. It is said tl D. M. Isaacs, of Liverpool and ] che tei. was the first to do so. i ers say the Rev. Aaron Levy first preached in the vernac while some say it was Dr. Jj. Raphall. The same claim is also for Tobias Goodman, autl a work on "The Faith of Israel" first English translator ol eshl's "Behinat ha-Olani." CHOPSUEY AND AMERICAN CUISINE ORDERS PREPARU TO TAKE TOKIOROOFCAROEN ii A. M. 272W.FLAGLER! to 2 A. M. Phone MH| WALK A THON CINDERELLA BALLROOM $1,000 CASH PRIZES 21 not Its DAILY PAST Till. 1300th HOIK — c;o/.\(, ON sowSee HAVANA the best way TICKETS 122.60 Itiri-'i M.mniT or via Kej Went Tours, All Expense. S35 Up Authorized agent* for I'jin \merit an tlrwayn [vantern tlrwayn i lyde-Mallor) Line* P, A O. S. s. COM pan) Men hanlH \ Miner* Lint MiMNon s. s. Line Florida Motor Linen EL i FARR TOURS I are far hctter 130 WASHINGTON AVE. HOTEL 33 S. W. 2nd Avi\ (>/>( %  '/ the Year Round ;-,i> ROOM8 — :•" HATHS Single Rooms '.MTU II VTII $2.00 Up Double Rooms WITH HATH $3.50 Up Exactly tinplace you A i ll want to si.i\ ... A real home for you while m Miami. 7". R. KNIGHT, Proprietor MIAMI, FLORIDA A W SH JUDEA FILMS bwudt FOUR GENERATIONS^ WORLD'S GREATEST CANTORS VilCE ISRAEL ^ —~C-*-** P] <• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:••:•:• •> •" •*• InHiHt on your (irorer KivinK vou .•-., f ;.^aa %  >* NEW YORK BREAD A CAKE t COMPANY % BREAD AND CAKES % 471 S. W. 8th St. • Phone 2-7K.-.2 % llranrh Store: I.V, N. W. :,th Si. ********************* % %  % % %  SUNDAY, MARCH 5th 3 Times Only -2 \\ U. / l\ \J. and 11:15 P.M. BISCAYNE PLAZA THEATRE MIAMI BEACH



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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
February 24, 1933

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00209

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
February 24, 1933

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00209

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
*eJewish Floncti'am
J LORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY
Vol. 6. No. 8.
MIAMI. II.ORIDA, IRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 19)3.
1'ricc Five Cents
SCIENGH in the
TALMUD
Annual Purim Final Charity
Ball Wednesday Drive Now On Given Synagog
Holy Scroll Is
i( ontinued from Last Week)
The fourth annual Purim ball of \ Dispensing with the regular week-
tne Ladies' auxiliary of the Miami ly luncheon meetings in order to
MUiK SteToT heTra? T^ ^"^ "Won will devote the extra tregained to the
fZ TZTZ1ZZZ' hCW al thC MaJ" Sh,ine lem^ W f <*ets and solicitation for
,1Ce ,TT,;71Z1ZITZ ^ BiSCaVne bUleVard' nCXt Wed- ^ lor enir program, the
lU0 f clean and unclean meat. In nesday evening, March 1, beginning arrangements committee directing
tnc Tracta e Chulm there ,s a com- al 9:3o p. m. P.ans announced for the annual charity bal. of the Jew-
plete description of the aesophagus. this event include entertainment
jlmentary canal is fully de- from many of the night clubs of the
scribed. Rab Hisdai mentions the greater Miami district including
muscle. The operation for im- those who appeared at the dance
perforated anus in the new-born is given by the auxiliary last month.
[bed in Shabbos 134b. Crutch- A complete floor show will be given
es are mentioned in the same trac- during the evening and every effort
ish Welfare bureau is making a
whirlwind drive to raise funds for
the organization. Realizing that
sufficient funds must be raised by
the ball to take care of the urgent
calls being made on the Jewish Wel-
fare bureau daily, the committee us
One of the most impressive cere-
monies held in Miami Beach in re-
cent years was that of last Sunday
night when Mr. and Mrs. P. Silver-
man of Newark. N. J., presented a
Safer Torah to Beth Jacob congre-
gation. Many tourists and residents
ol Miami and Miami Beach gath-
ered at the home of the Silvermans
and in procession marched to the
Beth Jacob synagogue accompanied
by a band of music. As the proces-
sion approached the synagogue Rab-
bi Lazarus Axelrod, Harry Wasser-
man and Rev. M. B. Herman, each
?:------------------------1
Announcements!
i___________i
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
(ConwiTvativi' i
139 N. W. Third Avenue
MAX SHAPIRO. Rabbi
Regular services begin at 5:45
with the late services at 8 o'clock
when Rabbi Max Shapiro will
preach the sermon on "America's
Immortal Presidents Have They
Lived in Vain?" Cantor Louis Hay-
man and his choir will chant the
uu, Dislocation of joints, amputa- wll] be made to make this one of the impressing this fact on both resi- .
UOD and trephining are discussed, gala events of the season. Novelties. dents and tourists of the greater carrying a Safer Torah. came from services and lead the congregational
in Baba Mitzia there is mention of Punm eircct.s. and booths will help I Miami district. Representing every the synagogue to greet the new Saf- singing. Refreshments will be serv-
somekindof anaesthetic a sleep- carry out and heighten the enjoy- Jewish organization in the district er Torah. To the tunes of tradi-
mg potion-administered to pa- ment to be provided for the guests. are their respective officers or dele- tional hymns the entire procession.
dents during a major operation. Several stunts will be provided dur- gates who are members of the gen- I headed by the rabbi and others car-
Embryology, that science to which, ing the evening, the exact nature of eral welfare committee. Mrs. R.' rying the Scrolls, entered the svua-
legend asserts. King David, evident- winch will not be divulged by the Yunes was named a member of this | gogue. A word of welcome to all as-
ly as a good provider for his son, committee in charge of this part of committee recently. The ball will | sembled was then given in a brief
devoted a great deal of his time, the program until a few minutes
was not neglected by the Talmud- before the stunts are put on. Prizes
ists. Rabbi Samuel, for example, will be awarded for the most unique
costumes depicting Jewish charac-
.1,1- able to tell the exact age of a
Niddah 25b. He maintained,
however, that it was impossible to
utiate sex before the end of
the fourth month, which, indeed, is
the opinion of modern embryolo-
En passant, too, we must men-
tion that most egregious of charac-
ters, Abba Saul, symbol of philoso-
phy, who was at once embryologist
and grave-digger.
It is remarkable, too, that hydro-
phobia, a puzzle to scientists until
Pasteur discovered the treatment of
anti-toxins, is indicated in the Trac-
late Yoma. and is cured almost pre-
cisely in the manner which inedi-
iince Pasteur has adopted. For
ters linked with the history of Pur-
im.
Mrs. Nathan Abramson is chair-
man of the arrangements commit-
tee and she is being assisted by Mrs.
Louis Pallott, co-chairman. Mrs,
Morris Rappaport. Mrs. Jacf: Hirsch
and Mis Max Rappaport in charge
of cakes and candies: Mrs. Max
Kupfersteln in charge of drinks:
Mis. Nathan Adelinan m charge of
sandwiches; Mrs. Charles Feldman
and Mrs. Moe Harris in charge ol
Dowers; Mis. diaries Taunenbaum
in charge of tickets; Mrs. J. L.
ShOChet m charge of entertainment.
be held at the beautiful Floridian
hotel. Miami Beach, on Sunday eve-
ning. March 12. Artists appearing
in all of the night clubs will be on
hand to entertain the guests. Dur-
ing the evening relreshments will
be i rved without additional charg-
es.
Famous Cantors
Will Appear Here
Interest in the first all Yiddish
talking and singing picture to be
exhibited in thus disirict la increas-
ln every day. "The Voice of Is-
rael." which Is a picturization of delicious refreshments were served.
the struggle of a nation whose life_____________
message by the chairman of the
evening. City Councilman Baron de
Hirsch Meyer. Rabbi E. Lazarus
Axelrod spoke in Yiddish, and was
followed by Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan
of the Miami Jewish Orthodox con-
gregation, who delivered the only
address in English. Rabbi Samuel
M. Machtei of the Radio Synagog.
and Rabbi Uri Langer of Hungary,
i hen .spoke in Yiddish.
The honors of filling in the un-
finished letters of the Scroll were
then sold by Harry Wasserman, who
was assiSed by Cantor Boris
Schlachman ol the congregation.
Assisting in the arrangements was
I. L. Mintzer. secretary of Beth Ja-
cob. At the close of the ceremonies
ed in the Talmud Torah hall fol-
lowing the services.
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI
(Reform)
1.17 N. K. Nineteenth Street
DR. JACOB II. KAPLAN. Rabbi
Services will begin tonight at 8:15
when Dr. Kaplan's subject will be
"Washington. Lincoln and Franklin
D. Roosevelt. Three Epochs in Am-
erican History, a New Constitution,
a New Union and a New Deal."
After services a reception will be
held in Kaplan hall, so that the vis-
itors may meet each other and
spend a pleasant social hour.
Religious school is conducted each
Sunday from 10 to 12 in Temple Ls-
rael.
the Tana. Matya ben Cheresh de- ,
He who is bitten by a mad HadaSSah tO Hold
dog is fed with a mad dog's liver,"
which, though trefa, is full of blood
toxin.
Dentistry
The drawers of teeth and the hew-
ers of molars are not forgotten in
the Talmud. We glean, for exam-
ple, that pepper, cinnamon, ginger
and clotesall common ingredients
employed In treatment in science in
the Talmud Gal Three modern
times were used by the afflicted
of the Gemara times. Reference is
also made to gold teeth, and silver
plates. Even that most modern of
ailments ubiquitous halitosis is,
according to the Tractate Sabbath
65a. curable by a grain of pepper
and a mouth-wash of salt.
Geology
An original interpretation of Rab-
bi Abbahu's statement that "The
Lord successively created worlds and
destroyed them, saying that these
used Him, and these pleased Him
not, until our Earth appeared," is
given by Rabbi Israel Lifshitz. He
maintained much to the shocked
astonishment of his contemporaries
that this was a reference to geo-
logic strata!
It is impossible, in a sketch of
this nature, to be exhaustive. Like
Hillel, one must be merely laconic
and teach Talmud while standing on
one leg. The scientific utterances
in the Talmud, it now appears, are
of that type where, to use Milton's
Phrase, more is meant than merely
meets the ear. It can bear re-read-
ing. But alas, the Talmud is a clas-
sic, and a classic, by definition, is a
book about which everybody talks
and nobody reads .
throbs with endless tragedy and
(llama seethes with their plight
in Egypt under the taskmasters of
Pharaohs their freedom their
Miami chapter of Senior Hadas- starvation the rise of the Jewish
sah will present one of the most in- people from a tribal
Musical and Tea
( ONGREGATION BETH JACOB
I Orthodox l
111 Haohinitton Ave.. Miami Reach
L. AXELROD. Rabbi
teresting programs of the current
season at a musicale and tea next
Wednesday afternoon, March 1, at 3
o'clock at the home of Mrs. Joseph
Williamson. 1415 Meridian avenue.
Miami Beach. Among the artists
who will appear on the program are
the noted tenor. Joseph Kallini. the
Junior Symphony Trio of the Uni-
versity of Miami, Rosemary Klemt-
ner in several vocal selections, and
nation to a j
kingdom and commonwealth in
their own land the fall of Jeru-
salem the rebuilding of the Tem-
ple .. and their wanderings down
to the present time. The voices of '
present-day Jewry's most famous
cantors symbolize the priests of old
and are heard in liturgical music
which has made them famous
the noted Zionist, lecturer and trav- throughout the world. Cantor Shiis-
eler. The public is invited to attend kv sin?s unsane Tokef. Cantor Ros-
Local Worker
Elected Officer
________
Mrs. Freda Lutzky, president of
the Miami Senior Hadassah and ac-
tive Zionist worker here for a num-
ber of years, was elected first vice
president of the southern region of
Hadassah at the regional convention
held in Atlanta. Ga. several weeks
ago. She will also act as chairman
of the infant welfare committee of
Hadassah for the southern region.
Mrs. Lutzky, prior to her becoming
president of the senior Miami Ha- tne congregational singing and will
dassah. was for a number of years | chant the services. Saturday morn-
president of the local Junior Hadas-
sah.
and may
phoning 5-1331.
be served.
make reservations by
Refreshments will
Biscayne Track
Attracts Crowds
enblatt is heard in his famous
Adonoy Zchoronu," Cantor Hersh-
man in the age-old "Hayom Haras
Olom." Cantor Roitman in "Av Hor-
achamim," and such famous can-
tors as Joseph Shapiro, Louis Wald-
man, the venerable Seidel Rover,
dean of the world's cantors, and
Regular services will begin at 5:30
with the late services at 8 p. m.
when Rabbi Lazarus Axelrod will
preach a sermon on "Broken Laws."
Mr. M. Suvotkin. of Saratoga
Springs. N. Y.. an active communal
worker and a director of the Rabbi
Isaac Elchanan yeshiva will speak
briefly on his travels in Palestine.
Cantor Boris Schlachman will lead
ing Rabbi Axelrod will preach in
Yiddish on the portion of the week.
The largest crowds ever attending ^ h ^^ ^ heard
dog races have been in evidence at j
the beautiful plant of the Biscayne
Kennel club since its opening. Com-
pletely renovated since last year,
the new management in charge of
Joe Adams and Carson Bradford
have spared no efforts or money to
make it a thing of beauty and en-
joyment to the patrons.
Some of the fastest dogs have
in selections that touch one's heart
and bring back memories of old. The
famous boy cantor, Sheiele Engel-
hardt. is heard in a Sabbath hymn
which endeared him to many
throughout the country. Abraham
Machtenberg's choir appears in full
in "Yismachu." which is sung by
Singer To Give
Concert Sunday
Making his second and final ap-
pearance in this section of the
country, Solomon Small tSchmule-
witz). famous Yiddish poet, com-
poser and singer, will be heard in a
concert Sunday night at the Beth
Jacob congregation. Miami Beach.
Cantor Boris Schlachman will act
as chairman of the evening and will
introduce the artist.
Mr. Small is the author of "Der
Talisel," a "Brivele Der Mamen"
and thousands of other folk songs
which have been famous through-
out the entire Yiddish speaking
been entered in the different races ,nis all.male cnolr Md which de- | ^ ^ ^^ yearg ^ q[ ^
nightly and they have been so wen hghted countiess audiences in recent
matched that it is hard to pick | ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ghown at
winner with any certainty,
large prices have been paid in many
(ConUnued on Page Five)
compositions have been played on
the radio by such famous stars as
the Biscayne Plaza theatre. Miami | Eddie Cantor. George Jessel and Al
Beach, three times only on March 5. [ Jolson.
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION
(Orthodox)
1(41 S. W. Third Street
JONAH E. CAPLAN. Rabbi
The regular early services begin
at 5:45 p. m. with the late services
at 8:30 when Rabbi Caplan will
preach a sermon on "Laws and
Their Moral Influence." The regular
weekly current Jewish news topics
will be discussed by the rabbi and
is being met with much favor by
those attending. A social hour will
follow. Saturday morning services
begin at 9 a. m. and a sermon will
be preached in Yiddish by the rabbi
in observance of "Shabbos M'Vor-
chin." Mincha services and Shalosh
Saudah services begin Saturday at
5 p. m.
, I
'




Page Two
THE JEWISH FLOR ID'AN
Friday, February 24. 193,

f
Those who have attended recent
lectures by Mrs. Van Dyke at 44 S.
E. First street, are urging all their
female friends not to miss them be-
cause of the splendid lessons taught
them. The lectures are illustrated
and living models are used. Mrs.
Van Dyke, who is an authority, talks
of women obtaining happiness
through the study of female hy-
giene, and a small fee Is charged
for admission. Those attending have
term these lectures inspiring and
educational.

Mrs. Isaac Levin, president of
Temple Israel Sisterhood, will enter-
tain the executive board of the sis-
terhood and out-of-town guests at
a Sabbath tea in the beautiful Bel-
levue hotel at 407 N. E. Seventeenth
terrace. An intimate Sabbath spirit
will prevail.

The annual donors luncheon spon-
sored by the Miami chapter of Sen-
ior Hadassah scheduled for Febru-
ary 27 has been postponed and will
be held on Monday, March 13. at
the Floridian hotel. Miami Beach.
This will mark the twenty-first an-
niversary of the founding of Hadas-
sah. All those who have not yet
tilled the quota to entitle them to
attend are urged to communicate
with Mrs. Barney Weinkle. chair-
man of the committee. Splendid
entertainment and a delightful pro-
gram has been prepared.
a
As we go to press the annual Pur-
im ball and bazaar of Beth David
Sisterhood is being held at the Mahl
Shrine temple. A full account of
this event will appear in our next
issue.

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Berkowitz and
a party of friends left for a brief
tour of Florida, during which time
they will visit Tampa. Jacksonville
and other Florida cities.

Samuel Wax. 48, formerly of West
Palm Beach, died in the Jackson
Memorial hospital Tuesday. He had
been in Palm Beach and here for
more than 25 years. He leaves a son,
Charles, of Palm Beach; two broth-
ers, Morris of Montelair. N. J., and
Benjamin, West Palm Beach; three
sisters, Mrs. B. Weinnan, Brooklyn,
N. Y.; Mrs. Roy Wax, Brooklyn, and
Mrs. D. Dickson. Washington. He
was a member of the West Palm
Beach Elks lodge and an Odd Fel-
low. The body was shipped to West
Palm Beach Wednesday night by
the Gautier funeral home for bur-
ial. Interment will be in the Jewish
cemetery at West Palm Beach, Sun-
day, February 26, at 3 p. m. from
the Ferguson funeral home.
Rabbi S. M. Machtei of the Radio
Synagog will officiate.

Gathering in the beautiful home
of Mrs. William Lewin at Miami
lie ach, members and friends of
Temple Israel Sisterhood enjoyed
the Washington's birthday bridge
sponsored by the sisterhood last
ruesday afternoon. The home was
lavishly decorated for the event with
cut flowers and potted palms which
enhanced the natural beauty and
ettlngs of the home. After bridge
was played delicious refreshments
were served which were enjoyed by
all. Prices were awarded for high
scores to Mis. H. H. Miller. Mlu
Bertie Harrison of Roanoke. Va.. and
several others. Assisting the hostess
Mrs. Lewin were Mesdames Jacob
H. Kaplan, Bert Reisner and Isaac
Levin.

Quite a tidy sum was realized last
Tuesday night at the regular card
party of the Ladies' auxiliary of
the Miami Jewish Orthodox congre-
gation when Mrs. Jack Hirsch was
ess. About 20 tables of bridge
were in play and individual prizes
were awarded to highest scores at
1 ach table. Delicious refreshments
served during the evening.

The annual spring festival of Beth
Jacob Sisterhood for the purpose of
raising funds for its Talmud Torah
will be held on Sunday evening.
March 26. at the Floridian hotel.
Miami Beach. A complete floor
show will be given. Mrs. Barney
Weinkle, president of the sisterhood.
is chairman of the general commit-
tee in charge of this annual event.
A sisting Miss Mildred Greenberg,
popular Miami pianiste. in her re-
cital March 5 at the University of
Miami recital hall on N. E. Second
avenue and Fourteenth street will
Use Fresh Milk
Ask Your (iriMir fur
GRAHAMS
Pasteurized Milk ..... 10c
Light (ream ......... 13c
Heavy (ream ........ 20c
Graham's Dairi
I'hune Canal 2.~,.*>-J
PENN8UCO, FLA.
VISIT TUB
ROMA
Restaurant
Italian Dinners
l.-IO N. K. 2nd At*.
First Class Food at
Moderate Prlcei
\Love is a bond often
broken through
ignorance
A1 tend thv*v
I 1 nlii. fit.111m; Itctorw
ELIZABETH
VAN DYKE
on IV mi nine Power.
She Will (harm You!
If rb formula! free f'r unmrn'. ;,il-
menta, ikln trouble* and other ill*.
Tuesday
( enetlpation and llalanied Meal*.
Wednesday
Beaut) Make-up, CouMtica
Thursday
feminine Power and (harm
Friday
Fond Sail.. Vitamin*. Calorie*
Saturday
Trpee of u ,,,,. m ,,,:,,,,,. ,
I
A "Golden Opportunity" for
real Health Kduration for
only 25 cents.
DAILY
3 p.m. and 8 p.m.
II S. K. FIRST STREET
Oppaelte Hear llurdine'a
Living Model I'sed
Girle I'nder I" Not Admitted
be Leonard Rase, popular young
cellist, and Louis Eley, violinist. A
very excellent musical program has
been arranged, designed to show the
ability of the talented artist.
a *
An important meeting of the
Ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jew-
ish Orthodox congregation will be
held at the synagogue on next Tues-
day evening. February 28, when im-
portant business will be transacted.
All members are urged to attend, as
this is the night before the annual
Purim ball and final arrangements
for the ball will be announced at
this meeting. Following the social
meeting a social hour will be spent.

Mr and Mrs. J. S. Field enter-
tained recently with a dinner for
their nieces. Mrs. Paul E. Siglei and
Mrs. Abbott Lippman of New York,
Mrs. Irving Frankinstein of Savan-
nah, Ga.. and Mrs, P. Pearlman of
New York.
a
Mrs. Harry Rosen and sister. Miss
Evelyn Bhrllch, of New York, are
-pending the winter here.
*
E, Ehrlich of Brooklyn. N. Y.. and
daughter, Mrs. Helen Kaplan, of
Flatbush. N. Y.. are spending the
winter at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
W. N. Hull on Brickell avenue. They
are dividing their time between the
races and Miami Beach. With them
1- Mrs. Kaplan's daughter. Joan.

I. Finkcnberg. New York City, was
a guest at a birthday party given at
the Hollywood Beach hotel recently
by Mrs, Finkenberg. Included am-
ong the guests were Mr. and Mrs.
Sam Ungerleider. Mr. and Mrs. John
Sherman, Mr. and Mrs. I. Isaacs, ;
Mr. and Mrs. D. Bernstein all of
New York City, and Mr. and Mrs.
O. Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. D. Janover,
Mr. and Mrs. A. Block of Brooklyn.

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Scheer gave a
-------------------------------------a.
party Saturday at the Seville apart-
ments, Miami Beach, in honor of
the birthday anniversaries of their
grandchildren, J. Leonard Scheer, 8.
and Bernice Scheer. 13. Their birth-
day anniversaries fell on the same
date.
The children attending were El-
aine and Edgar Feldman. Doris and
Maurice Solomon, Christina Hill.
Evelyn Schwartz. Joyce Diamond,
Lucille Green. Dolores Covert and
Howard Dowman.

j. j. Simmons, executive director
of the Hebrew Orphan's asylum of
New York, addressed the Jewish
Welfare auxiliary meeting yesterday
afternoon In Kaplan hall with the
president, Mrs. Meyer .Schwartz, in
charge, He spoke on "Social Service
Work and What It Signifies." Capt.
M. F. Tobias used social service work
as the theme of his talk and Mrs.
Max Dobrin spoke in behalf of the
Community Chest. A banquet cloth,
donated by Maj. K. Mandel, will be
sold at the charity ball on March
12 at the Floridian hotel. Mrs. Mor-
ris Dubler was hostess during a so-
cial hour.

Tent Hive No. 22 of the Macca-
bees celebrated George Washing-
ton's birthday Tuesday night at
their hall. 2100 W. Flagler street.
Jerry Johnson represented George
Washington. He was dressed in the
style of the colonial days and wore
a white powdered wig. Ho gave a
monologue of the life of George
Washington from boyhood through i
to his retirement of his presidency.
Piano solos of music of the seven-
teenth century was rendered by Mrs.
Martha Kretzschmar. who was
dressed as Martha Washington. Cel-
lo solo by Paul Jewett; reading was
given by Miss Frances Saco; a whis
tling solo by Sue Ernest Hewli,^
piano duet of colonial numbers bv
Mrs. Kretzschmar and Miss Sac
A. M. Coffin, state manager, gave ,
description of localities in the south.
em part of Florida, which have
been inspected by himself and C. a
Avant, chairman of the executive
committee, for the location of the
proposed hotel and golf links for the
Maccabees recreation center, it was
announced that the next meeting
would be held at the time of the
visit of the supreme board of trus-
tees.
Ice cream and cake was served
by Mrs. A. M. Coffin, assisted by
Miss Betty Searing, Miss lino Wald-
ron. George T. Mann and J. |[
Huffman.

The regular Bnai Brith meeting
scheduled for last night was not
held, having been postponed because
of the Purim ball of Beth David
Sisterhood. The meeting will be held
at the community centre of the
Hebrew Athletic club Thursday eve-
ning, March 2, and a program will
be presented in addition to the us-
ual business meeting.

The marriage of Sally Lee Rosen-
feld of Chicago, 111., to Mr. Averon
Allan Ziegler of the London Arms
hotel took place at the home ol
Rabbi S. M. Machtei of the Radio
Synagog last Wednesday afternoon.
+-------------------
j The New S100.000.00 Museum
i "SOUTH SKAS"
1
MONSTERS
of the
DEEP
The Mil) I cnlifir Exhibition of it- kind
\er produced.
The Greatest
Collection of Under
Sea Life in the
World
Giant devilfish, monstrous oc-
topus, man-eater sharks, sword
fish, mammoth sea cow, big
same fish, liuRe turtles, alli-
Katiirs. giant crocodile, bril-
liantly colored fish from Tropic
Seas.
See These
If eird Creatures
In Their
Native Haunts
Special elevator effect*, special
electrical effects, speeial scenic
effects ... a gorgeous and mag-
nificent spectaile, now showing
at
BISCAYNE BLVD. at 9TII ST.
Near Clyde Line and
Mu 11 .,1 n I.in; l>, ks
10 A.M. Till 11 l'.M. Daily
Total Admission
ADULTS 25c CHILDREN 10c
Thin Exhibition made po*ihle
hy the
Florida Year-
Round Clubs,
Incorporated
gti Edna
La France
* rJ beauty
r~ salon
An Aid for Eer> lleautv Need Specializing in Kaeial and Hair Tinting in McAllister arcade Phnne 2-72l
Say "Howdy" to
the Folks back
Home with
"Sunshine
Fruits"
LIVE POII.THY AND
< HOICE FRIITS AND
VEGETABLES
Prires Itiirht
MRS. A. WALL
Ml (it, Terminal Market
s. W. 2nd Ave. and 2nd Si.
Crystallized or fresh, .1 Rift of
Burdinc "Sunshine" Fruit is a
fjift that's typically tropical
... chosen for its incompar-
I able blossom freshness, purity
I and quality. Crystallized SI to
j $4 Fresh Fruit $ 1 to S9.
I MAIN STORE STREET FLOOR
Express Rate'
are reduced!
Burdino's
MIAMI and MIAMI BEACH j
No One Ever Lost a Dollar of Swings or Interest hi a Morris
Plan Rank"
PIONEERS OK INDUSTRIAL BANKING
S Per Cent Interest Paid On Savings
BBRVINO millions OF PEOPLE ALL over THE UNITED STATES
MORRIS PLAN COMPANY
of MIAMI
IU N. B. Plral Arena
Vincent R. Ilriee. Manager


c,iH..v. February 24, 1933.
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page Three
THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
PTBLISHBD KVKKY FRIDAY
by the
WISH H.oKIUMN PUBLISHING CO.
1 IJ1 S. W. I'ifteenth Avenue
i I.Ol'IS SIIOCHET, Editor
P. O. Box 2
Miami. Florida Phone 2-1183
ourselves. All sorts of methods have
been proposed to relieve the situa-
tion, but thus far none seem prac-
tical. We say again that the best
financial minds of the country's con-
gregations should meet and work
out jointly some plan by which our ---------------'---------------------------------
religious Institutions can carry on How old is the charge against
without asking rabbis and teachers U, Talmud that it allows all kinds
"Ask and Ye Shall
Learn"
,..,:,I ,l:i-. mailer July 4.
... !..., Offlca at Miami. Florida.
*"' ... ..f M,.rh I IST'I
., \..: of M.rch 8, 1879.
WEST PALM BBACH OFFICE
III Kiuhlh Street
Mr-. M. Srhrebniek. I!. i.i, ntnl i\ ,
SUBSCRIPTION
Our V.r.......t-0
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24. 1933.
Vol. 6. No. 8.
Propose Tax
Dr Herbert S. Goldstein recently
suggested that a dollar tax be levied
on every seat holder in every Ortho-
dox Jewish congregation in the
country, believing by this means the
3.000 congregations would contribute
,i million and a quarter dollars. Dr.
Goldstein painted a very dark pic-
ture to the Union of Orthodox con-
Hons meeting two weeks ago.
He .-aid that spiritual despair has
tripped many communities, that
rabbis and teachers have been dras-
tically cut in salaries, but, even
more serious, they don't receive any
pay because of the distressed situa-
tion in which congregations find
Ives,
While some money may be raised
by the I ax plan we think it won't
amount to very much. A great many
cannot afTord to pay much more
than a dollar, let alone an addition-
al a dollar. We know of no
more uniortunate situation in Jew-
in this country than that in
our religious institution:, find
elves. We have overbuilt, of
Every group needed a syna-
and a rabbi all its own. Well,
now they have them, with a head-
thrown in for good measure,
irs the philanthropies tended
more and more to centralization.
; In every possible plan to elimi-
nate useless and wasteful duplica-
tion. But the synagogues evidently
to see, or if they saw. to heed
ns of the times. They went
blithely ahead, building and build-
ing and mortgaging, and now at a
time when, whether we wish it or
not. interest in things spiritual Ls at
low ebb, and the very last tiling
anyone lias money for is a religious
Institution, we find ourselves in des-
perate straits.
The greatest burden falls upon
'he rabbi. We are speaking of rab-
bis who don't get paid. They make
'he greatest sacrifice, and, after all.
we must consider them as human
beings first and rabbis second. They
"e entitled to a living for them-
selves and their families. There is
no reason in all the wide world why
' men should continue to work
for nothing. It is true it is not to be
expected that they can or should
draw salaries as large as in years
gone by. But it Is also true that
' hey should be PAID for their ser-
vices.
Dr. Cyrus Adler says that no Jew-
ish religious or educational institu-
tion should be built with a mort-
gage. That may be all right for the
'uture, but we have our present
buildings and our mortgages and
*e have obligations that can't be
^t. That is the immediate prob-
iem with which we have to concern
to work without pay (Reprinti
Signal Honor
Departing from a 50-year-old tra- '
clition. the Actors' Fund of America
has selected a non-English play for
Its benefit performance in "Yoshe
Kalb." Maurice Schwartz's widely
acclaimed spectacle, Daniel Froh-
man, president ol the Actors' Fund
hi America, lias announced. Ex-
plaining the unprecedented choice
ol a foreign-language play, Mr.
Prohman said: "This is the Brat
time in the history of the Actors'
Fund oi America, now in its fifty-
first year, thai a play In a language
other than English has been select-
ed for a benefit performance of the
fund. I am very proud of it. Tins
gives me an opportunity to sponsor
a play which I consider one of the
outstanding dramatic achievements
of our time. 'Yoshe Kalb' is the
nearest approach to a Shakespear-
ean drama written in the twentieth
century. The production represents
a milestone in the history of the
American stage." Daniel Frohman
is the dean ol American theatrical
producers. He Ls a man of eighty
and by no means in the habit ol
exaggerating or propagandizing. His
estimate Of "Yoshe Kalb'' is there-
fore a significant tribute to the gen-
ius ol I. J. Singer, author ol the
novel "Yoshe Kalb." and to the tal-
ent Of Maurice Schwartz, the dram-
atist, director and actor.
ill
UIID 11(111-
of dishonest dealings
Jeii ?
The first to accuse the Talmud
that it permits the Jews to perform
all sorts of dishonest acts in their
dealings With Christians was Nich-
olas Donin of La Rochelle, France,
a convert from Judaism to Chris-
tianity, who lived in Paris in the
liist hall ol the thirteenth century.
Ii was in revenge for his having
been publicly excommunicated, with
the usual ceremonies, by Rabbi Je-
eliiel of Paris, because of doubts he
had expressed concerning the va-
lidity of Talmudical tradition, that
he embraced Christianity and join-
ed the Franciscan order. In 1238
Donin formulated 35 charges against
llie teachings ol the Talmud and
personally presented them to Pope
Gregory IX. In his charges he main-
THE
A scarcity of calls for acrobats has
kept many Arabs out of work, says
a Broadway scout. If disarmament
gets farther along, we could have
them fold tents.
A housewife was sent to a Detroit
hospital when pounced upon by a
folding bed. You trust them for
years and then they turn on you.
One trouble with technocrats was
that when they said a mouthful it
was loo big for our ears.
New York finds it costs as much
to keep a man in prison as in col-
lege. Nevertheless, we must refuse
to buy magazines to help an ambi-
tious young forger through Sing
1 Sing.
We are again reminded by his vis-
tained that the Talmud was full of I it that the poet. Masefleld, got his
gross errors, blasphemous represen-
tations of Clod, and numerous In-
sulting expressions regarding Jesus
and the Virgin Mary. He also main-
tained that the followers of Tal-
mudic teachings are permitted by
the Talmud to act dishonestly with
Christians. He even went as far as
to allege that according to the Tal-
mud the killing of a Christian was
considered a meritorious act. Ap-
parently the Pope must have been
com meed oi the truth of these But February's cold is best
start in a saloon. At the time it was
easily dorie, if not on beer then on
a double Scotch.
March 5 would seem the best da\
for an alert brush salesman to pull
the White House bell and ask.
Could I interest you in a new
broom?"
For some a holiday is June,
For some, the month of May.
I ulgarizing Religion
a preference ol quality to quant- Talmud, the charges
a true and unmistakable ligi intiated, the book.- were to be
since he promptly issued
an order to seize all copies of the
Talmud for deposit with the Do-
minican- and Franciscans. If, after
an examination of the text of the
of Donin be
For banks, the bankers say.
They seem to like the winter sports
When chill winds freeze your
bones.
I sues.-- it comes from fussing with
So many frozen loans.
burned The Talmud was then rig- To get a little rest they take
orously prosecuted. Under pain of Vacation with no pay.
he Jews of France were com-
pelled to surrender their copies of
the Talmudlc text and by order of
Louis IX four distinguished rabbis
Experience is the comb a man ac-
ol Prance were compelled to answer | quires after he loses his hair.
ol refinement. The higher we
the scale of values the more pro-
nounced and prominent becomes
the Importance of quality. In ethics
and aesthetics, In art, science and
literature, it is quality and not
quantity that counts. The only place
where quantity is stressed is in the Donin in a public disputation, which
I material world. There, volume and was held in Latin, in the presence
nol worth forms the basis ol figur- ol many royal dignitaries and
The only other place where church prelates. It took place in
quantity is stressed to the neglect ol Paris on June 25-27, 1240. Despite
quality Is in the held ol religion. II the tavorable Impression created by
hardly requires a keen observer to the Jewish disputants and the inter-
notice that both church and svna- cession of the Archbishop of Sens.
gceue are placing the strongest em- the Talmud was condemned to be
phasls upon quantity. That is a burned. Twenty-four carloads of
the Talmud were subsequently con-
signed to the flames in 1242. It is
curious that even nowadays a good
many of the unfounded accusations
of Donin against the Jews and
against the Talmud are often re-
peated, but fortunately not always
taken as seriously as when they
were originally made.
Does the "Talmud" actually
tbeak of thirteen tribes taking pos-
session of Palestine?
In the Babylonian Talmud cBaba
Bathra 122a it is said: "The land
of Israel is in the future to be di-
vided among thirteen tribes, and
And what a Valentine it was.
This Bankers Holiday!
great denomination which draws a
large following even though the fol-
low nn; consists of an ignorant and
| superstitious lot. That one is a fine
j church to which many people flock.
even though these be blockheads.
And who is an excellent preacher?
Why, of course, he who can reach
the masses, who can attract the
crowd, even though he disgust and
, repel every person with the least in-
I telligence and self-respect.
But. while this sort of standard
| may not be inconsistent in the
church, in the synagogue it has no
1 place. Christianity has from the very
' beginning opposed this quantitative
icreedal standard to the qualitative : viaea among "^ ,
"dtura. standards of the classic an- j not. as at first, among twelve.
cients. In contrast to the efforts of
the most advanced nations of an- era. bribes and threats-all these
tiouity who were bent on the deep- j may not be out of keeping with the
ening culture, Christianity was ac- intent and purpose of the church.
rutted bv the one desire of widening i In the synagogue, however, such
!u One need not be surprised. methods and measures are deplor- | conclusion Chat the board was mis-
therefore to see the tragic effort able. Judaism has always striven to taken,
the church is making to have many raise the quality of worshippers
and largely attended services. A fa- rather than to enlarge their quant-
natical and hypocritical advocacy of tity. Knowledge was always placed
"nngent Sunday laws, sensational above faith, study preferred to pray-
mThods of dragging people or en- er. If there is any one thing against
tiring them into the house of pray- which Judaism has always guarded
! er. newspaper advertising, bill past- it is vulgarizing religion.
Adversity Is the only scale thai
gives the correel weight of our
friend).
If gossips would slop to think.
their tongues would get a much-
needed rest.
The man who tells you that all
men are equal, really believes that
he Ls a little more so.
Patent medicine men fill their al-
manacs with ancient jokes in order
to show their skill in prolonging life.
Tlie man who expresses his wil-
lingness to obey a woman's slightest
wish usually draws a line at a
large sized one.
A radio studio gives out the infor-
mation that crooners croon with
their eyes closed. They could not do
that on the stage, where it would be
necessary to dodge.
Say not last while memory lingers.
Though the years have slipped
away;
Time will point with magic fingers
Back where shines a happy day.
Life's sweet cycle in its turning
Cannot hide a Joy once known;
Memories' fires forever burning
Make the long past still our own.
"What did they teach you at
school today, sonny?"
"Oh, teacher told us all about
Columbus, who went 2,000 miles on
a galleon."
She did, did she? Well, don't be-
lieve all she tells you about those
American cars, my boy."
A national publicist pleads for
more of the spirit of '76, and almost
anyone will concede that whisky 57
years old should be mellow.
We read of an actor in Paris being
chased by an angry mob. Although
he usually appears in a minor role
he was on this occasion a leading
man.
It was fortunate, perhaps, that
the attempt of German magicians
last summer to change a goat into
a man was a failure. The man, af-
ter going through what men have
had to go through since then, would
have been awful sore.
Or maybe they did succeed in
changing a goat into a man. and
the man is Hitler. A goat, though
otherwise qualified for the position,
couldn't be made Chancellor, unless
he at least looked something like a
man.
The temporary closing of banks
is no new thing in this world.
Glancing over the writings of the
great authors. I deduce that nearly
all of them were caught at some
time or other with only a few cents
change in their pockets, and no way
of getting more. I quote:
"Put money in thy purse."
Shakespeare.
"How pleasant it is to have mon-
ey 'Arthur Clough.
"He that wants money, means and
content. Ls without three good
friends."Shakespeare.
"Can any one remember when
times were not so hard and money
not scarce?"Emerson.
"And no one shall work for mon-
ey."Kipling.
"Get money, still get money, boy,
no matter by what means."John-
son.
" "Tis money makes the man."
Laertius.
"We don't want to fight, but by
jingo if we do,
We've got the ships, we've got the
men, we've got the money, too."
(O yeah?)
At the opening of the Civil war
an Iowa man was rejected by the
examination board as too frail for
military service. As he celebrated
his 102nd birthday in California re-
cently, he had almost reached the
The chins of our public men have
grown smaller in the last hundred
years, a physiognomist declares, the
exercise of this organ having less-
ened. I suppose, as men talked more
and more through their hats.
Honeymoon is a word left us,
while the custom giving it its name
is a thing of the past. It had its
origin among the ancient Germans
whose newly married couples drank
mead with honey for thirty days af-
ter the wedding.
4
i



T E E .% S >ICR '
D I AN
Friday, February 24. i9J,
St. Petersburg
Notes

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DANGER WITHIN
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-
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-

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- -
- i

.
nitting quest for a recon-
oce with religion. It
jee how this almost
me should trouble
ad intellect. As
Kani did not conclus-
j hundred years ago
Ebc idea of God
be practical rea-
-.he sphere
D. If de-
D because of all
science has
years, the
- German phys-
ramus
ran today.
d that
isti of
.'.:::..-
E re bew-
o pro-
-

-.. prived

:- i
It ::
.

_'...- re-
APPEARING AT THE
TtVOU THEATRE
'''*'.
Harlene Dietrich and C ary Grant
in "Blonde Venus."
DR. J. H. YARBOROUGH !
VETERINARIAN
Dor* CUpped. Plucked
and Bathed
:-: N W. 14th st. Ph..n. :-.-;. |
proper

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HAVANA
Ml \NY ROME
B*a- ir \ Rail
s45.50
The-^ T-nir"* iri-ludi- round
:np InUM -.. tax. ho-
tel meals and rifMwetaf,
MITCHELLS
TOURS.
.... ..
iih i Beach
I :\iu riRH co.
US. EVANS
VI V V BII -
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a. u>i pM*it
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tCVM- >-' ~ -C^
1H .-*' -^ -_- -
^ -
Kind's Garage
\ Makes
ta m

For fresh
Sea Foods
STOP Vt
CAPT. TOMS
FISH MART
F'j<(er >t- xad Hiami B
"wm : IK *i >*r "-*
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v*_



iFridiy
February 24, 1933.
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
rage Five
SOCIETY
Mrs. Bernard Simon was appoint-
I second vice president of the Mi-
lanii Woman's club, Tuesday, at their
I gUir board meeting. Mrs. Simon
[holds seven offices in different or-
I 'anizaiions at the present time.

A new mode in eyebrows lias been
Introduced by Marlene Dietrich.
In "Blonde Venus," her latest pic-
ture, which comes to the Tivoli
l-hpatre Sunday and Monday, she
I,...,::: displays the slanting, oriental
[eyebrow makeup that she wore in
1-Shanghal Express." Though orig-
[:r.ally she intended It only for the
lone picture, her own liking for the
I innovation was seconded so heartily
|bv movie fans that she decided to
I:etam it.
In "Blonde Venus" she is cast as
I the wife of an ailing scientist, whose
I only chance for life is in a visit to
Ian expert abroad. To raise the mon-
|ey. she goes to work in a night club.
| There she attracts the attention of
| a wealthy young politician. He falls
in love with her, and provides her
FAYMUS
FAY'S
FOR
TROPICAL
WEAR
BME BACK
DRESSES
PIQUES
FANCIES
AND
SEER-
SUCKER
SEE OUR
NOVELTY
^ PAJAMAS
IMPORTED g\ g\
BERETSJJC
24 N. MIAMI AYE.
with the money necessary to send
her husband abroad. Meanwhile,
she discovers that she loves him!
and when the husband, cured, re-
turns and discovers the situation,
she faces a decision which leads to
a dramatic climax.
Cary Grant, considered one of the
most promising of the new crop of
young male players, plays the role
of the lover, with Herbert Marshall,
well-known star of the dramatic
stage, as the husband.

The next general meeting of the
Hebrew Athletic club will be held
next Wednesday, March 1, beginning
at 8 p. m. when Mr. W. L. Williams,
president of the local Bnai Brith,
will urge a plan for the amalgama-
tion of the club with the Bnai Brith
lodge. All members are urged to
attend.

Fortnightly Book Review club held
its regular meeting Tuesday evening
at the home of Mrs. Samuel Weis-
sell, 200 Coral way, Coral Gables.
Mrs. Albert E. Rosenthal reviewed
Sinclair Lewis' newest book, "Ann
Vickcrs." A social hour followed.
Several out-of-town guests were in-
troduced.
Famous Cantors Who Will Appear Here
These will be heard in "The Voice of IsraeL"
New Gas Service
Is Offered All
Rabbi S. M. Machtei. founder and
director of the Radio Synagog, will
preach over WIOD at 10 o'clock
Sunday morning on "Refuge."
Leonard Tobin will deliver the Jun-
ior Radio Synagog sermonette on
"God's Country." The rabbi's ser-
mon will be dedicated to Director of
Public Safety S. D. McCreary, and
his efforts to reduce the number of
automobile accidents. In addition to
the sermon there will be prayers,
hymns and music.
Peninsular Life
Insurance Go.
h ..rl...r: i. .i b> thf State nf Florida
Hume Office: Jacksonville. Fl.
MAIN OFFICE
236 Lorraine Arcade
Drop a line to K. J. Morlock or
phone 2-fi:l37 for a representative
who will explain w-hy
/'/>, Peninsular Life is the Best
IPAN-AMER1CAN
COLLEGE of COMMERCE
INCORPORATED
210 East Flagler Street
(2nd Floor Tatum llldg.)
'Only the Best Is Good Enough"
Biscayne Klectric
Supply Go.
Electrical Appliances of every de-
scription. Phone and we will do
the rest at very reasonable prices.
41 W. FLAGLER STREET
Phone 2-3024
Biscayne Track
Attracks Crowds
( "litinii.ci from Page One)
cil the races because of the uncer-
tainly of the results, and particu-
larly in the quinellas and daily
doubles. Last night the crowds were
entertained with the monkey jock-
eys riding the dogs. These clever
little riders were extremely popular
at the West Flagler Kennel club re-
cently and have been an added at-
traction, giving considerable enter-
tainment to the patrons in special
races for such events. These mon-
keys originally came from Califor-
nia, and when shown cause the
crowds to pack the capacity of the
track to the limit.
One desiring a real evening of en-
joyment and an opportunity to get
real play for his money should at-
tend the nightly races at the Bis-
cayne Kennel club track. It is easy
to reach by bus or by auto.
What we need is not a new concep-
tion of God to meet cosmic, atomic,
behavioristic and God knows what
not theories, we need rather a living
spiritual idea, a religious inspiration
tor a humanity dominated by the
machine and engrossed in material-
ism. The indifference or the masses
and of the so-called intellectual
group towards organized religion is
not due to the lack of rationalism
in religion, as so many rabbis would
make us believe, but to the contrary,
to the overdose of rationalism. Peo-
ple do not go to churches and syna-
gogues to satisfy their need for in-
tellectual searching, but rather to
satisfy their emotional and spiritual
yearning. They are little concerned
with metaphysical argumentations
and theological definitions of God.
The God man's heart is seeking and
yearning for, the God of daily relig-
ious experience, is the product of
man's consciousness of his insignif-
icance and impotency as he faces
the universe plus the practical de-
mands of human needs and human
after it has been shorn of that in-
heritance which alone explains and
made its existence possible to this
day. For almost two thousand years
we suffered persecution and martyr-
dom for the sake of ideals, all orig-
inating and culminating in Israel's
unique idea of God. We are the
apostles of the Oneness of God in
the midst of the polytheistic pagan
world of antiquity, we contrasted
our ideal of truth to the Hellenic
ideal of beauty, our ideal of Justice
to the Roman ideal of might. We
held on uncompromisingly to our
monotheism as opposed to the
Christian trinity. We taught the be-
lief in man's free-will in contrast to
Islam's fatalism. What justification
is there to continue as a small mi-
nority and to continuously being
discriminated against and even per-
secuted, for the sake of a shallow
humanism which advocates the wor-
ship of man. It is a strange coinci-
dence that our Jewish humanists
are Zionists. As Zionists, they could
justify the separate identity of the
Jewish people on purely national-
istic grounds. But, what about the
vast majority of Jews who refuse to
accept Zionism as the sole solution
of the Jewish problem? Should they
continue the martyrdom? What a
strange spectacle of humanist lead-
ers seeking the fulfillment of their
human ideal in limited nationalism,
while the much maligned Religionist
still prays and works for the reali-
zation of that all-embracing proph-
etic universalism.
Dr. Kaplan claims that it was
just as important to teach people to
give up their idols and false beliefs
as it was to be in possession of the
true religion. How paradoxical for
a Humanist! If pure monotheism
and ethical prophetism are the great
achievements which the Jewish peo-
ple gave to humanity, there is still
some justification in our preserva-
tion in the face of the fact that
more than two thousand million of
men and women still adhere to what
even humanists must concede to be
a lower conception of the deity, such
as the Christian trinity, the Cath-
The Florida Bottled Gas Service
are offering a service that is enabl-
ing many to enjoy comforts and
conveniences of cooking, lighting
and heating with gas wherever they
live by furnishing natural bottled
gas.
Through the services of this con-
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Florida has been made much" more
attractive, and now, because of their
services, there is no home which
cannot enjoy a modern system of
cooking and heating with a natural
gas fuel.
This firm offers natural gas which
gives you a natural gas fuel. It has
been approved by the National
Board of Underwriters. It can be
secured with complete system with
ranges, heaters and other gas
appliances. Thus gas can be used
for practically every purpose for
which natural gas is employed, and,
in fact, it is just like having a gas
well in the back yard. Save for the
fact that the installation is extreme-
ly simple and does not involve tear-
ing up the lawn for mains, nor the
floor and walls for plumbing, be-
cause their tanks can be installed
quickly and easily without fuss or
dirt. The system comes in tanks
and at the end of the month they
charge your tanks and only charge
for what has been used. In fact it
is like having the meter read. One
pound of this dry gas is equal to
6.35 kilowatt hours of electricity in
heat units.
For any information concerning
their service call 2-2637.""
Gautier Funeral
Service, Inc.
514 W. Flagler St.
PHONES 2-8421 2-8422
R. A. Gautier, President
E. K. Carter. Set y and Treat
!
WINE GRAPES I
I t'alifornia Wine (irapes
Fine for Juice Ready Now
I Prices Cheaper than Last Year
m.i.i I ki i; PRODUCE, INC. I
N. Miami Ave. at 7th St. Phone 2-02335
a
aspirations. Because the public fails olic belief in the infallibility of the
The Best in Travel
and
Our Rates Will
Please You
See Vt Before Booking Anywhere
Have you a trip to Cuba in
mind? Our Hotel in Havana,
the Hotel Packard, serves
strictly Kosher Meats.
Prices and Sen ice Right
Davis Tours,
INCORPORATED
3(1 F.ast Flagler Street
Phone 3-1722
to find that atmosphere which uni-
versally appeals to human emotions
and which satisfies the human heart
as religion did in what modernists
indulge in calling the dark ages, is
one of the principal reasons for the
empty spaces in churches and syna-
gogues.
Another puzzling problem for our
Jewish humanists should be how to
justify the separate existence of the
Jewish people as a distinct group
HOME SERVICE LAUNDRY
MKS. CI.ARA n. KERSEY. Prop.
1225 S. W. 6th St.
Mending and buttons sewed on
free of charge. Called for and
delivered.

I Popular Price* Open All Night
i Shoreland Grill
115 East Flagler Street
(Next to First National Bank)
:
Special Meala 20c Table d'Hote Dinner|
Steaks. Chops. Sea Foods,
Sandwiches. Waffles

Pope. Mohammed's conversations
with angel Gabriel, etc., etc. There
is no special privilege involved in
remaining Jews in order to establish
the worship of man, even of the
superman.
(To be Continued Next Week)
TOURS CRUISES
STEAMSHIP TICKETS
TRAVELERS CHEQUES
Remittances to All Foreign
Countries
Arrange your Passover Trip
to Palestine through
American Express
Company
330 E. FLAGLER ST.
Miami Tel. 3-3178
YOU NEED A DENTIST!
You Need a
GOOD
DENTIST!
* want the opportunity to
prove my professional ability
at prices to please you.
DR. HARRY E. FRY
DENTIST
36 East Flagler Street
Phone 2-7215
MARINE HARDWARE
YACHT SUPPLIES
FISHING TACKLE
PAINTS & OILS
DISTRIBUTORS OF DEVOE
PAINTS & VARNISHES
Prices Now Much Lower
PHILLIPS HARDWARE CO.
301-303 N. Miami Avenue Phone 2-8445
. t
I


(
Past- Six
THE JEWISH FLORID! AN
Friday, February 24. 1>}J
+? : : < : : : : : : : > > : : * * * * * : * > *
?
.;. .U.MMV MORNINGS W1UU, MIAMI. ILOR1DA *
S.____________________________________________________________________ __________________________________ KaiMn S>yttagng SulUtitt
Edited by RABBI S. M. MACHTEI
Pounder and Director, Radio Bynagog of Ameriea
Si m)av Mokmni.s WIOl), Miami. Florida
* Vol. 1. FEBRUARY 19, 1933 No. 11.
: : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : :
Too Many Laws
j-r Scripture Reading, Exodus, Chapter XX, Versa 1-16. incl.
^>1IK weekly portion read in the synagogues yesterday contained the
Decalogue. Some English translations of the Bible give .slightly different
ins. Moses, in reporting it. in Deuteronomy, uses different words in
several of the Commandments. I am not concerned, this morning, with
the relative merits of the several versions.
I AM interested 111 the merits of the charge, by many people, that there
are "too many laws." A Jew knows that he has "Toryog mitSVOS"
613 commands. He knows, also, that that's too much to expect Horn any-
one. Believing that lie can't possibly obey them all. he starts with the
thought of making no effort to obey any of them. He feels that, as lie
must fall far short of the mark and be considered a sinner, he may just
as well sin all the way. However, having some sort of a conscience, the
individual selects a group of laws that he believes it possible for him to
obey and these laws he defends as being "essential." Many men and wom-
en have told me, "Well, 1 obey the Ten Commandments. That's enough
lor anyone." I agree. Nay. I go further. I say, "Even that's too much."
I have my doubts as to the exact number of people who observe the Dec-
alogue. It would not require much ink not many drops of it to write
the numerical figure that denotes the total number of human beings that
obey all the Ten Commandments. I make no accusations. I suggest that
each of you make an honest appraisal of yourself. Check over the full list
of ten laws and eliminate those that you have violated. Most people look
at the Ten Commandments as did Willie. Willie's Sunday school teacher
had just finished lecturing the class on the punishment for sin. Anxious
to determine the extent to which her lesson had impressed the class, she
asked. "What would happen if you broke one of the Ten Command-
ments?" Willie's hand shot up into sight. The teacher called on him. He
said. "Teacher, there'd be nine left." Using that as a basis for my own
computations and for my estimate of the observance of the Decalogue by
the people who claim to obey these ten laws. I should say that there are
less than nine left, considerably less.
OH. I've stepped on someone's corns. I've touched a sensitive spot. I
can almost see the scowls. The anger reaches me through the micro-
phone. How da re I accuse so many fine and upright people of being so
derelict as to disobey the Ten Commandments? Well, let's figure this out.
together. Do you mind if I do it 111 reverse order? 1 have a reason for it.
My reason is not. as some may claim, that. I have a natural Inclination to
do things backwards. Nor is it that as some believe Jews write backwards
and. therefore, our Commandments must be read from the last to the
lust. My reason is based on my desire to have a means ot gauging. Ii you
tell me that you are rich, I can check you at the bank. If you say that you
tron 1 can gi\e you a weight to hit. 11 you lay claims to a know-l-
ot music, .: lence, I can engage you In a conversation to de-
li linn.r the extent of your knowledge. But. should you tell me that you
have faith, that you believe in God and love Him, I have no known med-
ium for testing your religiosity. So. were I to start with the first Com-
mandment, you would have an unfair advantage.

Can you pass 'in Examination}
Arc you fulh cot ered?
Permit a (iulf Life Rcpre-
entative to rail and i< 11
you Mlecl a program of
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LET us begin at the last Commandment. 110' Have you overcome 1
ousness? Are you free from envy? Do you ever cast longii. 1
upon that which is forbidden m the last Commandment? Have you never
expressed a desire for that which Is, Impliedly, forbidden you by the last
word in the Decalogue? (9) Have you never lied about another? Have
you never borne false witness by slandering another? Have you ever been
silent when, in your presence, the reputation of another was maligned?
By your silence you bore false witness. You should have defended the
innocent. <8> Now, as to the eighth Commandment: you've never put a
gun up to a man's head to compel him to give you his wallet, so you've
not violated the eighth Commandment. Nonsense! Have you ever mis-
represented an article you were selling to the purchaser? That's stealing,
within the law. Have you ever made an excessive and unfair profit? Have
you ever delivered an interior article to that ordered and paid for? Well,
do you call that honesty? 17> The seventh Commandment: You never
seduced your neighbor's wife so you're innocent of violating the seventh
Commandment. That's very fine of you. But. have you kept your mind
out of the "gutter"? Has your conversation been free from lewdness?
Have you shunned all unclean references to sex? 161 Of course you hav-
en't committed murder, or you would be in the penitentiary. That's no
proof for me. You may have shed human blood by the bloodless method.
How? Have you ever drained the blood from anyone's face through an
insult that humiliated that person? Have you ever compelled an employee
to jeopardize his health in your service? That hasn't added any to his |
length of life. Have you ever pressed a debtor to the wall, figuratively, **
to the degree where he contemplates suicide or a crime against another?
That hasn't added to his life's span. These acts are as murderous as the
actual shedding of blood. <5> I won't insult you by charging you with vio-
lating the fifth Commandment. You love your father and mother. You
have shown them every possible deference and have accorded them all
honor. You have always avoided bringing them a moment of unhappiness.
Never have they, even for a day, had occasion to worry because of some
act by you. Of course, you have cared for them in their old age as well as
they have cared for and provided all your wants when you were a child
dependent on them. If you haven't. I can't quite understand that you
have obeyed the fifth Commandment. (4) Now, I have no foundation for
any charge that you have violated the fourth Commandment. Rest? Why.
you enjoy a day of rest. The Sabbath is a blessing. Yes, but have you
spent it as a holy day? And, by the way, it's a common error to believe
EVERYTHING /OR THE BEACH
BATHING Sins
Catalina end Queen Knll
BEAI II ROBES and PAJAMAS
Por Men, Women and children
100-ios N. 1:.
-M> AVENCE
"THE SHOP of QUALITY"
IIQVINE'S
'""' '.....* North ol Bail Flatlet Street
ItO-lM N. K.
2ND AVENI'E
that the fourth Commandment speaks only of resting. It express* says.
"Six days sha.t thou labor." How about it? Have you been at *orkto
support your dependents.- Alright, how about pnor to he ^n
Have vou put your best into your work to make it productive? (3 Have
you ever taken the name of C,od in vain? Have you ever sworn needlessly
or falsely? Have you ever associated the name of God m a profane way
With anything inappropriate? So much for the third Commandment. .2.
You do not worship any idols or any graven images. You worship God in
the abstract. You do not place your business or your career above God.
No. of course not. You wouldn't hurt a fellow human being, one of God s
child.. 1 could make an extra dollar, would you? You wouldn t
suspend the'operation of one of the laws Inspired by God if by so doing
vou stood to gain, would you? In other words, you wouldn't put anything
else above God? You wouldn't worship, honor, or serve some pet hobby
with greater zeal Hum you worship God? And if you did. it wouldn t be
worshipping an idol, would it? You tell me. What would it be? .1) Now,
we come to the first Commandment. It's a statement ol fact. You re so ,
broad-minded that you wont argue with God. He says Hi 1 and you ac-
cept His word. That'.-- very fine and noble of you. You have a great deal
ot faith, How do 1 know.' Why, t can't ma sin it- Thus,
you've proven to me that you obey the Ten Commandments. Of course.
so busy m the observance of the Decalogue, you have no time to
consider the other laws. That's just too bad.
YOU think me terribly sarcastic. I appear to be an awful cynic. IS'
ging your pardon, you are slightly mistaken. 1 am neither. I just
walk about with open eyes. Just so long as the human race will be satis-
fied to eliminate the laws of life from its practice, we shall be confronted
with the spectacles ol misery and suffering. When we learn that we an
not the sources of wisdom, when we realize that the laws of God are not
obstacles to success and happiness but that they are aids, we shall put
them into practice and insure happiness lor all men. There are not too
many laws. There arc too few observers of the law. The Torah Is a
"Toras Chayim" a law of life and all that life implies. We live and
progress with the law. Without it well, we are just as we are today
THE NEW
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AT VOIIt RADIO DEAI KB
I'rirea from SIN..in j.j.j l"
On Display a(
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IH09 N. E. 2nd Ave. Phne j..,
-".on.
Dr. A. T. knowles
MSI V W. 17th A.r. Ph.n, ...;. I
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Lara* imiiwriual Boardlni id,,,
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THE LONDON ARMS
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sSPMPAHli


Friday
. February 24, 1933.
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page Seven
ETY
M the meeting of the Book In
brief clllb Mondav nl8ht at the
paw
Ijeisner.
of its president, Mrs. I. L.
Mrs. David Solomon re-
I : Earth Horizons," by Mary
liustin. and Mrs. Jonah Caplan gave
ling on "Segregation." A so-
rt hour followed.
.
Rabbi S. M. Maehtei will conduct
Ike Bible Study group at 11 o'clock
I morning at the home of
I Kaufman Mandel, 3012 s. w.
:.!. street. The lesson for the
r will d''"1 with Abraham and the
trowth of I lie idea of Monotheism.
I :;im will discuss the question
1 Kashruth laws and the prac-
tice oi observing the Jewish dietary
lavis in the home. The Bible class
L conducted for the benefit of those
I ted In the study of scripture
be .source and the application
i; religious laws in the daily life of
[itrj individual regardless of re-
L::oiis alfiliation. The attendance
1 e classes is representative of
l:; denominations and creeds with
enphasis laid on anything but
spiritual value of scripture. Jews
ir.d Christians mingle and meet on
I common plane of brotherhood.

The high water mark of the
talkathon, now' in progress the
I cth day at the Cinderella
lallroom and 1320 hours, was reach-
pi -o far this season, Monday night.
ihis was due to the wedding of the
iTIVOLI
W. Flaclrr at Kth Phone 2-3352
Simla] iind .Monday. Feb. 26-27
Continaeai 2 in 11 j
MATINEE :< EVENING SSc
"Blonde Venus" j
iih MARLENE DIETRICH |
Attention,
Visitors!
The policy of this store, to
meet all advertised prices, al-
ihourii well-known and well-
OtabUshed among lo<'al folks
is Rood news to Miami's visi-
tors. Think of the hours of
Mopping time you can save by
Mining here where stocks are
complete and where you know
liriics are guaranteed to be as
'w or lower than anywhere
rise.
Mmiv Su-.If St
Amerc Wrjrst
RED CROSS
I DRUG
DEPARTMENT
STOREf
51 E. Flakier
' K- Flatlet St. I'hone 2-819
ft* Delivery in Greater Miami
By This
Sign
You are
assured of the
BEST
Electrical Work
Jj**trk BtOTM and Refrigerators
In* Service You Will Appreciate
George La Vigne
Company, Inc.
II'. Iriial Contractor* and
Engineer!*
12 N. E. Third Avenue
I'hone 2-7838
popular sweetheart couple, No. 1,
Millie Rosen and Jesse Putch, of
Jacksonville, Pla.
The largest and most appreciative
audience of the season turned out
and the large ballroom was crowded
to capacity. Jack Negley, popular
master of ceremonies, gave the bride
away, Wally Adams was best man
and Marjorie Poster, maid of honor.
Rudy, jr., was ring-bearer and Jack
Bentley, jr., train-bearer.
The other feature was I he en-
trance of the 10 championship
teams from Jacksonville, In compc-
tition against the local contestants.
The newcomers wore black sweaters
With orange letters on them and the
Miami favorites wore blue with
white figures. Dr. Pepper, the fav-
Orite beverage of the Walkathoners.
furnished the sweaters to the local
entries,
The "grinds" have proven the
most thrilling events staged up to
date and on each occasion someone
goes out. The girls have proven a
bit more hardy than the boys in the
early days but when Beulah Sapp
and Joan Miller fell by the wayside,
it left only one girl solo, Cleo Clif-
ford.
Jack Negley and his Alimony
Jumpers have scored In a big way
With the fans, and this band of mu-
sicians have already won their way
into the hearts of the patrons. Neg-
ley has long been the outstanding
master of ceremonies of this mode
ol entertainment.
a a a
A most delightful meeting of the
Junior Hadassah was held in the
Spanish room of the Ponce de Leon
hotel.
Plans for a bridge were voted on,
DRS. HART & HART
Kir Chicago)
DR. JOHN H. HART
l>K. MARY A. HART
Chiropodists
Nine Yeun in Miami
Suites 5 and 7
36 East Klagler Street
Phone 2-8538
ARE WEkpis
faith with those who trust us, arc
we living up to our obligations if
we risk their future happiness by
ignoring the problems that would
arise for them if, some day, we
did not come home?
life Insurance offers the safe and
certain answer. There is no sub-
stitute.
A Southern Health & Life Insur-
ance Policy on each one is neces-
sary to protect the others from
the privation and expense caused
by the last illness and death.
A few pennies each week is the
total cost.
Southern Life &
Health Insurance
Company
T. S. Cook, Manager
6! Realty Beard Bide;. I'hone 2-3419
CENTRAL BUSINESS
COLLEGE
Congress Building
111 N. E. 2nd kit. Miami. Fla.
,,,1,1,,,, m. vat. tutorial In Spnntoh, Pwm* and
all Commeretal wbjeett. Expert in-
structors.______________
| to be given March 8, at the William
j I'enn hotel.
After the business meeting several
vocal selections were rendered by
Mrs. Naldesh, guest, accompanied
by Miss Hortense Landesman, fol-
lowed by Miss Landesman in a pi-
ano selection.
Miss Lillian Weiss, National Pal-
estinian chairman of New York,
gave an interesting talk on Pales-
tine and its affairs.
Refreshments were then served.

Miss Beatrice Goldenblank, Miss
Lena Weinkle and Miss Helen Yunes
returned from Savannah last week,
where they attended the southern
regional conference, as delegates of
the Miami chapter of Hadassah.
While there, they were entertained
'nil parties, dances and a din-
ner given alter the conference.

Senior Council of Jewish Women
is sponsoring a card party at 2 p. m.
February 28, al the William Penn
hotel. Miami Beach. Proceeds will
benefit the serving of Passover
baskets to underprivileged Jewish
families. Mrs. Lewis Brown is gen-
eral chairman, assisted by Mrs. P.
Scheinberg. Mrs. D. Blanck, Mrs.
Weinkle. Mrs. Morris Dubler, Mrs.
M. S. Rubin. Mrs. Al Seiden, Mrs.
Charles Greenfield and Mrs. Isidor
Cohen.

Coining to the front quickly be-
cause ol their inherent qualities,
Nan's beauty creations have become
exceedingly popular not only with
the general public but with beauti-
cians as well. Through long chem-
ical research and a thorough knowl-
edge of the delicate facial and skin
tissues, the wrinkle remover and
electric lotion manufactured by
"Nan's Beauty Creations" were for-
mulated to meet every possible ad-
verse condition. These preparations
have shown the ability and study
given by its manufacturers by the
results obtained by the customers
and users. Most leading drug stores
in this territory and in the North
carry a complete line of the prepar-
ations and beauty parlors in more
than 18 states are constant users.

Robert T. Knight, known to Mi-
amians for many years as "Bob," is
justly proud of the renovated El
Commodoro hotel recently complet-
ed. Located in the heart of the city,
it is easily accessible to railroad
stations, to places of amusement,
and within easy transportation of
every section of the city. Every
modern convenience is within the
reach of the patrons and the man-
agement extends every effort to
make the guest feel at home. "Bob"
Knight is one of Miami's pioneers
and has been closely identified with
APPEARING AT THE
7TII AVE. THEATRE
Lee Tracy in
'Washington-Merry-Go-Round'
A Columbia Picture
CAPTAIN METSHEL'S
Class In Bottom
BOAT
Dail) 2 p.m. Pan si.on
Baa Ihe Submarine tiarden* and the
Heeded Diver at Work
LEAVES PIER NO. 8.
CITY YACHT BASIN.
MIAMI
Modern sanatoria and reducing equip-
ment, including infra-red. electric
cabinet, exercisers, etc.
Aneta A. Pell
i.r ..In il.' Philadelphia
General Hospital)
Swedish Massage
Light and Heat Treatments
Irrigations, Sun-Haths. etc.
574 S. W. SECOND ST.
Phone 2-GC09
Kstablishcd Miami 1922
the communal life of the city, thus
coming in close contact with many
of its Jewish citizens among whom
he numbers a host of friends. Rates
are very reasonable and since the
recent renovations have been made,
the hotel has become the mecca for
visitors from all over the country.

Made possible by the Florida Year
Round Clubs. Inc., of which Henry
L. Doherty is president, the ship
"South Seas" is exhibiting monsters
of the sea in surroundings which
have atracted many and caused
gasps of astonishment from the pa-
trons. Captain Thompson, who is
in charge of the exhibit while cruis-
ing the Carribean sea some years
ago, anchored in one of the Keys
for a night because of an approach-
ing storm. While at anchor a mas-
sive chain was discovered bringing
the beginning of an interesting
treasure hunt. It was during this
hunt that Captain Thompson dis-
covered the most wonderful sub-
marine life ever before seen. He de-
termined to have as many people
see these treasures beneath the sur-
face of the sea as was humanly pos-
sible and so began the work of
tranplanting sea life to a ship. This
is now in this famous .ship, "South
Seas." It is a veritable treasure and
one worth seeing.
The bi-weekly meeting of the He-
brew Athletic board of governors
was held at their community centre
building last Wednesday night and
because of the popularity of the reg-
ular Sunday night dances, these will
be continued with ladies free this
coming Sunday evening. Plans for
a joint social alfair with another
local Jewish organization will be an-
nounced shortly.
For sheer timeliness, no other pic-
ture produced in Hollywood can
compare with Columbia's "Wash-
ington Merry-Go-Round," hailed in
advance reports as a sensational
film expose of what really happens
behind the scenes in Washington
political, social and diplomatic cir-
cles. The picture now comes at a
time when the entire nation is dis-
cussing the nation's future with
more serious enthusiasm than at any
time in the country's history. It is
showing Sunday and Monday at the
Seventh Avenue theatre.
Directed by James Cruze, "Wash-
ington Merry'-Go-Round" has a
splendid cast headed by Lee Tracy,
brilliant young actor who has cap-
tivated picture audiences. Constance
Cammings is the heroine, and Wal-
ter Cononlly, Alan Dinehart and
Arthur Vinton, splendid actor from
the Broadway stage, enact principal
roles.
The powerful and dramatic story
I of a patriotic young congressman's
| dramatic struggle against the polit-
! ical machinery of Washington was
I written by Maxwell Anderson, co-
author of "What Price Glory."
The Soldiers' bonus army encamp-
ment at Anacostia Flats, which was
dramatized on the front page head-
lines of the nation for months, is
one of the episodes of Washington
life shown in this picture. The en-
tire action takes place against the
ever interesting background of the
White House, the House of Repre-
sentatives, the Senate, Embassy
buildings, Arlington cemetery where
the bodies of America's illustrious
departed rest in peace, and Penn-
sylvania avenue.
It pays to advertise in The Jewish
Fiorldian.
Institute of Fashion
Ml N. K. 2nd A\e.. Miami
FREE LECTURES BY
MADAM MH.N< N
World Traveler
Friday. February 24
8 p. in
2 TO I I'.M. CLASSICS
Monday. Keb 27 to
Friday. March 1
teaching yea to make
year own master pattern,
to simplify future dress-
making. Appealing espec-
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and irregular sizes.
Most sensational
RESULTS
obtained
This wonderful preparation,
destined to be one of the
worlds' greatest beauty aids,
actually
Removes Wrinkles
ami
Double Chin
Will not harm the most deli-
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mu\ beautiful.
ASK YOUR DRUGGIST
or phone 2-8596 for home delivery
NAN'S ELECTRIC LOTION
Remove* u peril u huh hair.
pleasantly, safely in one to
two m.nuteH and diM'ournce*
all new jfniwth.
Sold by Dr. Carter's Phar-
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and .ill leading beauty parlors
in the State of Florida,
NAN'S
beauty creations
159 N. W. 17th Street
Miami, Florida
E. C. THRALL & COMPANY
State Agent New York Fire Insurance Co.
and Metropolitan Assurance Underwriters
318-19 MEYER KISER BLDG.
Phone 2-5821
E. C. THRALL.. President

Miami. Kla.


Page Eight
THE JEWISH FLORID'AN
Friday, February 24
f
Recipes for the
Jewish Family
Brain Salad
Scald brains with boiling hot wat-
er to cleanse thoroughly. Boil until
tender in fresh cold water, being
careful to remove from water while
it is yet firm. Slice lengthwise and
lay in dish. Pour over one-half cup
of vinegar, which has been sweet-
ened with a pinch of sugar to re-
move sharp taste, pinch of salt and
pepper. Garnish with parsley and
serve cold. Can also be served with
mayonnaise.
Swcotbread Salad
Take cucumbers and cut length-
Wise to .serve the salad in; scrape
out the inside and salt well, then
squeeze and use this to mix with the
filling. Take a pair of sweetbreads
or calf's brains, wash well, and boil;
when done, throw in cold water at
once and skin them; chop fine, add
bunch of celery, one can of peas,
scraped part of cucumber; mix all
together and season. Mix mayon-
naise with it and fill the cucumber
shells; keep all cold and serve on
lettuce leaf.
Neapolitan Salad
Take some white meat of a turkey,
cut up fine, cut up a few pickles the
same way. a few beets, one or two
carrots, a few potatoes (the carrots
and potatoes must be parboiled), al-
so a few stalks of asparagus; chop
up a bunch of crisp white celery; a
whole celery root (parboiled), sprin-
kle all with fine salt and pour may-
onnaise dressing over it. Line the
salad bowl with lettuce leaves or
white cabbage leaves. Add a few
hard boiled eggs and capers; garnish
with sprigs of fresh parsley.
Sandwich Fillings with Honey
Honey in sandwich fillings brings
extra goodness to the lunch. Blend
with cream cheese, chopped nuts.
raisins and celery, chopped carrots,
peanut butter, dates chopped (with
or without nuts), and many other
combinations. You'll find them all
different and delicious; easy to make
yet most appetizing. In sand-
wiches plain. roTied. ribbon or tier
honey assures additional flavor,
keeps the sandwich moist and holds
crumbly bread together.
Honey retan Bread Roll
Thoroughly blend one cup finely
cut salted pecans with one-half cup
-lightly warmed honey to form
spreading paste. Cut bread in slices
full length of loaf "ordinary loaf
cuts live lengthwise slices). Spread
with butter, then with honey-pecan
paste, and roll as for jelly roll. Wrap
each in waxed paper and tie to keep
intact. Let stand an hour or longer;
remove paper and cut each roll in
three slices each loaf used makes
15 rolled slices.
Vegetables with Honey
Vegetables, with their appetizing
salts and health promoting vitamins,
are digestive aids and important
WANTED-
Distributors for northern and
eastern states. We (five you lo-
cal and national advertising
and guarantee U> sell your first |j
order in less than sixty days. [j
Nan's Beauty
Creations
161 -N. W. ITtfa St.
VERY LATEST
Here is a charming dress for
school girl age in early spring fash-
ion showings. It is the semi-su-
spender guimpe and exceedingly
practical. It may be worn with a
variety of guimpes.
As shown in the sketch, it is a
light navy blue wool crepe, the sep-
"Ask And Ye
Shall Learn"
arate guimpe being a red and white
gingham. A plain yellow guimpe
with a vivid wool crepe would also
make a .smart change.
1'laided woolens, rayon mixtures
and cotton tweeds are also suitable
and lend themselves to original col-
or combinations. Size 8 requires one
and one-half yards of 39-inch ma-
terial for the skirt with one and
three-fourths yards of 35-inch ma-
terial lor the blouse.
'protective" loods. To bring out
their best fresh flavor, add a tea-
spoon ol mild honey for each cup of
ble when adding butter and
salt.
I'ilaf (Russian Style)
Follow recipe below but substitute
cooked lamb for the chicken, and
add chicken livers fried and cut m
small pieces. I
I'ilaf (Turkish Style)
Soak one cup of rice in cold water '
for one hour. Pour off the water. '
and put the rice with two cups of
soup stock and one-quarter of a
white onion on to boil. Stew until
the rice absorbs all the stock. Stew
one-half can ol tomatoes thorough-
ly and season with olive oil or chick-
en fat. salt and pepper. Mix it with
rice.
Saute in chicken fat to a light
color, a jointed chicken slightly par-
boiled, or slices of cold cooked
chicken or turkey. Make a depres-
sion in the rice and tomato, put in
the chicken and two tablespoons of
olive oil or chicken fat. and stew all
together for 20 minutes. Serve on a
platter in a smooth mound, the red
rice surrounding the fowl.
1< it true that Philo Judaeus, the
Hellenistic Jewish philosopher of
tin- fust century, denounced desert-
ers of the Faith in the I.n ing God-
Philo Judaeus, the leading Judeo-
Alexandrlan philosopher, in his
work. -On Repentance II.," discusses
Apostates and proselytes. In com-
paring the two he says:
"It is necessary that, as in the
sun shadow follows the body, so also
a participation in all other virtues
must inevitably follow the giving
due honour to the living God; for
those who come over to this worship
become at once prudent, and tem-
perate, and modest, and gentle, and
nn rcil'ul. and humane, and vener-
able, and just, and magnanimous,
and lovers of truth, and superior to
all considerations of money or plea-
sure; just as, on the contrary, one
may see that those who forsake the
holy laws of God are intemperate,
shameless, unjust, disreputable, weak
minded, quarrelsome, companions of
falsehood and perjury, willing to
sell their liberty for luxurious i
ing. for strong wine, for sweetmeats,
and for beauty, for pleasures of the
belly and of Uie parts below the
belly; the miserable end of all
which enjoyments is ruin to both
body and soul."
"Works of Philo Judaeus. Trans-
lated by C. D. Yonge. vol. 3, London.
1855. p 455.)
An eiangelical preacher in a re-
i i /;/ >c i ii/iiii in ;//i /in, h said that
tin \pulsion nf ih,- Hebreu from
Palestine in the days of the Proph-
ets meant that the Cod of Israel
-iiiii,/ hi- relation with the peopU
wbo u ere supposed to worship him.
/> this claim based on fait?
Among the ancient Semites the
deportation of a people from its
land was viewed as a severance from
n- god. For the ancient Hebrews it
was one of the bitterest ingredients
in their cup to hear the heathen
taunt: "These are the people of the
Lord, and yet, out of His land are
they gone forth" (Ezekiel 36,20). In
the religion of the ancient Semites
illy each nation had not only
Its own land but its own god. The
god was as closely associated with
the land as with the nation. A god
had a vested right, so to speak, in
his land. Irrespective of his relation
inhabitant.-. Thus even in the
i ., n| ol the removal of his worship-
pers, the land was still theoretically
rid. The new settlers drafted
into Samaria by the king of Assyria
utter the deportation ol the 10
tribes, imported their own gods; but
avoc wrought among them by
led them u> acknowledge "the
: the land" 'II Kings 17. 241T.).
On the other hand, it was an ac-
cepted principle that a god could
not be fitly worshipped outside of
Ins own land (Joshua 22, 19; II
Sam. 26. 19: Hosea 9. 3ff.). This idea
finds expression even in connection
with the worship of the God of Is-
rael. Naaman asks for two mules'
burden of Palestinian soil in order
to render possible the worship of
the God of Israel at Damascus. The
exiles in Babylon were at a loss how-
to sing the Lord's song in a strange
land (Psalm 1371. The land of a god
corresponded with the land U1
worshippers (see William Rofcn
Smith's "Lectures on the fta
of the Semites." third edition
A. Cook, London. 1927, pp. g,,"'
is this primitive Semitic cone
of the relation of a god to his u
and to his land that underlies
claim cited in the above inquiry
Who of the Anglo. Jnji
preachers was the first t c.
the English language fur h
ing?
The credit of first preaching!
English in the Jewish puiplI
claimed for more than one
Jewish minister. It is said tl
D. M. Isaacs, of Liverpool and ]
che tei. was the first to do so. i
ers say the Rev. Aaron Levy
first preached in the vernac
while some say it was Dr. Jj.
Raphall. The same claim is
also for Tobias Goodman, autl
a work on "The Faith of Israel"
first English translator ol
eshl's "Behinat ha-Olani."
CHOPSUEY
AND
AMERICAN CUISINE
- ORDERS PREPARU
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ii a. m. 272W.FLAGLER!
to 2 A. M. Phone MH|
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21 not Its DAILY
PAST Till. 1300th HOIK
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the best way
TICKETS 122.60
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Double Rooms
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m Miami.
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Miami, Florida
A
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3 Times Only -- 2 \\ U. / l\ \J. and 11:15 P.M.
BISCAYNE PLAZA THEATRE
MIAMI BEACH