The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00207

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewist Florid!ia m
VoL 6. No. 6.
THE JEW
in MEDICINE
/il Dr. Harry Goldman
{('onlinued from Last Week)
In Bagdad during the life of Har-
em-Al Rachid, 786-809, laws were
again promulgated which, prohibited
je irom studying medicine and
hence we find that most Jewish
iana became Mohainnicdiai.
converts.
One of the earliest of medical
works is that of Isaac ben Solomon
Israeli, who lived from 832 to 932.
This famous physician was occulist
and court physician to the Caliph
(Jbaid Allah al-Mahdi at Kairwan.
His original Arabic work was*trans-
lab d into Latin by the Monk Con-
stantine in 1087, who claimed it as
n. In 1515 it was reprinted in
Leyden and contained chapters on
fevers, diatetics, urine drugs, dropsy I
treatment and ailments.
One of the greatest of Jewish phy- .
tlclans who ever lived was Maimon-
born in Spain, he chose to
leave because of the disfranchise-
ment of the Jews and settled in
1166 m Fustat. Egypt, where he be-
came court physician to the Sultan
Saladin. Many of his works remain
behind.
There were, of course, many
splendid and famous Jewish physi-
cians In Spain and Portugal, the
best of whom served as physicians
to the various courts, all subject td
persecution and many to escape
banishment accepted Christianity.
Ii Is Interesting to note that in 1335
the Synod of Salamana declared
that Jewish physicians offered their
services only to kill as many Chris-
tians as possible. In 1412 John II
prohibited Jews from practicing in
Spain, which immediately caused a
general exodus to Prance. Algiers
and Italy.
In Portugal Solomon, ben Moses
Solomon was physician to Kings
Ferdinand and John I. Joseph and
Rodriques, physicians to John II of
Portugal, were members of the com-
mission to examine Columbus' plans.
In Italy the University of Saler-
mo. famous for its medical school.
"the Civitar, Hppocratica." had two
J( wish teachers in 848 and 855 nam-
ed Joseph and Joshua. The first
medical encyclopedia was written by
the Jewish teacher Copho. From
Salermo came many Jewish practi-
. one of whom was court phy-
lo Pope Boniface VIII.
In Prance, from 1000 to 1337, sev-
eral Jewish medical schools were
founded at Montpelier. Narhonne
and Paris, most importane of which
was the first.
In Germany there is no early rec-
ord of Jews practicing medican but
In 1267 the Council of Vienna for-
bade them practicing. Of interest is
the fact that in 1475 a Jewess by the
name of Zerlin was a practicing oc-
al Frankfort on the Main, as
'he earliest record of a Jew-
Ish woman physician in Germany.
One speculates why. with the con-
slant and never-ending persecution
Mid banishment of Jewish physi-
cians, why so many popes, rulers
and many of the lesser lights re-
talned them as their personal court
Physicians. On the whole, it may be
said that the 300 years ending about
1800 saw few outstanding Jewish
medical lights. They were usually
general practitioners, often combin-
ing the offices of rabbi and physi-
cian, and the probable reason for
their failure to have many worth-
while works was their constant fear
of banishment or death.
'Continued on Page Three)
FLORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY
MIAMI. FLORIDA, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1933.
Price Five Cents
PHILIP I.1EBF.RMAN
New President of Beach Synagof;
YiddishComposer
To Give Concert
Solomon Small (Smulewltz), Yid-
dish poet, composer and singer, will
present a program of dramatic, po-
etic and song numbers consisting of
Jewish art, at the Talmud Torah
auditorium. N. W. Third avenue and
Second street. Sunday evening. Feb-
ruary 12, at 8:30 p. m., and will be
accompanied by Miss Mildred
Oreenberg,
Mr. Small is the author of a book
ol poems and songs that have been
reprinted nine times. He also com-
posed 300 compositions for the pi-
ano, wrote four musical comedies in
three acts each and 200 original po-
etical riddles in both English and
Yiddish. Of Mr. Small's 500 Jewish
national and folk songs, the most
popular are "A Letter to the Moth-
er" i A Brevele der Maman >, "The
Prayer of Carmen" iDer Talesll),
'The Flower Wreaths" iDer Blum-
enkranzele).
Jewish Players
Presents Show
Rehearsing nightly so as to make
the finished production one com-
parable t<> New York Jewish shows,
the members of the Miami Jewish
Dramatic Players are bending every
effort to make the performance next
Sunday evening an outstanding suc-
cess. The noted Jewish actor and
playwright, Max Goebel has been
assisting in the direction of the play
and coaching the cast. Presenting
the famous Yiddish melodrama.
"Die Zushteete Chasong." under the
auspices of Beth Jacob congregation
of Miami Beach, at the beautiful
auditorium of the Ida M. Fisher
High school. Miami Beach, the play-
ers will portray a picture of life in
the New York ghettoes, of some
years ago. Replete with dramatic
episodes though it is. a touch of
humor and comedy is interspersed
throughout the play to relieve the
tension. Songs are heard during sev-
eral of the scenes and carry the
poignant tale never failing in any
Yiddish play. Led by Joseph Green-
berg, well-known merchant of Mi-
ami, formerly connected with the
Jewish stage in New York, the cast
includes Harry Oreenberg, its di-
rector. Mrs. F. Slaviter. Joe Mandel-
baum, Mrs. L. Silverman. Miss E.
Slaviter. Harry Rase. Miss J. Selig-
man and Louis Regal. Cantor Boris
Schlachman and several other well-
known artists Will appear during the
evening as additional attractions.
Prices of admission have been kept
to low prices in order that those
who desire to attend may find it
within their means to do so.
Announcements!

i
CANTOR SHLISKY
Beth David
Elects Rabbi
Cantor Shlisky
Chants Services
Because of the insistent demands
of both tourists and residents of the
Greater Miami district. Beth Jacob
congregation of Miami Beach has
arranged for the famous cantor.
Joseph Z. Shlisky. to chant the late
Friday evening services tonight, and
the complete service tomorrow
morning at the Beth Jacob syna-
gogue. For those familiar with the
ability of Cantor Shlisky, it is no
secret that he has endeared himself
to the Jewish people because of his
remarkable interpretation in song of
the outpourings of the heart of a
people in its prayers. Sympathetic
intonations of the solemn prayers,
joyous exaltations of the praises,
and the knowledge and ability to
KeyWestShoched
Dies In Atlanta
Rev. Robert Rachmil of the Key-
West. Fla., synagogue, died in a hos-
pital at Atlanta. Ga.. Tuesday, fol-
lowing a long illness. He was 60
years old and a native of Poland.
Before going to Key West from
Atlanta seven years ago he taught
in a private Hebrew school here.
Funeral services were conducted
on Wednesday afternoon. Rabbi
Harry Epstein officiating. Burial
was in Greenwood cemetery.
Besides the widow he leaves a son.
Dr. A. S. Rachmil, of Philadelphia,
and two daughters, Mrs. Jack Gor-
don and Mrs. E. C. Piexotto, both
of Atlanta.
At a well-attended meeting of
Beth David congregation held last
Thursday night Rabbi Max Shapiro,
who has been serving Beth David
temporarily as rabbi, was unani-
mously elected to serve as rabbi and
religious leader of the congregation
until September. 1934. Following the
formal election. Mr. Stanley C. My-
ers, chairman of the administrative
board of the congregation, present-
ed Rabbi Shapiro to the congrega-
tion. In his speech of acceptance
the rabbi expressed his thanks to the
members for their confidence and
urged their continued support in or-
der to enable him to succeed in his
chosen work. Following the rabbi's
address a social hour followed.
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION
t Orthodox)
i:,i.-, s. W. Third street
JONAH K. CAPI.AN. Rabbi
Regular services begin at 5:30
with the late services at 8:30 when
Hit rabbi will preach a sermon on
"Trees." A social hour will follow
the services. Saturday morning ser-
vices will begin at 9 a. m. and the
Mincha and Marriv services begin
at 5 p. m.
CONGREGATION BETH JACOB
< Orthodox!
.Ill Washington Ave., Miami lleaeh
I.. AXEI.ROD, Rabbi
Early Friday evening services be-
gin at 5:30 with the late services at
3 p. m.. when the rabbi will preach
a sermon on "Song of the Sea." The
renowned Cantor Joseph Z. Shlisky
will chant at the late services and
will chant the entire Saturday
morning services, which begin at
8:30 a. m. The rabbi will preach in
Yiddish Saturday morning on the
portion of the week.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
(Conservative)
1.19 N. W. Third Avenue
MAX SHAPIRO, Rabbi
Regular services begin at 5:30
with the late services at 8 p. m..
when the rabbi will preach a ser-
mon on "Zionism Is That the So-
lution?" A social hour will follow.
Cantor Louis Hayman will chant
the services and lead in the congre-
gational singing, assisted by the
choir.
Maccabees honor
Supreme Officer
J. D. Coakley, Detroit, supreme
commander of the Maccabees, was
guest of honor at a dinner at the
Ponce de Leon hotel last Monday
night, given by the executive corn-
express the very essence of the age- mittee of Miami,
old traditional yearnings of his peo- Mr. Coakley told of plans for es-
Benefit Program
At Park Tonight
The first of a series of entertain-
ments in Bayfront park sponsored
by the municipal recreation division
for the benefit of the unemployed
fund will be presented at 8 p. m. to-
night.
Featuring the program will be ar-
tists from the Embassy club and the
three musical divisions of the Miami
Junior Chamber of Commerce boys'
organizations, the drum and bugle
corps, the harmonica band and the
boys' band, all under the direction
of Caesar LaMonaca. Added attrac-
tions will be specialty dancing acts
and ensembles furnished by the Mae
Rose Studio and Danny Sheehan
Dancing Academy.
Miss Ruth Mae Smith, known as
"The Song Bird of Cleveland," will
be the feature soloist with Adolph
Seerth. who also will lead commun-
ity singing and be master of cere-
monies.
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI
(Reform!
1.17 N. R. Nineteenth Street
DR. JACOB H. KAPLAN, Rabbi
Services will be held tonight be-
ginning at 8:15. Dr. Jacob H. Kap-
lan has chosen as his subject "I've
Lost My Religion." This subject will
be of interest to all those who are
beginning to realize that religion,
politics and economics must all be
adjusted to the needs of the pres-
ent day. The public is welcome.
pie have brought fame and success
to this young cantor.
Sunday evening Cantor Shlisky
will give a recital during the gala
evening of entertainment sponsored
by the synagogue at the Ida M.
Fisher High school auditorium at
Miami Beach, in addition to the
tablishing a year-round girls' camp
in the state for young women of the
organization in all states of the Un-
ion and in Canada. He was accomp-
anied by Mrs. Coakley.
The dinner was preceded by a
musical program by the orchestra
of the Junior Maccabees under the
Yiddish play that will be presented direction of Sue Ernest Hewling.
bv the Miami Jewish Dramatic Those attending the dinner ln-
players. Cantor Boris Schlachman eluded A. M. Coffin, state manager;
of the congregation and a life-long C. A. Avant, chairman of the execu-
friend of Shlisky. will also be heard tive committee, and Mrs. Avant, and
during the evening in a number of many prominent citizens of this sec-
liturgical compositions. tion.
DisabledVeterans
To Sell Flowers
Tuesday, February 14. will be ob-
served as St. Valentine's day here
with the Summerall Chapter No. 10
of the Disabled American Veterans
of the World war selling forget-me-
nots on the streets of the Greater
Miami district all day. These funds
are used exclusively to aid in the
rehabilitation of these disabled vet-
erans and to help their families.
Educational Tax
Urged For Goods
NEW YORK. N. Y. A resolution
calling upon the manufacturers of
candles, matzohs and all other pro-
ducts which might be considered of
a religious nature to place a stamp
tax on their goods the proceeds to go
to Jewish education was adopted at
a meeting of the Federation of Ye-
shiveth and Talmud Torahs of New
York. A number of candle manu-
facturers, among them the Stand-
ard Oil Company, have already
agreed to the plan, it was stated.
The matzoh makers, it was admit-
ted, have declined to levy such a
tax. Several speakers urged that the
federation go into the matzoh bus-
iness, if the matzoh bakers refused
to levy a stamp tax for educational
purposes. On an estimated con-
sumption of 8,000,000 pounds of
matzoh in New York annually, $80.-
000 would be provided by a "torah
tax" for Jewish education, it was
said.
t i

many of whom are in dire need at
this time.


Page Two
THE JEWISH FLORI PI AN
Friday, February in, 19JJ
I
For the first time in the history
of the South, Jews will be given the
opportunity of seeing and hearing
an all-Yiddish singing and talking
picture, "The Voice of Israel," on
February 26. when it will be pre-
sented at the Biscayne Plaza thea-
tre. Miami Beach. The picture is a
singing and talking presentation of
the struggles of the Jewish people
from Egypt down to the present day.
Such famous cantors as the Seidele
Rovner, known as the dean of the
world's cantors; Yosele Rosenblatt.
Yosele Shlisky. Mordecai Hershman.
and David Roitman are among
those who are seen on the screen
and heard in renditions of famous
synagogue numbers. Machtenberg's
choir, famous in the entire world,
appears during the picture in a ren-
dition of several numbers. The pic-
ture has attracted considerable at-
tention and long runs throughout
the United States and Canada, and
has been jecommended to all who
want an insight into the life of the
Jewish nation.

In observance of Chamisho Osor
B'Shvat. the Ladies' auxiliary of the
Miami Jewish Orthodox congrega-
tion will present bags of fruit to the
; hildren of its Sunday school at the
Sunday morning assembly. Cha-
misho Osor B'Shvat is the Jewish
Arbor day in Palestine.
Nightly Dinner
DANCE
THE
E
1TTH FLOOR
COLUMBUS HOTEL
DINNER SERVED
6 p. m. to 9:.>0 p. m.
DANCING
7 p. m. to 1 a. m.
$1.50 PER PERSON
HARRY RICHARDSON
and his CAVALIERS
Rabbi Mayer Freed of the Isaac
Elchanan Yeshiva and Theological
Seminary arrived In Miami yester-
day and will stop at the Knicker-
bocker hotel. Miami Beach.
Junior Hadassah will sponsor a
bridge to be held the end of Febru-
ary, full details of which will be an-
nounced in an early issue, it was
decided at a meeting of us execu-
tive board held last week at :!'.e
home of Ita president.
Rabbi Max Shapiro of Beth David
will leave Sunday morning for New
York City to keep a promise made
to a boyhood friend some years ago
He will officiate at the wedding of
this friend. Dr Halley Fnederwitzer
to Miss Esther Rankin at New York
City. Saturday. February 18. and
will return to Miami the following
Wednesday morning While In New
York the class in history meeting at
Beth David every Tuesday night will
hear Sydney L. Weintraub lead a
.-ion.

An important meeting of the Sen-
I lor Council of Jewish Women tru
held Wednesday at Beth David hall
with Mrs Bernard Simon, its
I ident. presiding. A donatic:
made to the scholarship fund of the
' Dade County Federations : Wom-
en Clubs, and a number of new
members were admitted Future
ngs of the orgar.izauc:
i be held at the Ponce de Leon hotel.
The council is sponsoring a card
at 2 p. m o'clock. Febr,:.
.. Mr- Lewis Brown in
irangements.

During the past week Mr. and
'.:.- William Friedman have had as
-jests Mr. and Mrs. J. Cranz-
i-.o will spend the season at
. Beach, and their cousin. Mrs.
I On _:nd daughter.
..ood is sponsor-
I bridge on Tuesday evening.
We Specialize in
HOSIERY
Surely We Can Serve
You Beat
('ome in '/'/'<
HOSIERY SHOP
MRS. JOHN A. r.ADDIS
117 Sc>hold Arcade
Este
es
Gowns
Moderately Priced
200 E. FLAGLER ST.
ARE WE keeping.
with those who trust us. arc
ng up to our obligations if
k their future happiness by
the problems that would
Tor them if, some day. we
: not come home?
I ife Insurance offers the safe and
certain answer. There is no sub-
-titute.
A Southern Health U Life Insur-
ance Policy on each one is neces-
sary CO protect the others from
the privation and expense caused
by the last illness and death.
A few pennies each week is the
total cost.
Southern Life &
Health Insurance
Company
T. s. Cook, Mana
Realty I 2-3418
February 14. at the home of Mrs. J.
Kopplowitz at 842 Salzedo street.
Gables, when she. Mrs. Harry
Markowltl and Mrs. Sam Wiesel will
be the hostesses. Prizes will be giv-
en for high scores and refreshments
Will be served. The public is invited
to attend.

Next Sunday morning a number
of tourists headed by Mrs. Holtzman
of Detroit will provide candies and
fruits for the children of Beth Jac-
ob Sunday school in observance of
Chamisho Osor B'Shvat.

The next meeting of Beth David
Sisterhood will be held at its Tal-
mud Torah hall with Mrs. Isidor
Cohen, the president, presiding, on
Wednesday afternoon. February 15.
beginning at 2 p. m. An interesting
program will be presented with Mrs.
F J Manning delivering the princi-
pal address on "Work for the Blind."
All members and the public are urg-
d to attend.

Temple Israel Sisterhood enter-
I a large number of friends
Monday afternoon In observance of
ts birthday anniversary with a
bridge luncheon at the Blackstone
hotel. Mrs Isaac Levin presided and
Dr Jacob H. Kaplan delivered the
invocation. Mrs Hannah Spiro Ash-
irected the musical numbers.
Mrs Arthur Buchband of Chicago
as an honor guest Mrs, J A. Rich-
airman of the committee
:. barge of arrangements and she
-tod by Mesdames P.
Ben Reisne r and
Adolph Wertheimer.
.lar Sunday evening dances
thi community (enter ol the He-
brew Athletic club will be continued
and ladies will again be admitted '
this coming Sunday evening.
All of the procei devited to
the community center building fund.
Continuing its recent victories the
basketball team of the Hebrew Ath-
letic club trounced the First Bap-
tist church team by 53 to 7; the Ida
M Fisher High school team 37 to 16
and Gesu Young Men's club 57 to
26

More than 20 tables of bridge
wen In play at the bridge luncheon
sponsored by the Ladies' auxiliary
of the Miami Jewish Orthodox con-
ion last Tuesday afternoon at
the home of Mrs Charles Tannen-
baum in Shenandoah. Four prizes
tor high scores, and one door prize
.warded. Among the winners
were Miss Sophie Usilowitz of Char-
lotte. N. C. and Mrs. Charles Feld-
man ol Miami. In charge of ar-
ment8 were Mrs, Sam Tannen-
baum. assistant chairmen. The pro-
Moe Harris and Charles Tannen-
baum. assistane chairmen. The pro-
went to the Talmud Torah
fund of the organization.

Mrs Jacob Grossman and daugh-
ter of New York City will arrive
here Saturday morning to visit her
mother-in-law, Mrs. Grossman, at
the Charles Tannenbaum home. She
will remain here for the balance of
the winter season.

An important meeting of the Lad-
ies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish
Orthodox congregation will be held
' at the synagogue. 1545 S. W. Third
street, next Tuesday evening, Febru-
, ary 13. beginning promptly at 8 o'-
clock. All members are urged to at-
tend. A social hour will follow.

Miss Beady Goldenblank. Miss
Lena Weinklc and Miss Helen Yunes
have been elected delegates to the
seventh annual Southern Regional
Conference of Hadassah to be held
on February 12 and 13 at Savannah.
Ga. They are leaving for Savannah
today. While there they will attend
a Symposium .on Palestine to be
conducted by Miss Hortensc Levy,
National board member from New
York, who has recently returned
from Palestine. A dinner dance has
been planned in Savannah for the
delegates.

Representatives of every Jewish
organization In Greater Miami have
bi i ii added to the general commit-
tee in charge of the annual Charity
ball now being sponsored by the
Jewish Welfare bureau, with Mrs.
Bertha B. Levy in charge of ar-
rangements. Among those who will
actively participate in the prepara-
tions for this annual event to be
held on March 12 at the Floridian
hotel. Miami Beach, are Mesdames
Schwartz. Sadye G. Rase, J.
A. Richter. Lee Weiner, Sam Tan-
nenbaum. Rose Simpson, Philip
Lieberman, A. I. Magid. H. E. Klei-
man, Freda Lutzky. Barney Wein-
klc. Isaac Levin. Isidor Cohen. Ida
Buckstein, J. L. Shochet. Lena Si-
mon, F. Slaviter, Henry Seitlin, Le-
on Elkin. and the Misses Lena
Weinklc and Sylvia Dreisen; Messrs
.Stanley C. Myers. Jack Bernstein,
Herbert E. Kleiman. Norman J.
Musky, j. Gerald Lewis, Day J.
Apte. Philip Lieberman, Bert Reis.
ner. Murray Grossman, W. L. Wil-
liams. Abe Aronovitz and M. Chert-
koff. Tickets for this gala annual
event have been distributed and the
public is urged to make purchases
now to encourage the workers in
this appeal to relieve the distress
now so acute with many Jewish
families.

The Civic theatre was crowded to
capacity and standing room only
could be had last Sunday night
when the well-known writer, j. Ad-
ler, better known to the world un-
der his pen name, B. Kovner, was
presented in a series of readings
from his own works as the feature
attraction. The well-known actor.
L. Goldberg, of Lakewood. N. j.,
was master of ceremonies and kept
the audience laughing throughout
the evening. Louis Regel sang, and
Mr. and Mrs. S. Cohen of New York
played several musical selections on
the violin and piano. Leonard Rose
received tumultuous applause for his
splendid rendition of several cello
numbers. Kovner read a number of
his own works in his usual inimit-
able manner which kept the audi-
ence amused. The affair was held
under the auspices of the local
Workman's circle, and following the
conclusion of the program many of
those present were entertained at
the Workmen's circle hall as the
guests of the Woman's club of the
organization. Folk songs were en-
joyed and refreshments were served
* : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : :
LA SALLE
| beauty shop
* Phone 2-5S87 S
1 '
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* i
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* 214 SEYBOI.n BUILDING *
.. Mezzanine Floor
* *
* All Branches Beauty Culture *
| and Barber Shop *
t Soft Water I'sed

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801-:!().-! N. Miami Avenue Phone 2-8445
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Phone 2-5111


Friday, February 10, 1933.
THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
pi BLISHED EVERY FRIDAY
by Ihc
JEWISH FLORIDIAN PUBLISHING CO.
621 S. W. Fifteenth Avenue
THE JEWIS H FLORIDIAN
THE JEW
MEDICINE
Page Three
in
[Continued from P. <)nej
j. LOUIS SHOCHET, Editor
P. 0. Box 2973
Miami, Florida Phone 2-1183
Entered a* *econd claws matter July 4.
ihe 1'nst Office at Miami, Florida.
I,,. Act <>f March 3. 1879.
WEST PAI.M BEACH OFFICE
414 Eighth Street
Mr*. M. Schrebnick. Representative
SIBSCRIPTION
Bh Month*.......11.00
tine Year.......12.00
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1933.
Vol. 6, No. 5.
'A Fine Excuse
I had the pleasure recently of be-
ing invited to meet some friends
who Jiad come down from the North
to spend a little time In Miami. We
chatted about days gone by. and
how things were working out rather
differently from what we had pic-
tured as children. As things will,
we gradually veered into a discus-
sion of things in Miami. Several
tourists, men of affairs in their
home towns, joined In the conver-
sation. We were interrupted during
the course of our talk, by a group of
women who told us they represented
a local welfare organization and
urged our tourist friends to pur-
chase some tickets for a dance. The
reply these good ladies received was
"We can do nothing for you ... we
do our share at home."
And now I join Issue. You good
tourists who come down to bask in
the Florida sunshine, to gather re-
newed vitality and strength for the
vicissitudes of business, DO OWE A
DUTY TO MIAMI and its commun-
ity.
Come with me, if you will, to the
offices of the Jewish Welfare bureau
and let me show you record after
record where men and women, yes,
and even children, coming directly
to Miami in search of health, of a
living, have been helped by Miam-
ians. I can show you the record of a
splendid little girl from the North,
who had been pronounced a hope-
less paralytic, who came to Miami
with her penniless parents and
thank Heaven and the good people
of Miami, is now making remark-
able progress and in time will be a
healthy, useful citizen and a pride
to her people.
Yes you excuse-seeking tour-
ists .. come with me to the He-
brew Friendly Inn and there see for
yourselves what is being done daily
'o help, not Miamians. but Jews of
the North.
It has been the pride of the Jew-
ish people that no call for help was
ever refused when it was found
worthy. Jews are brethren through-
out the world. We know not bar-
riers of oceans, state or clime. A Jew
is a Jew whether he be Polish, Aus-
trian. Russian. German, American
or whatever place he may have
come from. When a Jew asks for
help whether it be for food to satisfy
the physical self or for food to help
his spiritual needs, that cry must
be answered, and not by the ques-
tion, where do you come from?
U has been saifl and with much
truth "The man who gives at
home, gives wherever he may be."
The man who seeks to give excuses
a*ay from home, gives Just the
same and no more, when he is at
home.
Following the French revolution
more liberty was granted the Jews
and we find them again becoming
students and practitioners of medi-
cine. It would be decidedly uninter-
esting to enumerate the many who
did splendid work, hence I shall on-
ly name a few of the really great
physicians of recent times.
Before I begin, let me say in pass-
ing that it is extremely interesting
to note that Jacob Eduard Polak,
Vienna, 1818-91. was court physician
to the Shah of Persia.
Probably one of the greatest anat-
omists of all times was Frederick
Gustov Jacob Henle. 1809-1885,
whose original work on the kidney
was sufficiently authoritative to
have a portion of that organ named
for him. Then there was Robert Se-
mak. Berlin. 1815-65. the first Jew-
ish privat-docent in Prussia admit-
ted to the faculty of the University
of Berlin for his discoveries in neur-
ology, embryology and electro-ther-
apy. Of famous pathologists let me
just mention Julius Cohnheim. Mor-
itz Henrich Romberg and Weigert.
Again. Ludwig Trauhe. Berlin, is
designated as the father of experi-
mental pathology.
Of opthalmologists, the city of
Baltimore was fortunate in hav-
ing Dr. Aaron Friedenwald practice
here. The splendid achievements of
his three illustrious sons. Dr. Harry
in the same field as his father: Dr.
Julius, who has specialized in dis-
eases of the stomach and intestines.
and Dr. Edgar, who follows the
practice of diseases of children.
Among the famous of yet more
recent date must be mentioned Al-
bert Neisser of Breslau, who discov-
ered the germ of gonorrhoea. Ern-
est Frankel. also of Breslau. gynec-
ologist and author of a magnificent
work on his specialty. Albert Moll,
of Berlin, who did so much original
work in embryology and neuropath-
ology. Paul Erlich of Frankfort on
the Main with his bacteriological
work, his side-chain theory of Im-
munity, and the discoverer of 606.
the cure of that dreaded disease,
syphilis. In this connection let me
not forget to mention the name of
Wasserman. whose test for the de-
tection of syphilis bears his name.
In the United States the first Jew-
ish physician of whom any record
exists was Jacob Lumbrozo. who
practiced in Maryland in 1639.
Certainly I must mention if all
too briefly Simon Flexner, head of
the Rockefeller Institute and dis-
coverer of the cure of cerebro-spinal
meningitis: the distinguished laryn-
gologist. Jacob de Selva Soils Cohen
of Philadelphia, and his equally il-
lustrious brother, who specialized in
internal medicine, Soloman de Sel-
va-Soles-Cohen. Several pediatri-
cians have left their mark, especial-
ly Abraham Jacobi and Henry Kop-
lick. who was first to describe the
spots in the mouth which are proof
positive of the presence of measles,
and for whom these spots are there-
fore known as Koplick spots.
The famous biologist, Jacques
Loeb. and probably one of the most
outstanding bacteriologists, Milton
Joseph Rosenau of Rochester, Mnn.
Then, too. Libman of New York.
Austrian of Baltimore, have both
Men and women who come to this
glorious section of the world. "God's
own paradise," owe a duty to its
people and to its iastitutions. Let
not exclusion laws be adopted by
our own, towards our own.
Let every tourist remember that
his helping hand should be extended
to every Miami institution, towards
the hungry and the needy, towards
the Talmud Torah, towards the
Synagogue. Let him not say, "I do
my share at home." We doubt its
truth. Moreover, it's not Jewish.
THE AMERICAN JEWISH
JOINT DISTRIBUTION COMM.
Inc.
February 2, 1933.
Rabbi Jacob H. Kaplan,
137 N. E. 19th St..
Miami, Fla.
Dear Rabbi Kaplan:
Just as I had announced to the
press that the Board of Directors of
the Joint Distribution Committee,
after very careful consideration of
conditions here and abroad, had
unanimously agreed that our basic
relief program must be maintained
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency ca-
bled a report which in a few words
describes the stark misery of the
Jewish populations in Europe.
"It is a commonplace to see chil-
dren in the schools faint from hun-
ger both in Warsaw and in the prov-
ince.' states the cable, adding that
the TOZ. a health organization sub-
sidized by the Joint Distribution
Committee, asserts that five or six
children faint in every classroom
daily.
Unfortunately, it is a common-
place that the Jews of Poland and
other lands in eastern and central
Europe have no one to turn to in
any crisis except their American
brethren. They do not, like the na-
tive populations abroad or any of
our citizens here, receive some mea-
sure of help and support from gov-
ernmental and private philanthropic
efforts of national or communal re-
lief. Their right to engage in any
type of employment is being nar-
rowed constantly with unconcealed
discrimination. Thousands of Jew-
ish homes are without food or heat,
in an atmosphere haunted by dis-
turbance and riot.
But it will never be a common-
place that the Jews of America,
whether we have much or little to
share, do not give what we can of
material aid and moral encourage-
ment to our brethren in misery and
despair.
With a clear knowledge of the dif-
ficulties here and even the sacrifices
that may be involved, the Joint Dis-
tribution Committee is appealing to
the Jews of America for support of
its 1933 overseas program.
In order not to incur field service
expense and to save every dollar we
can for remittance overseas, we
shall have to depend on our Jewish
community leaders to take the ini-
tiative wherever possible in making
their communities participants in
thus endeavor.
Please let me have your sugges-
tions and the re-assurance of your
cooperation.
Sincerely yours,
Jonah B. Wise,
Nat'l Chairman.
THE
GLOOM
CHAftl
A lot of us applaud because we're
ulad the party's over.
The hardest job of all is trying to
look busy when you're not.
Men really have the best of it.
and the women know it.
Even if you don't get anywhere
it's a satisfaction to know you did
your best.
Everybody would be a paid re-
former if raising money were just a
little easier.
done much original work in medi-
cine. Dee Lee of Chicago is prob-
ably the most famous obstetrician
now living.
In the short time allotted it is ab-
solutely impossible to cover all the
ground and many names have been
necessarily left out. Suffice it to
say in conclusion, that the Jewish
physician has certainly made many
valuable contributions to the science
of medicine, thereby improving it.
the results of which have made this
a finer and healthier world to live
in.
If Hendrik Van Loon sets out tc
prove his statement that the human
race can be packed in a box a mile
square, will he put the best looking
layer on top?
An Oregon orchardist has grafted
plums, apricots, pears and nectar-
ines on a peach tree. A final step
will be crossing the whole thing
wHh rattan, to produce bon voyage
baskets.
A Seattle youth asks a divorce on
the plea that he was married while
in a trance. His progress will be
closely watched by interested mil-
lions.
Carrying a copy of the Lytton re-
port in a breast pocket is a wise pre-
caution for the Chiumenkuo de-
fender who is apt to meet an irri-
tated Japanese.
It is announced there will be no
further evening star until March 1.
At that time it is hoped the treasury
will again be in a position to revive
this pleasing institution.
Radio waves, says an engineer,
continue on into infinity. Thus Jokes
first broadcast back in '78 may be
heard today on some distant stars
as they are here.
"Sense of touch" is knowing just
whom to strike for a loan.
Many a man might cure his wife's
insomnia by going home earlier.
A man's egotism may be pardoned
if it doesn't generate into vanity.
A woman's idea of a personal devil
is a neighboring woman who talks
about her.
Lunatics are the only persons who
never do or say anything they are
not ashamed of.
No matter how good a bluffer a
man may be. he has to give in when
his money gives out.
Why does the man who declares
his willingness to die for a woman
always back out at the last moment?
Very few men who find themselves
between his satanical majesty and
the deep blue sea are ever drowned.
Imitation may be doing the sin-
cerest form of flattery, but most
men acquire wealth by doing what
they see others do not do.
The statement that a "man is as
old as he feels" has thrown my
neighbor's mind into great confus-
ion. This man's birth certificate says
he is 50, and he felt approximately
that age the other evening at the
beginning of a party. But after the
first drink he felt 40: after the sec-
ond drink, 30; after the third drink,
16; and from then on, if his mam-
ma had asked him to tell the pretty
ladies his age, he would have said,
"Just thwee." Then, next morning,
he felt 108.
Old Man Supply met Mme. Demand
And straightway begged her languid
hand.
But she with gentle, artful grace
Brought grim foreboding to his face.
Said she, "I've got a little brat,
His namehis name is Technocrat."
Old Man Supply was filled with
gloom
For three he really had no room.
But though his head was bowed with
grief,
He heaved a sigh of pure relief.
"A plan I've got," he said with cheer
"Well raise young Technocrat on
beer."
A tablet discovered in the ruins
of ancient Nineveh records that a
king had toothache 3,000 years ago.
That famous handwriting on the
wall we read about in scripture
probably said. "This one will have
to come out."
The weight of marble statesmen
in Statuary Hall in the capitol at
Washington is said to have become
too great for the floor supports and
something mast be done about it. I
suggest weakening the supports a
little, and adding another statue at
once.
Two women who crashed their
plane in Kenya wrote a message
with lipstick to save their lives. But
it was no great sacrifice, as they
had plenty for their lips as well.
The electric dollar wouldn't be
any great novelty. Much of the
money we hear people talk about is
gas.
An artistically inclined congress-
man thinks there are too many stat-
ues in Statuary Hall in the capitol.
But why specify any particular
room?
TALE OF A ROV
He owns a home. And that's why
re can't receive anything from the
relief committee until his mortgage
is foreclosed, which it soon will be.
Once he was the dean of Jewish
cantors, now he is Just one of New
York's many poverty-stricken old
men. All he can do is sit and re-
member. Remember how seven
years ago he was received by the
President, and how Mr. Coolidge
listened while he chanted a prayer
he had composed in his honor, and
how he thanked him for the set of
I phylacteries with which he present-
! ed him. Remember how, when he
; and his wife, who still shares his
i fortune, celebrated their golden
wedding anniversary ten years ago
so many people tried to crowd into
the old Hippodrome that the police
had to take charge of the mob.
Well, there's nothing but memories
when you're 77 and can't sing any
more. But Cantor Seidel Rovner
must think that New York's memory
is pretty short. Which it often is.
Reprint Baltimore Jewish Times.
Never again does a man feel as
important and successful as the day
he graduates from college.
A man will forgive and forget al-
most any negligence around the
house except letting the salt shaker
get empty.
;/irFACT FINDER
ORIGIN OF "DARK HORSE"
Everyone knows what is meant by
a "dark horse," but few know the
origin of the expression. The phrase
was first used by Thackeray in his
"Adventures of Philip." Said Philip,
referring to some talk about a can-
didate for parliament:
"Well, bless my soul, he can't
mean me. Who is the dark horse he
has in his stable?"
Li
i


*
Four
THE JEWISH FLOR I Dl AN
Friday, February 1Q, iqjj
: < : < : : : : : : : : : : : :.;. ;. ;. .;.;. ;..;.
"SWEET WATERS
of MEGIDDO"
By Rabbi Lazarus Axelrod
v v v v : ; ; ; :- : ; : v -.-
vw ;* "2'
Feverish, with our minds in a
whirl, we left the giddy scene of the
Are. the frenzied Chassidim and
their distracted, impassioned danc-
es, and began a wild hunt for a
night's rest. Exorbitant prices were
asked for the privilege of sleeping
on a hard, uncomfortable mattress
in a corner of the Hachnosath Or-
ehitn. We finally settled for 50
piastres apiece, and tossed about
wildly in small camp cots, seeking
the soothing arms of Morpheus. We
were surrounded by several hun-
dreds of thoroughly exhausted indi-
viduals who snored balef ully
throughout the night. There were
several thousands of glutton-
ous mosquitoes, fully matured and
eager for a solid meal, setting up a
symphony orchestra which buzzed
and droned dismally, competing
I
with the snoring multitude. And.
through the open windows, came
the mellifluous chanting of the Se-
phardic women, the hoarse cries of
.he Chassidic dancers and the weird
melancholy call of the fried liver
vendor"Raved, kaved .
After two or three hours of rest-
less sleep, during which time we
were awakened frequently by the
vicious sting of the mosquitoes. I
was conscious of someone standing
over me prodding me lightly through
the blanket. I opened my eyes and
beheld the Shanuiias of the Hach-
:. Oichim. who advised me to
'.,tkt> an early morning dip In the
waters of Megiddo. lying several
hundred feet below Miron. I dressed
'. and made my way down
>pe through tricky stony sldi
often clinging desperate
the soft turf to avoid dropping 10
feet or so through space. There is
no other access to Megiddo. A nar-
row, winding path, allowing one
U descend al a time with
natural footholds all the way. The
sound of the water a- il
See And Hear
Rovner
Rosenblatt
Shiisky
Hershman
Roitman
Waldman
Katchko
Shapiro
The most Famous Cantors
in Jewish History
in
THE VOICE OF ISRAEL
A powerful singing and talkin
picture of the
Jewish people
B
AT THE
Biscayne Plaza
1 heatre
Miami Beach
Sunday Feb 26th.

AT THE TIYOLI THEATRE
NEXT WEEK
WILLIAM POWELL
. h miles ot pebbles.
. mj ears There was a mys-
I here about the place.
Down here, alone, with the clear
tn am pursuing its way
merrll] rocks and ravines.
.;,' of beautiful Miron with
vaults wherein the
- of Hillel. Shammai and other
kept watch over Me-
giddo. I fell strangi ly elevated. The
rined laden with the spir-
it of poets and king rs and
prophets. I undressed In a secluded
spot, and reverently entered the In-
rtg rating and cool waters ol this
rivulet. What a delicious
clean
as rystal I drank
tasteless ilorless
and odorless liquid, which is God's
:o man. Truly Mayim
. :- : :.: 1 d
ed and sat down i the bank of
lines
Imist 3-. :. rivers ol
Babylon we even wept
: could
plctun bar] and i las I
he bran pi ading fol-
: the pomegranate formed a
tting tor an artist's idyll.
Pigs, peaches and olives grew here
in abundance. Ah! Sweet wati
Megiddo. with your tiny ripples
playing divine music on the smooth-
ened pebbles of mother earth, i nt<
inseen clefts and rift.'-, you are
eternal: fresh and young, v
the victory of life over death.
You are serene, tranquil, sharil
the regnant mood of satisfaction
that even now spreads over the
whole landscape on the wings of
this misty blue haze that wraps it-
self about yonder hills, softly, ten-
di rly .
Divine revelation. It is reflected
in the foaming whitecaps of the sea.
in the soft raindrops falling gently
from heaven; in the winds veering
about on their endless circuit, in
the prettiness of flower-studded
meadows and in the tremulous
spring breezes that blow a new soul
into the nostrils of the world. Di-
vine revelation. It is expressed by
master minds and heavenly ill-
spired super men. They pour out
their souls on canvas, others express
this harmony with the divine
through violin strings, piano keys.
through poetry and song. Wistfully
I leave the scene of meditation and
ascend the slope which leads to Mi-
ron and the small unassuming Shti-
bel. The elders of the community
are preparing for prayer. The
chanting ol the early morning bless-
ings pierce the stillness of the morn-
111- and mingles with the reciting
ot the Kaddish which emanates
from the Sephardic Minyan across
the way. "Yisgadal Veyiskadash"
Six hours later, and the world had
assumed a cold, hard and unsym-
pathetic attitude. I stand at the
junction of Jaffa Road in Jerusalem
by the General Post Oiiice. and
watch the passing show. Jerusalem.
the international, the home of a
hundred religions, complete with
pride and hate, where the
Ji w turns In despair and hope three
nine- a day. to add his share of
tears to the Wailing Wall. The
Gate City ol the East, the key to
the world, turned into a bedlam;
British officers patrol the streets.
Arab gendarmerie keep watch over
the city, airplanes purring overhead
like contented eats My head aches.
I am bewildered by the sudden
change from the poetical to the
practical, and I can think of only
one spot that has emerged un-
scathed from this versatile modern
age, thai has retained its individual
GOPPINGER'S
i Pirate's Cove)
TROPICAL GARDENS and
sk.minoi.i-: INDIAN VILLAGE
The Oricinal and LargMl
Indian Villas* in Florida
Alligator and Crocodile Farm
\. W. Itlh Are. Off Till SI.
(rreati si In A merit ,i
TO GET HERETake Ihr hoal
"Dixie" direct In il,,- Indian VII-
lace. leaving dail> al III a. m. and
.' p. m. from Pier 7. ( ity Yacht
Basin in lla> front Park,
l"r dri\,- out Wl Flaeler St reel
lo 16th Atenue. lurn north lo N.
W. 7th Street and area) to 19th
Avenut or two hlni-k* treat of 171 h
Avenue Bridge. All for hire ear*
from Bail Plat-let Street, all Yel-
low Cab Company's for hire car*
and taxi* atop at CoppinKer'a.
color, its fragrance and divinity-,
the pure, sweet waters of MegiddrT
The End.
NEW 7TH AVENUE THEATRE
3033 N. W. 7th Ave. Phone 2.3-5,
ADULTS 20c CHILDREN loc
Sunday and Monday. Peb. H-IJ
MARION DAVIES in
"Blondie of the
Follies"
with
III).I.IK DOVE and JIMMY lit -RANTS
llnx Office lip. 11- 5:|s Sunday
Miami Plating
Works. Inc.
Chromium, Nickel. Tin, Silver
and Gold Plating
..... N. e. 2nd Ave. Phone 2-.-,oo;
Breakfaal
Dinner
Lunch
1 In |0
.", to -
11 tn io
'DAVIS CAFETERIA
33 N. K. Second Ave.
Opposite Halcyon Hotel
Efficient Service
Bojl to carry your tray
---------+
DR. J. II. YARBOROICII
VETERINARIAN
Dogs Clipped. Plucked
and Bathed
IMS N. W. 36th St. Phone 2-IM I
4-------------------------

I >
YOUR CAR "
Washed, Polished and
Greased for ..........
SI .of.
T
55
Z ROYAL PAI.M
Valves Ground, Carbon .Sf".00l
Cleaned, Fords-Chevs.
SERVICE STATION
I IS S. W. FIRST ST.
SOUTHERN
BROTHERS
MIAMI BUSINESS
CMVERSITY, INC.
Fifty Thousand Young
People ;;; the Busitieii World
Today Hate Been Trained
/'i Southern Brothen
3RD FLOOR, TOWNI.EY BLDG.
77 E. Hauler St. at 1st Ave.
Phone 2-2320
MIAMI, FLORIDA
TO I RS ( RIISIS
STEAMSHIP TICKETS
TRAVELERS CHEQUES
Kemittawrs to All Foreign
Countries
Arranar your I'aiow-r Trip
lo l*aletinr through
American Express
Company
330 E. FLAGLEB ST.
Miami i el, :::;i7s
WfWfXHK
v\V0a^\ss\\tt
\HC.
fc*5-WE USUALLY HAVE 10 KEEP
AW EYE ON THE CLOCK WHEN WE
WAKE THESE TfilPS LETS SEE
WHAT THEV OSt> FOR TELUW}
TIAAEW THE OLD PAYS.
MITCHELL GOBBRNA, PreaMi
ESTAIII.ISHED 1912
THESUWDIAL
WASUSEO
MOSTOrTEK
AS TIME
piece in
TOO B.C.
THE SAND GW;
LATER. THE HOUR
GLASS, PATES
TlOM ABOUT THE
2*CENTURvB.c.
Tl*autDK-Ali IMOUal CfiMrxrrfDTlMF BV""
ouD.
GEeUlPFATWEO
CU3UX
THE E6VPTIAU
WATER CLA-
USED AEVUT
(3oB.c.


February 10, 1933.
THE J EWISH FLORIDIAN
Page Five
SOCIETY
noted Yiddish writer and
Liber of the staff of the Jewish
CrnMg Jurnal> M' Klorman ar"
I,. nere this week to spend a
|ort time visiting in Miami.

Imi-5. Cooperman. accompanied by
'. son Jack and daughter Emma
h yolk City, are visiting their
., Mr. and Mrs. I. L. Mintzer
liaonl Beach. They will be en-
Lined at dinner tonight at the
Ltzer home, where a large num-
f 0( guests have been invited to
L) them.

lTiif local Bnai Brith lodge will
Vd an initiation of members and
open meeting next Thursday eve-
L. February 16, beginning at 8
Jm. in ""' community center of
(,. Hebrew Athletic club. The pub-
,,, invited to attend.

i annual donor's luncheon
the Senior Hadassah chapters
fcich Is observed throughout the
.[if country will be observed in
I. Oreater Miami district on Mon-
Pebruary 27, at a place to be
[wuinced in our next issue. All
ji k who desire to attend and have
[ yet raised their quota are urged
J communicate as soon as possible
I-!: Mrs. Barney Weinkle, chair-
fen, or Mesdames Freda Lutzky
1 Lee Woiner.
&M
OpedaJidt
EVE, BAR, NOSE A THROAT
HI N. K. Ill Ave. Phone 2-0393
PAN-AMERICAN
ICOLLEGE of COMMERCE
INCORPORATED
210 But Flagler Street
tlnd Hoar i.ii..... Hldc-l
\(>nl) the Best h Good Enough"
> i ilaiei
// It's Insurance
Ask Vanderpoolt
c maintain an enirineerinn de-
partment fur eherkinn fire ratex.
iImb, etc.
FIRE, AUTO, CASUALTY.
1-11 K. BONDS, Etc.
Vanderpool
& Company
INCORPORATED
VANDERPOOL BFII.DING
K. I*t Av. Phone 2-7681
JJ>JMn you BACK WITH 1W
j^WUTOTME COUUTBIK, TUAT
KM JHfi WORLD VJI1H FOBVVOO
^lUSABOOTIT PKOKSSOR -
The annual spring festival of the
Beth Jacob Sisterhood of Miami
Beach will be held at the Floridian
hotel on March 26, and will include
a complete program of entertain-
ment with an elaborate floor show.

Jack Negley, popular master of
ceremonies who is responsible for
much of the fun that the large
crowds at the Cinderella ballroom
get each night, is still going strong
and making the contestants at the
Walkathon do their share towards
the public entertainment. Nearing
the 1000th hour, the grind is on
stronger than ever and it is taking
real "nerve" and will power to force
the physical self on and on in an ef-
fort to win the attractive prizes, so
near and yet so far. What the next
hour may bring, none, not even the
contestants, can foretell. The con-
testants themselves, and recruits
from most of the local night clubs '
are providing novel shows nightly, i
An evening of real amusement is in '
store for the visitor to the Walka-
thon at the Cinderella.
*
A class in Biblical interpretations j
and revealed studies in scripture will
be conducted by Rabbi S. M. Mach- .
lei at the home of Major Kaufman
Mandel. 3012 S. W. Eighth street, at
11 o'clock Sunday morning. At the
first meeting of this class, last Sun-
day, an introduction to Genesis was
Jiveil by the rabbi. Major Mandel
extended an invitation to all pres-
ent to return with others interested
in a study of scripture in a form of
revelation. These classes are con-
ducted in a spirit of fellowship with-
out dogmatic emphasis. Rabbi
Machtei expressed the purpose of
these meetings and discussions m
the words, "We aim to stress the
things we have in common and to
minimize our differences." Adher-
ents of all faiths are invited to at-
tend.

More than 150 women attended
the card party Friday afternoon in
the Blackstone hotel gardens, for
Biscayne Electric
Supply Co.
Kl.rtri.nl Appliance* of every de-
scription. Phnne and we will dit
Ihe reI at very reaonnahle price*.
41 W. FLAGLER STREET
Phone 2-3024
.._.+
The Best in Travel
Our Rates Will
Please You
See I* Before Booking Anywhere
Have you a trip to Cuba in
mind? Our Hotel in Havana,
the Hotel Packard, MTVe*
strictly Kosher Meats.
trices and Sen ice Right
Davis Tours,
rNCORPORATED
.1111 But Hauler Slreel
Phone .1-1722
Sun-Back Gingham
Here is a summer sun style, as
worn by Helen Krakeur of New
York in a pre-season view at Palm
Beach. It is a blue gingham sun
back beach dress with knitted
white hat.
the benefit of the Jewish Welfare
auxiliary, under the leadership of
Mrs. Isidore Cohen, assisted by Mrs.
Harry Oilphant, Mrs. Bertha Levy.
Mrs. Harry Isaacs, and Mrs. Herbert
Kleinman. During the social hour
prizes were awarded to Mrs. Ludwig.
ii visitor of Boston: Mrs. Laikin. and
Mrs. Charles Tobin of Miami Beach.

Plans are being completed for an
installation luncheon and meeting
of the Ladies' auxiliary of the Jew-
ish Welfare bureau, to be held Mon-
day. February 20, in charge of a
committee headed by Mrs. Cecil
Tannenbaum.
0 0 0
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Shulman. who
have been winter visitors in Miami
several weeks, left by automobile for
New York recently.
*
Dr. J. H. Kaplan of the extension
department of the University of Mi-
ami, was the principal speaker at
the meeting of the Town and Gown
of the university last Thursday, in
the girls" social hall. The conserva-
tory presented a number of musical
groups.

Mr. and Mrs. Abe Davis of Tan-
nersville. N. Y.. are spending their
honeymoon in Miami and are at the
Pioneer hotel.
*
Mrs. Adele Vince Rose entertained
members of the Fortnightly Book-
Review club last Tuesday at her
home. Mrs. Rosa R. Levin reviewed
"Prologue to Love," by Martha Os-
tenso. A social hour followed and
Mrs. Zachary Taylor Beal, an aunt
of Mrs. Rose, from New York, was
introduced. Mrs. Beal is the house
guest of her sister. Mrs. R. Vince
Rose, and will remain about three
months.
*
Mr. and Mrs. P. Applebaum. 1721
S. W. Eleventh terrace, announce
the engagement of their daughter,
Thelma, to Meyer Silberstein, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Silberstein, 547
S. W. First street. The wedding will
take place February 19.
Miss Applebaum is a popular
member of the younger set and is a
graduate of Miami High school. Mr.
Silberstein attended the Bethlehem,
Pa., High school and is owner of the
Biscayne Tire & Service Company.

Mrs. Barney Balaban of Chicago
is a recent arrival at the Wofford
hotel, Miami Beach. Her husband is
a member of the firm, Balaban &
Katz, theatre operators, in Chicago.

The first annual dance sponsored
by the Sisterhood of Temple Israel
will be given Saturday night at the
Miami Beach Golf & Country club.
Entertainment will be presented by
Al Parker from the Silver Slipper,
Chester Alexander from Club Bag-
dad. Dilworth Sisters dance team,
Lew Hampton. Danny Sheehan, Bet-
ty Ann Ganger and Francis Kame.
Mrs. Herbert S. Sepler is general
chairman.

The Books in Brief club met Mon-
day with Mrs. David Solomon. Mrs.
A. Reisman. president, appointed
Mrs. Charles Feldman parliamen-
tarian and Mrs. Harry Oliphant
chairman of publicity. Mrs. Seld-
man reviewed "Croilus and Cres-
sida." The next meeting will be at
the home of Mrs. S. Tannenbaum.

The basketball team of the He-
brew Athletic club will play the Mi-
ami Senior High school at the high
gym next Monday night.
?+*****+******>****?*?*+
While In florid a
V^anror
* Joseph Zj. oluisky
accept a limited numb*
Engagements
:
.. will aceept a limited number of
% Engagements
' at very reasonable prices. Write ^
4 or wire Bolstein, care of Jew- >
t ish Floridian, P.O. Box 2973, +
i
.;. Miami, Florida.
??????????????????????
IF TOll REALLY want
FRKSH BKEF
and VEAL
STOP AND SHOP AT
Farmer's Meat Market
71 Northweat Fifth Slreel
(One-half 111.,, I, Weil of
Miami Avenue!
Veal Shoulder. 2 lbs.......25c
Legs of Veal, lb............15c
Veal Chops, lb.............15c
Beef Steaks and Boneless
Beef, lb..................15c
Scalded Calves' Heads and
Calves' Feet
Formerly Five Yean at
Farmer* Cily Curh Market
All Meats fresh Killed

IIOMf. SliRVICf. LAUNDRY
MRS, (I,AHA I). KERSEY, Prop,
122.1 S. W. Hth SI.
Mending and buttons sewed on
free of charge. Called for and
delivered.
Eagle Service Sta.
N. K. 6th SI. and 2nd Ave.
Phone 2-.17N6
Specializing in Brake and Axle
Work and Motor Overhauling
Fine.I equipped shop in city. Low.
et price* in ur ten year* of hu-.-
incHs here.
w. K. LIVINGSTONE, Prop.
1
+.
WINE GRAPES \
California Wine (irapen
Kine for Juire Ready Now I
I'm..-- Cheaper lhan Last Year I
m KLEFEKEB PRODUCE, INC. 1
IN. Miami Ave. at 7th St. Phone 2-023.1 J
Mrs. Walker, R.N.
MASSEUSE
> .r .whi.it.' Nur*e
Reference
I860 N. W. 44TH STREET
Phone 2-8017
-------------------

YOU NEED A DENTIST:
You Need a
GOOD
DENTIST!
I want the opportunity to
prove my professional ability
at prices to please you.
DR. HARRY E. FRY
DENTIST
36 East Flagler Street
Phone 2-7215
Always Fresh
LA TOURAINE COFFEE
AND
FIFTH AVENUE COFFEE
Roasted, packed and delivered
daily from our Miami plant
to insure
"That Delicious
Fresh Flavor"
W. S. QUINBY CO., Inc.
MIAMI JACKSONVILLE
Hit MJC IMDUM8Y *4Ol0 AS AAAM HiMSeLF.
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1
(


Page Six
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN____
Friday, February^ I
[
Sa&tn ^yitagng fiitllrtin
Edited by RABBI S. M. MACHTEI
Founder and Director, Radio Synagos <>f America
Sunday Mornings \\ lOD. Miami, Florida
{ Vol. L MIAMI. FLORIDA. FEBRUARY 12. 1933. No. 8.
: : ? : : # > : : : #+# : ; < + : :.:-: : : : : : : : -: : : : : : : : *
Woman's Contribution to Life
Sermon Delivered Sunday. February 3. 1933
Scripture Reading, Prot'tfbs, Chapter XXXI, VffSCS 10-31, incL
Recipes for the
Jewish Family
,^\5 a man I have inherited a natural pride for my own sex. "Men have
made this world what it is." From its present condition I hardly consider
it anything to brag about. Possibly, if some men had listened to women,
certain of our present difficulties might have been avoided. I repeat, that,
as a man. my own allegiance is to manhood. As an unbiased and open-
minded thinker and student I must acknowledge the share that Woman
has had in the progress of the human race. Man's lot would have been
much harsher were it not for the softening influence of woman.
MEN who have attained greatness have, in a very large measure, been
guided into the right channels by mothers and wives. The very fact
that we have advanced from the barbaric stage is evidence of the influ-
ence of woman upon man. Because the mothers of the Stone Age refused
to be satisfied with caves for their children; because the mothers prodded
the fathers on to building better homes as protection for their children
from the elements and from wild beasts, we have, today, homes that are
safe and comfortable. Men who have introduced legislative measures to
improve living and working conditions have been inspired to do1 so by
women. The indefatigable workers in the cause of alleviating human suf-
fering have been women. The home, society's foundation, is the result of
womanly efforts.
WE men. take the credit for all of progress. Shall I attribute that to
the historians who have been men? It is not so under the rules
laid down by our Hebrew sages. Woman was held in high esteem. The
rabbis said "hakol min ho'ishoh" all things are due ta the woman
she is the cause of everything. Accordingly, they advised man to be con-
siderate of woman. Someone has written. "Jewish custom bids the Jewish
mother, after her preparations foi the Sabbath have been completed on
Friday evening, kindle the Sabbath lamp." That is symbolic of the Jew-
ish woman's influence on her own home, and through it upon larger cir-
cles. She is the inspirer of a pure, chaste, family life whose hallowing
influences are incalculable; she is the center of all spiritual endeavors,
the confidante and fosterer of every undertaking. To her the Talmudic
sentence applies: "It is woman alone through whom God's blessings are
vouchsafed to a house."
I recall an incident in a Jewish home several years ago. A member of
my congregation related this to me: His five-year-old son had re-
turned from his first day at Sunday school. The father, anxious to know
whether the experience had had any effect upon his son. questioned him
about the things he had learned that day. The little fellow, without any
hesitancy, repeated the lesson for the day. He told his father that he had
been taught about God's creating the world in six days and of the things
that had been created each day. "On the sixth day." said the five-year-
old, "late in the afternoon. God made Man." "How did He make Man?"
asked the father. "Why. God took some dirt, made a mud-man. breathed
into it and it became alive." said the youngster. "That's fine." encouraged
the father. "And what else did God make?" "A woman." replied the
child. "Yes." said the parent, "and did He make the woman from the dirt,
too?" The child hesitated a moment, then said. "No! God put the man
to sleep, took out his brains and made a woman."
rE child, unconsciously and in his simplicity, had expressed a great
truth. One of the greatest of Bible commentators, the Malbim. ex-
presses a similar thought, as does the Midrash. Because' of the use of
special Hebrew words in the record of God's creation of Eve, in Genesis,
the rabbis contend that the greater practical sense has been given to the
female of the species.
THERE are women whose very acts brand these statements as untrue.
Yes. and there are men whose very lives are examples of the iu'.'.^zy
of the supremacy of Man, But. with these we do not concern ourselves.
Men and women who have forfeited every right to the designation "human
beings" are not the types which concern us. The exception attracts our
attention because it is different from the general rule. It serves to streng-
then our desire to be classified with the normal not with the abnormal.
IN our scripture reading for today. Solomon speaks of the valorous and
virtuous woman "She openeth her mouth with wisdom; and in her
tongue is the law of kindness." That is the underlying theme in the con-
tribution that Woman has made to life kindness. While there have
been women who h. ve inspired men to war. they have been outnumbered
by the women who nave injected kindness into life. The Divine Spirit is
spoken of in the feminine gender the "Schechinah." Even the Lord is
referred to in the Hebrew pronouns, several times, in scripture, in the
feminine gender. No student considers God either masculine or feminine.
But. in considering the Divine attributes, femininity is ascribed to* the
Deity. You won't find that In your English translation of the Bible be-
cause in translating it is impossible to carry over the gender of a noun
or pronoun into a language where such grammatical forms do not exist.
The fact remains, however, that the feminine touch, the womanly influ-
ence, in life. Is as certain as the very principle and source of life God.
Waldorf Salad
Mix an equal quantity of sliced
celery and apples, add one-fourth
pound of pecans or English walnuts,
chopped fine. Put over a tablespoon
of lemon juice and sufficient Gel-
'and's mayonnaise dressing to thor-
oughly cover. To be absolutely cor-
rect, this salad should be served
without lettuce; it can. however, be
dialled on lettuce leaves.
Fish Salad for Twenty People
Boil four pounds halibut, cool and
shred fish. Marinate the fish. When
ready to serve ad six hard-boiled
eggs chopped, and one pint bottle
of pickles of chow-chow. The pickle
may be omitted and celery cut fine
be added. When these are well
mixed serve on lettuce leaves with
' Gelfand's mayonnaise dressing, of
i which one pint will be required.
Grapefruit Salad
Cut the grapefruit in halves and
j remove the pulp, being careful to
^et none of the tough white skin.
Mix with bananas and oranges and
stir in mayonnaise dressing. Remove
all skin from inside of the grape-
fruit and fill with the mixture,
heaping it high and ornamenting
with maraschino cherries. Lay each
half in a bed of lettuce leaves and
serve.
Brain Salad
Scald brains with boiling hot wat-
er to cleanse thoroughly. Boil until
tender, in fresh cold salt water, be-
ing careful to remove from the wat-
er while it is yet firm. Slice length-
wise and lay in dish. Pour over
one-half cup of vinegar which has
been sweetened with a pinch of sug-
ar to remove sharps taste, pinch of
salt and pepper. Garnish with par-
sley and serve cold. Can also be
served with mayonnaise.
Sweetbread Salad
Take cucumbers and cut length-
wise to serve the salad In; scrape
out the inside and salt well. Then
squeeze and use this to mix with
the filling. Take a pair of sweet-
breads, or calf's brains, wash well
and boil; when done throw in cold
water at once and skim them; chop
': fine, add bunch of celery, one can
of French peas, scraped part of cu-
cumber. Mix all together and sea-
son. Mix mayonnaise with It and
I fill cucumber shells; keep all cold,
i and serve on lettuce leaf.
Honey Sandwich Fillings
Honey in sandwich fillings brings
extra goodness to the lunch. Blend
with cream cheese, chopped nuts,
raisins and celery, chopped carrots,
peanut butter, dates chopped (with
or without nuts) and many other
combinations. You'll find them all
different and delicious, easy to make
yet most appetizing. In sand-
wichesplain, rolled, ribbon or tier
honey assures additional flavor,
keeps the sandwich moist, and holds
crumbly bread together. A good
combination in new form: honey
bread roll thoroughly blend one
cup finely cut salted pecans with
one-hall cup slightly warmed honey
to form spreading paste. Cut bread
in slices full length of loaf (ordi-
nary loaf cuts five lengthwise sli-
ces'. Spread with butter, then with
honey pecan paste, and roll as for
jelly roll. Wrap each in waxed pa-
per and tie to keep intact. Let stand
an hour or longer: remove paper
and cut each -oll in three slices
each loaf used makes 15.
Honey Cakes No. 1
One pound of honey, one cup of
granulated sugar, four eggs, one
tablespoon of allspice, three table-
spoons of salad oil, four cups of
flour, well sifted, three teaspoons of
baking powder. Warm up or heat
h'/ney. not hot, just warm. Rub
yolks well with sugar, beat whites
to a froth, then mix ingredients, add
flour and bake in moderate oven for
ine hour.
OMaal Repair Shop in Miami
AMERICAN
SHOE SHOP
Miami's Bat for
SAoc Repairing
15 S. MIAMI AVENUE
C. B. BARRETT. Prop.
SPOTLESS DRY CLEANERS
MRS. J. H. HICKMAN. Prop.
A BEAUTY SHOPPF. FOR YOUR CLOTHES
Laundry Agency Alterations Repairs
1274 WEST FLAGI.ER STREET -:- PHONE 2-5013
WE CALL for and DELIVER

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P & A GARAGE
|
< omplftf Automobile
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Wrecker Service
Wheel Alignment
"'ake Specialiita
PRONE 2-7222
Miami Ilearh
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112 N. E. 2 Ave.
T.ATiisrnpv
^120 N. W. FIRST AVENUE MIAMI, FLORIDA
HAVANA
4 Days $42.50
ALL EXPENSE
< uban Tax S3.00
Extensive Sight Seeing
Outside Room with Bath
and Meals
< ON>iOI.Il>ATi:i) TOL'RS, INC.
305 N. E. Fint Si. At THORIZKI) AM) HONI'KM AGENCY Phone 2-.903
LEAMINGTON HOTEL BUILDING
OPEN
DAILY
%ND
SUNDAY
SEE THE PRIMITIVE EVERGLADES AT
MUSA ISLE
Seminole Indian Village
OPEN
DAILY
AM)
SUNDAY
-ARGEST COLLECTION7 bT'cATOVE'MoATOI&
rtmKmmwm ANI> CROCODILES *'-'',OATORS
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Ba.m-2 p. m. daily ... on .p,edo,".r"Spe^' 7. P'"L.,6' ,h Yfh
___________ Miami Beach m "' Dock.
Honey Cakes No. 2
Three eggs, not separated
with one cap of sugar, one CUo
honey, and cup of blanched
monds chopped finely, one ^
each of allspice, cloves and ci"
mon, one cup of chocolate and a
enough to make a thick batter
teaspoon of baking soda s
very thin on a square, buttered l
bake in a hot oven, and when do
spread with a white icing, cut
squares and put a half blanched"]
mond In the center of each squartl
Banana Dainty
Cut the bananas in half crossm,
and arrange them on a plate, tm
ating from the center. Sprinkle J
grated nuts or nutmeg and ha
white mayonnaise in the cento
Garnish with maraschino chen
Nut Salad
You make a plain grapefruit a
ad. When you have it ready
serve, cover the top thickly nj
finely chopped almonds or ,.
mixed. Pour over mayonnaise drsi
lng.
Delaney & Beers
Kodak Finlahing and Enlir.in,
Commercial Work and Home Porlniti I
50% Off on AH Amateur Work
212 N. E. 4th St. Phone MM
Can you pass an Examination:
Are you fully covered?
Permit a Hulf Life Repre-
sentative to call and help
you select a prorram of
Life Insurance
TODAY
Gulf Life
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Insurance
111 Seybold Buildinf
Phone 2-4911
In the Heart of Your
Neighborhood
PIGGLY
WIGGLY
A Miami Institution
Corns, NailB. CallOUMs, ItC, removed
painlessly under antiseptic condition.
Arch trouble* corrected.
DOCTOR
I". N. L.AUBENTIIAL
Chiropodist
7-9 Halcyon Arcade
AT Bt'KOINE'S BALC0OT
On and After Feb. 13
PHONE 3-3089
lecfricify
IS YOUR
CHEAPEST
SERVANT.
Use it!
ripfe


... February 10, 1933.
_________THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page Seven
OCIETY
L^and Mrs. Lou Magnolia and
Lou, jr.. of New York, have ar-
I to spend the season at Miami
Lfh and are guests of the Bay
Crt apartments.

special meeting of Emunah
Xpter o.E.S. will be held on
lursday evening, February 16, at
I Scottish Rite temple with Mrs.
Iherine E. McKay, worthy grand
of the Grand chapter of
paying an official visit. A
Ltion and program will be pre-
jed. Following the meeting there
j be an official banquet at the
L Heidelberg restaurant for which
trvations may be made with Mrs.
Eve G. Rose or Mrs. Lena Simon.

Lie Floridian hotel, Miami Beach,
D be the scene of the annual ben-
[bridge for the Hadassah Medical
j on next Wednesday afternoon,
[niary 15, beginning at 2 p. m.
ose interested in furthering the
: of the unit which has helped
luate the distress of inhabitants
(Palestine, and has done more to
lent the friendship between Ar-
[ and Jews in the Holy Land than
j other factor, are urged to pat-
Ize this bridge. Delicious re-
khments will be served and prizes
l be awarded for high scores. Mrs.
}:on Weiner is chairman of the
nmittee in charge of arrange-
rs, and every effort is being
I to give the patrons an after-
fcn of real enjoyment.
1VOLI
W. Flaglcr at 8th Phone 2-3352
I NIIAY & MONDAY. Feh. 12-13 |
t'untinuMUM 2 to II a. m.
lilliam 'dwell and Kay Francis
Jewel Robbery"
\Attention,
Visitors!
The policy of this store, to
meet all advertised prices, al-
phoueh well-known and well-
mjI>IMii-(1 among local folks,
l |00d news to Miami's visi-
tors. Think of the hours of
popping; time you can save by
poming here where stocks are
'impleto and where you know
prires arr guaranteed to be as
or lower than anywhere
|m-i.v Busir-.l |
RED CRQSS
DRUG
DEPARTMENT
STORE
SIE FUrflcr!
1 R PUclw St. Phone 2-8196
ft*t Delivery In Urealer Miami
An important meeting of Senior
Hadassah will be held Monday, Feb-
ruary 13, beginning at 2 p. m. at the
Miami Acacia club in the Congress
ouilding. All members are urged to
attend.

Mrs. J. Adler, better known as
B. Kovner, and L. Goldberg, who
spent several weeks in Miami, left
by auto last Monday for their homes
in New York City.

Mr. Philip Liberman, well-known
communal worker, at present pres-
dent of the Jewish Welfare bureau,
was elected by an overwhelming
vote last Sunday night as president
jf Beth Jacob congregation, Miami
Beach, to succeed Harry I. Lipton,
who declined re-election after serv-
ing a two-year term. Other officers
rill be elected at a later date.

In splendid voice, Joseph Z. Shlis-
:y, world famous cantor, astounded
ocal music critics last Sunday af-
ernoon at the Temple theatre with
his rendition of not only the fa-
miliar liturgical music and Jewish
oik songs but in the able and dis-
inctlve manner he sang a number
f difficult operatic arias in the or-
iginal Italian. One not knowing
Shlisky and merely listening to his
voice imagines that the possessor of
so strong and robust a tenor voice
must be a man of gigantic physique,
tut the sight of so small and slender
.1 man soon astounds the hearer.
Receiving continuous applause,
Shlisky graciously responded with
.'veral encores.
Particularly touching and feeling
vere Shlisky's renditions of "Av
Horachamim" and 'Omar Rabbi El-
?zor." The Yiddish typical Chassid-
lc folk song, "A Brief Tzum Reb-
oin" was one of the highlights of
.he entertainment. Cantor Shlis-
ky is resting at Miami for a short
time before resuming his southern
our, undertaken at the request of
many who had heard him only on
recorded numbers and were anxious
.o hear him in person. Shlisky ap-
peared in movies recently as one of
lie stars of the Yiddish singing and
alklng film. "The Voice of Israel,"
which will be presented at Miami
Beach on February 26.
a
As we go to press Miss Ida Engler
s being installed as Light of the
East, Order of Beatitudes at the
B-scayne Masonic temple. The- or-
ganisation is sponsored by the East-
ern Star and Masonic organizations.
Eastern Star officers include the
well known communal worker, Mrs.
ena Simon, as prophetess of the
Bast, and Mrs. Janette Friedman as
By This
Sign
You are
assured of the
BEST
Electrical Work
. S"1* Stove, .nd Refriverators
iHe Serrlce You Will Appreciate
[George La Vigne
Company, Inc.
Electrical Contractor! anil
Ensrineera
'2 N. E. Third Avenue
Phone 8-7838
APPEARING AT THE NEW
7TH AVE. THEATRE
CENTRAL BUSINESS
COLLEGE
Connrcss Buildina-
111 N. K. 2nd Ave. Miami. Fla.
:.w,-t tuition n.t.-H In bUtory. Pri-
vate, tutoring in Spantah, French mm
,.,1 Commercial ubjecU. Expert in-
'- 'tins. ______
OPEN All. TIIK TIME
Central Hospital
936 BiteariM Blvd. Phone 2-6712
NURSES ON CALL
OPEN TO MEMBERS OF
THE DADE COUNTY
MEDICAL SOCIETY
GERSON'S
1.101 Colllna Ave.
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-3989
A Place to Dine
in Contentment
ROBERT MONTGOMERY
chief musician.

The regular board meeting of the
Beth David Sisterhood was held re-
cently with Rabbi Max Shapiro as
guest speaker. Outstanding events
planned for the sisterhood are as
.'ollows: February 14. Valentine
bridge with Mrs. M. J. Kopplowitz
md Mrs. Harry Markowitz, host-
sses; on February 23, the twentieth
innual Purim bill and bazaar will
be held at the Mahi temple; on
March 5. there will be a Purim con-
gregational dinner and on March 19
the annual musical birthday party
will take place. The next regular
meeting of the Beth David Sister-
hood will be held on Wednesday.
February 15.

Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Saltzman en-
tertained with a dinner dance at
the Hotel Floridian Supper club Sat-
urday evening.
Present were: Mayor and Mrs. A.
Frank Katzentine. Mr. and Mrs.
Philip Leiberman, Sol Meyer, Mr.
and Mrs. James Jonas, Mr. and Mrs.
Fred Meyer, Mrs. Maurice Miller,
Miss Hazel David, Mrs. E. A. Man-
del. Baron de Hirsch Meyer, Leon-
ard Abess.
*
Miss Sophie Usilowits of Char-
lotte, N. C. is the house guest of her
cousins. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Oli-
phant. and Mr. and Mrs. Meyer
Schwartz, of this city.

"Blondie of the Follies." Marion
Da vies' new starring picture with
Robert Montgomery featured, comes
Sunday and Monday to the New 7th
Avenue theatre.
In directing this comedy drama,
Edmund Goulding, whose wizardry
was exemplified in his direction of
Grand Hotel," saw new possibilities
in enlarging the production as he
went along, with the result that the
supporting cast reflects the names of
personalities not contemplated in
the original scheme of things.
Blondie of the Follies" was a
veritable snowball in the matter of
cast names, gaining in size and im-
portance as filming progressed. To
begin with, there were, besides Mar-
ion Davics, Robert Montgomery.
Billie Dove, James Glcason. Zasu
Pitls. Sidney Toler, Douglass Dum-
brille, Sarah Padden and Louise
Carter. That alone is a cast of im-
pressive proportions.
But as the story pursued its mer-
ry way through the glitter of the
Ziegfeld Follies, gay parties on Park
Avenue and the contrasting humble-
ness of New York tenement life,
Goulding began assembling more ce-
lebrities. Last minute additions
brought into the cast the names of
such stars of the entertainment
world as Jimmy Durante, Clyde
Cook, and the Rocky Twins from the
Paris musical stage. The completed
cast is the most illustrious array of
bo-office names with which Marion
Davies has been surrounded.

Celebrating the seventy fourth
birthday of P. Lerner, a group of
friends assembled for dinner and
dancing last week at the Hotel Flo-
ridian Supper club. The table was
decorated with flowers and candles.
The party included Mrs. Charles
Lerner, Mr. and Mrs. Ephraim Sam-
uels, Isador Lerner, Dr. and Mrs.
Bernard Berkowitz, Mrs. Samuel A.
Lerner, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Lerner,
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Ginsberg, Mr.
and Ms. Michael Lerner, Mr. and
Mrs. Albert Kaffenburgh, Miss Bar-
bara Lerner, Miss Ruth Lerner, Al-
an Lerner, Robert Lerner, William
Lerner, Mrs. Jennie Shiers.

Mrs. L. Lehrer, wife of Rabbi Laz-
arus Lehrer of Asheville, N. C, is
visiting here and is the house guest
of Mr. and Mrs. Ted Gulkis.

If you're looking for something
delightfully different in the way of
motion picture entertainment see
"Jewel Robbery" at the Tivoli thea-
tre next Sunday and Monday.
The story is laid in modern Vi-
enna, and the audience is thrilled
and amused with what happens
when Europe's most accomplished
thief finds himself face to face with
Vienna's most fascinating noble-
woman. Kay Francis is the Baron-
ess Teri. whose boast it has always
been that no man could thrill her
as could a diamond. Collecting pre-
cious stones had been the ruling
passion of her life until the after-
"Radio Service"
WM. SIEI.ER
Parts and Accessories
430 NORTH MIAMI AVE.
No Charge for Examination
noon when she, her husband and
her friends are the victims of the
"Robber's" most daring coup in Vi-
enna's most exclusive Jewelry shop.
For the first time in her luxurious
vain existence, the Baroness forgets
her Jewels in her admiration for a
man. And though the Robber's en-
terprise is successful, he finds him-
self madly in love with the beautiful
Baroness.
Having stolen the lady's Jewels
and her heart along with them, the
"Robber" coolly proceeds to steal
the lady herself.
From that moment, the duel of
wits between the two becomes more
and more intense.
Powell lives the character with a
zest that is absolutely irresistible.
Those who have become accustomed
to Kay Francis as the serious, earn-
est heroine of her recent pictures
will be astonished and charmed by
her interpretation of the flirtatious,
irresponsible wife of Vienna's rich-
est banker.
Other members of the supporting
cast are Helen Vinson, Hardie Al-
bright, Henry Kolker, Andre Luguet,
Lee Kohlmar and Spencer Charters.

In charge ot tickets for the an-
nual Purim ball of Beth David are
Mrs. M. J. Kopplowitz, Mrs. Isidor
Cohen and Mrs. Jake Engler.
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'%


Page Eight
THE JEWISH FL OR I PI AN
Friday, February tn,^
Rebecca Franks,
Famous Loyalist.
Wit and Beauty
B~i Mildred Ln Mom -
In this year of the Washington
bicentennial, the story oi Rebecca
lc& a Philadelphia girl of Revo-
lution is ol interest u II
conditions under
ol bU Country
ol bis fr.emies.
W] *'' arniy
...... pc of Valley
ol Philadel-
ipied by the British wu
series I
and other
In thi at pac-
he Q laki r City bet
Rebec.. T one of the out-
ad a favorl
';
as a membe: wealthy
family Her father.
son of Jacob Franks
[hteenth century
:r. London to New York.
The latter was a member of the
ngregation. and participat-
ed actively in Jewish affairs. His
son moved to Philadelphia, was also
influential in business and social cir-
cles and married Margaret Evans, a
Christian society woman. Their
daughter. Rebecca, was born about
VER Y LA TEST
B\ Patricia Do*
Tailored suits and the big vogue
for mannish apparel brings the shirt
waist or blouse back into the lime-
1758. and while some of her broth- light for spring. Many of the shirt
ers and sisters were baptized, there waists are severe in line to click in
is no record of her baptism, and all with the mannish mode. Other
accounts speak of her as a Jewess. waists, however, retain their femi-
She was carefully educated, hav- nine distinctiveness. such for Ul-
an excellent knowledge of the stance as the puffed sleeve as shown
classics. Besides being a splendid on the lower figure in the sketch.
St. Petersburg
Notes
THI XI W
PILOT DRAGON
AT rOl'R RADIO DE U KR
I'riit- from I18.S* lo lt.S(
On Display at
Pan-American
Radio, Inc.
V K. .'nd A>
I'honr .
ROSE MEEK
tt
HART HARDWARE CO.
25 Fre. Prire* for Be*! Ro**
Hrinji Your* In
44-46 N. E. FirM street
Southern Mattress
Company
<.uarantrt-d Work />' I | if
Exptfl Renn\atinc ind I ph"l-irnr;
2141 N. MIAMI AVENUE
Telephone :-".-.'!
IVpuUr Pri< i -
open All Sight
Shoreland Grill
115 East Flagler Street B
... Bank
special Meal* :<>c T.ble d'Hote DinnerB
StMks. ( hop*. Sea Food*. _
>.ndi(he-. Waffle-

' > > > : : -I- -i- ; : > > ; > > > -> > >:-:-
+
-:
*
*
*
*
:
:
:
.-\>; Ideal TaU .
Crystal Springs
I KuM ORANGE < ITV
Pure, light. parkline. p.Liable,
refre-hinc. Awarded >il>cr Med.l
St, Loail K\po*ition .nd hirheM
award for purity and excellence.
1 oui-iana Purchase F\po*ition.
conversationalist, she was consid-
ered the wit of her day.
At the outbreak of the Revolu-
tion. her father remained loyal to
George III. which was not unusual
:.- members of the Colonial so-
descended from English stock.
TOils was especially natural in the
case of David Franks, as he was the
representative in America,
and is described as 'agent to the
contractors for victualing the troops
of the King of Great Britain."
During the British occupation of
lelphla, General Howe called
frequently at the home of David
and listened with enjoy-
:o the amusing remarks of
Rebecca which were often directed
against the patriots. At this time a
poem was in circulation entitled.
TimesA Poem by Camilio
' Poet Laureate of the Con-
:--- This sarcastic composition
lampooned the revolutionists, and
authorship was ascribed to Rebecca.
The tnosl extravagant entertain-
ment given by the British and one
long remembered in Philadelphia
feti called the Meschianza.
from the Italian, meaning a mix-
ture of medley. Ill-fated Major An-
dre was actfte in planning the ev-'
- Rebecca was assigned
Ing role T!-.e occasion result-
: of the officers
c: the B::-..-. ..:.. to honor Gen-
ral Howe.
As Howe's conduct of the war was
tisfactory. and he had been or-
perseded by Clinton, the
were denounced in
;;::': rs .,- ill-timed and
The American pies* was
Itter and contrasted the lev-
: their opp : ith the suf-
and hardships at Valley
Forge.
r. May 18. 1778. the
Meschianza was celebrated with
much magnificence. Special pavil-
lad been erected and decor-
ated. There was a water regatta, a
i fin irk* and a ball
d by an elaborate supper of
420 co\ : en ed by negro sla\
Oriental costumes, and at which
ts to King George and the
a. Family were proposed.
tournament, there were
faction -. : adies of
Shirtwaist dresses made of wool-
ens, colored suede Jackets often
without collars, reversible shorter
Congregation Bnai Israel will hold
its late Friday night services begin-
ning at 8 o'clock when Rabbi A. 8.
Kleinfeld will have as the subject of
his sermon. "The Science of Music."
A discussion of the ancient and
modem composers, especially the
cantor and his place in the service
of the synagogue, will follow.
Saturday morning services begin
at 9 o'clock.
The Ladies' Auxiliary and Aid so-
held an open meeting on Tues-
evening, February 7. Rabbi
Kleinfeld delivered an address on
Woman's Contribution to Com-
munity Life." The meeting was well
attended by the local membership
and a number of tourists who were
guests of the auxiliary
The card party given by Mrs. J.
Miller and Mrs. H. Jacobs for the
Ladies' Auxiliary and Aid society,
held at the Horowitz hotel, was a
grand success.
A regular meeting of the Judaic-
council was held at the home of
Mrs. Pauline Esrick. on Monday
evening, February 6. A large affair
is being planned, details of which
will be announced next week.
the set of a hoop, stay, or j,
The next year, she married
Sir Henry Johnson in New \
and after the surrender at
town, went to England to live, ]
years later when she was an
lady. General Winfield Scott
her at Bath.
She greeted him in a kindly J
"Is this the young rebel? r vA
gloried in my countrymen. Would,
God I. too. had been a
I
Turning to her husband, she
tinued. "I do not. I have never
j gretted my marriage. No ,
was ever blessed with a kinder
better husband; but I ought to h>
been a patriot before marriage-
She died March, 1823. in her
days, did she not sometimes
that she had also remained km
the faith of her fathers?
swagger coats and skirts, and fancy
knitted suits are recommended in
sportswear. Blouses showed the in-
fluence ol the tailored suit, with
lub collars, bows at the neck
line, and Ampler sleeves. Boucle,
chenille, and polka dot zephyr
sweaters were recommended for
; :ing
The simplest type oi mannish
aist made to accompany the
tailored suit is developed in white
: Ith pearl buttons, it is also
available in the market in shirting
silks and cottons There are also
many shirtwaist dresses for country
..: which add the skirl
to a blouse of this type.
gether with the lady of the Blended
Rose was crowned Queen of Beauty.
In many instances, there was evi-
dently no rift in the friendship of
the supporters o! opposing sides of
the war. Many Whig ladies were
present at the Meschianza, who
were anxious to take part in the
gaiety, and were not deterred bv
feelings of patriotism. Rebecca cor-
the Blended Rose, and the Ladies of responded with many eminent per-
* he Burning Mountain each with son* of the time, both Whig and
tin le of beautifully attired la-
and pages. Rebecca
headed the latter division, and to-
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92 N. E. 28th Street %
:: : :: : : : -: : : :..;..:..;..-_. .;. .;. ...;. .;. *
GOOSE
I LI I KEN SHOES
WALK A THON
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LOWEST RATES IN MIAMI
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If you want a good used at prices and terms that will
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';\vi>>T n agleb t-un
l-2 -V B. JM> AVE. .
SMITTY'S
DAY A NIGHT GARAGE
N W. ",th >t. and 3rd Aw.
Wrecker Service
! Dependable Repairs All Makes
| Pfcom 1-U41 Niht I'hon. 2-1 -^i
Tory. In a letter to Mrs. Paca. wife
of one of the delegates to congress,
she described the social activities of
Philadelphia, and asked her friend
to persuade her husband to allow
her to attend some of the British
fi tivities,
A diverting incident and one that
widely discussed was the chal-
lenge to a duel sent to Rebecca by
eccentric General Charles Lee of the
American army. She had made fun
I of his breeches, saying that 'hey
were patched. In rather caustic lan-
ding to her Jewish ail-
he wrote saying that his cos-
i tume consisted of 'sherry vallies"
or riding breeches"; they were not
; patched, but trimmed with leather.
, I insist on the privilege of the in-
i jured party, which L* to name his
j hour and weapons: and as I .
I it to be a very serious affair, will
* : ? ? : : : : ;. *.;..;..;..;..;..;.,;. :.......
f
V lniM on vour Crocrr *iv
not admit of any seconds." he con-
tinued.
Mrs. Flanks must have protested
against his discourteous words, for
he explained that whatever he said
was intended as a joke to bring B
smile in sad times; that he consid-
ered that she had too great under-
standing to be offended by it. The
challenge was merely intended as an
innocent "jeu d'esprit."
Her wit. however, spared neither
friend nor foe, Alter the evacuation
of Philadelphia. Lieut.-Col. Jack
Stewaul of Maryland called to see
her dressed in a suit of scarlet.
"I have adoptde your colors, my
Princess," he said, "the better to se-
cure a courteous reception; deign
to smile on a true knight."
She did not reply, but said to
those around her. "How the ass
glories in the lion's skin!"
In 1781. Rebecca visited the Van
Horns in New York, and in a letter
to her sister. Mrs. Andrew Hamilton,
she comments on New York society
as follows:
"By the way. few New York ladies
know how to entertain company in
their own houses, unless they intro-
duce the card table. Except the fam-
ily, who are remarkable for their
good sense and ease. I don't know
a woman or girl that can chat above
half an hour, and that on the form
of a cap. the color of a ribbon, or
*
inn you
NEW YORK BREAD A CAKE
COMPANY
BREAD AND CAKES
4T1 S. W. ih SI. Phone 2-785J
Brmnrh Store: ||| N. w. .Ith St.
r : : : : > : : : *.;. >.;.;.-.
Burdine's
MIAMI and MIAMI BEACH
"Sunshine
Fashions99
Swim
Suits
sS5-^ to $9.95
.. New Weaves
New Styles
New Colors
Exclusive with Burdine's
Radio Synagog
Rabbi S. M. Machtei. founder 1
director of the Radio Synagog.
preach over WIOD at 10 oc:c<_
Sunday morning on "A Challenge!
The sermonette on "Brain Fa
will be delivered by Leonard Tot
In addition to these there mi; 1
prayers, music and scripture rea
I ing.
Beth Jacob Cong. |
presents the u orld ftmou
Cantor
Joseph Z. Shlisky
At Late Services
Friday, Feb. 10th
8 p. m.
And at Services
Saturday, Feb. 11th
8:30 a.m.
AT ITS SYNAGOG
311 Washington An.
Miami llcarh
Sunday, Feb. 12th
8:30 p.m.
at the
Ida M. Fisher
High School
14th St. and Drtid A>.
MIAMI BEAI H
The Miami .lewis*
Dramatic Players \
in
"Die Zushterte Chasono*'
A melodrama in f'""r af^
replete with heart thro^
drama, joy and laughter, ana
Cantor Shlisky
In a program of Yiddish Folk
BtJBfa, Operatic Arias a"
Liturgical Number-
POPULAR PR'CS


Full Text

PAGE 1

Friday, February 10, 1933. THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN pi BLISHED EVERY FRIDAY by Ihc JEWISH FLORIDIAN PUBLISHING CO. 621 S. W. Fifteenth Avenue THE JEWIS H FLORIDIAN THE JEW MEDICINE Page Three in [Continued from P.„ <) ne j j. LOUIS SHOCHET, Editor P. 0. Box 2973 Miami, Florida Phone 2-1183 Entered a* *econd claws matter July 4. %  ihe 1'nst Office at Miami, Florida. %  I,,. Act <>f March 3. 1879. WEST PAI.M BEACH OFFICE 414 Eighth Street Mr*. M. Schrebnick. Representative SIBSCRIPTION Bh Month* 1 1.00 tine Year 1 2.00 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1933. Vol. 6, No. 5. 'A Fine Excuse I had the pleasure recently of being invited to meet some friends who Jiad come down from the North to spend a little time In Miami. We chatted about days gone by. and how things were working out rather differently from what we had pictured as children. As things will, we gradually veered into a discussion of things in Miami. Several tourists, men of affairs in their home towns, joined In the conversation. We were interrupted during the course of our talk, by a group of women who told us they represented a local welfare organization and urged our tourist friends to purchase some tickets for a dance. The reply these good ladies received was "We can do nothing for you ... we do our share at home." And now I join Issue. You good tourists who come down to bask in the Florida sunshine, to gather renewed vitality and strength for the vicissitudes of business, DO OWE A DUTY TO MIAMI and its community. Come with me, if you will, to the offices of the Jewish Welfare bureau and let me show you record after record where men and women, yes, and even children, coming directly to Miami in search of health, of a living, have been helped by Miamians. I can show you the record of a splendid little girl from the North, who had been pronounced a hopeless paralytic, who came to Miami with her penniless parents and thank Heaven and the good people of Miami, is now making remarkable progress and in time will be a healthy, useful citizen and a pride to her people. Yes you excuse-seeking tourists .. come with me to the Hebrew Friendly Inn and there see for yourselves what is being done daily 'o help, not Miamians. but Jews of the North. It has been the pride of the Jewish people that no call for help was ever refused when it was found worthy. Jews are brethren throughout the world. We know not barriers of oceans, state or clime. A Jew is a Jew whether he be Polish, Austrian. Russian. German, American or whatever place he may have come from. When a Jew asks for help whether it be for food to satisfy the physical self or for food to help his spiritual needs, that cry must be answered, and not by the question, where do you come from? U has been saifl and with much truth "The man who gives at home, gives wherever he may be." The man who seeks to give excuses a *ay from home, gives Just the same and no more, when he is at home. Following the French revolution more liberty was granted the Jews and we find them again becoming students and practitioners of medicine. It would be decidedly uninteresting to enumerate the many who did splendid work, hence I shall only name a few of the really great physicians of recent times. Before I begin, let me say in passing that it is extremely interesting to note that Jacob Eduard Polak, Vienna, 1818-91. was court physician to the Shah of Persia. Probably one of the greatest anatomists of all times was Frederick Gustov Jacob Henle. 1809-1885, whose original work on the kidney was sufficiently authoritative to have a portion of that organ named for him. Then there was Robert Semak. Berlin. 1815-65. the first Jewish privat-docent in Prussia admitted to the faculty of the University of Berlin for his discoveries in neurology, embryology and electro-therapy. Of famous pathologists let me just mention Julius Cohnheim. Moritz Henrich Romberg and Weigert. Again. Ludwig Trauhe. Berlin, is designated as the father of experimental pathology. Of opthalmologists, the city of Baltimore was fortunate in having Dr. Aaron Friedenwald practice here. The splendid achievements of his three illustrious sons. Dr. Harry in the same field as his father: Dr. Julius, who has specialized in diseases of the stomach and intestines. and Dr. Edgar, who follows the practice of diseases of children. Among the famous of yet more recent date must be mentioned Albert Neisser of Breslau, who discovered the germ of gonorrhoea. Ernest Frankel. also of Breslau. gynecologist and author of a magnificent work on his specialty. Albert Moll, of Berlin, who did so much original work in embryology and neuropathology. Paul Erlich of Frankfort on the Main with his bacteriological work, his side-chain theory of Immunity, and the discoverer of 606. the cure of that dreaded disease, syphilis. In this connection let me not forget to mention the name of Wasserman. whose test for the detection of syphilis bears his name. In the United States the first Jewish physician of whom any record exists was Jacob Lumbrozo. who practiced in Maryland in 1639. Certainly I must mention if all too briefly Simon Flexner, head of the Rockefeller Institute and discoverer of the cure of cerebro-spinal meningitis: the distinguished laryngologist. Jacob de Selva Soils Cohen of Philadelphia, and his equally illustrious brother, who specialized in internal medicine, Soloman de Selva-Soles-Cohen. Several pediatricians have left their mark, especially Abraham Jacobi and Henry Koplick. who was first to describe the spots in the mouth which are proof positive of the presence of measles, and for whom these spots are therefore known as Koplick spots. The famous biologist, Jacques Loeb. and probably one of the most outstanding bacteriologists, Milton Joseph Rosenau of Rochester, Mnn. Then, too. Libman of New York. Austrian of Baltimore, have both Men and women who come to this glorious section of the world. "God's own paradise," owe a duty to its people and to its iastitutions. Let not exclusion laws be adopted by our own, towards our own. Let every tourist remember that his helping hand should be extended to every Miami institution, towards the hungry and the needy, towards the Talmud Torah, towards the Synagogue. Let him not say, "I do my share at home." We doubt its truth. Moreover, it's not Jewish. THE AMERICAN JEWISH JOINT DISTRIBUTION COMM. Inc. February 2, 1933. Rabbi Jacob H. Kaplan, 137 N. E. 19th St.. Miami, Fla. Dear Rabbi Kaplan: Just as I had announced to the press that the Board of Directors of the Joint Distribution Committee, after very careful consideration of conditions here and abroad, had unanimously agreed that our basic relief program must be maintained the Jewish Telegraphic Agency cabled a report which in a few words describes the stark misery of the Jewish populations in Europe. "It is a commonplace to see children in the schools faint from hunger both in Warsaw and in the province.' states the cable, adding that the TOZ. a health organization subsidized by the Joint Distribution Committee, asserts that five or six children faint in every classroom daily. Unfortunately, it is a commonplace that the Jews of Poland and other lands in eastern and central Europe have no one to turn to in any crisis except their American brethren. They do not, like the native populations abroad or any of our citizens here, receive some measure of help and support from governmental and private philanthropic efforts of national or communal relief. Their right to engage in any type of employment is being narrowed constantly with unconcealed discrimination. Thousands of Jewish homes are without food or heat, in an atmosphere haunted by disturbance and riot. But it will never be a commonplace that the Jews of America, whether we have much or little to share, do not give what we can of material aid and moral encouragement to our brethren in misery and despair. With a clear knowledge of the difficulties here and even the sacrifices that may be involved, the Joint Distribution Committee is appealing to the Jews of America for support of its 1933 overseas program. In order not to incur field service expense and to save every dollar we can for remittance overseas, we shall have to depend on our Jewish community leaders to take the initiative wherever possible in making their communities participants in thus endeavor. Please let me have your suggestions and the re-assurance of your cooperation. Sincerely yours, Jonah B. Wise, Nat'l Chairman. THE GLOOM CHAftl A lot of us applaud because we're ulad the party's over. The hardest job of all is trying to look busy when you're not. Men really have the best of it. and the women know it. Even if you don't get anywhere it's a satisfaction to know you did your best. Everybody would be a paid reformer if raising money were just a little easier. done much original work in medicine. Dee Lee of Chicago is probably the most famous obstetrician now living. In the short time allotted it is absolutely impossible to cover all the ground and many names have been necessarily left out. Suffice it to say in conclusion, that the Jewish physician has certainly made many valuable contributions to the science of medicine, thereby improving it. the results of which have made this a finer and healthier world to live in. If Hendrik Van Loon sets out tc prove his statement that the human race can be packed in a box a mile square, will he put the best looking layer on top? An Oregon orchardist has grafted plums, apricots, pears and nectarines on a peach tree. A final step will be crossing the whole thing wHh rattan, to produce bon voyage baskets. A Seattle youth asks a divorce on the plea that he was married while in a trance. His progress will be closely watched by interested millions. Carrying a copy of the Lytton report in a breast pocket is a wise precaution for the Chiumenkuo defender who is apt to meet an irritated Japanese. It is announced there will be no further evening star until March 1. At that time it is hoped the treasury will again be in a position to revive this pleasing institution. Radio waves, says an engineer, continue on into infinity. Thus Jokes first broadcast back in '78 may be heard today on some distant stars — as they are here. "Sense of touch" is knowing just whom to strike for a loan. Many a man might cure his wife's insomnia by going home earlier. A man's egotism may be pardoned if it doesn't generate into vanity. A woman's idea of a personal devil is a neighboring woman who talks about her. Lunatics are the only persons who never do or say anything they are not ashamed of. No matter how good a bluffer a man may be. he has to give in when his money gives out. Why does the man who declares his willingness to die for a woman always back out at the last moment? Very few men who find themselves between his satanical majesty and the deep blue sea are ever drowned. Imitation may be doing the sincerest form of flattery, but most men acquire wealth by doing what they see others do not do. The statement that a "man is as old as he feels" has thrown my neighbor's mind into great confusion. This man's birth certificate says he is 50, and he felt approximately that age the other evening at the beginning of a party. But after the first drink he felt 40: after the second drink, 30; after the third drink, 16; and from then on, if his mamma had asked him to tell the pretty ladies his age, he would have said, "Just thwee." Then, next morning, he felt 108. Old Man Supply met Mme. Demand And straightway begged her languid hand. But she with gentle, artful grace Brought grim foreboding to his face. Said she, "I've got a little brat, His name—his name is Technocrat." Old Man Supply was filled with gloom For three he really had no room. But though his head was bowed with grief, He heaved a sigh of pure relief. "A plan I've got," he said with cheer "Well raise young Technocrat on beer." A tablet discovered in the ruins of ancient Nineveh records that a king had toothache 3,000 years ago. That famous handwriting on the wall we read about in scripture probably said. "This one will have to come out." The weight of marble statesmen in Statuary Hall in the capitol at Washington is said to have become too great for the floor supports and something mast be done about it. I suggest weakening the supports a little, and adding another statue at once. Two women who crashed their plane in Kenya wrote a message with lipstick to save their lives. But it was no great sacrifice, as they had plenty for their lips as well. The electric dollar wouldn't be any great novelty. Much of the money we hear people talk about is gas. An artistically inclined congressman thinks there are too many statues in Statuary Hall in the capitol. But why specify any particular room? TALE OF A ROV He owns a home. And that's why re can't receive anything from the relief committee until his mortgage is foreclosed, which it soon will be. Once he was the dean of Jewish cantors, now he is Just one of New York's many poverty-stricken old men. All he can do is sit and remember. Remember how seven years ago he was received by the President, and how Mr. Coolidge listened while he chanted a prayer he had composed in his honor, and how he thanked him for the set of I phylacteries with which he present! ed him. Remember how, when he ; and his wife, who still shares his i fortune, celebrated their golden wedding anniversary ten years ago so many people tried to crowd into the old Hippodrome that the police had to take charge of the mob. Well, there's nothing but memories when you're 77 and can't sing any more. But Cantor Seidel Rovner must think that New York's memory is pretty short. Which it often is. — Reprint Baltimore Jewish Times. Never again does a man feel as important and successful as the day he graduates from college. A man will forgive and forget almost any negligence around the house except letting the salt shaker get empty. ;/irFACT FINDER ORIGIN OF "DARK HORSE" Everyone knows what is meant by a "dark horse," but few know the origin of the expression. The phrase was first used by Thackeray in his "Adventures of Philip." Said Philip, referring to some talk about a candidate for parliament: "Well, bless my soul, he can't mean me. Who is the dark horse he has in his stable?" Li • i % 



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... February 10, 1933. THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page Seven OCIETY L^and Mrs. Lou Magnolia and Lou, jr.. of New York, have arI to spend the season at Miami L fh and are guests of the Bay Crt apartments. • • • special meeting of Emunah Xp ter o.E.S. will be held on lursday evening, February 16, at I Scottish Rite temple with Mrs. Iherine E. McKay, worthy grand of the Grand chapter of paying an official visit. A Ltion and program will be prejed. Following the meeting there j be an official banquet at the L Heidelberg restaurant for which trvations may be made with Mrs. Eve G. Rose or Mrs. Lena Simon. • • • Lie Floridian hotel, Miami Beach, D be the scene of the annual ben[bridge for the Hadassah Medical j on next Wednesday afternoon, [niary 15, beginning at 2 p. m. ose interested in furthering the : of the unit which has helped luate the distress of inhabitants (Palestine, and has done more to lent the friendship between Ar[ and Jews in the Holy Land than j other factor, are urged to patIze this bridge. Delicious rekhments will be served and prizes l be awarded for high scores. Mrs. }:on Weiner is chairman of the nmittee in charge of arrangers, and every effort is being I to give the patrons an afterfcn of real enjoyment. 1VOLI W. Flaglcr at 8th Phone 2-3352 I NIIAY & MONDAY. Feh. 12-13 | t'untinuMUM 2 to II a. m. lilliam %  'dwell and Kay Francis Jewel Robbery" \Attention, Visitors! The policy of this store, to meet all advertised prices, alphoueh well-known and wellMJI>IMII-(1 among local folks, l |00d news to Miami's visitors. Think of the hours of popping; time you can save by poming here where stocks are 'impleto and where you know prires arr guaranteed to be as or lower than anywhere |M-I.V Busir-.l | RED CRQSS DRUG DEPARTMENT STORE SIE FUrflcr! 1 R PUclw St. Phone 2-8196 ft*t Delivery In Urealer Miami An important meeting of Senior Hadassah will be held Monday, February 13, beginning at 2 p. m. at the Miami Acacia club in the Congress ouilding. All members are urged to attend. • • • Mrs. J. Adler, better known as B. Kovner, and L. Goldberg, who spent several weeks in Miami, left by auto last Monday for their homes in New York City. • • • Mr. Philip Liberman, well-known communal worker, at present presdent of the Jewish Welfare bureau, was elected by an overwhelming vote last Sunday night as president jf Beth Jacob congregation, Miami Beach, to succeed Harry I. Lipton, who declined re-election after serving a two-year term. Other officers rill be elected at a later date. • • • In splendid voice, Joseph Z. Shlis:y, world famous cantor, astounded ocal music critics last Sunday afernoon at the Temple theatre with his rendition of not only the familiar liturgical music and Jewish oik songs but in the able and disinctlve manner he sang a number f difficult operatic arias in the original Italian. One not knowing Shlisky and merely listening to his voice imagines that the possessor of so strong and robust a tenor voice must be a man of gigantic physique, tut the sight of so small and slender .1 man soon astounds the hearer. Receiving continuous applause, Shlisky graciously responded with .'veral encores. Particularly touching and feeling •vere Shlisky's renditions of "Av Horachamim" and 'Omar Rabbi El?zor." The Yiddish typical Chassidlc folk song, "A Brief Tzum Reboin" was one of the highlights of .he entertainment. Cantor Shlisky is resting at Miami for a short time before resuming his southern our, undertaken at the request of many who had heard him only on recorded numbers and were anxious .o hear him in person. Shlisky appeared in movies recently as one of lie stars of the Yiddish singing and alklng film. "The Voice of Israel," which will be presented at Miami Beach on February 26. a • • As we go to press Miss Ida Engler s being installed as Light of the East, Order of Beatitudes at the B-scayne Masonic temple. Theorganisation is sponsored by the Eastern Star and Masonic organizations. Eastern Star officers include the well known communal worker, Mrs. ena Simon, as prophetess of the Bast, and Mrs. Janette Friedman as By This Sign You are assured of the BEST Electrical Work S" 1 Stove, .nd Refriverators iHe Serrlce You Will Appreciate [George La Vigne Company, Inc. Electrical Contractor! anil Ensrineera '2 N. E. Third Avenue Phone 8-7838 APPEARING AT THE NEW 7TH AVE. THEATRE CENTRAL BUSINESS COLLEGE Connrcss Buildina111 N. K. 2nd Ave. Miami. Fla. :.„w,-t tuition n.t.-H In bUtory. Private, tutoring in Spantah, French MM ,.,1 Commercial •ubjecU. Expert in•''tins. OPEN All. TIIK TIME CENTRAL HOSPITAL 936 BiteariM Blvd. Phone 2-6712 NURSES ON CALL OPEN TO MEMBERS OF THE DADE COUNTY MEDICAL SOCIETY GERSON'S 1.101 Colllna Ave. MIAMI BEACH Phone 5-3989 A Place to Dine in Contentment ROBERT MONTGOMERY chief musician. • • • The regular board meeting of the Beth David Sisterhood was held recently with Rabbi Max Shapiro as guest speaker. Outstanding events planned for the sisterhood are as .'ollows: February 14. Valentine bridge with Mrs. M. J. Kopplowitz md Mrs. Harry Markowitz, hostsses; on February 23, the twentieth innual Purim bill and bazaar will be held at the Mahi temple; on March 5. there will be a Purim congregational dinner and on March 19 the annual musical birthday party will take place. The next regular meeting of the Beth David Sisterhood will be held on Wednesday. February 15. • • • Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Saltzman entertained with a dinner dance at the Hotel Floridian Supper club Saturday evening. Present were: Mayor and Mrs. A. Frank Katzentine. Mr. and Mrs. Philip Leiberman, Sol Meyer, Mr. and Mrs. James Jonas, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Meyer, Mrs. Maurice Miller, Miss Hazel David, Mrs. E. A. Mandel. Baron de Hirsch Meyer, Leonard Abess. • • Miss Sophie Usilowits of Charlotte, N. C. is the house guest of her cousins. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Oliphant. and Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Schwartz, of this city. • • "Blondie of the Follies." Marion Da vies' new starring picture with Robert Montgomery featured, comes Sunday and Monday to the New 7th Avenue theatre. In directing this comedy drama, Edmund Goulding, whose wizardry was exemplified in his direction of •Grand Hotel," saw new possibilities in enlarging the production as he went along, with the result that the supporting cast reflects the names of personalities not contemplated in the original scheme of things. •Blondie of the Follies" was a veritable snowball in the matter of cast names, gaining in size and importance as filming progressed. To begin with, there were, besides Marion Davics, Robert Montgomery. Billie Dove, James Glcason. Zasu Pitls. Sidney Toler, Douglass Dumbrille, Sarah Padden and Louise Carter. That alone is a cast of impressive proportions. But as the story pursued its merry way through the glitter of the Ziegfeld Follies, gay parties on Park Avenue and the contrasting humbleness of New York tenement life, Goulding began assembling more celebrities. Last minute additions brought into the cast the names of such stars of the entertainment world as Jimmy Durante, Clyde Cook, and the Rocky Twins from the Paris musical stage. The completed cast is the most illustrious array of bo-office names with which Marion Davies has been surrounded. • • • Celebrating the seventy fourth birthday of P. Lerner, a group of friends assembled for dinner and dancing last week at the Hotel Floridian Supper club. The table was decorated with flowers and candles. The party included Mrs. Charles Lerner, Mr. and Mrs. Ephraim Samuels, Isador Lerner, Dr. and Mrs. Bernard Berkowitz, Mrs. Samuel A. Lerner, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Lerner, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Ginsberg, Mr. and Ms. Michael Lerner, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Kaffenburgh, Miss Barbara Lerner, Miss Ruth Lerner, Alan Lerner, Robert Lerner, William Lerner, Mrs. Jennie Shiers. • • • Mrs. L. Lehrer, wife of Rabbi Lazarus Lehrer of Asheville, N. C, is visiting here and is the house guest of Mr. and Mrs. Ted Gulkis. • • • If you're looking for something delightfully different in the way of motion picture entertainment — see "Jewel Robbery" at the Tivoli theatre next Sunday and Monday. The story is laid in modern Vienna, and the audience is thrilled and amused with what happens when Europe's most accomplished thief finds himself face to face with Vienna's most fascinating noblewoman. Kay Francis is the Baroness Teri. whose boast it has always been that no man could thrill her as could a diamond. Collecting precious stones had been the ruling passion of her life — until the after"Radio Service" WM. SIEI.ER Parts and Accessories 430 NORTH MIAMI AVE. No Charge for Examination noon when she, her husband and her friends are the victims of the "Robber's" most daring coup in Vienna's most exclusive Jewelry shop. For the first time in her luxurious vain existence, the Baroness forgets her Jewels in her admiration for a man. And though the Robber's enterprise is successful, he finds himself madly in love with the beautiful Baroness. Having stolen the lady's Jewels and her heart along with them, the "Robber" coolly proceeds to steal the lady herself. From that moment, the duel of wits between the two becomes more and more intense. Powell lives the character with a zest that is absolutely irresistible. Those who have become accustomed to Kay Francis as the serious, earnest heroine of her recent pictures will be astonished and charmed by her interpretation of the flirtatious, irresponsible wife of Vienna's richest banker. Other members of the supporting cast are Helen Vinson, Hardie Albright, Henry Kolker, Andre Luguet, Lee Kohlmar and Spencer Charters. • • • In charge ot tickets for the annual Purim ball of Beth David are Mrs. M. J. Kopplowitz, Mrs. Isidor Cohen and Mrs. Jake Engler. beauty salon An Aid for Every Beauty Need Specializing* In Facial and Hair Tintin* 16 MCALLISTER ARCADE Phone 2-8721 Enjoy an Elaborate FLOOR SHOW at the MAHI SIIISI TEMPLE 1415 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD Saturday, February 18th, 8 p. m. as the guests of VIOLA BELASGO Studio of Dance 812-14 Ponce de I.eon Entrance. Coral Cable* NEW TERM COMMENCES FEBRUARY 20th [YlTfHRALL &T6MPANY f State Agent New York Fire Insurance Co. I and Metropolitan Assurance Underwriters 318-19 MEYER KISER BLDG. I Phone 2-5824 E. C. THRAI.L. President Miami, Fla. 4 1? Souk 3Gmi?ra f&ifitppt (One Block Eaut of New Pont Office I Everything in Rooks, Old and New 410 NORTHEAST SECOND AVENUE Now you can buy BILTMORE LAUNDRY SERVICE at a price that fit!, your pocketbookl PHONE 3-3687 21 N. W. 9TII ST. For fresh Sea Foods STOP AT GAPT. TOM'S FISH MART Flagler St. and Miami River Phone 2-5321 We Never float OUR PRICES ARE THE LOWEST Our Fish arc the freshest — Caught by our own boats daily If it is Sea Food, we have it at its very best, and at attractively low prices. Our method of handling and selling Sea Food is in observance with all the sanitary rules and regulations. %  % •



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wJewist Florid!ia m VoL 6. No. 6. THE JEW in MEDICINE /il DR. HARRY GOLDMAN {('onlinued from Last Week) In Bagdad during the life of Harem-Al Rachid, 786-809, laws were again promulgated which, prohibited je irom studying medicine and hence we find that most Jewish iana became Mohainnicdiai. converts. One of the earliest of medical works is that of Isaac ben Solomon Israeli, who lived from 832 to 932. This famous physician was occulist and court physician to the Caliph (Jbaid Allah al-Mahdi at Kairwan. His original Arabic work was*translab d into Latin by the Monk Constantine in 1087, who claimed it as n. In 1515 it was reprinted in Leyden and contained chapters on fevers, diatetics, urine drugs, dropsy I treatment and ailments. One of the greatest of Jewish phy. tlclans who ever lived was Maimonborn in Spain, he chose to leave because of the disfranchisement of the Jews and settled in 1166 m Fustat. Egypt, where he became court physician to the Sultan Saladin. Many of his works remain behind. There were, of course, many splendid and famous Jewish physicians In Spain and Portugal, the best of whom served as physicians to the various courts, all subject td persecution and many to escape banishment accepted Christianity. Ii Is Interesting to note that in 1335 the Synod of Salamana declared that Jewish physicians offered their services only to kill as many Christians as possible. In 1412 John II prohibited Jews from practicing in Spain, which immediately caused a general exodus to Prance. Algiers and Italy. In Portugal Solomon, ben Moses Solomon was physician to Kings Ferdinand and John I. Joseph and Rodriques, physicians to John II of Portugal, were members of the commission to examine Columbus' plans. In Italy the University of Salermo. famous for its medical school. "the Civitar, Hppocratica." had two J( wish teachers in 848 and 855 named Joseph and Joshua. The first medical encyclopedia was written by the Jewish teacher Copho. From Salermo came many Jewish practi. one of whom was court phylo Pope Boniface VIII. In Prance, from 1000 to 1337, several Jewish medical schools were founded at Montpelier. Narhonne and Paris, most importane of which was the first. In Germany there is no early record of Jews practicing medican but In 1267 the Council of Vienna forbade them practicing. Of interest is the fact that in 1475 a Jewess by the name of Zerlin was a practicing ocal Frankfort on the Main, as 'he earliest record of a JewIsh woman physician in Germany. One speculates why. with the conslant and never-ending persecution Mid banishment of Jewish physicians, why so many popes, rulers and many of the lesser lights retalned them as their personal court Physicians. On the whole, it may be said that the 300 years ending about 1800 saw few outstanding Jewish medical lights. They were usually general practitioners, often combining the offices of rabbi and physician, and the probable reason for their failure to have many worthwhile works was their constant fear of banishment or death. 'Continued on Page Three) FLORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY MIAMI. FLORIDA, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1933. Price Five Cents PHILIP I.1EBF.RMAN New President of Beach Synagof; YiddishComposer To Give Concert Solomon Small (Smulewltz), Yiddish poet, composer and singer, will present a program of dramatic, poetic and song numbers consisting of Jewish art, at the Talmud Torah auditorium. N. W. Third avenue and Second street. Sunday evening. February 12, at 8:30 p. m., and will be accompanied by Miss Mildred Oreenberg, Mr. Small is the author of a book ol poems and songs that have been reprinted nine times. He also composed 300 compositions for the piano, wrote four musical comedies in three acts each and 200 original poetical riddles in both English and Yiddish. Of Mr. Small's 500 Jewish national and folk songs, the most popular are "A Letter to the Mother" i A Brevele der Maman >, "The Prayer of Carmen" iDer Talesll), 'The Flower Wreaths" iDer Blumenkranzele). Jewish Players Presents Show Rehearsing nightly so as to make the finished production one comparable t<> New York Jewish shows, the members of the Miami Jewish Dramatic Players are bending every effort to make the performance next Sunday evening an outstanding success. The noted Jewish actor and playwright, Max Goebel has been assisting in the direction of the play and coaching the cast. Presenting the famous Yiddish melodrama. "Die Zushteete Chasong." under the auspices of Beth Jacob congregation of Miami Beach, at the beautiful auditorium of the Ida M. Fisher High school. Miami Beach, the players will portray a picture of life in the New York ghettoes, of some years ago. Replete with dramatic episodes though it is. a touch of humor and comedy is interspersed throughout the play to relieve the tension. Songs are heard during several of the scenes and carry the poignant tale never failing in any Yiddish play. Led by Joseph Greenberg, well-known merchant of Miami, formerly connected with the Jewish stage in New York, the cast includes Harry Oreenberg, its director. Mrs. F. Slaviter. Joe Mandelbaum, Mrs. L. Silverman. Miss E. Slaviter. Harry Rase. Miss J. Seligman and Louis Regal. Cantor Boris Schlachman and several other wellknown artists Will appear during the evening as additional attractions. Prices of admission have been kept to low prices in order that those who desire to attend may find it within their means to do so. •Announcements! • i CANTOR SHLISKY Beth David Elects Rabbi Cantor Shlisky Chants Services Because of the insistent demands of both tourists and residents of the Greater Miami district. Beth Jacob congregation of Miami Beach has arranged for the famous cantor. Joseph Z. Shlisky. to chant the late Friday evening services tonight, and the complete service tomorrow morning at the Beth Jacob synagogue. For those familiar with the ability of Cantor Shlisky, it is no secret that he has endeared himself to the Jewish people because of his remarkable interpretation in song of the outpourings of the heart of a people in its prayers. Sympathetic intonations of the solemn prayers, joyous exaltations of the praises, and the knowledge and ability to KeyWestShoched Dies In Atlanta Rev. Robert Rachmil of the KeyWest. Fla., synagogue, died in a hospital at Atlanta. Ga.. Tuesday, following a long illness. He was 60 years old and a native of Poland. Before going to Key West from Atlanta seven years ago he taught in a private Hebrew school here. Funeral services were conducted on Wednesday afternoon. Rabbi Harry Epstein officiating. Burial was in Greenwood cemetery. Besides the widow he leaves a son. Dr. A. S. Rachmil, of Philadelphia, and two daughters, Mrs. Jack Gordon and Mrs. E. C. Piexotto, both of Atlanta. At a well-attended meeting of Beth David congregation held last Thursday night Rabbi Max Shapiro, who has been serving Beth David temporarily as rabbi, was unanimously elected to serve as rabbi and religious leader of the congregation until September. 1934. Following the formal election. Mr. Stanley C. Myers, chairman of the administrative board of the congregation, presented Rabbi Shapiro to the congregation. In his speech of acceptance the rabbi expressed his thanks to the members for their confidence and urged their continued support in order to enable him to succeed in his chosen work. Following the rabbi's address a social hour followed. MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CONGREGATION t Orthodox) i:,i.-, s. W. Third street JONAH K. CAPI.AN. Rabbi Regular services begin at 5:30 with the late services at 8:30 when Hit rabbi will preach a sermon on "Trees." A social hour will follow the services. Saturday morning services will begin at 9 a. m. and the Mincha and Marriv services begin at 5 p. m. CONGREGATION BETH JACOB < Orthodox! .Ill Washington Ave., Miami lleaeh I.. AXEI.ROD, Rabbi Early Friday evening services begin at 5:30 with the late services at 3 p. m.. when the rabbi will preach a sermon on "Song of the Sea." The renowned Cantor Joseph Z. Shlisky will chant at the late services and will chant the entire Saturday morning services, which begin at 8:30 a. m. The rabbi will preach in Yiddish Saturday morning on the portion of the week. BETH DAVID CONGREGATION (Conservative) 1.19 N. W. Third Avenue MAX SHAPIRO, Rabbi Regular services begin at 5:30 with the late services at 8 p. m.. when the rabbi will preach a sermon on "Zionism — Is That the Solution?" A social hour will follow. Cantor Louis Hayman will chant the services and lead in the congregational singing, assisted by the choir. Maccabees honor Supreme Officer J. D. Coakley, Detroit, supreme commander of the Maccabees, was guest of honor at a dinner at the Ponce de Leon hotel last Monday night, given by the executive cornexpress the very essence of the agemittee of Miami, old traditional yearnings of his peoMr. Coakley told of plans for esBenefit Program At Park Tonight The first of a series of entertainments in Bayfront park sponsored by the municipal recreation division for the benefit of the unemployed fund will be presented at 8 p. m. tonight. Featuring the program will be artists from the Embassy club and the three musical divisions of the Miami Junior Chamber of Commerce boys' organizations, the drum and bugle corps, the harmonica band and the boys' band, all under the direction of Caesar LaMonaca. Added attractions will be specialty dancing acts and ensembles furnished by the Mae Rose Studio and Danny Sheehan Dancing Academy. Miss Ruth Mae Smith, known as "The Song Bird of Cleveland," will be the feature soloist with Adolph Seerth. who also will lead community singing and be master of ceremonies. TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI (Reform! 1.17 N. R. Nineteenth Street DR. JACOB H. KAPLAN, Rabbi Services will be held tonight beginning at 8:15. Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan has chosen as his subject "I've Lost My Religion." This subject will be of interest to all those who are beginning to realize that religion, politics and economics must all be adjusted to the needs of the present day. The public is welcome. pie have brought fame and success to this young cantor. Sunday evening Cantor Shlisky will give a recital during the gala evening of entertainment sponsored by the synagogue at the Ida M. Fisher High school auditorium at Miami Beach, in addition to the tablishing a year-round girls' camp in the state for young women of the organization in all states of the Union and in Canada. He was accompanied by Mrs. Coakley. The dinner was preceded by a musical program by the orchestra of the Junior Maccabees under the Yiddish play that will be presented direction of Sue Ernest Hewling. bv the Miami Jewish Dramatic Those attending the dinner lnplayers. Cantor Boris Schlachman eluded A. M. Coffin, state manager; of the congregation and a life-long C. A. Avant, chairman of the execufriend of Shlisky. will also be heard tive committee, and Mrs. Avant, and during the evening in a number of many prominent citizens of this secliturgical compositions. tion. DisabledVeterans To Sell Flowers Tuesday, February 14. will be observed as St. Valentine's day here with the Summerall Chapter No. 10 of the Disabled American Veterans of the World war selling forget-menots on the streets of the Greater Miami district all day. These funds are used exclusively to aid in the rehabilitation of these disabled veterans and to help their families. Educational Tax Urged For Goods NEW YORK. N. Y. — A resolution calling upon the manufacturers of candles, matzohs and all other products which might be considered of a religious nature to place a stamp tax on their goods the proceeds to go to Jewish education was adopted at a meeting of the Federation of Yeshiveth and Talmud Torahs of New York. A number of candle manufacturers, among them the Standard Oil Company, have already agreed to the plan, it was stated. The matzoh makers, it was admitted, have declined to levy such a tax. Several speakers urged that the federation go into the matzoh business, if the matzoh bakers refused to levy a stamp tax for educational purposes. On an estimated consumption of 8,000,000 pounds of matzoh in New York annually, $80.000 would be provided by a "torah tax" for Jewish education, it was said. t i many of whom are in dire need at this time.



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Page Eight THE JEWISH FL OR I PI AN Friday, February tn ^ Rebecca Franks, Famous Loyalist. Wit and Beauty B~i MILDRED Ln MOM In this year of the Washington bicentennial, the story oi Rebecca lc& a Philadelphia girl of Revolution is ol interest u II conditions under ol bU Country ol bis fr.emies. W] *•'•' arniy pc of Valley ol Philadelipied by the British wu series I and other In thi at pache Q laki r City bet Rebec.. T one of the outad a favorl • '; as a membe: wealthy family Her father. son of Jacob Franks [hteenth century :r. London to New York. The latter was a member of the ngregation. and participated actively in Jewish affairs. His son moved to Philadelphia, was also influential in business and social circles and married Margaret Evans, a Christian society woman. Their daughter. Rebecca, was born about VER Y LA TEST B\ PATRICIA DO* Tailored suits and the big vogue for mannish apparel brings the shirt waist or blouse back into the lime1758. and while some of her brothlight for spring. Many of the shirt ers and sisters were baptized, there waists are severe in line to click in is no record of her baptism, and all with the mannish mode. Other accounts speak of her as a Jewess. waists, however, retain their femiShe was carefully educated, havnine distinctiveness. such for Ulan excellent knowledge of the stance as the puffed sleeve as shown classics. Besides being a splendid on the lower figure in the sketch. St. Petersburg Notes THI XI W PILOT DRAGON AT rOl'R RADIO DE U KR I'riitfrom I18.S* lo lt.S( On Display at PAN-AMERICAN RADIO, INC. V K. .'nd A> I'honr ROSE MEEK tt HART HARDWARE CO. 25 Fre. Prire* for Be*! Ro** Hrinji Your* In 44-46 N. E. FirM street Southern Mattress Company <.uarantrt-d Work / %  >' I | if Exptfl Renn\atinc ind I ph"l-irnr; 2141 N. MIAMI AVENUE Telephone :-".-.'! IVpuUr Pri< i open All Sight SHORELAND GRILL 115 East Flagler Street B %  ... Bank %  special Meal* :<>c T.ble d'Hote DinnerB StMks. ( hop*. Sea Food*. >.ndi(he-. Waffle%  % % % % % % % % % % %  '•• •> •> •> •:• •:• -I-i•;• •:• •!• •> •> •;• •> •> •> -> •> •>•:-•:-••• + -:• •:• •:• •:• .-\>; Ideal TaU Crystal Springs I KuM ORANGE < ITV Pure, light. parkline. p.Liable, refre-hinc. Awarded >il>cr Med.l St, Loail K\po*ition .nd hirheM award for purity and excellence. 1 oui-iana Purchase F\po*ition. conversationalist, she was considered the wit of her day. At the outbreak of the Revolution. her father remained loyal to George III. which was not unusual :.members of the Colonial sodescended from English stock. TOils was especially natural in the case of David Franks, as he was the representative in America, and is described as 'agent to the contractors for victualing the troops of the King of Great Britain." During the British occupation of lelphla, General Howe called frequently at the home of David and listened with enjoy%  :o the amusing remarks of Rebecca which were often directed against the patriots. At this time a • poem was in circulation entitled. Times—A Poem by Camilio —Poet Laureate of the Con:--This sarcastic composition lampooned the revolutionists, and authorship was ascribed to Rebecca. The tnosl extravagant entertainment given by the British and one long remembered in Philadelphia feti called the Meschianza. from the Italian, meaning a mixture of medley. Ill-fated Major Andre was actfte in planning the ev-' % %  Rebecca was assigned Ing role T!-.e occasion result%  :• of the officers c: the B::-..-. ..:. %  •. to honor Genral Howe. As Howe's conduct of the war was tisfactory. and he had been orperseded by Clinton, the were denounced in ;;:: : rs .,ill-timed and The American pies* was Itter and contrasted the lev: their opp : ith the sufand hardships at Valley Forge. r. May 18. 1778. the Meschianza was celebrated with much magnificence. Special pavillad been erected and decorated. There was a water regatta, a i fin irk* and a ball d by an elaborate supper of 420 co\ •: en ed by negro sla\ • Oriental costumes, and at which ts to King George and the a. Family were proposed. tournament, there were faction -. : adies of Shirtwaist dresses made of woolens, colored suede Jackets often without collars, reversible shorter Congregation Bnai Israel will hold its late Friday night services beginning at 8 o'clock when Rabbi A. 8. Kleinfeld will have as the subject of his sermon. "The Science of Music." A discussion of the ancient and modem composers, especially the cantor and his place in the service of the synagogue, will follow. Saturday morning services begin at 9 o'clock. The Ladies' Auxiliary and Aid soheld an open meeting on Tuesevening, February 7. Rabbi Kleinfeld delivered an address on •Woman's Contribution to Community Life." The meeting was well attended by the local membership and a number of tourists who were guests of the auxiliary The card party given by Mrs. J. Miller and Mrs. H. Jacobs for the Ladies' Auxiliary and Aid society, held at the Horowitz hotel, was a grand success. A regular meeting of the Judaiccouncil was held at the home of Mrs. Pauline Esrick. on Monday evening, February 6. A large affair is being planned, details of which will be announced next week. the set of a hoop, stay, or j, The next year, she married Sir Henry Johnson in New \ and after the surrender at town, went to England to live, ] years later when she was an lady. General Winfield Scott her at Bath. She greeted him in a kindly J "Is this the young rebel? r vA gloried in my countrymen. Would, God I. too. had been a I Turning to her husband, she tinued. "I do not. I have never j gretted my marriage. No was ever blessed with a kinder better husband; but I ought to h> been a patriot before marriageShe died March, 1823. i n her days, did she not sometimes that she had also remained km the faith of her fathers? swagger coats and skirts, and fancy knitted suits are recommended in sportswear. Blouses showed the influence ol the tailored suit, with %  lub collars, bows at the neck line, and Ampler sleeves. Boucle, chenille, and polka dot zephyr sweaters were recommended for ; :ing The simplest type oi mannish aist made to accompany the tailored suit is developed in white •: %  Ith pearl buttons, it is also available in the market in shirting silks and cottons There are also many shirtwaist dresses for country ..: which add the skirl to a blouse of this type. gether with the lady of the Blended Rose was crowned Queen of Beauty. In many instances, there was evidently no rift in the friendship of the supporters o! opposing sides of the war. Many Whig ladies were present at the Meschianza, who were anxious to take part in the gaiety, and were not deterred bv feelings of patriotism. Rebecca corthe Blended Rose, and the Ladies of responded with many eminent per* he Burning Mountain each with son* of th e time, both Whig and %  tin le of beautifully attired laand pages. Rebecca headed the latter division, and toPHONE 2-3645 f 92 N. E. 28th Street % %  : %  •: %  %  : %  %  : % %  : %  %  : %  %  : %  %  : %  -:• %  : %  %  : %  %  :..;..:..;..-_. .;. .;. .•..;. .;. GOOSE I LI I KEN SHOES WALK A THON CINDERELLA BALLROOM S1.000 CASH PRIZES :i HOURS DAILY PAST THE 9GCTH HOI R — GOING ON NOW — R. S. EVANS '""" ; Bt Jim AUTOMOBILES LIBERAL TRADE-INS LOWEST RATES IN MIAMI TERMS ANYWHERE IN THE UNITED STATES If you want a good used > T n AGLEB t-un l-2 -V B. JM> AVE. — SMITTY'S DAY A NIGHT GARAGE N W. ",th >t. and 3rd Aw. Wrecker Service Dependable Repairs All Makes | Pfcom 1-U41 — Niht I'hon. 2-1 -^i Tory. In a letter to Mrs. Paca. wife of one of the delegates to congress, she described the social activities of Philadelphia, and asked her friend to persuade her husband to allow her to attend some of the British fi tivities, A diverting incident and one that widely discussed was the challenge to a duel sent to Rebecca by eccentric General Charles Lee of the American army. She had made fun I of his breeches, saying that 'hey were patched. In rather caustic landing to her Jewish ailhe wrote saying that his cosi tume consisted of 'sherry vallies" or riding breeches"; they were not ; patched, but trimmed with leather. I insist on the privilege of the ini jured party, which L* to name his j hour and weapons: and as I I it to be a very serious affair, will •:• • &f &f •:• •:• •:• •:• •;. *.;..;..;..;..;..;.,;. : ....... f • V lniM on vour Crocrr *iv not admit of any seconds." he continued. Mrs. Flanks must have protested against his discourteous words, for he explained that whatever he said was intended as a joke to bring B smile in sad times; that he considered that she had too great understanding to be offended by it. The challenge was merely intended as an innocent "jeu d'esprit." Her wit. however, spared neither friend nor foe, Alter the evacuation of Philadelphia. Lieut.-Col. Jack Stewaul of Maryland called to see her dressed in a suit of scarlet. "I have adoptde your colors, my Princess," he said, "the better to secure a courteous reception; deign to smile on a true knight." She did not reply, but said to those around her. "How the ass glories in the lion's skin!" In 1781. Rebecca visited the Van Horns in New York, and in a letter to her sister. Mrs. Andrew Hamilton, she comments on New York society as follows: "By the way. few New York ladies know how to entertain company in their own houses, unless they introduce the card table. Except the family, who are remarkable for their good sense and ease. I don't know a woman or girl that can chat above half an hour, and that on the form of a cap. the color of a ribbon, or inn you NEW YORK BREAD A CAKE COMPANY BREAD AND CAKES 4T1 S. W. ih SI. Phone 2-785J Brmnrh Store: ||| N. w. .Ith St. r •:• •:• •:• •:• %  > %  : %  •:• :• *.;. •>.;.;.-. Burdine's MIAMI and MIAMI BEACH "Sunshine Fashions 99 Swim Suits sS5-^ to $9.95 •.. New Weaves • • • New Styles • %  New Colors Exclusive with Burdine's Radio Synagog Rabbi S. M. Machtei. founder 1 director of the Radio Synagog. preach over WIOD at 10 oc :c<_ Sunday morning on "A Challenge! The sermonette on "Brain Fa will be delivered by Leonard Tot In addition to these there mi; 1 prayers, music and scripture rea I ing. Beth Jacob Cong. | presents the u orld ftmou Cantor Joseph Z. Shlisky At Late Services Friday, Feb. 10th 8 p. m. And at Services Saturday, Feb. 11th 8:30 a.m. AT ITS SYNAGOG 311 Washington An. Miami llcarh Sunday, Feb. 12th 8:30 p.m. at the Ida M. Fisher High School 14th St. and Drtid A>. MIAMI BEAI H The Miami .lewis* Dramatic Players \ in "Die Zushterte Chasono*' A melodrama in f'"" r af ^ replete with heart thro^ drama, joy and laughter, ana Cantor Shlisky In a program of Yiddish Folk BtJBfa, Operatic Arias a" Liturgical NumberPOPULAR PR' C£S


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Page Six THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Friday, February^ I [ Sa&tn ^yitagng fiitllrtin Edited by RABBI S. M. MACHTEI Founder and Director, Radio Synagos <>f America SUNDAY MORNINGS \\ lOD. MIAMI, FLORIDA { Vol. L MIAMI. FLORIDA. FEBRUARY 12. 1933. No. 8. •:• •:• &f •:• •:• # •> •:• •:• •:• #+# •:• •;• <• + •:• •:.•:•-:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •: %  •:• -:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• Woman's Contribution to Life Sermon Delivered Sunday. February 3. 1933 Scripture Reading, Prot'tfbs, Chapter XXXI, VffSCS 10-31, incL Recipes for the Jewish Family ,^\5 a man I have inherited a natural pride for my own sex. "Men have made this world what it is." From its present condition I hardly consider it anything to brag about. Possibly, if some men had listened to women, certain of our present difficulties might have been avoided. I repeat, that, as a man. my own allegiance is to manhood. As an unbiased and openminded thinker and student I must acknowledge the share that Woman has had in the progress of the human race. Man's lot would have been much harsher were it not for the softening influence of woman. M EN who have attained greatness have, in a very large measure, been guided into the right channels by mothers and wives. The very fact that we have advanced from the barbaric stage is evidence of the influence of woman upon man. Because the mothers of the Stone Age refused to be satisfied with caves for their children; because the mothers prodded the fathers on to building better homes as protection for their children from the elements and from wild beasts, we have, today, homes that are safe and comfortable. Men who have introduced legislative measures to improve living and working conditions have been inspired to do 1 so by women. The indefatigable workers in the cause of alleviating human suffering have been women. The home, society's foundation, is the result of womanly efforts. W E men. take the credit for all of progress. Shall I attribute that to the historians — who have been men? It is not so under the rules laid down by our Hebrew sages. Woman was held in high esteem. The rabbis said "hakol min ho'ishoh" — all things are due ta the woman — she is the cause of everything. Accordingly, they advised man to be considerate of woman. Someone has written. "Jewish custom bids the Jewish mother, after her preparations foi the Sabbath have been completed on Friday evening, kindle the Sabbath lamp." That is symbolic of the Jewish woman's influence on her own home, and through it upon larger circles. She is the inspirer of a pure, chaste, family life whose hallowing influences are incalculable; she is the center of all spiritual endeavors, the confidante and fosterer of every undertaking. To her the Talmudic sentence applies: "It is woman alone through whom God's blessings are vouchsafed to a house." I recall an incident in a Jewish home several years ago. A member of my congregation related this to me: His five-year-old son had returned from his first day at Sunday school. The father, anxious to know whether the experience had had any effect upon his son. questioned him about the things he had learned that day. The little fellow, without any hesitancy, repeated the lesson for the day. He told his father that he had been taught about God's creating the world in six days and of the things that had been created each day. "On the sixth day." said the five-yearold, "late in the afternoon. God made Man." "How did He make Man?" asked the father. "Why. God took some dirt, made a mud-man. breathed into it and it became alive." said the youngster. "That's fine." encouraged the father. "And what else did God make?" "A woman." replied the child. "Yes." said the parent, "and did He make the woman from the dirt, too?" The child hesitated a moment, then said. "No! God put the man to sleep, took out his brains and made a woman." r E child, unconsciously and in his simplicity, had expressed a great truth. One of the greatest of Bible commentators, the Malbim. expresses a similar thought, as does the Midrash. Because' of the use of special Hebrew words in the record of God's creation of Eve, in Genesis, the rabbis contend that the greater practical sense has been given to the female of the species. T HERE are women whose very acts brand these statements as untrue. Yes. and there are men whose very lives are examples of the iu'.'.^zy of the supremacy of Man, But. with these we do not concern ourselves. Men and women who have forfeited every right to the designation "human beings" are not the types which concern us. The exception attracts our attention because it is different from the general rule. It serves to strengthen our desire to be classified with the normal — not with the abnormal. I N our scripture reading for today. Solomon speaks of the valorous and virtuous woman —"She openeth her mouth with wisdom; and in her tongue is the law of kindness." That is the underlying theme in the contribution that Woman has made to life — kindness. While there have been women who h. ve inspired men to war. they have been outnumbered by the women who nave injected kindness into life. The Divine Spirit is spoken of in the feminine gender —the "Schechinah." Even the Lord is referred to in the Hebrew pronouns, several times, in scripture, in the feminine gender. No student considers God either masculine or feminine. But. in considering the Divine attributes, femininity is ascribed to* the Deity. You won't find that In your English translation of the Bible because in translating it is impossible to carry over the gender of a noun or pronoun into a language where such grammatical forms do not exist. The fact remains, however, that the feminine touch, the womanly influence, in life. Is as certain as the very principle and source of life — God. Waldorf Salad Mix an equal quantity of sliced celery and apples, add one-fourth pound of pecans or English walnuts, chopped fine. Put over a tablespoon of lemon juice and sufficient Gel'and's mayonnaise dressing to thoroughly cover. To be absolutely correct, this salad should be served without lettuce; it can. however, be dialled on lettuce leaves. Fish Salad for Twenty People Boil four pounds halibut, cool and shred fish. Marinate the fish. When ready to serve ad six hard-boiled eggs chopped, and one pint bottle of pickles of chow-chow. The pickle may be omitted and celery cut fine be added. When these are well mixed serve on lettuce leaves with Gelfand's mayonnaise dressing, of i which one pint will be required. Grapefruit Salad Cut the grapefruit in halves and j remove the pulp, being careful to ^et none of the tough white skin. Mix with bananas and oranges and stir in mayonnaise dressing. Remove all skin from inside of the grapefruit and fill with the mixture, heaping it high and ornamenting with maraschino cherries. Lay each half in a bed of lettuce leaves and serve. Brain Salad Scald brains with boiling hot water to cleanse thoroughly. Boil until tender, in fresh cold salt water, being careful to remove from the water while it is yet firm. Slice lengthwise and lay in dish. Pour over one-half cup of vinegar which has been sweetened with a pinch of sugar to remove sharps taste, pinch of salt and pepper. Garnish with parsley and serve cold. Can also be served with mayonnaise. Sweetbread Salad Take cucumbers and cut lengthwise to serve the salad In; scrape out the inside and salt well. Then squeeze and use this to mix with the filling. Take a pair of sweetbreads, or calf's brains, wash well and boil; when done throw in cold water at once and skim them; chop : fine, add bunch of celery, one can of French peas, scraped part of cucumber. Mix all together and season. Mix mayonnaise with It and I fill cucumber shells; keep all cold, i and serve on lettuce leaf. Honey Sandwich Fillings Honey in sandwich fillings brings extra goodness to the lunch. Blend with cream cheese, chopped nuts, raisins and celery, chopped carrots, peanut butter, dates chopped (with or without nuts) and many other combinations. You'll find them all different and delicious, easy to make —yet most appetizing. In sandwiches—plain, rolled, ribbon or tier —honey assures additional flavor, keeps the sandwich moist, and holds crumbly bread together. A good combination in new form: honey bread roll — thoroughly blend one cup finely cut salted pecans with one-hall cup slightly warmed honey to form spreading paste. Cut bread in slices full length of loaf (ordinary loaf cuts five lengthwise slices'. Spread with butter, then with honey pecan paste, and roll as for jelly roll. Wrap each in waxed paper and tie to keep intact. Let stand an hour or longer: remove paper and cut each -oll in three slices — each loaf used makes 15. Honey Cakes No. 1 One pound of honey, one cup of granulated sugar, four eggs, one tablespoon of allspice, three tablespoons of salad oil, four cups of flour, well sifted, three teaspoons of baking powder. Warm up or heat h'/ney. not hot, just warm. Rub yolks well with sugar, beat whites to a froth, then mix ingredients, add flour and bake in moderate oven for ine hour. OMaal Repair Shop in Miami AMERICAN SHOE SHOP Miami's Bat for SAoc Repairing 15 S. MIAMI AVENUE C. B. BARRETT. Prop. SPOTLESS DRY CLEANERS MRS. J. H. HICKMAN. Prop. A BEAUTY SHOPPF. FOR YOUR CLOTHES Laundry Agency Alterations %  Repairs 1274 WEST FLAGI.ER STREET -:PHONE 2-5013 WE CALL FOR AND DELIVER Seventeen Years of Satisfactory Sen ice P & A GARAGE | < omplftf Automobile Kebuildem and Refininhern All Modern Equipm't 3 N EEIGHTH STREET "We Call For and Deliver Your Car TELEPHONE 2-4616 Wrecker Service Wheel Alignment "'ake Specialiita PRONE 2-7222 Miami Ilearh (Iffire: 23S 2,1rd Si. 112 N. E. 2 Ave. T.ATiisrnpv ^120 N. W. FIRST AVENUE MIAMI FLORIDA HAVANA 4 Days $42.50 — ALL EXPENSE — < uban Tax S3.00 Extensive Sight Seeing Outside Room with Bath and Meals < ON>iOI.Il>ATi:i) TOL'RS, INC. 305 N. E. Fint Si. At THORIZKI) AM) HONI'KM AGENCY Phone 2-.903 LEAMINGTON HOTEL BUILDING OPEN DAILY %ND SUNDAY SEE THE PRIMITIVE EVERGLADES AT MUSA ISLE Seminole Indian Village OPEN DAILY AM) SUNDAY •-ARGEST COLLECTION 7 bT'cATOVE'MoATOI& rtmKmmwm ANI > CROCODILES *'-'' ,OATORS TO GET THERE I Take \"t !" tn 1*""'* "" *"''" Ba.m-2 p. m. daily ...„ on .p,edo,".r"Spe^' 7. P '"L., 6 ,£ h Y fh Miami Beach m "•'•• %  Dock. Honey Cakes No. 2 Three eggs, not separated with one cap of sugar, one CUo honey, and cup of blanched monds chopped finely, one ^ each of allspice, cloves and ci" mon, one cup of chocolate and a enough to make a thick batter teaspoon of baking soda s very thin on a square, buttered L bake in a hot oven, and when do spread with a white icing, cut squares and put a half blanched"] mond In the center of each squartl Banana Dainty Cut the bananas in half crossm, and arrange them on a plate, tm ating from the center. Sprinkle J grated nuts or nutmeg and ha white mayonnaise in the cento Garnish with maraschino chen Nut Salad You make a plain grapefruit a ad. When you have it ready serve, cover the top thickly n j finely chopped almonds or ,. mixed. Pour over mayonnaise drsi lng. Delaney & Beers Kodak Finlahing and Enlir.in, Commercial Work and Home Porlniti I 50% Off on AH Amateur Work 212 N. E. 4th St. Phone MM Can you pass an Examination: Are you fully covered? Permit a Hulf Life Representative to call and help you select a prorram of Life Insurance TODAY Gulf Life Co. Insurance •111 Seybold Buildinf Phone 2-4911 In the Heart of Your Neighborhood PIGGLY WIGGLY A Miami Institution Corns, NailB. CallOUMs, ItC, removed painlessly under antiseptic condition. Arch trouble* corrected. DOCTOR I". N. L.AUBENTIIAL Chiropodist 7-9 Halcyon Arcade AT Bt'KOINE'S BALC0OT On and After Feb. 13 PHONE 3-3089 lecfricify IS YOUR CHEAPEST SERVANT. Use it! ripfe



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February 10, 1933. THE J EWISH FLORIDIAN Page Five SOCIETY noted Yiddish writer and Liber of the staff of the Jewish CrnMg J urnal> M Klorman ar I ,. ne re this week to spend a |ort time visiting in Miami. • • • IMI-5. Cooperman. accompanied by '. son Jack and daughter Emma H yolk City, are visiting their .•, Mr. and Mrs. I. L. Mintzer liaonl Beach. They will be enLined at dinner tonight at the Ltzer home, where a large numf 0 ( guests have been invited to L) them. • • • l T iif local Bnai Brith lodge will Vd an initiation of members and open meeting next Thursday eveL. February 16, beginning at 8 Jm. in ""' community center of (,. Hebrew Athletic club. The pub,,, invited to attend. • • • i annual donor's luncheon the Senior Hadassah chapters fcich Is observed throughout the .•[if country will be observed in I. Oreater Miami district on MonPebruary 27, at a place to be [wuinced in our next issue. All ji K who desire to attend and have [ yet raised their quota are urged J communicate as soon as possible I-!: Mrs. Barney Weinkle, chairfen, or Mesdames Freda Lutzky 1 Lee Woiner. &M OpedaJidt EVE, BAR, NOSE A THROAT HI N. K. Ill Ave. Phone 2-0393 PAN-AMERICAN ICOLLEGE of COMMERCE INCORPORATED 210 But Flagler Street tlnd Hoar i.ii Hldc-l \(>nl) the Best h Good Enough" > i ila—iei— — // It's Insurance Ask Vanderpoolt c maintain an enirineerinn department fur eherkinn fire ratex. IIMB, etc. FIRE, AUTO, CASUALTY. 1-11 K. BONDS, Etc. VANDERPOOL & COMPANY INCORPORATED VANDERPOOL BFII.DING K. I*t Av. Phone 2-7681 JJ>JMn YOU BACK WITH 1W %  j^WUTOTME COUUTBIK, TUAT KM JHfi WORLD VJI1H FOBVVOO ^lUSABOOTIT PKOKSSOR The annual spring festival of the Beth Jacob Sisterhood of Miami Beach will be held at the Floridian hotel on March 26, and will include a complete program of entertainment with an elaborate floor show. • • • Jack Negley, popular master of ceremonies who is responsible for much of the fun that the large crowds at the Cinderella ballroom get each night, is still going strong and making the contestants at the Walkathon do their share towards the public entertainment. Nearing the 1000th hour, the grind is on stronger than ever and it is taking real "nerve" and will power to force the physical self on and on in an effort to win the attractive prizes, so near and yet so far. What the next hour may bring, none, not even the contestants, can foretell. The contestants themselves, and recruits from most of the local night clubs are providing novel shows nightly, i An evening of real amusement is in store for the visitor to the Walkathon at the Cinderella. • A class in Biblical interpretations j and revealed studies in scripture will be conducted by Rabbi S. M. Mach. lei at the home of Major Kaufman Mandel. 3012 S. W. Eighth street, at 11 o'clock Sunday morning. At the first meeting of this class, last Sunday, an introduction to Genesis was Jiveil by the rabbi. Major Mandel extended an invitation to all present to return with others interested in a study of scripture in a form of revelation. These classes are conducted in a spirit of fellowship without dogmatic emphasis. Rabbi Machtei expressed the purpose of these meetings and discussions m the words, "We aim to stress the things we have in common and to minimize our differences." Adherents of all faiths are invited to attend. • • • More than 150 women attended the card party Friday afternoon in the Blackstone hotel gardens, for Biscayne Electric Supply Co. Kl.rtri.nl Appliance* of every description. Phnne and we will dit Ihe reI at very reaonnahle price*. 41 W. FLAGLER STREET Phone 2-3024 .._.+ The Best in Travel Our Rates Will Please You See I* Before Booking Anywhere Have you a trip to Cuba in mind? Our Hotel in Havana, the Hotel Packard, MTVe* strictly Kosher Meats. trices and Sen ice Right DAVIS TOURS, rNCORPORATED .1111 But Hauler Slreel Phone .1-1722 Sun-Back Gingham Here is a summer sun style, as worn by Helen Krakeur of New York in a pre-season view at Palm Beach. It is a blue gingham sun back beach dress with knitted white hat. the benefit of the Jewish Welfare auxiliary, under the leadership of Mrs. Isidore Cohen, assisted by Mrs. Harry Oilphant, Mrs. Bertha Levy. Mrs. Harry Isaacs, and Mrs. Herbert Kleinman. During the social hour prizes were awarded to Mrs. Ludwig. II visitor of Boston: Mrs. Laikin. and Mrs. Charles Tobin of Miami Beach. • • • Plans are being completed for an installation luncheon and meeting of the Ladies' auxiliary of the Jewish Welfare bureau, to be held Monday. February 20, in charge of a committee headed by Mrs. Cecil Tannenbaum. 0 0 0 Mr. and Mrs. Ben Shulman. who have been winter visitors in Miami several weeks, left by automobile for New York recently. • • Dr. J. H. Kaplan of the extension department of the University of Miami, was the principal speaker at the meeting of the Town and Gown of the university last Thursday, in the girls" social hall. The conservatory presented a number of musical groups. • • • Mr. and Mrs. Abe Davis of Tannersville. N. Y.. are spending their honeymoon in Miami and are at the Pioneer hotel. • • Mrs. Adele Vince Rose entertained members of the Fortnightly BookReview club last Tuesday at her home. Mrs. Rosa R. Levin reviewed "Prologue to Love," by Martha Ostenso. A social hour followed and Mrs. Zachary Taylor Beal, an aunt of Mrs. Rose, from New York, was introduced. Mrs. Beal is the house guest of her sister. Mrs. R. Vince Rose, and will remain about three months. • • Mr. and Mrs. P. Applebaum. 1721 S. W. Eleventh terrace, announce the engagement of their daughter, Thelma, to Meyer Silberstein, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Silberstein, 547 S. W. First street. The wedding will take place February 19. Miss Applebaum is a popular member of the younger set and is a graduate of Miami High school. Mr. Silberstein attended the Bethlehem, Pa., High school and is owner of the Biscayne Tire & Service Company. • • • Mrs. Barney Balaban of Chicago is a recent arrival at the Wofford hotel, Miami Beach. Her husband is a member of the firm, Balaban & Katz, theatre operators, in Chicago. • • • The first annual dance sponsored by the Sisterhood of Temple Israel will be given Saturday night at the Miami Beach Golf & Country club. Entertainment will be presented by Al Parker from the Silver Slipper, Chester Alexander from Club Bagdad. Dilworth Sisters dance team, Lew Hampton. Danny Sheehan, Betty Ann Ganger and Francis Kame. Mrs. Herbert S. Sepler is general chairman. • • • The Books in Brief club met Monday with Mrs. David Solomon. Mrs. A. Reisman. president, appointed Mrs. Charles Feldman parliamentarian and Mrs. Harry Oliphant chairman of publicity. Mrs. Seldman reviewed "Croilus and Cressida." The next meeting will be at the home of Mrs. S. Tannenbaum. • • • The basketball team of the Hebrew Athletic club will play the Miami Senior High school at the high gym next Monday night. &f +*****+******•>**** &f &f *+ While In florid a V^anror Joseph Zj. oluisky accept a limited numb* Engagements •:• .•. will aceept a limited number of £ % Engagements '£ at very reasonable prices. Write ^ 4 or wire Bolstein, care of Jew•> t ish Floridian, P.O. Box 2973, + i .;. Miami, Florida. &f&f&f &f &f&f &f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f &f&f&f&f&f&f&f IF TOll REALLY WANT FRKSH BKEF and VEAL STOP AND SHOP AT Farmer's Meat Market 71 Northweat Fifth Slreel (One-half 111.,, I, Weil of Miami Avenue! Veal Shoulder. 2 lbs 25c Legs of Veal, lb 15c Veal Chops, lb 15c Beef Steaks and Boneless Beef, lb 15c Scalded Calves' Heads and Calves' Feet Formerly Five Yean at Farmer* Cily Curh Market All Meats fresh Killed %  %  %  IIOMf. SliRVICf. LAUNDRY MRS, (I, AHA I). KERSEY, Prop, 122.1 S. W. Hth SI. Mending and buttons sewed on free of charge. Called for and delivered. Eagle Service Sta. N. K. 6th SI. and 2nd Ave. Phone 2-.17N6 Specializing in Brake and Axle Work and Motor Overhauling Fine.I equipped shop in city. Low. et price* in „ur ten year* of hu-.incHs here. w. K. LIVINGSTONE, Prop. 1 + .— %  WINE GRAPES \ %  California Wine (irapen Kine for Juire — Ready Now I %  I'M..-Cheaper lhan Last Year I m KLEFEKEB PRODUCE, INC. 1 IN. Miami Ave. at 7th St. Phone 2-023.1 J Mrs. Walker, R.N. MASSEUSE > .r .whi.it.' Nur*e Reference I860 N. W. 44TH STREET Phone 2-8017 • %  YOU NEED A DENTIST: You Need a GOOD DENTIST! I want the opportunity to prove my professional ability at prices to please you. DR. HARRY E. FRY DENTIST 36 East Flagler Street Phone 2-7215 Always Fresh LA TOURAINE COFFEE AND FIFTH AVENUE COFFEE Roasted, packed and delivered daily from our Miami plant to insure "That Delicious Fresh Flavor" W. S. QUINBY CO., INC. MIAMI JACKSONVILLE Hit MJC IMDUM8Y *4Ol0 AS AAAM HiMSeLF. TUfriL>St Ml:* IO AAAlrt VM OF FUQ W£OE TMt UWl MEW OF finWffBMC TIMgS WHO StOjKf 0 THt ?UTS OfAWIAAALS FOB PftOreaioN AOAIHST COLD. ^ WEGCTSOMEOFTU£MocrcUO!Cr-8.pc< 'rriUN fULFUKS lUTHETRADEFBOMrUEOU'V. ->nS0 tePA^^.^Af^cMo^-I^c^rf Tilt FOBS CHIEFLY 1U DEMAND ABE BEAVEP, |U BOKHARA I1M CEUriAl ASlA-i.\feli AMD WR T,?r^J H r'he;V. E .i S ^o P ^ t 0 ^ C < U A^A t i/ EttMIUE.SEAL.FOX.SABLE, MlUK.SKU Hk.LIWX, EBMlUE FBOMSIfttPlA IEOPARD MO UC> gra^r^^ SK.MSFBOMAr.;,r_UVeM 1 • (



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*£ Four THE JEWISH FLOR I Dl AN Friday, February 1Q, IQJJ •:• <• •:• <• •:• %  : %  %  : %  •:• •:• %  : %  • % %  •: %  %  : %  •: %  •: %  %  : %  •: %  .;. •;. •;. .; %  .;. %  ;..;. "SWEET WATERS of MEGIDDO" By RABBI LAZARUS AXELROD v v v v • %  • •:• •;• •;• •;• •:•:• •;• •:• v -.• •vw •;•••* "2' Feverish, with our minds in a whirl, we left the giddy scene of the Are. the frenzied Chassidim and their distracted, impassioned dances, and began a wild hunt for a night's rest. Exorbitant prices were asked for the privilege of sleeping on a hard, uncomfortable mattress in a corner of the Hachnosath Orehitn. We finally settled for 50 piastres apiece, and tossed about wildly in small camp cots, seeking the soothing arms of Morpheus. We were surrounded by several hundreds of thoroughly exhausted individuals who snored balef ully throughout the night. There were several thousands of gluttonous mosquitoes, fully matured and eager for a solid meal, setting up a symphony orchestra which buzzed and droned dismally, competing I with the snoring multitude. And. through the open windows, came the mellifluous chanting of the Sephardic women, the hoarse cries of .he Chassidic dancers and the weird melancholy call of the fried liver vendor—"Raved, kaved After two or three hours of restless sleep, during which time we were awakened frequently by the vicious sting of the mosquitoes. I was conscious of someone standing over me prodding me lightly through the blanket. I opened my eyes and beheld the Shanuiias of the Hach:. Oichim. who advised me to '.,tkt> an early morning dip In the waters of Megiddo. lying several hundred feet below Miron. I dressed '. and made my way down >pe through tricky stony sldi often clinging desperate the soft turf to avoid dropping 10 feet or so through space. There is no other access to Megiddo. A narrow, winding path, allowing one U descend al a time with natural footholds all the way. The • sound of the water ail See And Hear Rovner Rosenblatt Shiisky Hershman Roitman Waldman Katchko Shapiro The most Famous Cantors in Jewish History in THE VOICE OF ISRAEL A powerful singing and talkin picture of the Jewish people B AT THE Biscayne Plaza 1 heatre Miami Beach Sunday Feb 26th. AT THE TIYOLI THEATRE NEXT WEEK WILLIAM POWELL h miles ot pebbles. m j ears There was a mysI here about the place. Down here, alone, with the clear tn am pursuing its way merrll] %  • rocks and ravines. .•;,' of beautiful Miron with vaults wherein the of Hillel. Shammai and other kept watch over Megiddo. I fell strangi ly elevated. The %  rined laden with the spirit of poets and king • rs and prophets. I undressed In a secluded spot, and reverently entered the Inrtg rating and cool waters ol this rivulet. What a delicious clean as rystal I drank tasteless ilorless and odorless liquid, which is God's :o man. Truly Mayim %  • :%  : :.: %  1 d ed and sat down i the bank of lines Imist 3-. •:.• rivers ol Babylon we even wept : could plctun bar] and %  i las I •he bran pi ading fol%  : the pomegranate formed a tting tor an artist's idyll. Pigs, peaches and olives grew here in abundance. Ah! Sweet wati Megiddo. with your tiny ripples playing divine music on the smoothened pebbles of mother earth, i nt< inseen clefts and rift.'-, you are eternal: fresh and young, v the victory of life over death. You are serene, tranquil, sharil the regnant mood of satisfaction that even now spreads over the whole landscape on the wings of this misty blue haze that wraps itself about yonder hills, softly, tendi rly Divine revelation. It is reflected in the foaming whitecaps of the sea. in the soft raindrops falling gently from heaven; in the winds veering about on their endless circuit, in the prettiness of flower-studded meadows and in the tremulous spring breezes that blow a new soul into the nostrils of the world. Divine revelation. It is expressed by master minds and heavenly illspired super men. They pour out their souls on canvas, others express this harmony with the divine through violin strings, piano keys. through poetry and song. Wistfully I leave the scene of meditation and ascend the slope which leads to Miron and the small unassuming Shtibel. The elders of the community are preparing for prayer. The chanting ol the early morning blessings pierce the stillness of the morn111and mingles with the reciting ot the Kaddish which emanates from the Sephardic Minyan across the way. "Yisgadal Veyiskadash—" Six hours later, and the world had assumed a cold, hard and unsympathetic attitude. I stand at the junction of Jaffa Road in Jerusalem by the General Post Oiiice. and watch the passing show. Jerusalem. the international, the home of a hundred religions, complete with pride and hate, where the Ji w turns In despair and hope three ninea day. to add his share of tears to the Wailing Wall. The Gate City ol the East, the key to the world, turned into a bedlam; British officers patrol the streets. Arab gendarmerie keep watch over the city, airplanes purring overhead like contented eats My head aches. I am bewildered by the sudden change from the poetical to the practical, and I can think of only one spot that has emerged unscathed from this versatile modern age, thai has retained its individual GOPPINGER'S i Pirate's Cove) TROPICAL GARDENS and SK.MINOI.I-: INDIAN VILLAGE The Oricinal and LargMl Indian Villas* in Florida Alligator and Crocodile Farm \. W. Itlh Are. Off Till SI. ( r reati si In A merit ,i TO GET HERE—Take Ihr hoal "Dixie" direct In il,,Indian VIIlace. leaving dail> al III a. m. and .' p. m. from Pier 7. ( ity Yacht Basin in lla> front Park, l"r dri\,out Wl Flaeler St reel lo 16th Atenue. lurn north lo N. W. 7th Street and area) to 19th Avenut or two hlni-k* treat of 171 h Avenue Bridge. — All for hire ear* from Bail Plat-let Street, all Yellow Cab Company's for hire car* and taxi* atop at CoppinKer'a. color, its fragrance and divinity-, the pure, sweet waters of MegiddrT The End. NEW 7TH AVENUE THEATRE 3033 N. W. 7th Ave. Phone 2.3-5, ADULTS 20c CHILDREN lo c Sunday and Monday. Peb. H-IJ MARION DAVIES in "Blondie of the Follies" with III).I.IK DOVE and JIMMY lit -RANTS llnx Office lip. 115:|s Sunday Miami Plating Works. Inc. Chromium, Nickel. Tin, Silver and Gold Plating N. E. 2nd Ave. Phone 2-.-,oo; Breakfaal Dinner Lunch 1 In |0 .", to 11 tn io 'DAVIS CAFETERIA 33 N. K. Second Ave. Opposite Halcyon Hotel Efficient Service Bojl to carry your tray + DR. J. II. YARBOROICII VETERINARIAN Dogs Clipped. Plucked and Bathed IMS N. W. 36th St. Phone 2-IM I 4 %  % % % % %  %  %  I > %  YOUR CAR %  Washed, Polished and %  Greased for SI .of. T 55 Z ROYAL PAI.M %  Valves Ground, Carbon .Sf".00l %  Cleaned, Fords-Chevs. SERVICE STATION I IS S. W. FIRST ST. SOUTHERN BROTHERS MIAMI BUSINESS CMVERSITY, INC. Fifty Thousand Young People ;;; the Busitieii World Today Hate Been Trained /'i Southern Brothen 3RD FLOOR, TOWNI.EY BLDG. 77 E. Hauler St. at 1st Ave. Phone 2-2320 MIAMI, FLORIDA TO I RS ( RIISIS STEAMSHIP TICKETS TRAVELERS CHEQUES Kemittawrs to All Foreign Countries Arranar your I'ai—ow-r Trip lo l*aletinr through American Express Company 330 E. FLAGLEB ST. Miami i el, :::;i7s WfWfXHK v\V0a^\ss\\tt \HC. fc*5-WE USUALLY HAVE 10 KEEP AW EYE ON THE CLOCK WHEN WE WAKE THESE TfilPS LETS SEE WHAT THEV OS£t> FOR TELUW} TIAAEW THE OLD PAYS. MITCHELL GOBBRNA, PreaMi ESTAIII.ISHED 1912 THESUWDIAL WASUSEO MOSTOrTEK AS TIME PIECE IN TOO B.C. THE SAND GW; LATER. THE HOUR GLASS, PATES •TlOM ABOUT THE 2*CENTURvB.c. Tl*autDK-Ali IMOUal CfiMrxrrfDTlMF BV"" ouD. GEeUlPFATWEO CU3UX THE E6VPTIAU WATER CLAUSED AEVUT (3oB.c.



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Page Two THE JEWISH FLORI P I AN Friday, February in, 19JJ I For the first time in the history of the South, Jews will be given the opportunity of seeing and hearing an all-Yiddish singing and talking picture, "The Voice of Israel," on February 26. when it will be presented at the Biscayne Plaza theatre. Miami Beach. The picture is a singing and talking presentation of the struggles of the Jewish people from Egypt down to the present day. Such famous cantors as the Seidele Rovner, known as the dean of the world's cantors; Yosele Rosenblatt. Yosele Shlisky. Mordecai Hershman. and David Roitman are among those who are seen on the screen and heard in renditions of famous synagogue numbers. Machtenberg's choir, famous in the entire world, appears during the picture in a rendition of several numbers. The picture has attracted considerable attention and long runs throughout the United States and Canada, and has been jecommended to all who want an insight into the life of the Jewish nation. • • • In observance of Chamisho Osor B'Shvat. the Ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation will present bags of fruit to the ; hildren of its Sunday school at the Sunday morning assembly. Chamisho Osor B'Shvat is the Jewish Arbor day in Palestine. Nightly Dinner DANCE THE E 1TTH FLOOR COLUMBUS HOTEL DINNER SERVED 6 p. m. to 9:.>0 p. m. DANCING 7 p. m. to 1 a. m. $1.50 PER PERSON HARRY RICHARDSON and his CAVALIERS Rabbi Mayer Freed of the Isaac Elchanan Yeshiva and Theological Seminary arrived In Miami yesterday and will stop at the Knickerbocker hotel. Miami Beach. Junior Hadassah will sponsor a bridge to be held the end of February, full details of which will be announced in an early issue, it was decided at a meeting of us executive board held last week at :!'.e home of Ita president. Rabbi Max Shapiro of Beth David will leave Sunday morning for New York City to keep a promise made to a boyhood friend some years ago He will officiate at the wedding of this friend. Dr Halley Fnederwitzer to Miss Esther Rankin at New York City. Saturday. February 18. and will return to Miami the following Wednesday morning While In New York the class in history meeting at Beth David every Tuesday night will hear Sydney L. Weintraub lead a .-ion. • • %  An important meeting of the SenI lor Council of Jewish Women tru held Wednesday at Beth David hall with Mrs Bernard Simon, its I ident. presiding. A donatic: made to the scholarship fund of the Dade County Federations : Women Clubs, and a number of new members were admitted Future ngs of the orgar.izauc: i be held at the Ponce de Leon hotel. The council is sponsoring a card at 2 p. m o'clock. Febr,:. •.. MrLewis Brown in irangements. %  %  • During the past week Mr. and '.:.William Friedman have had as -•jests Mr. and Mrs. J. Cranzi-.o will spend the season at Beach, and their cousin. Mrs. I On _:nd daughter. ..ood is sponsorI bridge on Tuesday evening. We Specialize in HOSIERY Surely We Can Serve You Beat ('ome in '/'/'< HOSIERY SHOP MRS. JOHN A. r.ADDIS 117 Sc>hold Arcade Este es Gowns Moderately Priced 200 E. FLAGLER ST. ARE WE keeping. with those who trust us. arc ng up to our obligations if k their future happiness by the problems that would Tor them if, some day. we : not come home? I ife Insurance offers the safe and certain answer. There is no sub-titute. A Southern Health U Life Insurance Policy on each one is necessary CO protect the others from the privation and expense caused by the last illness and death. A few pennies each week is the total cost. SOUTHERN LIFE & HEALTH INSURANCE COMPANY T. s. COOK, Mana • Realty I 2-3418 February 14. at the home of Mrs. J. Kopplowitz at 842 Salzedo street. Gables, when she. Mrs. Harry Markowltl and Mrs. Sam Wiesel will be the hostesses. Prizes will be given for high scores and refreshments Will be served. The public is invited to attend. • • • Next Sunday morning a number of tourists headed by Mrs. Holtzman of Detroit will provide candies and fruits for the children of Beth Jacob Sunday school in observance of Chamisho Osor B'Shvat. • • • The next meeting of Beth David Sisterhood will be held at its Talmud Torah hall with Mrs. Isidor Cohen, the president, presiding, on Wednesday afternoon. February 15. beginning at 2 p. m. An interesting program will be presented with Mrs. F J Manning delivering the principal address on "Work for the Blind." All members and the public are urgd to attend. • • • Temple Israel Sisterhood enterI a large number of friends Monday afternoon In observance of ts birthday anniversary with a bridge luncheon at the Blackstone hotel. Mrs Isaac Levin presided and Dr Jacob H. Kaplan delivered the invocation. Mrs Hannah Spiro Ashirected the musical numbers. Mrs Arthur Buchband of Chicago as an honor guest Mrs, J A. Richairman of the committee :. barge of arrangements and she -tod by Mesdames P. Ben Reisne r and Adolph Wertheimer. .lar Sunday evening dances thi community (enter ol the Hebrew Athletic club will be continued and ladies will again be admitted %  this coming Sunday evening. All of the procei devited to the community center building fund. Continuing its recent victories the basketball team of the Hebrew Athletic club trounced the First Baptist church team by 53 to 7; the Ida M Fisher High school team 37 to 16 and Gesu Young Men's club 57 to 26 • • More than 20 tables of bridge wen In play at the bridge luncheon sponsored by the Ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Orthodox conion last Tuesday afternoon at the home of Mrs Charles Tannenbaum in Shenandoah. Four prizes tor high scores, and one door prize .warded. Among the winners were Miss Sophie Usilowitz of Charlotte. N. C. and Mrs. Charles Feldman ol Miami. In charge of arment8 were Mrs, Sam Tannenbaum. assistant chairmen. The proMoe Harris and Charles Tannenbaum. assistane chairmen. The prowent to the Talmud Torah fund of the organization. • • • Mrs Jacob Grossman and daughter of New York City will arrive here Saturday morning to visit her mother-in-law, Mrs. Grossman, at the Charles Tannenbaum home. She will remain here for the balance of the winter season. • • • An important meeting of the Ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation will be held at the synagogue. 1545 S. W. Third street, next Tuesday evening, Febru, ary 13. beginning promptly at 8 o'clock. All members are urged to attend. A social hour will follow. • • • Miss Beady Goldenblank. Miss Lena Weinklc and Miss Helen Yunes have been elected delegates to the seventh annual Southern Regional Conference of Hadassah to be held on February 12 and 13 at Savannah. Ga. They are leaving for Savannah today. While there they will attend a Symposium .on Palestine to be conducted by Miss Hortensc Levy, National board member from New York, who has recently returned from Palestine. A dinner dance has been planned in Savannah for the delegates. • • • Representatives of every Jewish organization In Greater Miami have bi i ii added to the general committee in charge of the annual Charity ball now being sponsored by the Jewish Welfare bureau, with Mrs. Bertha B. Levy in charge of arrangements. Among those who will actively participate in the preparations for this annual event to be held on March 12 at the Floridian hotel. Miami Beach, are Mesdames Schwartz. Sadye G. Rase, J. A. Richter. Lee Weiner, Sam Tannenbaum. Rose Simpson, Philip Lieberman, A. I. Magid. H. E. Kleiman, Freda Lutzky. Barney Weinklc. Isaac Levin. Isidor Cohen. Ida Buckstein, J. L. Shochet. Lena Simon, F. Slaviter, Henry Seitlin, Leon Elkin. and the Misses Lena Weinklc and Sylvia Dreisen; Messrs .Stanley C. Myers. Jack Bernstein, Herbert E. Kleiman. Norman J. Musky, j. Gerald Lewis, Day J. Apte. Philip Lieberman, Bert Reis. ner. Murray Grossman, W. L. Williams. Abe Aronovitz and M. Chertkoff. Tickets for this gala annual event have been distributed and the public is urged to make purchases now to encourage the workers in this appeal to relieve the distress now so acute with many Jewish families. • • • The Civic theatre was crowded to capacity and standing room only could be had last Sunday night when the well-known writer, j. Adler, better known to the world under his pen name, B. Kovner, was presented in a series of readings from his own works as the feature attraction. The well-known actor. L. Goldberg, of Lakewood. N. j., was master of ceremonies and kept the audience laughing throughout the evening. Louis Regel sang, and Mr. and Mrs. S. Cohen of New York played several musical selections on the violin and piano. Leonard Rose received tumultuous applause for his splendid rendition of several cello numbers. Kovner read a number of his own works in his usual inimitable manner which kept the audience amused. The affair was held under the auspices of the local Workman's circle, and following the conclusion of the program many of those present were entertained at the Workmen's circle hall as the guests of the Woman's club of the organization. Folk songs were enjoyed and refreshments were served •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •• %  LA SALLE | beauty shop Phone 2-5S87 S 1 % %  131 CENTRAL ARCAIIE i •Iand .;. 214 SEYBOI.n BUILDING .•. Mezzanine Floor All Branches Beauty Culture | and Barber Shop t Soft Water I'sed •:• &f •:•••.•:.**•..%.:..:.*.•..;.**.:..:..:..•.**** J. P. ALEXANDER, INC. 1!" S. E. FIRST AVENUE fin Foster Building) I Iigh Grade Shoe Repairing Cripple and Corrective Fool Work Our Specialty MARINE HARDWARE YACHT SUPPLIES FISHING TACKLE PAINTS & OILS DISTRIBUTORS OF DEVOE PAINTS & VARNISHES Prices Now Much Lower PHILLIPS HARDWARE CO. 801-:!().-! N. Miami Avenue Phone 2-8445 What livery Woman wants to Know it ill Intnld in a series of illmtral, d FREE LECTURES git en />) Elizabeth Van Dyke DAILY — NIGHTLY 10:30 a. m., 2:30 p. m.. 7:30 p. m. WOMEN ONLY — girla under In no! admitted Admission Free — No Collections l',A-, K ., l '. ,HST STREKT MIAMI '"•'""" -'" b 'r h urd n in l e' y k, S,ore / isibN TO NEW, EYE-OPENING INSTRUCTIVE FACTS! EV SS£IiL iNG FOR THE BEACH <"*, In*,*., Srl S "EACH ROBES and PAJAMAS •a.ahna and (,„„„ Knit r „ „,„, Womrn nd ,.„,„„„ 100-10N N. K. IND AVENUE "THE SHOP of QUALITY" IRVINE'S "ne lllock North of Ea.t Elagler Street 100-108 N. E. 2ND AVENUE | THE NIIAMlTAIJXnUV I 28 N. E. 3rd St. Noted for the Fine Quality of Its Work Phone 2-5111