The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00206

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewish floridiaim
No. 5.
Ik jew
medicine
Dr. Harry Goldman
the other arts and sciences
Jewish physician since time
prlal has made very definite
Llions to medicine and med-
|tory.
Jews, unlike other primitive
very early separated the
practice from the priest -
llic prophets, however, prac-
|hc healing art.
nigs, it is mentioned that Eli-
uglit a child apparently dead
|as did his disciple Elisha
saiah cured King Hezekiah
Inflammation by applying a
krr. The Jews were the first
Lge their practitioners and
j' the greatest single contri-
at that time was the isolat-
|tho lepers, which idea has
own to include all other con-
I diseases. Imagine living in
[without isolation,
ancient Jewish physicians
ill acquainted with the vari-
cles and bones, though they
Uite ascertained the correct
of the latter in the body.
, as 252 instead of 205. They
knowledge of the various
knd are frequently mention-
pi Talmud and Midrash. At
i of King David certain Tal-
linterested themselves in the
the human embryo and ac-
If these studies are remark-
lurate and certain of their
pons have long since been
ated.
m-lent Jewish physician, too,
acquainted with the nor-
ly functions and described
la manner remarkably trite.
Ibbis of Israel were the first
petition to the fact that ill-
a manifestation of de-
tissue function and tissue
a science we now call pa-
Hippocrates. the father of
|, never advanced this idea
5alen vaguely hinted at it.
was the natural out-
bf the necessary investiga-
Jthe rabbis of slaughtered
|which were found to have
organs, and were termed
treifah.
ply case in ancient litera-
pre a diagnosis was con-
y postmortem is cited of
p the case of a sheep with
of the hind legs due to
rd injury.
My, Talmudic physicians
ecially skilled, many being
Major operations were
the patient deeply drug-
operation now known as
I Section was known to the
Its. One must not forget
)l ot circumcision a hy-
rgical procedure.
post-talmudic period we
for several hundred years
persecution barred Jews
Idical practice. With the
of Mohammedism. how-
Asia Minor, new schools
nded and we again find
eachers and students until
they were again prevent-
|>ractice. Many gifted phy-
listed, the earliest in 643,
pal medical attendants to
l>s Abu Hafsah Yazid. to
Omar. Another was Sahl,
pbban-al-Tahari. His son,
ihl Ibn Rabban al Tahar-
pysician to two caliphs af-
Irsion to Mohammedanism
Intinued Next Week)
FLORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY
MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1933.
Price Five Cents
Beth Jacobs
Sponsors Play
Appearing at the Ida M. Fisher
High school at Drexel and Four-
teenth streets, Miami Beach, on
Sunday evening. February 12. begin-
ning at 8:30, the Jewish Dramatic
Players will be seen in a presenta-
tion of one of the most powerful
melodramas of the Yiddish stage.
"Die Zushterte Chasono." In the
cast are Harry Greenberg, Mrs. F.
Slaviter, Joe Mandelbaum, H. Rase.
Mrs. Silverman. Joseph Greenberg.
Miss E. Slaviter, Mrs. J. Seligman
and Louis Regal. Cantor Boris
Schlachman, well known for his ro-
bust baritone, will be one of the
artists appearing as added attrac-
tions during the evening's enter-
tainment. The proceeds are to be
used for the benefit of Beth Jacob
synagogue of Miami Beach.
Famous Yiddish Ladies Auxiliary
Writer to Appear to Hold Lunch
?
Rabbis Issue
Joint Statement
In a signed statement issued by
Rabbi Max Shapiro of Beth David
congregation and Rabbi Jonah E.
Caplan of the Miami Jewish Ortho-
dox congregation, received by the
Jewish Floridian, they state: "At a
meeting held between the rabbis,
shechtim and butchers, satisfactory
conclusions were arrived at whereby
Kashrus can be assured at the fol-
lowing butcher shops on Fifth
street: Atlantic Kosher Meat Mar-
ket, operated by Mr. Mayerowitz;
Reisman's Kosher Meat Market and
Daum's Kosher Meat Market. The
meat procured from Jacksonville,
Fla., sold by Mrs. Daum of Daum's
Kosher Meat Market is under the
personal supervision and responsi-
bility of Rabbi Tobias Geffen of At-
lanta. Ga."
I AM going to make a plea to
support your Jewish paper.
A Jewish journal like this is an
essential and very necessary part
of Jewish community life. It has
a definite function to perform
and it is your organ of expres-
sion. The price is reasonable and
it means virtually no sacrifice to
enroll as a subscriber. If your
neighbor has been borrowing
your copy suggest that she be-
come a subscriber.
Now a word to the advertising
community: It is a fact that in
proportion to its numbers, the
Jewish community spends ab-
normally. And here is a point I
wish to stress. No other class
publication touches on so many
varied angles of group life as
does a Jewish journal. A Prot-
estant or a Catholic church pa-
per deals primarily with church
news and other religious infor-
mation. A Jewish community,
because of its unique make-up.
requires a newspaper that will
be the medium for religious, cul-
tural, educational, philanthropic
and social news. That's why such
a paper as this is indispensable
to every Jewish family that wish-
es to be informed on Jewish
icws. Which in turn makes it
in unusually valuable medium
for advertisers.
We believe H appropriate to
direct our readers' attention to
the above by Charles H. Joseph.
which appeared in a recent tout
of the Baltimore Jewish Times.
I. Adler. better known throughout
the Yiddish reading world as B.
Kovner, will be heard at the Civic
Theatre, West Flagler street and
Twenty-first avenue, Sunday eve-
ning. February 5, beginning at 8:30
p. m.. in a series of readings of his
own works.
Kovner, proclaimed by many to be
the Yiddish counterpart of the im-
mortal Mark Twain, is a native of
Poland, where he attended a rab-
binical seminary and also received
his secular education. For the past
20 years he has been feature editor
of the Yiddish Daily, the Forward
printed in New York, and has dur-
eon
What promises to be one of the
most enjoyable afternoons of the
year is the benefit luncheon bridge
being sponsored by the Ladies' aux-
iliary of the Miami Jewish Orthodox
congregation next Tuesday. Febru-
ary 7, at 1 o'clock at the home of
Mrs. Charles Tannenbaum, 2101 S.
W. Eleventh street. The proceeds
will be devoted to the Talmud Tor-
ah fund of the organization. In
charge of arrangements are Mrs.
Sam Tannenbaum. chairman, and
she is being assisted by Mesdames
Moe Harris and Charles Tannen-
baum. The public is invited to at-
tend.
Announcements!
.;,________________________\
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION
(Orthadox)
IMS S. W. Third Street
JONAH E. CAPLAN, Rabbi
Regular services begin at 5:30
with the late services at 8:30 when
the rabbi will preach on "Good
News." A social hour will follow the
services. Saturday morning services
begin at 9 a. m.. and Rabbi Morde-
cai Hal pern will deliver a talk in
Yiddish following the reading of the
law.
B. KOVNER
ing the course of his career created
such famous fiction characters as
"Yente Telebende," "Payshe the
Farmer,'' "Moslie Kapoir," "Charlie
the Blufl'er" and "Fishel Dovid, the
Hebrew Teacher." He is the author
of six Yiddish plays, one of which
played 48 consecutive weeks in New
York City. He is the author of more
than eight thousand humorous
stories, and under 22 pen names has
been associated with more than 42
publications appearing in Yiddish,
such as "Der Kibitzer," "The Big
Stick" and similar publications.
Many of his compositions have been
set to music and sung on both the
Yiddish and English stage, and his
stories have appeared in translation
in both English and foreign lang-
uage publications throughout the
world. Eight books by Kovner have
been published in recent years and
include his poems which have re-
ceived enthusiastic endorsements of
noted critics. Charlie Chaplin's fam-
ous picture "The Kid" was based on
one of this prolific writer's stories.
Kovner is well known as a racon-
teur and has entertained audiences
throughout the country in readings
of his own stories. Though he came
to Miami to recuperate from his ar-
duous efforts and work, he yielded
to the pleas of lovers of Yiddish
literature in this district and will
appear this coming Sunday eve-
ning. Together with him, L. Gold-
berg, well known Yiddish actor and
singer, will be heard in several songs
and character impersonations.
Cantor Arrives for
Sunday Concert
Arriving in Miami today for sev-
eral days rest prior to his appear-
ance in a program of liturgical
numbers, folk songs and operatic
anas. Cantor Joseph Z. Shlisky will
be the guest of Beth David syna-
gogue at the services here tonigh*
and Saturday. Sunday afternoon at
3 o'clock the cantor will be present-
ed by Beth David at the Temple
theatre in the first and only con-
cert to be given in the Miami dis-
trict.
Cantor Shlisky. though only 38
years old, has had a meteoric rise
to fame after a struggle to earn a
livelihood. Coming to this country
with the famous Cantor Vollman,
he lived and worked in Toronto, ap-
peared in concert tours in the Unit-
ed States, returned to Toronto
where he worked in a shop during
his attendance at the Tororito Con-
servatory of Music, and joined the
San Carlo Opera Company, under
the direction of the renowned con-
ductor Fortuno Gallo. who is now on
a visit to Miami. Yielding to his real
desires, he turned from the operatic
stage and became a cantor with the
First Roumanian synagogue of New
York City, one of the oldest and
largest congregations in America.
As the result of his remarkable ten-
or voice, Shlisky soon became known
as one of the foremost singers the
Jewish people possess, and has been
in demand throughout the far and
near parts of the country.
Sunday's appearance at the Tem-
ple theatre is part of a tour of the
southern part of the United States
being made to satisfy those who
have heard his records or in person.
The following program will be
heard: 1 "My Arms" (recitative)
from Judas Maccabeus; "Sound
an Alarm" ; "Al Hatzadi-
kim" itraditional); 2. (a) "Av Hora-
chamin (traditional); (bi "Omar
Rabbi Elozor" (traditional); 3. (a)
"E Lucevan le Stelle" (aria) Tosca;
(b) "La Donna E Mobile" (Rigolet-
to); 4. (a) "A Dudele" (folk song);
(b) "A Brief Zum Rebin" (folk
song); 5. (a) "Akavyo" (tradition-
al); (b> "Eloheinu" (traditional).
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI
l Reform t
137 N. K. Nineteenth Street
DR. JACOB II. KAPLAN. Rabbi
Services at Temple Israel will be
held tonight beginning at 8:15 when
Dr. Kaplan will speak on "Peoples'
Houses in Palestine." The public is
invited to attend. A social hour will
follow.
CONGREGATION BETH JACOB
(Orthodox)
311 WahinKton Ave., Miami Reach
L. AXELROD, Rabbi
The regular services begin at 5:30
with the late services following at
8:30. with the rabbi preaching on
"The Exodus." Dr. Adler, a noted
speaker, will address the audience
at the late services on a subject of
interest. Saturday morning services
begin at 9 o'clock and Earle Bar-
rach. the son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry
Barrach, will recite the Maftir and
Haftoro and will make a brief ad-
dress in English. Rabbi Axelrod will
also speak in English on the Bar
Mitzva and will then deliver a dis-
course in Yiddish on the portion of
the week.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
(t'onHervative)
139 N. W. Third Avenue
MAX SHAPIRO, Rabbi
Regular services begin at 5:30 to-
night with the late services at 8 p.
m., when Rabbi Shapiro will speak
on "Hitler's Prejudice Is That
Permanent." He will base his ser-
mon on Hitler's ascension to the
chancellorship of Germany. Cantor
Joseph Z. Shlisky will recite the
Kiddush at the late service. Cantor
Louis Hayman will chant and lead
the congregational singing with the
choir.
Supreme Officers
Herein Visit
Supreme Commdr. D. J. Coakley
and Supreme Record Keeper C. L.
Biggs from the home office of the
Maccabees in Detroit, are visiting In
Miami for a few days in behalf of
the local organization and the bus-
iness welfare of the Maccabees in
the state of Florida.
State Manager A. M. Coffin has
been In Tampa for the last 10 days
organizing a new tent in that terri-
tory, and returned to Miami Friday
to greet Mr. Coakley and Mr. Biggs.
They will attend the initiation cer-
emony of this new organization in
Tampa, while in Florida.
Rabbi Halpern
To Speak Here
Rabbi Mordecai Halpern, who oc-
cupied a position in New York City,
as the result of the dire plight of
the Lomza Yeshiva of which he is a
graduate and of which his father-
in-law was the founder, is now in
Miami on a tour of the country in
the interests of raising funds for
relief of the students, numbering
more than three hundred attending
the institution. Not only are these
students taught but they are also
given their material needs by the
yeshiva. Founded about 50 years
ago by the renowned Rabbi Eleazer
Shulawitz aided by the famous Rab-
bi Israel Salanter, to speed the
learning of Torah throughout Pol-
and it has made an enviable record
throughout the world. The present
dean. Rabbi I. M. Gordon, a broth-
er-in-law of Rabbi Halpern, visited
this country several years ago and
was received with wide acclaim.
I

'




Page Two
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Friday, February 3,
f
Last Monday evening the local
chapter of Junior Hadassah held a
very interesting meeting at the
Ponce de Leon hotel when plans for
the participation of the local organ-
ization in the coming southern reg-
ional conference of Hadassah were
discussed. Rabbi Max Shapiro of
Beth David congregation delivered
a short address and Millicent Rubin
was heard in a number of readings.
Miss Lena Weinkle and Miss Bede
Goldenblank were two of the dele-
gates chosen to represent the local
organization at the Savannah con-
ference. The remaining two dele-
gates will be chosen shortly. Pol-
lowing the program and business
a social hour was spent and re-
freshments were served.
*
An important meeting of the Lad-
ies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish
Orthodox congregation was held at
the synagog last Tuesday evening.
Reports of the recent dance were
received showing that a substantial
sum had been realized for the Tal-
mud Torah work of the congrega-
tion. Plans for the coming Purim
ball of the organization were made
and Mrs. Nathan Abramson was
named chairman of the arrange-
minl.s committee with Mrs. Al
Hiisch and Mrs. Louis Pallott as as-
sistant chairmen. The resignation
of Mrs. Ida Buckstein as president
Nightly Dinner
DANCE
...in...
THE
E
17TH FI.OOK
COLUMBUS HOTEL
DINNER SERVED
6 p. m. to 9:30 p. m.
DANCING
7 p. m. to 1 a. m.
S1.50 PER PERSON
HARRY RICHARDSON
and his CAVALIKRS
We Specialize in
HOSIERY
Surely We Can Serve
You Best
Come to The
HOSIERY SHOP
MRS. JOHN A. CADDIS
117 Si v li.ild Vrrade
of the auxiliary because of all health
was received and after repeated ef-
forts to have her withdraw the res-
ignation were unavailing, it was ac-
cepted with regret. Mrs. J. L, Sho-
chet will serve as president until the
annual elections in May. Following
the business meeting a social hour
was spent.

Mrs. Max Scliaff entertained at a
luncheon bridge shower last Thurs-
day afternoon in honor of her niece.
Uisa Dorothy Kaplan, whose mar-
riage to Mr. Sidney Pepper of this
1 city will be an event of the early
spring. The house was attractively
decorated with fresh garden flowers
in a color scheme of gold and green.
Prizes for high scores were awarded
.0 Mrs. S. J. Spector, Mrs. J. Aug-
ust and Mrs. M. Dubler. Miss Kap-
lan was the recipient of a large
number of beautiful gifts. Assisting
the hostess in receiving were Miss
Kaplan, the guest of honor. Mrs.
Max Hoffman, aunt of the bride-
elect. Mrs. Kowane and Mrs. Schon-
feld.
*
Mr. and Mrs. Max FanarofT of
Washington, D. C. are spending the
winter season here.

The annual bridge sponsored by
the senior chapter of Miami Ha-
dassah for the purpose of raising
money for the Hadassah medical
fund will be held at the Floridian
hotel. Miami Beach, on Wednesday
afternoon, February 15. Delicious
refreshments will be served during
he afternoon and prizes will be
awarded for high scores. Mrs. Milton
Weiner is chairman of the arrange-
ments committee in charge of this
annual event and is making every
ctrort to make this bridge one of the
outstanding events of the current
si ason.

Stars of the local night clubs in-
cluding Chester Alexander. Lew
Hampton, Al Parker and Danny
Sheehan will appear at the seventh
annual dance of Temple Israel Sis-
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Phone 2-T.6H7 X
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I'll BEYBOLD BUILDING
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Estelles
11,
Gowns
Moderately Priced
200 E. FI.AGLER ST.
ARE WElplB
faith with those who trust us, are
we living up to our obligations if
we risk their future happiness by
ignoring the problems that would
arise for them if, some day, wc
did not come home?
Life Insurance offers the safe and
certain answer. There is no sub-
stitute.
A Southern Health & Life Insur-
ance Policy on each one is neces-
sary to protect the others from
the privation and expense caused
by the last illness and death.
A few pennies each week is the
total cost.
Southern Life &
Health Insurance
Company
T. S. Cook, Manager
610 Realty Hoard Bid*. Phone 2-3419
terhood on Saturday evening, Feb-
ruary 11. at the Miami Beach Golf
and Country club, beginning at 9:30
p. m. Prizes will be awarded for the
1 best dancers in the contests that
will be held during the evening. Mrs.
Herbert Srppler is chairman.

Mrs. J. A. Richter is chairman of
irran ements committee i>rc-
parlng for the celebration of the
ninth anniversary of the founding
, of Temple Israel Sisterhood. This
will be observed this year witli a
luncheon bridge at the beautiful
Blackstone hotel. Miami Beach, on
February 9. beginning at 12:30 p. m.
The public is invited to attend and
to make their reservations with the
chairman. A nominal charge will
be made.
Believing that the needs oi the
distressed wards of the Jewish Wel-
fare bureau and their relief is para-
mount at this time to any other
calls being made for help, the Lad-
ies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish
Orthodox congregation has post-
poned its annual Purim ball sched-
uled for the latter part of February,
and will hold this gala event sev-
eral days after the annual Charity
ball being sponsored by the Jewish
Welfare bureau. Solicitations for
advertisements in the annual pro-
gram will not begin until after the
welfare ball program has been
closed. Representatives of the Lad-
ies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish
Orthodox congregation will actively
cooperate with the ball committee
of the annual Charity ball to help
raise funds to relieve the local poor.

Appearing at the New Seventh
Avenue theatre this coming Sunday
and Monday is Irene Dunn, sup-
ported by John Boles in Fannie
Hursts 'Back Street.'' The opening
scenes, showing the old horse-car
days in Cincinnati, are done with
realism and are very effective:
The hero, a young banker, meets
.in- heroine two months before he
is to be married to another woman;
they fall desperately in love with
each other. He arranges for her to
meet his mother accidentally. On
the appointed day. Just as she Is
ready to leave for the meeting, her
sister BObbingly tells her that she
had had an affair with a young man
and that unless the heroine helped
her to stop the man from leaving
town she would kill herself. She aids
her sister but by so doing she loses
her one chance of becoming ac-
quainted with the hero's mother.
she does not see the hero again un-
til five years later when they acci-
dentally meet in New York. Their
love flames up anew-. He tells her
that he is married and the father of
two children, but that he needs her.
He sets her up in an apartment and
they live together. Her existence is
dull. She is not allowed to be seen
with the hero and is forced to live
a secluded life for by this time the
hero had become a prominent bank-
er. A former suitor proposes mar-
riage to her and she accepts. But
l he hero prevents her from marry-
ing bj telling her he cannot live
without her. She goes back to the
hem and their affair continues on
for 25 years. The hero's children
find out. about it but his wife never
suspects. While in Paris on a trip
the hero dies. His last thoughts
were of the heroine. His son goes to
the heroine and offers to take care
Of her. When he leaves she dies
from grief. It is a playing well
worth seeing.
The plot was adapted from the
novel by Fannie Hurst. It was di-
rected by John M. Stahl. in the
cast are June Clyde, Oeorge Meek-
er, Zasu Pitts. Shirley Grey. Wil-
liam Bakewell and others.

Meeting last Wednesday night at
the home of Mrs. Bertha B. Levy,
its chairman, the general arrange-
ments committee for the annual
Charity ball cf the Jewish Welfare
bureau completed plans lor the ev-
ent which will be held at the Flo-
ridian hotel on March 12. Plans
submitted show that the prices set
for tickets will be far below the
value oi the entertainment being
provided, exclusive of dancing. Stars
of the night clubs in Florida, vaude-
ville and movie stars here for brief
vacations have all signified their
willingness to help raise funds fa
I the needy Jews of this district vd
program committee is out worlun,
for the annual souvenir pr0gJ|
and all are urged to place adver
tisements in this as a means ol
showing their concrete help t0 tlB
poor. The advertising commit J
will meet at luncheon every w^j
nesday at 12:30 at the PaiatjJ
Kosher1 restaurant for reports of the
i progress of their work. All interest.
ed in helping make this aRair a
success are urged to get in l0Uch
with the chairman.
Permission to use its community
center was extended to the A.Z.A.
(Junior Bnai Brith) to meet evert
Tuesday night, by the Hebrew Ath-1
letic club. The same privilege is ex-
tended to any Jewish organization
in the city and no charge of anv |
kind will be made.

The annual Donor's luncheon I
sponsored by Senior Hadassah will |
be held Monday, February 27. Thosn
who have not yet raised their quotas
to enable them to attend are urged
to communicate with Mrs. Barney I
Weinkle, chairman, Mrs. Freda
Lutzky or Mrs. Lee Weiner.

The group in conversational He-
brew meets regularly at Beth David
every Tuesday evening from 7:30 to |
8:30. and is followed by the history
discussion group from 8:30 to 9:30.
Both classes are under the direction
of Rabbi Max Shapiro.
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"THE SHOP of QUALITY"
IRVINE'S
One Bloek North of Ka.t Flacler Street
110-108 N. E.
2ND AVKM E
THE MIAMI LAUNDRY
Noted for the Fine Quality of Its Work
28 N. E. 3rd St. Phone 2-5111


II ciHiv, February 3, 1933.
THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY
by Ihe
jKttlSII KI.ORHHAN PI'BLISHING CO.
fi'JI S. W. Fifteenth Avenue
j. LOUIS SIIOCIIET, Editor
P. O. Bex 2973
Miami, Florida Phone 2-1183
, ocond ela a matter July 4,
Ihe Post Office at Minmi. Florida,
.,. A, I of March 3, 1879.
Wl-T 'AIM BEACH OFFICE
II I i hih Street
Mr-. M. Bel rebniek. Representative
I'liSt'ltll'TION
.,. Mant!-* ilr.e Year 11.00 $2.0*
FRIDA1 FEBRUARY 3, Vol. 6, No. 5. 1933.

,,vvv,v-.- -"- V v % v ; > ;- ;
"SWEET WATERS
of MEGIDDO"
Hi Rabbi Lazarus Axelkud
iCiintinued from last week)
I turned at the touch on my el-
bow. An elderly woman, bewigged
and beshawled. turned to me ap-
peallngly. 'GefTint fir mir, bitte, die
plattz." and she handed me an old
prayer book, full of Techinoth for
all occasions. I fulfilled her wish.
Dankc. danke" she was profuse
in her thanks. A fine old lady; she
must have traveled far for this spir-
itual dellgift. I pictured her peti-
tioning Bar Jochai to protect her
children and grandchildren, and to
inspire them with a greater love for
home and God. A strange world.
Her children were at that very mo-
ment, if my assumptions were cor-
rect, dancing and waltzing to the
:une of jazz melody, far removed
(ton tins quaint and awe-inspiring
scene.
We pass on to the roof of the
building. Here, a Chasidic dancer
*U entertaining the onlookers by a
series of dances calculated to pro-
voke holy Chasidic zeal and inspi-
ration. He twisted and doubled him-
self up distortedly, his hands work-
ing rapidly, his head often touching
the ground as he tore his way
around the roof, singing hysterically
until be fell in a swoon. The dance
was immediately taken up by an- I
other exponent of this fine art. The
crowd cheered loudly, urging the1
dancers to still more hysteria.
The sun had set, and simultane-
ously a fire had been started. This
was the commencement of the Hil-
lulah Dbar Jochai, the celebration
in honor of Bar Jochai. The fire
grew rapidly, the flames leaping and
dancing, black smoke curling up-
wards in huge spiral columns. This
fire could be seen easily from Safed,
10 miles away. The crowd gathered
around the fire, and soon the flames
assumed alarming shapes. Nothing
was spared to honor the Great Rab-
bin. Silks and satins were thrown
carelessly Into this great burning
mass by pious ladies to appease the
wrath of the Are god. The flames
danced, the people danced, a verit-
able war dance was in progress.
Round and round the fire they
went, frenziedly they increased their
speed, swinging their hands in the
air, singing Bar Jochai melodies.
We looked on in mild bewilderment.
"Is this the African Congo?" asks
the Connecticut member of our
group. The German journalist had
ceased his babble, the agronomist
had apparently forgotten his orange
groves, and I thought I was in the
Page Three
THE
GLOOM
"I hear your son's at college."
"Yep."
"How's he doing?"
"Pretty good, I guess; he's taking
three courses. I've Just paid out
ten dollars for Latin, ten dollars for
Greek, and a hundred dollars for
Scotch."
Bus Driver: "Madam, that child
will have to pay full fare. He is five
years of age."
Madam: "But he can't be. I have
only been married four years."
Young Mrs. Levlnson and her best
friend were in the midst of one of
those delicious afternoons during
which two women confess their in-
nermost secrets to each other.
"Oh. Ella," she sighed tragically,
"I am most unhappy. I am con-
vinced that my husband married me
only for my money."
"Well, my dear," answered Ella,
"at least you have the consolation
jungle, witnessing an ancient war \ of knowing that he is not as stupid
dance. Long-bearded Jews in Kaf- a man as you used to think him."
tan and turban, pioneer Chalutzim, _
Ye.shiva bachoorim with dangling
earlocks, Yemenite Jews, Persian,
Indian and Bukharan Jews, bejew-
elled and bespangled, all were seized
with this infectious holiday spirit,
fascinated by the lurid flare of that
immense fire. Huge tins of olive oil
were being poured on the flames,
which were now licking at the par-
apet walls. Dangerously near the
crowd surged, exhausted and weary
with this supernatural burst of en-
ergy, their faces flushed with the
heat and their own violent passion-
ate emotions.
(To be concluded)
When a man has so much money
that it troubles him he can easily
find some women who will be glad
to share his troubles.
As one aggregation of ruins to an-
other, it is hoped that Athens will
keep American investors informed
from time to time concerning In-
sult.
Little Sarah came running to her
mother, breathless.
"What are you so excited about,
dear?" asked her mother, smiling.
"I just saw Sonya kissing Joseph,
the yeshiva student!" cried the lit-
tle girl.
"That's all right," answered her
mother. "They are announcing their
betrothal this Sunday."
"Oh," answered Sarah thought-
fully. Then she asked: "Mother,
when will papa and our cook an-
nounce their betrothal?"
Something each day a smile
It is not much to give,
And the little gifts of life
Make sweet the days we live.
The world has weary hearts
That we can bless and cheer.
And a smile for every day
Makes sunshine all the year.
"Get out of here!" cried the vaud-
evillian as the cat walked across the
stage during his act. "This is a
monologue not a catalogue!"
When old friends meet who long
have been apart,
Glad greetings spoken with hand
clasped in hand
Then falls a silence, as we waiting
stand,
The time-tried understanding of the
heart.
Oh. memories that make the pulses
start
The smoldering gleams that now
are quickly fanned
And light the years between; a
golden strand,
A light that shows real friends can
never part.
Oh, the silences of friendship that
SOUTHERN
BROTHERS
MIAMI BUSINESS
UNIVERSITY, INC.
Fifty Thousand Young
People in the Business World
Today llaie Been Trained
by Southern Brothers
3RD FLOOR, TOWNI.EY BLDU.
77 K. Flailer St. at lit Ave.
Phone 2-2320
MIAMI. FLORIDA
is old
How full of memories gathered
year by year!
How truly said that silences are
gold;
The gulf of time is spanned by
hands so dear.
Though spoken words leave many
things untold.
The word unspoken brings its mes-
sage clear.
Minor leagues must scrape along
this season on so thin a margin
there is talk of putting an elastic
on the ball in case of a foul into
the stands.
Out of 352 who thought of taking
it up, only seven persons in New
York have settled down to serious
careers of being Wendel heirs.
A skilled solver of puzzles suggests
that the novice tackle jigsaws by
working around the edges first, like
politicians with a depression.
A popular wedding gift in Lap-
land, says a travel letter, is the rein-
deer, embracing as it does a winter's
supply of meat, a hat rack and ma-
terial for a dress.
"An Ohio college boys pays his
way with magicians' feats." The us-
ual rule is to write father for an-
other feat of prestidigitation.
The press reports the passing of
the inventor of billiard chalk, as
substance formerly worn on the vest
to indicate that one was not open
to offers of employment.
We read again that a Bostonian
was showing a visiting Briton
around. "This is Bunker Hill Mon-
ument where Warren fell, you
know." The visitor surveyed the
-"\
lofty shaft thoughtfully, and then
said: "Nasty fall! Killed him, of
course."
A Texas paper says the Lone Star
state last summer produced the big-
gest cheese in the world. The Fer-
guson family, which has been in ex-
istence for years, treats this count-
er-claim with the contempt it de-
serves.
It is a wise fool who can keep his
lack of wisdom to himself.
Love that laughs at locksmiths
never giggles at the plumber.
Marriage is the end of all man's
troubles one end or the other.
Poor relations wonder if the rich
one really has a poor memory.
Some men are like silver-plated
knives; they look bright, but are
dull.
Some of our girls do their sleigh-
ing in January and their slaying in
June.
A girl has a young man twisted
around her finger when he circles it
with an engagement ring.
Some senators have such broad
views that they can straddle almost
any question.
Special Program
wqa'm
featuring
"The Aristocrats"
with Hubert Falrchlld
a* Cue*t-Announcer
Today
1 :00 p. m.. Club Chatter
1 :1" p. m.i Mukh Isle Seminule
Indian Village Program.
1 ;80 p. m.. Menial and Nervous
DIaeaaaii by Miami'* Foremost
Neurologist.
1 iSO p. Bin la Prance Barenadara,
courtesy I,a France Cleaner*.
Kmlorsetl by
MILADY'S RADIO CI.UB
Headquarters, Miramar Hotel
">
ONCE ONLY
SUNDAY
February 5th
3 P. M.
BETH
DAVID
Congregation
presents
Cantor
Joseph Z. Shlisky
World Renowned Tenor
at the
TEMPLE THEATRE
345 N. W. THIRD STREET
In a Program of Traditional Melodies,
Folk Songs and Operatic Arias
POPULAR PRICES
. I
i


Page Four
THE JEWISH FLORI PI AN
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* *
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+
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:
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BUttoa Sajttajjng Bullrtitt
Edited by RABBI S. M. MACHTEI
I :.t a.id Director. Kan.' Synas-acj of America
Sunday MORNINGS VIOL). Miami
! LORIOA
Vol. 1. MIAMI. FLORIDA. FEBRUARY 5. 1933. No. 8.
: : : # : : : : : < < : M* : : : : : # : : : : : # '- # *+ # *
Prayer For Whose Benefit
Srrmon DeUeered Sunda>. Januart 2H. Ittt.
Scripture Reading, Exodus Chapter X. Verses 7-11, iticl.
lliK think of Pharaoh as antiquated. We believe that the ideas he held
are not found in this day in the minds and concepts of men and women of
an enlightened twentieth century. I would to God that it were true. Un-
fortunately, we have made rapid strides away from the beliefs of that
day. only to find that very many who consider themselves versed in the
principles of religion, and. who would greatly resent being considered ig-
norant of the underlying principles of Divine worship, are no further ad-
vanced than was Phraraoh in hi.- of worship and prayer to the
Creator and Master of the universe. I am often made aware, in startling
fashion, of the mistaken beliefs that are held by some of our own people.
They. too. agree with Pharaoh m the argument he presented to Moses.
IN reply to the question by Pharaoh. But. who and who are they
that shall go?" to worship God. NK- .- said, "We will go with our young
and with our old, wit!-, our <.:_- ... .. ... our daughters ." Pharaoh is
quoted as telling Mom-.- Not .-. go no* ye that are men. and serve the
Lord. The conur.or.ly accepted Interpretation to this dialogue is that
Pharaoh was anxious to retain ::-.-. wives and the children as hostages to
insure the return 0: -...-.- males and the heads of families. That interpre-
tation is not a< : .-.. deeper thought involved. The dis-
cussion between Phara rite) principle of relig-
ion. Moses well kne '...-. Egyptian 01 worship. He was brought up
as a prince and was Initiated inw .... lh< mysteries of the priesthood. He
found certain practices in '. ian reiigion lacking in the true es-
sence of religion. When ........vised Moses that only the men of Is-
rael should go to woi Dd. he conveyed this thought "A relig-
ious rite is similar to a cen arranged for a king. When a reception
committee is chosen to wait upor. an earthly ruler, the leading men of
various provinces are chosen. These men are carefully selected because
their high standing is intended to reflect honor to the sovereign whom
they welcome. He is honored only when the reception committee is a body
of the greatest men in the land. Thus. Pharaoh asked, ". Who and who
are they that shall go?" Later, he advised Moses that it was wrong to take
along the women and children. He said. "Go now ye that are men." All
that was in keeping with the Egyptian practice. But. Moses did not view-
Divine worship from the same angle as did Pharaoh. To him it was not
intended to honor the King. God did not need our homage. He did not
thrive on the compliments and the flattery of human beings. No profit
accrued to the Almighty from the ritual performed by man. The benefit
from worship ol God rested upon man upon the worshipper and not
upon the Worshipped. Therefore, young and old. women and children,
must attend the rite of worship that they might be benefitted. The wor-
shipper is honored by his communion with the Worshipped.
WHEN ignorant zealots, in the synagogues, or out of them, have made
a great fuss about their devotion to God and their manner of wor-
ship. I have, often, been compelled to tell them that God does not weave
their prayers into a great shawl to throw over His shoulders to keep out
the chill of winter; that He does not utilize their chanting to convert it
into food and nourishment for Himself and His Heavenly Hosts; that God
does not require the praise and the worship for any benefit to Himself.
True, such apparently sacrilegious words from the mouth of a rabbi have
not helped his cause within the circles where idolatry reigns in the guise
of pure religion. Those who pray to God for God's benefit have not moved
one inch from the days of Pharaoh. In this very day they limit prayers
to men only and they seek the prominent to appear for them to honor Him
by whom they are honored. It would never occur to these that even the
veriest sinner by his supplication fits himself to receive the Divine mercy.
THE Psalms and the teachings of the sages are replete with examples
of the true purpose of prayer "When they have cried unto the Lord
in their trouble. He will save them out of their distress." "Because He
hath inclined His ear unto me, therefore will I call upon Him as long as
I live." "Prayer is good for man both before his fate has been decreed and
after it has been decreed." The rabbis teach that prayer "is good tor
man." No good can accrue to God from any act by man. Yet, foolish in-
dividuals rush to the house of worship "to honor God." Suppose that an
invalid who had just been rushed to a hospital were to tell you that he
came to the hospital for the benefit of the doctor? Would you call that
one rational?
EQUALLY unsound is the contention that only men must pray; that
women and children need not pray Because they are not sufficiently
important to honor God; or, that only those who have the stamp of ap-
proval of any group of human beings, the chosen ones, are the proper
ones to pray before the God of All. All these beliefs are still prevalent be-
cause man has created God in his own image; because man has endowed
God with the properties of an earthly King and worships Him by these
standards. When man will have learned that he has been created by God,
and, that to be happy, he must live by the standards of the Creator, we
shall have mad a forward step in the direction of recognizing the Father-
hood of God. As yet, most men have an illusion of being parents to the
Deity and they treat God as a spoiled child who must be pampered and
supplicated, cajoled and coaxed.
WE need no revision of religious truths. We need no revision of Divine
teachings. What we most sorely need is a fearless and honest min-
istry who has learned to know God as did the Patriarchs who "walked
with God." We have need for a laity that wants the esoteric religion
and, that, if it wants it not because it has no understanding of it. will,
Recipes for the
Jewish Family
Almond Biscuits
Prepare baking powder biscuits
about two inches in diameter. Bake
just before serving. Break them op-
en, butter, spread a mixture of hon-
ey and toasted chopped almonds.
Soup Cakes
Two eggs, two tablespoons chicken
fat. one teaspoon baking powder,
inn' and one-half cups flour, three-
fourths cup cold water.
Mix ingredients until well blend-
ed and smooth. Pour the batter in-
to greased muffin pans. Bake about
three-quarters hour, until light
brown. There should be a slight hol-
low in the center of each cake, for
they rise mainly at the sides.
Recipe makes one dozen soup
cakes.
Spice Cake
One tablespoon butter, three-
fourths cup sugar, two eggs (beaten)
; one teaspoon ginger, one and one-
half cups flour, one teaspoon baking
powder, one teaspoon cocoa, one
uii nutmeg, one teaspoon bak-
ing soda, one tablespoon boiling
water, one-half cup sour cream, one-
half cup walnuts (chopped), one-
hall cup raisins (chopped), one-half
c up molasses,
Cream sugar and butter, add eggs,
then dissolve in boiling water all
the spices, soda, baking powder and
molasses and add to miture. Add
at least, permit its teachers to reveal the truth of God's word, when those
teachers show evidence of knowing it a laity that will not hold to the
beliefs of Pharaoh merely because it was "good enough" for an Egyptian
monarch.
Pray to God for your own benefit. Ask and ye shall receive.
NEW 7th
AVE. THEATRE
3033 \. W. 7lh Am-. Phone 1*4351
Sunda> and Monday, Keh. ."i-f
"BACK STREET"
with
Irene Dunne and John Boles
ADULTS 20r CHILDREN loe
Box Office Opens S:45 Sunday
You May Smoke in the
NEW 7TII AVENUE THEATRE
Oldest Kepair Shop in Miami
AMHKIGAN
SI IOH SHOP
Miami's Best for
,S/xv Repairing
15 S. MIAMI AVENUE
C. B. ItAKKKTT. I'rop.
Complete Automobile
Kebuildem and
Keiiniher
\ll Modern Knuipm't
"Wt
Seventeen Years of Satisfactory Service
P&A GARAGE
N. E. 1 11.11 111 STREET
Wri'iktT Service
Whrtl \ 111 11111, nt
Brake Specialist*
Ml 1 ui and Deliver Your Car"
TELEPHONE :-4(ilU
PHONE J-7.'.':'
Miumi Hrut'h
Office:
IM 2,-lrd SI.
LAUNDRY
2120 N. W. FIRST AVENUE -:- MIAMI
I I oi.'lli \
s
OPEN
DAILY
AND
NDA1
Si / THE PRIMITIVE EVERGLADES M
MUSA ISLE
Seminole Indian Village
OPEN
DAILY
AM)
SUNDA1
LEADERSHIP CHIEF WILLIAM OSCEOLA
.. ... j I ""i>-iiiili Avenge ami Sixteenth Btreel
(,.. -( n Hauler Sir,-. I In I v., nl>--,>, nlh Awnur, Turn Nnrlh
LARGEST COLLECTION OF CAPTIVE ALLIGATOR8
AND CROCODILES
COMPLETE FLORIDA SWAMP ZOO AND MUSEUM
to tKT*TiiViM-'"'v ?i'i "'",' s,-1n.,in"1' l"'1"'" Wrestle the UlUatoi
TO GET TllhKl. l.kc ui) fr hire car r drive veel on Flatter and mirth
en rwenty-eerenth Avenne. ..r rachl "lisceshls" leave. I
Ha. n 1 ,,. m. dally abe on speedbeal "Sp
Miami Hrarh.
Ira*,-..
f rum
r fi, City
l-'I'iridian
Yarht
llnrk.
fsMfslolfrl'MAiuCEfl
77 WASHINGTON AVE. MIAMI BEACH
A COMPLETE LINE OF THE CHOICEST STRICT! Y
KOSHER MEATS AND FRESH KILLED POULTRY
Our imported moats are under the
personal supervision of Rabbi Joseph
Konvitz and Rabbi Isaae SieBel of
Newark. X.J. < ump ;[ l(,. ,.,;,.,.,,
DELICATESSEN GROCERIES, dairy PRODUCTS
FRESH FRUITS AM) VEGETABLES
TTtttiiifffiSS 252 for Free Delivery
......... '' **********+***+*++++#lMH|4t#>
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES
$3.50 Per Year
ACCESS 9:11 A. If. to S:M ,. >;
Conn- In and See Florida's Finest Vault
SAFETY VAULT CORPORATION
SAFE DEPOSIT BLDG., ,.!9 N. fc .ST ST.
ELLA BURNETT. .,.,
Phene :-12:11
Friday, February 3. m,,
sour cream, nuts and raisins, a
flour to make thick. Bake in a slo
oven in muffin pans.
Cream Cheese Pie
Pastry-One-eighth pound but-
ter, three tablespoons sugar, one 1
one-half teaspoon baking P0W(i"r'
one cup flour.
Pilling One-half pound c
cheese, two eggs, three tablespoons
sugar, one tablespoon flour, one pmt
milk, one-half teaspoon vanilla
juice of one lemon.
Cream together butter and suga-
and add egg, baking powder and
flour. Spread in a buttered pie
plate, patting it in firmly. Combine
filling ingredients and pour onto
dough in pie plate. Bake one hour
111 slow oven.
Delaney & Beers
Kodak Fininhinn and Knlargini
( cimminial Work and Homo Pettftla
50% Off on All Amateur Work
212 N. K. Ilh St. Phone 2-JJ.-,
iTIVOLIj
W. Flagler at 8th Phonr 2-3552 '
! Matinee 20.- 2 to 11 Bveabatlkl
SL'N. AM) MON. JAN. 29.3a
Erie Linden and Joan Rlondell
"Big City Blues"
V


'an you pass an Examination}
Are you fully covered)
IVrmit a (.ulf Life Kepre*
xenlalive to rail and help
>ou M'lt-ri a proKrom of
Life Insurance
TODAY
Gulf Life
Insurance Co.
.116 s, > In,Id Ii 1111. 11
Phone 2-41111
In the Heart of Your
Neighborhood
PIG G L Y
W IG G L Y
A Miami Institution
Corne, Nails, Calloused el remowd
painlessly under antiseptic condition!
Arch troubles corrected.
IX >< T< tit
F. N. I.AITtKNTllAI.
Chiropodist
7-9 Halcyon Arcade
Ground Ploor, Opp. Olympla Theatre
Phone 3-30KS
let
MS YOUR
CHEAPEST
SERVANT..
lUeit!


Friday. February 3, 1933.
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page Five
ETY
The Junior Council of Jewish
Women met at the Ponce de Leon
hotel last Tuesday with Miss Millie
nreisen in charge. A very enjoyable
evening was spent. The next meet-
ing of the organization will be held
M February 7, beginning at 8 o'-
clock with Miss Sara Kahn, nation-
al project chairman, in charge, at
tjie same hotel. All members are
ureed to bring magazines for dis-
tribution to the hospitals in this
section. Plans for the Chinese sup-
per to be held on March 5 were dis-
cussed and details will be announced
shortly.

The next meeting of Senior Ha-
dassah will be held at the Miami
Acacia" club on February 13, at 2
p. m. All members are urged to at-
tend.

A meeting of the board of gover-
nors of the Hebrew Athletic club
will be held next Wednesday night
at the community center and will
begin promptly at 9 p. m. All are
invited to attend.
The complete minstrel show re-
cently sponsored by Beth David will
again be produced with the same
excellent cast the early part of
March at Miami Beach at a place
to be announced in an early issue.
Attention,
I isitors!
Tln> pulley of this store, to
meet all advertised prices, al-
though well-known and well-
established among local folks
is good news to Miami's visi-
tors. Think of the hours of
'hopping time you can save by
coming here where stocks are
complete and where you know
prices are guaranteed to be as
low or lower than anywhere
else.
fcED CROSS
' DRUG
DEPARTMENT
K. Hauler St. Phone 2-H1S6
lri( Delivery in Greater Miami
TOUBS CRl'ISES
STEAMSHIP TICKETS
TRAVELERS CHEQUES
Remittances to All Foreign
Countries
American Express
Company
330 E. I I. At.I lit ST.
Miami Tel. 3-3178
By This
Sign
You are
assured of the
BEST
"' Electrical Work |
BUctrie Stovca and Hefriiternt.irt
The Service You Will Appreciate
George La Vigne
Company, Inc.
Klectrical Contractor* and
Eniineera
12 N. E. Third Avenue
Phone 2-7838
The exact date for the annual
Purim ball of Beth David Sisterhood
will be announced in our next issue.

Meeting at the Beth David Tal-
mud Torah last Wednesday at a
special meeting called by its presi-
dent, Mrs. Lena Simon, the Senior
Council of Jewish Women received
encouraging reports from its mem-
bership committee. Setting welfare
relief as its goal for the coining
year, all members have been remit-
ted their past dues and everyone
will be charged for dues beginning
with the present time only, to en-
able the organization to reach its
objectives. A meeting of the organ-
ization will be held next Wednes-
day, February 8, beginning at 2 p.
m. at Beth David Talmud Torah
and all interested in the work of
the senior council are urged to at-
tend.

Mrs. Isidor Cohen is chairman of
the committee sponsoring the bene-
fit bridge this afternoon at the
Blackstone hotel, beginning at 2 p.
in. for the Jewish Welfare bureau.
The public is invited to attend and
enjoy a pleasant afternoon, at the
same time helping relieve the dis-
tress of the needy Jews of this dis-
trict. Delicious refreshments will be
served and prizes will be awarded
for high scores.

Mrs. Sender Argintar and son of
Asheville, N. C, are visiting their
Bister and brother-in-law. Mr. and
Mrs. A. Kirschenbaum of this city,
and expect to remain here for the
balance of the winter season.
*
The noted Jewish cantor, M. Ka-
minsky. arrived last Monday in Mi-
ami from New York City to spend
the balance of the winter season
here. Mr. Kaminsky is renowned
throughout the entire Jewish world
and has had as his pupils many of
the present day famous cantors, in-
gliding Cantor Shlisky, who will
sing here this coming Sunday.
SOUTHERN
LAUNDRY
HI Tamiami Trail (S. W. sth Bt.)
Phone 2-252S
Wc Call and Delh er
CENTRAL BUSINESS
COLLEGE
Cong-re** KuildinK
HI N. K. 2nd Ave. Miami. Kla.
Lowest tuition rat.-- in hlatory. Prl-
vale Ultodng i" S|mni"h. l-'rench and ,
all Conunarcial tubjaeta. Bxpwl In-
itructoi*.
OPEN All. THE TIME
Central Hospital
936 Bluravne Blvd. Phone 2-6712
NURSES ON CALL
OPEN TO MEMBERS OF
THE DADE COl'NTY
MEDICAL SOCIETY
f RENTALS SALES AND SERVICE J
t Stevens Radio |
* Sales Co. +
* open evenings *
* 115 S. E. lat St. Phone 3-1718 J
An enterprising lady in London
has won the hand of the governor
of the Bank of England in mar-
riage, which proves that bankers do
not always say no.
A client came to a shadchan to
discuss terms, etc. The shadchan,
who was not content to let his rec-
ord speak for itself, began to boast
of his great successes of the past,
in order to impress the prospect.
"People married with my help,"
he declared proudly, "are so well
: satisfied with my services that even
I after they get divorced they always
return to me again."
Father (examining his son, Mose,
in general knowledge): "Now, Mose,
j name the four seasons."
Mose (after much thought): "Salt,
| pepper, vinegar and mustard."
Moishc: "Let's celebrate our silver
wedding anniversary next week."
Frieda: "But we've been married
only ten years."
Moishe: "I know that, but the de-
pression being what it is, we could
use the silver."

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Liberman en-
tertained with a dinner party at
their home in Miami Beach last Fri-
day night honoring Mine. Frances
Sebel. Among the guests were Mr.
and Mrs. Dorcey Miller. Mr. and
Mrs. S. Sebel, Mr. and Mrs. I. Got-
lieb, Mr. and Mrs. B. Marcie, Mr.
and Mrs. Irwin M. Cassell. Pink
rosebuds and yellow tea roses were
used m decoration.

Temple Israel Sisterhood spon-
sored a musicale and reception at
Temple Israel last Monday night.
Mrs, Hannah Spiro Asher, organist
and choir director, arranged a pro-
gram of vocal, piano ensembles and
trio numbers.
They included "Five Waltzes."
iBrahms). Ellouise King and Mil-
dred Greenberg; "A Mon Fils"
(Meyerbeer), and "Hills" (La Forgei
Evelyn Raff: coronation scene from
"Boris Godounoff" (Moussorgsky),
Mrs. Asher and Evelyn Plagman
Jones; "Wake Up" (Phillips), "The
Last Hour" (Kramer), and "The
False Prophet" (Scott), Margaret
i Nlmmo; "Blue Danube Waltz"
'Strauss-Chasinsi. Mildred Green-
berg and Miss King; first movement
(it the trio in D minor < Mendel-
ssohn i. Louis Ely. violin; Leonard
! Rose, cello, and Miss Greenberg, pi-
ano; "Dedication" iSchumani, and
"Bird in the Wilderness" (Hors-
I man), Miss Raff; "Andalusian
Dance" (Infante). Mrs. Asher and
Mrs. Jones.
Mrs. I. L. Rosendorf was in charge
I of the reception for members and
friends following the musicale. As-
sisting her in receiving were Mrs.
Isaac Levin, president; Mrs. J. H.
Kaplan, wife of the rabbi; Mrs. D.
J. Apte, Mrs. Morros Cowen and
Mrs. Jack Bernstein. Mrs. H. I. Ma-
Kid, Mrs. Henry Williams, Mrs.
Mitchell Wolfson, Mrs. Herbert Fei-
: : : :- > : : *
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f A. H. ROSS *
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MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-3989
A Place to Dine
in Contentment
ROW I for your health!
Watkins' Alleys
103 W. FLAGLER ST.
Morning Prices Until Noon
10c per line for llin Pina
5c per line for Duck Pina
Evening Prices
Bi( Pin* 2 for 25c
Small Pin* 3 for 25c
"Radio Service"
WM. SIELER
Parts and Accessories
430 NORTH MIAMI AVE.
No Charge for Examination
belman and Mrs. Sidney Meyer pre-
sided at the punch bowls.

Mr. and Mrs. Herman B. Gold-
berg, 308 S. W. Eleventh avenue,
announce the engagement of their
daughter, Louise, to Robert Kasdan
Calm, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob
Cahn of Mount Vernon, N. Y. Miss
Goldberg has many friends in Mi-
ami and is a graduate of Miami
Senior High school. She formerly
made her home in Columbus, Ohio.
Mr. Cahn attended the university of
Miami for several years and is a
member of the Omega Delta and
Phil Epsilon Pi fraternities. He is
associated with the law Arm of Ros-
enhouse & Rosenhouse. The mar-
riage will take place in the early
summer.
*
Some idea of the magnitude of
"Big City Blues," the Warner Bros,
production starring Joan Blondell.
at the Tivoli theatre, next Sunday
and Monday, may be gained from
the fact that its cast list includes
no less than seven of the studio's
featured contract players, and seven
more headliners borrowed from oth-
er studios.
Joan Blondell heads the cast,
while Evelyn Knapp also has an im-
portant role. Three new actresses,
recently taken to Hollywood from
New York successes, make their first
screen appearances at this time, al-
though they are also working sep-
arately in other productions. They
are Gloria Shea, Betty Gilette and
Sheila Terry names to bear in
mind. They may be among the stars
of the future. Guy Kibbee and Lyle
Talbot complete the list of contract
artists.
Playing opposite Miss Blondell in
the sensational drama of life on
Broadway is youthful Eric Linden,
whose work in "The Crowd Roars."
and "Are These Our Children?" will
live long in the memories of theatre
goers. Josephine Dunn and Inez
Courtney are among their party-
playmates, and such personages as
that famous comedienne. Jobyna
Howland, Walter Catlett, Grant
Mitchell and Humphrey Bogart
complete the featured cast list that
still has many others almost equal-
ly well known in smaller supporting
roles.
The noted Russian tenor, Josef
Kallini, a former member of the
Philadelphia Opera Company, who
made such a splendid impression
upon local music lovers in his first
concert at the Blackstone hotel last
Friday night will again be heard in
a recital at the Blackstone hotel
next Sunday evening beginning at
9:30 p. m. Guests of the hotel will
be permitted to attend without
charge while the public will pay a
nominal fee.

The Junior Maccabees' Rabbit
Court 330 is planning a special en-
tertainment program at the Joint
meeting of all the Junior courts in
Miami, Saturday afternoon at the
Studio hall, 2100 W. Flagler street,
in honor of our supreme officers.
Miss Frances Kane, who has been
appearing at the Blackstone hotel
in a series of dances is also appear-
ing at the public entertainments
sponsored by the City of Miami
Beach at Flamingo park.
DANNY
SHEEHAN
"I he Aristocrat of Dancing
and Master of Rhythm"
Former Inntruetor in Dancing
Teacher* Normal School D.M.A.
Eight consecutive years of teach-
ing in Cleveland, O. Ten years
actual stage experience, Keith-
Orphcum Circuit Tap and
stage dancing in all its form
adagio, limbering and stretching.
Every step taught to music, at
rates in keeping with the times.
ENROLL NOW!
The Leslie Bldg.
133(8 N. Miami A\e. Phone 2-0528
Plenty of Parking Space
; : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : ;- :
PIERRE'S
t Beauty Shop
J :
,j* Specializing in Haircuts and *
* Finger Waving Hair Dyed *
2J N. E. lat Ave. Phone 2-3828 *
> : : : : : : > : : : : : : : : : : : : :"
MADELON
beauty shop
17 S. K. l-t Avt, Phune :(-l!7.",l
Where you will meet
Madam Due, Tea Cup Reader
on Mondays and Wednesdays
***??*??*???:::*::***?-
t 1
j* Ins jut on your (iroccr giving you ***
2 *
* NEW YORK BREAD & CAKE *
* COMPANY %
BREAD AND CAKES *
* 471 S. W. 8th St. Phone 2-7832 '
'.-. Branch Store: 155 N. W. 5th St. >
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E. C. THRALL & COMPANY
I Phone I-MI4
*>.a-.*-.o
State Agent New York Fire Insurance Co.
and Metropolitan Assurance I'nderwriters
318-19 MEYER KISER BLDG.
K. C. THKAI.I.. President
Miami. I l.i
V? Sunk Cowra ^fyopjn?
(One 111.., k Ka*t of New Po*t Office!
Everything in Books, Old and New
410 NORTHEAST SECOND AVENUE
Now \on can buy
BILTMORE LAUNDRY SERVICE
at a price that fits your pocket hook!
PHONE 3-3687 21 N. W. 9TH ST.
J. P. ALEXANDER, INC.
19 S. E. FIRST AVENUE (In Foster Building)
High Grade Shoe Repairing
Cripple and Corrective Foot Work Our Specialty
t i
**


Page Six
THE JEWISH FLORI PI AN
Friday, February 3. 193,
SOCIETY
With more than 200 guests attend-
ing the installation ceremonies for
the new officers of Sholem lodge of
Bnai Brith were held at Beth David
Talmud Torah last Sunday evening.
The officers, headed by W. L. Wil-
liams, the president, were installed
by the will-known Bnai Brith work-
er and philanthropist, Adolph
Freund of Detroit. Mich., who de-
livered the main address of the
evening, Rabbis Jacob H. Kaplan,
Jonah E. Caplan and Max Shapiro
spoke, as did Isidor Cohen. Twenty-
nine new members were admitted.
A novelty dance was presented with
the Misses Ida Engler and Rosalyn
Daum as the entertainers. Dancing
was enjoyed until a late hour and
refreshments were served. Respons-
ible for the refreshments and devor-
ations was Mrs. Jake Engler.

The next meeting of the local
Bnai Brith lodge will be held Thurs-
day. February 16.
a a a
Very impressive exercises were
held last Friday night at the Miami
Senior High school when the mid-
year senior class was graduated.
Music was played by the high school
orchestra, the class greeting was de-
livered by Frances Saco and the
invocation and main address of the
evening was given by Dr. L. N.
Stuckey. Mr. W. H. Combs, sr., a
member of the Dade county board
of education, spoke as did Supt.
ROSE WEEK
HART HARDWARE CO.
IS Free Prize* for Brt Roue*
Bring Your* In
44-46 N. E. First Street
Southern Mattress
Company
l.iuir.intt d Work for It"
Kxpert Keno%tintf and I phoUterinn
2141 X. MIAMI AVENUE
Telephone S-58] I
I Charles M. Fisher who presented
the diplomas to the graduates.
Among the Jewish boys and girls
who graduated were: Frederick King
Shochet. Milton Max Kaplan. Rose
Farkas. Esther Neham and Eleanor
Beatrice Sheldon.

At a meeting of the Hebrew Ath-
letic club held last Wednesday in
their community center reports of
the membership and other commit-
tees were received. Donations of
material and furnishings for the im-
provement and furnishing of the
center were reported. A series of
Sunday evening dances will be held
regularly with the nominal admis-
sion charge of 25 cents. The initial
dance this coming Sunday evening
will be free to ladies.

Plans for the annual spring fes-
tival sponsored by Beth Jacob Sis-
terhood of Miami Beach at the Flo-
ridian hotel for March 26. include a
complete floor show and novelty en-
tertainment. Every effort will be
made to make this event an out-
standing evening of entertainment.
>
Jack Negley and his Walkathon-
ers are still attracting crowds every
i night at the Cinderella ballroom.
1 where the starting of the "grind" 1
recently has caused four couples to
drop out during the past week. With
more than 800 hours behind them,
rest periods eliminated, walking is
becoming more and more burden-
some and it takes real stamina at
this time to keep on in the race. No
one can tell who is to be the lucky-
winner of the "bag of gold" at the
end of the "horizon." The contest-
ants furnish the entertainment and
the onlookers help along with their
cries of encouragement and plaudits
of approval. Different floor shows
are shown nightly and because of
the recent attempts of city authori-
ties to stop the show, the attendance
has been increased.
APPEARING AT THE
NEW 7TH AYE. THEATRE
IRENE. OUHNE.
,nfANNIE HURSTS BACK STREET"
St. Petersburg
Notes
Popular Price"
Open All Night
Dr. A. T. knowles
-"'':* \. w. 17th \l%. Phone 1-7SM
MODERN PET hospital
Lame Individual Boarding Run.
Kfferliie Tick Medicine Sold
Shoreland Grill
115 East Flagler Street ,
iNaxt Il National Bank i |
Special MeaN 20c Table d'Hote Dinnerl
Steak". ( hop*. Sea Food". -
I Sand* iche<-, Waff ten
SMITTY'S
DAY A NIGHT GARAGE
N. W. :,th St. and 3rd Ave.
Wrecker Service
Dependable Repairs All Make-
Phone 2-' IT Night Phone 2-1-31
: : : : : : : : : : : : : :- : : : : : :
% An Ideal Table Water
i
% Crystal Springs
*
?
PROM ORANGE CITY
Pure, litthl. -|..irklm.-. palatable,
refre-hing. Awarded Silver Medal
SI. I.oui* Kvpo-ition and hifhe-t
ward for puritv and excellence.
I ouioiann PurchaMc Imposition.
I
I
I
I
Iiinner
-
", i.. -
1 li 11 t>. 1
7MVIS I AH TI RIA
:< N E >.- :. Ave.
Opi Hal Howl
Efficient Si ri ice
Boyi >" irrj your tray
PHONE 2-3645
92 N. E. 28th Street
?********************
>::
Dmp s,;, Wi ndcri Onlj Sea
'"" I" ... Hut..in
Living Spaclmani .
Miami Aquarium
on the f:,':
Pit INS VAI.DEMAR
North End Bayfronl I
.'>ih and Blacayna Boult
Admission 25c Children 10c
Open a.m. to m p.m.,
Congregation Bnai Israel, with
Dr. A. S. Kleinfeld. rabbi, will hold
Friday services at 8 p. m. tonight
when the rabbi will preach a ser-
mon. "Radio, the Loyal Friend of
Man," dedicated to the personnel
and artists of Station WSUN of St.
Petersburg. Fla. Saturday morning
services begin at 9 o'clock and Sun-
day school at 10 a. m. Sunday.
Immediately after the Friday-
night services a social hour will fol-
low.
Mrs. J. Miller and Mrs. H. Jacobs
will sponsor a card party at the
Horowitz hotel for the benefit of
the Ladies" Auxiliary and Aid so-
ciety on Thursday evening. Febru-
ary 9. at 8 o'clock. A large attend-
ance is expected.
The Ladies' auxiliary will have an
open social meeting Tuesday eve-
ning. February 7. at 8 o'clock. Prom-
inent speakers are scheduled to ad-
the gathering.
The baked goods sale held last
Friday for the benefit of the Lad-
ies auxiliary was a complete success
financially, and the auxiliary wishes
to thank its many friends and mem-
bers for their able assistance.
Sixty guests and members of the
Judaic council were entertained
with a charmingly arranged lunch-
eon bridge Tuesday, January 31, at
the Pennsylvania hotel. Mesdames
S. Fyvolent, G. Rippa, S. Rosen-
berg. W. V. Salzer, and the Misses
Rose Horowitz and Annabel Jacobs
acted as hostesses. Following the
luncheon the tables were arranged
for bridge in the lounge, and prizes
at the conclusion were given to Mes-
dames L. Goldberg. R. Muskin, N.
Hyman. A. Esserick. U. Miller, S.
Fyvolent, L. Feinberg. J. Ruffo, M.
Miller. A. Sierkese and M. Golden-
berg.
Receipts For The
Jewish Family
Fruit Cookies
Two eggs (well beaten), one cup
sugar, one-half cup shortening, one
teaspoon grated orange rind, two
tablespoons orange juice, one cup
chopped raisins, two cups flour, one-
fourth teaspoon salt, two teaspoons
baking powder.
Cream shortening; to sugar add
orange rind, allow to stand awhile;
then add to shortening. Mix well,
add egg. orange juice and raisins
and remaining ingredients, sifted
and thoroughly mixed. Roll, cut
and bake in moderate oven.
Fruit Bread
Three cups flour, four teaspoons
baking powder, one and one-half
teaspoons salt, one-fourth teaspoon
soda, one-fourth cup molasses, one
and one-fourth cups milk, one egg.
one-half cup chopped nuts, one cup
dates, raisins, or raw prunes, chop-
ped coarsely.
Sift flour, baking powder and salt.
Dissolve soda in molasses and add
to the flour. Add milk and slightly
beaten egg. Pour in nuts and fruits
and stir. Turn into greased pan.
Radio Synagog
Rabbi S. M. Machtei. founder and
director of the Radio Synagog, will
preach over WIOD at 10 o'clock on
Sunday morning on "Woman's Con-
; tribution to Life." In addition to
! the sermon there will be music,
prayers, and a question box.
At 11 o'clock a Bible study group
will meet at the home of Maj Kauf-
man Mandel. 3012 S. W. Eighth
street. Everyone interested is wel-
come. The class will be conducted
by Rabbi Machtei.
R. S. EVANS
tamoui fur Bargains
AUTOMOBILES
LIBERAL TRADE-INS
LOWEST RATES IN MIAMI
TERMS ANYWHERE IN
THE UNITED STATES
If you want a good used ear
at prices and terms that will
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U orld's Largest Denier"
8S8 wi-;st FLAGLER .1-2403
1622 N.. K. 2ND AVK. 2-.152S

Just Received .
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Buster Brown Z
SHOES FOR CHILDREN
WALK-A-THON
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BALLROOM
S1.000 CASH PRIZES
24 HOI'KS DAILY
PAST THE 798TH mil 1;
GOING ON NOW
Why Buy?
You can now RENT FURNITURE
at prices that are unbelievably low.
LET US CONVINCE YOU
MIAMI MATHER FURNITURE CO.
25-27-29 N. W. First Street
Priced from S1.45 to S3.95
-.
Sensibly Designed
to Insure Comfort
PRICED WAY BELOW
ACTIAL VALUE
MIAMI SHOE STORE
201 N. MIAMI AVENUE
Allow to rise for 15 minutesT^T.
one hour in moderate oven.
Depression note: A deSpondem
citizen of Milwaukee drank a bottle
of red ink and. although still Uvinir
dyed. %
Where you will find ^
very latest styles and prices
to satisfy you and everyone
of the family.
GROVES SHOK
COMPANY
44 N. Miami Ave.
~t
1 llll llllll
MODERN FIREPROOF
STRUCTURI
STEAM HEATED
Rates from
$2.50 Up
DINING ROOM
OPFRATIU) BY
LAURA JACOBSEN
Reasonable
Prices

II OTEL
U R M 1: Y|
34 S. E. Second Avenue
PI

IK rOU REALLY WANT I
FRESH BEEF I
and VEAL \
STOP AND SHOP AT I
Farmer's Meat Market \
71 Northwest fifth Slrrrt
'<>n. hall III", k Waal "I
Miami Avenue) g
Veal Shoulder, 2 lbs.......25c
Legs of Veal, lb............15c a
Veal Chops, lb.............15c
Beef SUaks and Boneless *
Beef, lb..................15c
Formerly Five Yearn nl
Farmeri* City Curb Market
All Meats Fresh Killed
Mil
Beth Jacob Cong.
MIAMI IIF.A.H
presents the
Miami Jewish
Dramatic Players
in
"Die Zushterte Chasono"
A melodrama in four acts,
replete with heart throbs,
drama, joy and laughter, at
the
Ida M. Fisher
High School
lllh Street and l)reel Avenoe
MIAMI MUCH
Sunday, Feb. 12th
at 8:30 p. m.
POPULAR PRICES


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PAGE 1

Page Four THE JEWISH FLORI PI AN •:• •:• -:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:•:• •:•:• %  :• •:•:• •:• •: %  •:• •:%  :•:• •:• •:• •:• •: %  •;• •:• •:••• •:-:•:•: •:• •:• •::• •:•:• %  :• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• # %  :• •:• + &f + •:• •:•> BUttoa Sajttajjng Bullrtitt Edited by RABBI S. M. MACHTEI I :.T a.id Director. Kan.' Synas-acj of America SUNDAY MORNINGS VIOL). MIAMI LORIOA Vol. 1. MIAMI. FLORIDA. FEBRUARY 5. 1933. No. 8. £ •:• •:• •:• # •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• <• <• •:• M* •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• # •:• •:• • •:• • • • •:• • • •:• # •" %  •*• %  %  • %  '%  # *+• # Prayer For Whose Benefit Srrmon DeUeered Sunda>. Januart 2H. Ittt. Scripture Reading, Exodus Chapter X. Verses 7-11, iticl. lliK think of Pharaoh as antiquated. We believe that the ideas he held are not found in this day in the minds and concepts of men and women of an enlightened twentieth century. I would to God that it were true. Unfortunately, we have made rapid strides away from the beliefs of that day. only to find that very many who consider themselves versed in the principles of religion, and. who would greatly resent being considered ignorant of the underlying principles of Divine worship, are no further advanced than was Phraraoh in hi.of worship and prayer to the Creator and Master of the universe. I am often made aware, in startling fashion, of the mistaken beliefs that are held by some of our own people. They. too. agree with Pharaoh m the argument he presented to Moses. I N reply to the question by Pharaoh. But. who and who are they that shall go?" to worship God. NK.said, "We will go with our young and with our old, wit!-, our <.:_... .. ... our daughters ." Pharaoh is quoted as telling MOM-.Not .-. go no* ye that are men. and serve the Lord. The conur.or.ly accepted Interpretation to this dialogue is that Pharaoh was anxious to retain ::-.-. wives and the children as hostages to insure the return 0: -...-.males and the heads of families. That interpretation is not a< : .-•.. %  deeper thought involved. The discussion between Phara rite) principle of religion. Moses well kne '...-. Egyptian 01 worship. He was brought up as a prince and was Initiated inw .... lh< mysteries of the priesthood. He found certain practices in '. ian reiigion lacking in the true essence of religion. When vised Moses that only the men of Israel should go to woi Dd. he conveyed this thought — "A religious rite is similar to a cen arranged for a king. When a reception committee is chosen to wait upor. an earthly ruler, the leading men of various provinces are chosen. These men are carefully selected because their high standing is intended to reflect honor to the sovereign whom they welcome. He is honored only when the reception committee is a body of the greatest men in the land. Thus. Pharaoh asked, ". Who and who are they that shall go?" Later, he advised Moses that it was wrong to take along the women and children. He said. "Go now ye that are men." All that was in keeping with the Egyptian practice. But. Moses did not viewDivine worship from the same angle as did Pharaoh. To him it was not intended to honor the King. God did not need our homage. He did not thrive on the compliments and the flattery of human beings. No profit accrued to the Almighty from the ritual performed by man. The benefit from worship ol God rested upon man — upon the worshipper and not upon the Worshipped. Therefore, young and old. women and children, must attend the rite of worship that they might be benefitted. The worshipper is honored by his communion with the Worshipped. W HEN ignorant zealots, in the synagogues, or out of them, have made a great fuss about their devotion to God and their manner of worship. I have, often, been compelled to tell them that God does not weave their prayers into a great shawl to throw over His shoulders to keep out the chill of winter; that He does not utilize their chanting to convert it into food and nourishment for Himself and His Heavenly Hosts; that God does not require the praise and the worship for any benefit to Himself. True, such apparently sacrilegious words from the mouth of a rabbi have not helped his cause within the circles where idolatry reigns in the guise of pure religion. Those who pray to God for God's benefit have not moved one inch from the days of Pharaoh. In this very day they limit prayers to men only and they seek the prominent to appear for them to honor Him by whom they are honored. It would never occur to these that even the veriest sinner by his supplication fits himself to receive the Divine mercy. T HE Psalms and the teachings of the sages are replete with examples of the true purpose of prayer — "When they have cried unto the Lord in their trouble. He will save them out of their distress." "Because He hath inclined His ear unto me, therefore will I call upon Him as long as I live." "Prayer is good for man both before his fate has been decreed and after it has been decreed." The rabbis teach that prayer "is good tor man." No good can accrue to God from any act by man. Yet, foolish individuals rush to the house of worship "to honor God." Suppose that an invalid who had just been rushed to a hospital were to tell you that he came to the hospital for the benefit of the doctor? Would you call that one rational? E QUALLY unsound is the contention that only men must pray; that women and children need not pray Because they are not sufficiently important to honor God; or, that only those who have the stamp of approval of any group of human beings, the chosen ones, are the proper ones to pray before the God of All. All these beliefs are still prevalent because man has created God in his own image; because man has endowed God with the properties of an earthly King and worships Him by these standards. When man will have learned that he has been created by God, and, that to be happy, he must live by the standards of the Creator, we shall have mad a forward step in the direction of recognizing the Fatherhood of God. As yet, most men have an illusion of being parents to the Deity and they treat God as a spoiled child who must be pampered and supplicated, cajoled and coaxed. W E need no revision of religious truths. We need no revision of Divine teachings. What we most sorely need is a fearless and honest ministry who has learned to know God as did the Patriarchs who "walked with God." We have need for a laity that wants the esoteric religion — and, that, if it wants it not because it has no understanding of it. will, Recipes for the Jewish Family Almond Biscuits Prepare baking powder biscuits about two inches in diameter. Bake just before serving. Break them open, butter, spread a mixture of honey and toasted chopped almonds. Soup Cakes Two eggs, two tablespoons chicken fat. one teaspoon baking powder, inn' and one-half cups flour, threefourths cup cold water. Mix ingredients until well blended and smooth. Pour the batter into greased muffin pans. Bake about three-quarters hour, until light brown. There should be a slight hollow in the center of each cake, for they rise mainly at the sides. Recipe makes one dozen soup cakes. Spice Cake One tablespoon butter, threefourths cup sugar, two eggs (beaten) ; one teaspoon ginger, one and onehalf cups flour, one teaspoon baking powder, one teaspoon cocoa, one uii nutmeg, one teaspoon baking soda, one tablespoon boiling water, one-half cup sour cream, onehalf cup walnuts (chopped), onehall cup raisins (chopped), one-half c up molasses, Cream sugar and butter, add eggs, then dissolve in boiling water all the spices, soda, baking powder and molasses and add to miture. Add at least, permit its teachers to reveal the truth of God's word, when those teachers show evidence of knowing it — a laity that will not hold to the beliefs of Pharaoh merely because it was "good enough" for an Egyptian monarch. Pray to God for your own benefit. Ask and ye shall receive. NEW 7th AVE. THEATRE 3033 \. W. 7lh AM-. Phone 1*4351 Sunda> and Monday, Keh. ."i-f "BACK STREET" with Irene Dunne and John Boles ADULTS 20r — CHILDREN loe Box Office Opens S:45 Sunday You May Smoke in the NEW 7TII AVENUE THEATRE Oldest Kepair Shop in Miami AMHKIGAN SI IOH SHOP Miami's Best for ,S/xv Repairing 15 S. MIAMI AVENUE C. B. ItAKKKTT. I'rop. Complete Automobile Kebuildem and Keiiniher \ll Modern Knuipm't "Wt Seventeen Years of Satisfactory Service P&A GARAGE N. E. 1 11.11 111 STREET Wri'iktT Service Whrtl \ 111 11111, nt Brake Specialist* Ml 1 ui and Deliver Your Car" TELEPHONE :-4(ilU PHONE J-7.'.':' Miumi Hrut'h Office: IM 2,-lrd SI. LAUNDRY 2120 N. W. FIRST AVENUE -:MIAMI I I oi.'lli \ s OPEN DAILY AND NDA1 Si / THE PRIMITIVE EVERGLADES M MUSA ISLE Seminole Indian Village OPEN DAILY AM) SUNDA1 LEADERSHIP CHIEF WILLIAM OSCEOLA .. ... %  !" j I "••"i>-iiiili Avenge ami Sixteenth Btreel (,.. %  -( „n Hauler Sir,-. I In I v., nl>--, %  >, nlh Awnur, Turn Nnrlh LARGEST COLLECTION OF CAPTIVE ALLIGATOR8 AND CROCODILES COMPLETE FLORIDA SWAMP ZOO AND MUSEUM TO t•KT*TiiViM-'"' v ?i'i "'",' s,1 n ,in 1 l "' 1 "'" Wrestle the UlUatoi TO GET TllhKl. —l.kc ui) f„r hire car „r drive veel on Flatter and mirth en rwenty-eerenth Avenne. ..r rachl "lisceshls" — leave. I Ha. n — 1 ,,. m dally —abe on speedbeal "Sp Miami Hrarh. Ira*,-.. f rum r fi, City l-'I'iridian Yarht llnrk. fsMfslolfrl'MAiuCEfl 77 WASHINGTON AVE. MIAMI BEACH A COMPLETE LINE OF THE CHOICEST STRICT! Y KOSHER MEATS AND FRESH KILLED POULTRY Our imported moats are under the personal supervision of Rabbi Joseph Konvitz and Rabbi Isaae Sie B el of Newark. X.J. < ump ;„„[ l( ,. ,.„,„;,„ .,.,, DELICATESSEN GROCERIES, DAIRY PRODUCTS FRESH FRUITS AM) VEGETABLES TTtttiiifffiSS £252 for Free Delivery '• '•' ••••••••••••••••••• **********+***+*++ ++#lMH | 4t#> SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES $3.50 Per Year ACCESS 9:11 A. If. TO S:M ,. >; ConnIn and See Florida's Finest Vault SAFETY VAULT CORPORATION SAFE DEPOSIT BLDG., ,. !9 N. fc .ST ST. ELLA BURNETT. .,.,„ Phene : %  -12:11 Friday, February 3. m,, sour cream, nuts and raisins, A flour to make thick. Bake in a slo oven in muffin pans. Cream Cheese Pie Pastry-One-eighth pound butter, three tablespoons sugar, one 1 one-half teaspoon baking P0W(i r one cup flour. Pilling — One-half pound c cheese, two eggs, three tablespoons sugar, one tablespoon flour, one p mt milk, one-half teaspoon vanilla juice of one lemon. Cream together butter and sugaand add egg, baking powder and flour. Spread in a buttered pie plate, patting it in firmly. Combine filling ingredients and pour onto dough in pie plate. Bake one hour 111 slow oven. Delaney & Beers Kodak Fininhinn and Knlargini ( cimminial Work and Homo Pettftla 50% Off on All Amateur Work 212 N. K. Ilh St. Phone 2-JJ.-, iTIVOLIj W. Flagler at 8th Phonr 2-3552 Matinee 20.2 to 11 Bveabatlkl SL'N. AM) MON. JAN. 29.3a Erie Linden and Joan Rlondell "Big City Blues" V 'an you pass an Examination} Are you fully covered) IVrmit a (.ulf Life Kepre* xenlalive to rail and help >ou M'lt-ri a proKrom of Life Insurance TODAY Gulf Life Insurance Co. .116 s, > In,Id Ii 1111. 11 Phone 2-41111 In the Heart of Your Neighborhood PIG G L Y W IG G L Y A Miami Institution Corne, Nails, Calloused el remowd painlessly under antiseptic condition! Arch troubles corrected. IX >< T< tit F. N. I.AITtKNTllAI. Chiropodist 7-9 Halcyon Arcade Ground Ploor, Opp. Olympla Theatre Phone 3-30KS let MS YOUR CHEAPEST SERVANT.. lUeit!



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1933 FEB



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II ciHiv, February 3, 1933. THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN PUBLISHED EVERY •FRIDAY by Ihe jKttlSII KI.ORHHAN PI'BLISHING CO. fi'JI S. W. Fifteenth Avenue j. LOUIS SIIOCIIET, Editor P. O. Bex 2973 Miami, Florida Phone 2-1183 ocond ela a matter July 4, Ihe Post Office at Minmi. Florida, .,„. A, I of March 3, 1879. Wl-T 'AIM BEACH OFFICE II I i hih Street Mr-. M. Bel rebniek. Representative I'liSt'ltll'TION .,. Mant!-* ilr.e Year 11.00 $2.0* FRIDA1 FEBRUARY 3, Vol. 6, No. 5. 1933. ,,vvv,v-.••••-•"• %  V *• '• %  v % ••• v %  ;• •> • %  •;•;• "SWEET WATERS of MEGIDDO" Hi RABBI LAZARUS AXELKUD iCiintinued from last week) I turned at the touch on my elbow. An elderly woman, bewigged and beshawled. turned to me appeallngly. 'GefTint fir mir, bitte, die plattz." and she handed me an old prayer book, full of Techinoth for all occasions. I fulfilled her wish. Dankc. danke" — she was profuse in her thanks. A fine old lady; she must have traveled far for this spiritual dellgift. I pictured her petitioning Bar Jochai to protect her children and grandchildren, and to inspire them with a greater love for home and God. A strange world. Her children were at that very moment, if my assumptions were correct, dancing and waltzing to the :une of jazz melody, far removed (ton tins quaint and awe-inspiring scene. We pass on to the roof of the building. Here, a Chasidic dancer *U entertaining the onlookers by a series of dances calculated to provoke holy Chasidic zeal and inspiration. He twisted and doubled himself up distortedly, his hands working rapidly, his head often touching the ground as he tore his way around the roof, singing hysterically until be fell in a swoon. The dance was immediately taken up by anI other exponent of this fine art. The crowd cheered loudly, urging the 1 dancers to still more hysteria. The sun had set, and simultaneously a fire had been started. This was the commencement of the Hillulah Dbar Jochai, the celebration in honor of Bar Jochai. The fire grew rapidly, the flames leaping and dancing, black smoke curling upwards in huge spiral columns. This fire could be seen easily from Safed, 10 miles away. The crowd gathered around the fire, and soon the flames assumed alarming shapes. Nothing was spared to honor the Great Rabbin. Silks and satins were thrown carelessly Into this great burning mass by pious ladies to appease the wrath of the Are god. The flames danced, the people danced, a veritable war dance was in progress. Round and round the fire they went, frenziedly they increased their speed, swinging their hands in the air, singing Bar Jochai melodies. We looked on in mild bewilderment. "Is this the African Congo?" asks the Connecticut member of our group. The German journalist had ceased his babble, the agronomist had apparently forgotten his orange groves, and I thought I was in the Page Three THE GLOOM "I hear your son's at college." "Yep." "How's he doing?" "Pretty good, I guess; he's taking three courses. I've Just paid out ten dollars for Latin, ten dollars for Greek, and a hundred dollars for Scotch." Bus Driver: "Madam, that child will have to pay full fare. He is five years of age." Madam: "But he can't be. I have only been married four years." Young Mrs. Levlnson and her best friend were in the midst of one of those delicious afternoons during which two women confess their innermost secrets to each other. "Oh. Ella," she sighed tragically, "I am most unhappy. I am convinced that my husband married me only for my money." "Well, my dear," answered Ella, "at least you have the consolation jungle, witnessing an ancient war \ of knowing that he is not as stupid dance. Long-bearded Jews in Kafa man as you used to think him." tan and turban, pioneer Chalutzim, Ye.shiva bachoorim with dangling earlocks, Yemenite Jews, Persian, Indian and Bukharan Jews, bejewelled and bespangled, all were seized with this infectious holiday spirit, fascinated by the lurid flare of that immense fire. Huge tins of olive oil were being poured on the flames, which were now licking at the parapet walls. Dangerously near the crowd surged, exhausted and weary with this supernatural burst of energy, their faces flushed with the heat and their own violent passionate emotions. (To be concluded) When a man has so much money that it troubles him he can easily find some women who will be glad to share his troubles. As one aggregation of ruins to another, it is hoped that Athens will keep American investors informed from time to time concerning Insult. Little Sarah came running to her mother, breathless. "What are you so excited about, dear?" asked her mother, smiling. "I just saw Sonya kissing Joseph, the yeshiva student!" cried the little girl. "That's all right," answered her mother. "They are announcing their betrothal this Sunday." "Oh," answered Sarah thoughtfully. Then she asked: "Mother, when will papa and our cook announce their betrothal?" Something each day — a smile — It is not much to give, And the little gifts of life Make sweet the days we live. The world has weary hearts That we can bless and cheer. And a smile for every day Makes sunshine all the year. "Get out of here!" cried the vaudevillian as the cat walked across the stage during his act. "This is a monologue — not a catalogue!" When old friends meet who long have been apart, Glad greetings spoken with hand clasped in hand — Then falls a silence, as we waiting stand, The time-tried understanding of the heart. Oh. memories that make the pulses start — The smoldering gleams that now are quickly fanned And light the years between; a golden strand, A light that shows real friends can never part. Oh, the silences of friendship that SOUTHERN BROTHERS MIAMI BUSINESS UNIVERSITY, INC. Fifty Thousand Young People in the Business World Today llaie Been Trained by Southern Brothers 3RD FLOOR, TOWNI.EY BLDU. 77 K. Flailer St. at lit Ave. Phone 2-2320 MIAMI. FLORIDA is old — How full of memories gathered year by year! How truly said that silences are gold; The gulf of time is spanned by hands so dear. Though spoken words leave many things untold. The word unspoken brings its message clear. Minor leagues must scrape along this season on so thin a margin there is talk of putting an elastic on the ball in case of a foul into the stands. Out of 352 who thought of taking it up, only seven persons in New York have settled down to serious careers of being Wendel heirs. A skilled solver of puzzles suggests that the novice tackle jigsaws by working around the edges first, like politicians with a depression. A popular wedding gift in Lapland, says a travel letter, is the reindeer, embracing as it does a winter's supply of meat, a hat rack and material for a dress. "An Ohio college boys pays his way with magicians' feats." The usual rule is to write father for another feat of prestidigitation. The press reports the passing of the inventor of billiard chalk, as substance formerly worn on the vest to indicate that one was not open to offers of employment. We read again that a Bostonian was showing a visiting Briton around. "This is Bunker Hill Monument — where Warren fell, you know." The visitor surveyed the -"\ lofty shaft thoughtfully, and then said: "Nasty fall! Killed him, of course." A Texas paper says the Lone Star state last summer produced the biggest cheese in the world. The Ferguson family, which has been in existence for years, treats this counter-claim with the contempt it deserves. It is a wise fool who can keep his lack of wisdom to himself. Love that laughs at locksmiths never giggles at the plumber. Marriage is the end of all man's troubles —one end or the other. Poor relations wonder if the rich one really has a poor memory. Some men are like silver-plated knives; they look bright, but are dull. Some of our girls do their sleighing in January and their slaying in June. A girl has a young man twisted around her finger when he circles it with an engagement ring. Some senators have such broad views that they can straddle almost any question. Special Program WQA'M featuring "The Aristocrats" with Hubert Falrchlld a* Cue*t-Announcer Today 1 :00 p. m.. Club Chatter 1 :1" p. m.i MUKH Isle Seminule Indian Village Program. 1 ;80 p. m.. Menial and Nervous DIaeaaaii by Miami'* Foremost Neurologist. 1 iSO p. Bin la Prance Barenadara, courtesy I,a France Cleaner*. Kmlorsetl by MILADY'S RADIO CI.UB Headquarters, Miramar Hotel %  • "> ONCE ONLY SUNDAY February 5th 3 P. M. BETH DAVID Congregation presents Cantor Joseph Z. Shlisky World Renowned Tenor at the TEMPLE THEATRE 345 N. W. THIRD STREET In a Program of Traditional Melodies, Folk Songs and Operatic Arias — POPULAR PRICES — I %  i



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Page Two THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Friday, February 3, f Last Monday evening the local chapter of Junior Hadassah held a very interesting meeting at the Ponce de Leon hotel when plans for the participation of the local organization in the coming southern regional conference of Hadassah were discussed. Rabbi Max Shapiro of Beth David congregation delivered a short address and Millicent Rubin was heard in a number of readings. Miss Lena Weinkle and Miss Bede Goldenblank were two of the delegates chosen to represent the local organization at the Savannah conference. The remaining two delegates will be chosen shortly. Pollowing the program and business a social hour was spent and refreshments were served. • • An important meeting of the Ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation was held at the synagog last Tuesday evening. Reports of the recent dance were received showing that a substantial sum had been realized for the Talmud Torah work of the congregation. Plans for the coming Purim ball of the organization were made and Mrs. Nathan Abramson was named chairman of the arrangeminl.s committee with Mrs. Al Hiisch and Mrs. Louis Pallott as assistant chairmen. The resignation of Mrs. Ida Buckstein as president Nightly Dinner DANCE ...in... THE E 17TH FI.OOK COLUMBUS HOTEL DINNER SERVED 6 p. m. to 9:30 p. m. DANCING 7 p. m. to 1 a. m. S1.50 PER PERSON HARRY RICHARDSON and his CAVALIKRS We Specialize in HOSIERY Surely We Can Serve You Best Come to The HOSIERY SHOP MRS. JOHN A. CADDIS 117 Si v li.ild Vrrade of the auxiliary because of all health was received and after repeated efforts to have her withdraw the resignation were unavailing, it was accepted with regret. Mrs. J. L, Shochet will serve as president until the annual elections in May. Following the business meeting a social hour was spent. • • Mrs. Max Scliaff entertained at a luncheon bridge shower last Thursday afternoon in honor of her niece. Uisa Dorothy Kaplan, whose marriage to Mr. Sidney Pepper of this 1 city will be an event of the early spring. The house was attractively decorated with fresh garden flowers in a color scheme of gold and green. Prizes for high scores were awarded .0 Mrs. S. J. Spector, Mrs. J. August and Mrs. M. Dubler. Miss Kaplan was the recipient of a large number of beautiful gifts. Assisting the hostess in receiving were Miss Kaplan, the guest of honor. Mrs. Max Hoffman, aunt of the brideelect. Mrs. Kowane and Mrs. Schonfeld. • Mr. and Mrs. Max FanarofT of Washington, D. C. are spending the winter season here. • • The annual bridge sponsored by the senior chapter of Miami Hadassah for the purpose of raising money for the Hadassah medical fund will be held at the Floridian hotel. Miami Beach, on Wednesday afternoon, February 15. Delicious refreshments will be served during he afternoon and prizes will be awarded for high scores. Mrs. Milton Weiner is chairman of the arrangements committee in charge of this annual event and is making every ctrort to make this bridge one of the outstanding events of the current si ason. • • • Stars of the local night clubs including Chester Alexander. Lew Hampton, Al Parker and Danny Sheehan will appear at the seventh annual dance of Temple Israel Sis* LA SALLE beauty sliop Phone 2-T.6H7 X •;• 114 CENTRAL ARCADE •:• nnd X I'll BEYBOLD BUILDING % Mezzanine Floor All Branches Beaut) Culture and Barber Shop > Soft Water I'scd ... .•. •. .•. .•. .• ... .•.... ... .-. ............ .-..;..;. .;. .;.... .;. .;. Estelles 11, Gowns Moderately Priced 200 E. FI.AGLER ST. ARE WE l p l „ B faith with those who trust us, are we living up to our obligations if we risk their future happiness by ignoring the problems that would arise for them if, some day, wc did not come home? Life Insurance offers the safe and certain answer. There is no substitute. A Southern Health & Life Insurance Policy on each one is necessary to protect the others from the privation and expense caused by the last illness and death. A few pennies each week is the total cost. SOUTHERN LIFE & HEALTH INSURANCE COMPANY T. S. COOK, Manager 610 Realty Hoard Bid*. Phone 2-3419 terhood on Saturday evening, February 11. at the Miami Beach Golf and Country club, beginning at 9:30 p. m. Prizes will be awarded for the 1 best dancers in the contests that will be held during the evening. Mrs. Herbert Srppler is chairman. %  • • Mrs. J. A. Richter is chairman of irran ements committee i>rcparlng for the celebration of the ninth anniversary of the founding of Temple Israel Sisterhood. This will be observed this year witli a luncheon bridge at the beautiful Blackstone hotel. Miami Beach, on February 9. beginning at 12:30 p. m. The public is invited to attend and to make their reservations with the chairman. A nominal charge will be made. Believing that the needs oi the distressed wards of the Jewish Welfare bureau and their relief is paramount at this time to any other calls being made for help, the Ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation has postponed its annual Purim ball scheduled for the latter part of February, and will hold this gala event several days after the annual Charity ball being sponsored by the Jewish Welfare bureau. Solicitations for advertisements in the annual program will not begin until after the welfare ball program has been closed. Representatives of the Ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation will actively cooperate with the ball committee of the annual Charity ball to help raise funds to relieve the local poor. • • • Appearing at the New Seventh Avenue theatre this coming Sunday and Monday is Irene Dunn, supported by John Boles in Fannie Hursts 'Back Street.'' The opening scenes, showing the old horse-car days in Cincinnati, are done with realism and are very effective: The hero, a young banker, meets •.inheroine two months before he is to be married to another woman; they fall desperately in love with each other. He arranges for her to meet his mother accidentally. On the appointed day. Just as she Is ready to leave for the meeting, her sister BObbingly tells her that she had had an affair with a young man and that unless the heroine helped her to stop the man from leaving town she would kill herself. She aids her sister but by so doing she loses her one chance of becoming acquainted with the hero's mother. she does not see the hero again until five years later when they accidentally meet in New York. Their love flames up anew-. He tells her that he is married and the father of two children, but that he needs her. He sets her up in an apartment and they live together. Her existence is dull. She is not allowed to be seen with the hero and is forced to live a secluded life for by this time the hero had become a prominent banker. A former suitor proposes marriage to her and she accepts. But l he hero prevents her from marrying bj telling her he cannot live without her. She goes back to the hem and their affair continues on for 25 years. The hero's children find out. about it but his wife never suspects. While in Paris on a trip the hero dies. His last thoughts were of the heroine. His son goes to the heroine and offers to take care Of her. When he leaves she dies from grief. It is a playing well worth seeing. The plot was adapted from the novel by Fannie Hurst. It was directed by John M. Stahl. in the cast are June Clyde, Oeorge Meeker, Zasu Pitts. Shirley Grey. William Bakewell and others. • • • Meeting last Wednesday night at the home of Mrs. Bertha B. Levy, its chairman, the general arrangements committee for the annual Charity ball cf the Jewish Welfare bureau completed plans lor the event which will be held at the Floridian hotel on March 12. Plans submitted show that the prices set for tickets will be far below the value oi the entertainment being provided, exclusive of dancing. Stars of the night clubs in Florida, vaudeville and movie stars here for brief vacations have all signified their willingness to help raise funds fa I the needy Jews of this district vd program committee is out worlun, for the annual souvenir pr 0 gJ| and all are urged to place adv er tisements in this as a means ol showing their concrete help t 0 tlB poor. The advertising commit J will meet at luncheon every w^j nesday at 12:30 at the Pai at jJ %  Kosher 1 restaurant for reports of th e i progress of their work. All interest. ed in helping make this aRair a success are urged to get in l0Uch with the chairman. Permission to use its community center was extended to the A.Z.A. (Junior Bnai Brith) to meet evert Tuesday night, by the Hebrew Ath-1 letic club. The same privilege is extended to any Jewish organization in the city and no charge of anv | kind will be made. • • • The annual Donor's luncheon I sponsored by Senior Hadassah will | be held Monday, February 27. Thosn who have not yet raised their quotas to enable them to attend are urged to communicate with Mrs. Barney I Weinkle, chairman, Mrs. Freda Lutzky or Mrs. Lee Weiner. • • • The group in conversational Hebrew meets regularly at Beth David every Tuesday evening from 7:30 to | 8:30. and is followed by the history discussion group from 8:30 to 9:30. Both classes are under the direction of Rabbi Max Shapiro. •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •: %  •;. *.;..;..;. *.;. .> .•. .;..;..;.. : .... | Riverside | |Hospital,Inc4 • &f 1450 S. W. 7TH ... -:•:• •:• STANDARDIZED •:• AMERICAN COLLEGE ST. MRS. ELIZABETH SHAW, Bapt. STANDARDIZED ACCORDING TO Tin: RIT.F.S OK THE OF BURGEONS You Arc Ready NOW for PAINTS/ We do not give price per can We give value for dollar PAINTS PUTT & TINGLE T "Miami's First Exclus'ne Paint Store" DISTRIBUTORS Wholesale Retail 49 Southwest First Street Phone 2-5012 Open |a m.mhir. „f ih, •;. Hade Count) MeHi.nl So.ietv i, Telephone 2-M7.-, .% Open the year 'rmtml COLONIAL TOWERS Hotel t Formerly Henrietiji Towers) 332 S. E. Second Are. Miami. Florida A more perfect location could not be desired. Rates reasonable — and you will meet your friends at COLONIAL TOWERS HOTEL ROBERT A. MANNING, K*T. MARINE HARDWARE YACHT SUPPLIES PISHING TACKLE PAINTS & OILS DISTRIBUTORS OF DKVOE PAINTS & VARNISHES Prices Now Much Lower PHILLIPS HARDWARE CO. 301-303 N. Miami Avenue Phone 2-8445 EVERYTHING FOR THE BEACH .SSP"?. Sl,TS BEACH ROBES and PAJAMAS %  lal.n. and (|„„ n K „lt For „,„ Wfflmen nd children 100-108 N. K. 2ND AVKM g "THE SHOP of QUALITY" IRVINE'S One Bloek North of Ka.t Flacler Street 110-108 N. E. 2ND AVKM E THE MIAMI LAUNDRY Noted for the Fine Quality of Its Work 28 N. E. 3rd St. Pho ne 2-5111



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Page Six THE JEWISH FLORI PI AN Friday, February 3. 193, SOCIETY With more than 200 guests attending the installation ceremonies for the new officers of Sholem lodge of Bnai Brith were held at Beth David Talmud Torah last Sunday evening. The officers, headed by W. L. Williams, the president, were installed by the will-known Bnai Brith worker and philanthropist, Adolph Freund of Detroit. Mich., who delivered the main address of the evening, Rabbis Jacob H. Kaplan, Jonah E. Caplan and Max Shapiro spoke, as did Isidor Cohen. Twentynine new members were admitted. A novelty dance was presented with the Misses Ida Engler and Rosalyn Daum as the entertainers. Dancing was enjoyed until a late hour and refreshments were served. Responsible for the refreshments and devorations was Mrs. Jake Engler. • • • The next meeting of the local Bnai Brith lodge will be held Thursday. February 16. a a a Very impressive exercises were held last Friday night at the Miami Senior High school when the midyear senior class was graduated. Music was played by the high school orchestra, the class greeting was delivered by Frances Saco and the invocation and main address of the evening was given by Dr. L. N. Stuckey. Mr. W. H. Combs, sr., a member of the Dade county board of education, spoke as did Supt. ROSE WEEK HART HARDWARE CO. IS Free Prize* for Brt Roue* Bring Your* In 44-46 N. E. First Street Southern Mattress Company l.iuir.intt d Work for It" Kxpert Keno%tintf and I phoUterinn 2141 X. MIAMI AVENUE Telephone S-58] I I Charles M. Fisher who presented the diplomas to the graduates. Among the Jewish boys and girls who graduated were: Frederick King Shochet. Milton Max Kaplan. Rose Farkas. Esther Neham and Eleanor Beatrice Sheldon. • • • At a meeting of the Hebrew Athletic club held last Wednesday in their community center reports of the membership and other committees were received. Donations of material and furnishings for the improvement and furnishing of the center were reported. A series of Sunday evening dances will be held regularly with the nominal admission charge of 25 cents. The initial dance this coming Sunday evening will be free to ladies. • • • Plans for the annual spring festival sponsored by Beth Jacob Sisterhood of Miami Beach at the Floridian hotel for March 26. include a complete floor show and novelty entertainment. Every effort will be made to make this event an outstanding evening of entertainment. • > • Jack Negley and his Walkathoners are still attracting crowds every i night at the Cinderella ballroom. 1 where the starting of the "grind" 1 recently has caused four couples to drop out during the past week. With more than 800 hours behind them, rest periods eliminated, walking is becoming more and more burdensome and it takes real stamina at this time to keep on in the race. No one can tell who is to be the luckywinner of the "bag of gold" at the end of the "horizon." The contestants furnish the entertainment and the onlookers help along with their cries of encouragement and plaudits of approval. Different floor shows are shown nightly and because of the recent attempts of city authorities to stop the show, the attendance has been increased. APPEARING AT THE NEW 7TH AYE. THEATRE IRENE. OUHNE. n fANNIE HURSTS BACK STREET" St. Petersburg Notes Popular Price" Open All Night Dr. A. T. knowles -"'':* \. w. 17th \l%. Phone 1-7SM MODERN PET HOSPITAL Lame Individual Boarding Run. Kfferliie Tick Medicine Sold %  SHORELAND GRILL %  115 East Flagler Street iNaxt Il %  National Bank i | Special MeaN 20c Table d'Hote Dinnerl %  Steak". ( hop*. Sea Food". I Sand* iche<-, Waff ten SMITTY'S DAY A NIGHT GARAGE N. W. :,th St. and 3rd Ave. Wrecker Service Dependable Repairs All MakePhone 2-'• IT — Night Phone 2-1-31 •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:•:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• % An Ideal Table Water i % Crystal Springs &f PROM ORANGE CITY Pure, litthl. -|..irklm.-. palatable, refre-hing. Awarded Silver Medal SI. I.oui* Kvpo-ition and hifhe-t %  ward for puritv and excellence. I ouioiann PurchaMc Imposition. I I I I Iiinner ", i.. 1 li • 11 t>. 1 7MVIS I AH TI RIA %  :< N E >.%  :. Ave. Opi %  • Hal • Howl Efficient Si ri ice Boyi >" irrj your tray PHONE 2-3645 92 N. E. 28th Street &f ******************** >:••:• DMP S, %  ;, Wi ndcri Onlj Sea '"" I" ... Hut..in Living Spaclmani Miami Aquarium on the f:,': Pit INS VAI.DEMAR North End Bayfronl I .'>ih and Blacayna Boult Admission 25c — Children 10c Open • a.m. to M p.m., Congregation Bnai Israel, with Dr. A. S. Kleinfeld. rabbi, will hold Friday services at 8 p. m. tonight when the rabbi will preach a sermon. "Radio, the Loyal Friend of Man," dedicated to the personnel and artists of Station WSUN of St. Petersburg. Fla. Saturday morning services begin at 9 o'clock and Sunday school at 10 a. m. Sunday. Immediately after the Fridaynight services a social hour will follow. Mrs. J. Miller and Mrs. H. Jacobs will sponsor a card party at the Horowitz hotel for the benefit of the Ladies" Auxiliary and Aid society on Thursday evening. February 9. at 8 o'clock. A large attendance is expected. The Ladies' auxiliary will have an open social meeting Tuesday evening. February 7. at 8 o'clock. Prominent speakers are scheduled to adthe gathering. The baked goods sale held last Friday for the benefit of the Ladies auxiliary was a complete success financially, and the auxiliary wishes to thank its many friends and members for their able assistance. Sixty guests and members of the Judaic council were entertained with a charmingly arranged luncheon bridge Tuesday, January 31, at the Pennsylvania hotel. Mesdames S. Fyvolent, G. Rippa, S. Rosenberg. W. V. Salzer, and the Misses Rose Horowitz and Annabel Jacobs acted as hostesses. Following the luncheon the tables were arranged for bridge in the lounge, and prizes at the conclusion were given to Mesdames L. Goldberg. R. Muskin, N. Hyman. A. Esserick. U. Miller, S. Fyvolent, L. Feinberg. J. Ruffo, M. Miller. A. Sierkese and M. Goldenberg. Receipts For The Jewish Family Fruit Cookies Two eggs (well beaten), one cup sugar, one-half cup shortening, one teaspoon grated orange rind, two tablespoons orange juice, one cup chopped raisins, two cups flour, onefourth teaspoon salt, two teaspoons baking powder. Cream shortening; to sugar add orange rind, allow to stand awhile; then add to shortening. Mix well, add egg. orange juice and raisins and remaining ingredients, sifted and thoroughly mixed. Roll, cut and bake in moderate oven. Fruit Bread Three cups flour, four teaspoons baking powder, one and one-half teaspoons salt, one-fourth teaspoon soda, one-fourth cup molasses, one and one-fourth cups milk, one egg. one-half cup chopped nuts, one cup dates, raisins, or raw prunes, chopped coarsely. Sift flour, baking powder and salt. Dissolve soda in molasses and add to the flour. Add milk and slightly beaten egg. Pour in nuts and fruits and stir. Turn into greased pan. Radio Synagog Rabbi S. M. Machtei. founder and director of the Radio Synagog, will preach over WIOD at 10 o'clock on Sunday morning on "Woman's Con; tribution to Life." In addition to the sermon there will be music, prayers, and a question box. At 11 o'clock a Bible study group will meet at the home of Maj Kaufman Mandel. 3012 S. W. Eighth street. Everyone interested is welcome. The class will be conducted by Rabbi Machtei. R. S. EVANS tamoui fur Bargains AUTOMOBILES LIBERAL TRADE-INS LOWEST RATES IN MIAMI TERMS ANYWHERE IN THE UNITED STATES If you want a good used ear at prices and terms that will Satisfy you. just telephone R. S. EVANS U orld's Largest Denier" 8S8 WI-;ST FLAGLER — .1-2403 1622 N.. K. 2ND AVK. — 2-.152S %  Just Received A Complete Line Buster Brown Z SHOES FOR CHILDREN %  WALK-A-THON CINDERELLA BALLROOM S1.000 CASH PRIZES 24 HOI'KS DAILY PAST THE 798TH mil 1; — GOING ON NOW — Why Buy? You can now RENT FURNITURE at prices that are unbelievably low. LET US CONVINCE YOU MIAMI MATHER FURNITURE CO. 25-27-29 N. W. First Street Priced from S1.45 to S3.95 -. Sensibly Designed to Insure Comfort PRICED WAY BELOW ACTIAL VALUE MIAMI SHOE STORE 201 N. MIAMI AVENUE Allow to rise for 15 minutesT^T. one hour in moderate oven. Depression note: A de S po ndem citizen of Milwaukee drank a bottle of red ink and. although still Uvi nir dyed. % Where you will find ^ very latest styles and prices to satisfy you and everyone of the family. GROVES SHOK COMPANY 44 N. Miami Ave. ~t 1 llll llllll MODERN FIREPROOF STRUCTURI STEAM HEATED Rates from $2.50 Up DINING ROOM OPFRATIU) BY LAURA JACOBSEN Reasonable Prices %  %  II OTEL U R M 1: Y| 34 S. E. Second Avenue %  PI % % % % % % % % % %  %  % % % % % % % % % % %  IK rOU REALLY WANT I FRESH BEEF I and VEAL \ STOP AND SHOP AT I Farmer's Meat Market \ 71 Northwest fifth Slrrrt '<>n. %  h all III", k Waal "I %  Miami Avenue) g Veal Shoulder, 2 lbs 25c %  Legs of Veal, lb 15c a Veal Chops, lb 15c Beef SUaks and Boneless Beef, lb 15c %  Formerly Five Yearn nl Farmeri* City Curb Market All Meats Fresh Killed Mil Beth Jacob Cong. MIAMI IIF.A.H presents the Miami Jewish Dramatic Players in "Die Zushterte Chasono" A melodrama in four acts, replete with heart throbs, drama, joy and laughter, at the Ida M. Fisher High School lllh Street and l)reel Avenoe MIAMI MUCH Sunday, Feb. 12th at 8:30 p. m. POPULAR PRICES



V
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1933
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wJewish floridiaim No. 5. IK JEW MEDICINE DR. HARRY GOLDMAN the other arts and sciences %  Jewish physician since time prlal has made very definite Llions to medicine and med|tory. Jews, unlike other primitive very early separated the practice from the priest llic prophets, however, prac|hc healing art. nigs, it is mentioned that Eliuglit a child apparently dead |as did his disciple Elisha — saiah cured King Hezekiah Inflammation by applying a krr. The Jews were the first Lge their practitioners and j' the greatest single contriat that time was the isolat|tho lepers, which idea has own to include all other conI diseases. Imagine living in [without isolation, %  ancient Jewish physicians ill acquainted with the varicles and bones, though they Uite ascertained the correct of the latter in the body. as 252 instead of 205. They knowledge of the various knd are frequently mentionpi Talmud and Midrash. At i of King David certain Tallinterested themselves in the the human embryo and acIf these studies are remarklurate and certain of their pons have long since been ated. m-lent Jewish physician, too, acquainted with the norly functions and described la manner remarkably trite. Ibbis of Israel were the first petition to the fact that illa manifestation of detissue function and tissue • a science we now call paHippocrates. the father of |, never advanced this idea 5alen vaguely hinted at it. was the natural outbf the necessary investigaJthe rabbis of slaughtered |which were found to have organs, and were termed treifah. ply case in ancient literapre a diagnosis was con•y postmortem is cited of p the case of a sheep with of the hind legs due to rd injury. My, Talmudic physicians ecially skilled, many being Major operations were the patient deeply drugoperation now known as I Section was known to the Its. One must not forget )l ot circumcision — a hyrgical procedure. post-talmudic period we for several hundred years persecution barred Jews Idical practice. With the of Mohammedism. howAsia Minor, new schools nded and we again find eachers and students until they were again prevent|>ractice. Many gifted phylisted, the earliest in 643, pal medical attendants to l>s — Abu Hafsah Yazid. to Omar. Another was Sahl, pbban-al-Tahari. His son, ihl Ibn Rabban al Taharpysician to two caliphs afIrsion to Mohammedanism Intinued Next Week) FLORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1933. Price Five Cents Beth Jacobs Sponsors Play Appearing at the Ida M. Fisher High school at Drexel and Fourteenth streets, Miami Beach, on Sunday evening. February 12. beginning at 8:30, the Jewish Dramatic Players will be seen in a presentation of one of the most powerful melodramas of the Yiddish stage. "Die Zushterte Chasono." In the cast are Harry Greenberg, Mrs. F. Slaviter, Joe Mandelbaum, H. Rase. Mrs. Silverman. Joseph Greenberg. Miss E. Slaviter, Mrs. J. Seligman and Louis Regal. Cantor Boris Schlachman, well known for his robust baritone, will be one of the artists appearing as added attractions during the evening's entertainment. The proceeds are to be used for the benefit of Beth Jacob synagogue of Miami Beach. Famous Yiddish Ladies Auxiliary Writer to Appear to Hold Lunch — &f Rabbis Issue Joint Statement In a signed statement issued by Rabbi Max Shapiro of Beth David congregation and Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation, received by the Jewish Floridian, they state: "At a meeting held between the rabbis, shechtim and butchers, satisfactory conclusions were arrived at whereby Kashrus can be assured at the following butcher shops on Fifth street: Atlantic Kosher Meat Market, operated by Mr. Mayerowitz; Reisman's Kosher Meat Market and Daum's Kosher Meat Market. The meat procured from Jacksonville, Fla., sold by Mrs. Daum of Daum's Kosher Meat Market is under the personal supervision and responsibility of Rabbi Tobias Geffen of Atlanta. Ga." I AM going to make a plea to support your Jewish paper. A Jewish journal like this is an essential and very necessary part of Jewish community life. It has a definite function to perform and it is your organ of expression. The price is reasonable and it means virtually no sacrifice to enroll as a subscriber. If your neighbor has been borrowing your copy suggest that she become a subscriber. Now a word to the advertising community: It is a fact that in proportion to its numbers, the Jewish community spends abnormally. And here is a point I wish to stress. No other class publication touches on so many varied angles of group life as does a Jewish journal. A Protestant or a Catholic church paper deals primarily with church news and other religious information. A Jewish community, because of its unique make-up. requires a newspaper that will be the medium for religious, cultural, educational, philanthropic and social news. That's why such a paper as this is indispensable to every Jewish family that wishes to be informed on Jewish icws. Which in turn makes it in unusually valuable medium for advertisers. We believe H appropriate to direct our readers' attention to the above by Charles H. Joseph. which appeared in a recent tout of the Baltimore Jewish Times. I. Adler. better known throughout the Yiddish reading world as B. Kovner, will be heard at the Civic Theatre, West Flagler street and Twenty-first avenue, Sunday evening. February 5, beginning at 8:30 p. m.. in a series of readings of his own works. Kovner, proclaimed by many to be the Yiddish counterpart of the immortal Mark Twain, is a native of Poland, where he attended a rabbinical seminary and also received his secular education. For the past 20 years he has been feature editor of the Yiddish Daily, the Forward printed in New York, and has dureon What promises to be one of the most enjoyable afternoons of the year is the benefit luncheon bridge being sponsored by the Ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation next Tuesday. February 7, at 1 o'clock at the home of Mrs. Charles Tannenbaum, 2101 S. W. Eleventh street. The proceeds will be devoted to the Talmud Torah fund of the organization. In charge of arrangements are Mrs. Sam Tannenbaum. chairman, and she is being assisted by Mesdames Moe Harris and Charles Tannenbaum. The public is invited to attend. •Announcements! .;, \ MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CONGREGATION (Orthadox) IMS S. W. Third Street JONAH E. CAPLAN, Rabbi Regular services begin at 5:30 with the late services at 8:30 when the rabbi will preach on "Good News." A social hour will follow the services. Saturday morning services begin at 9 a. m.. and Rabbi Mordecai Hal pern will deliver a talk in Yiddish following the reading of the law. B. KOVNER ing the course of his career created such famous fiction characters as "Yente Telebende," "Payshe the Farmer,'' "Moslie Kapoir," "Charlie the Blufl'er" and "Fishel Dovid, the Hebrew Teacher." He is the author of six Yiddish plays, one of which played 48 consecutive weeks in New York City. He is the author of more than eight thousand humorous stories, and under 22 pen names has been associated with more than 42 publications appearing in Yiddish, such as "Der Kibitzer," "The Big Stick" and similar publications. Many of his compositions have been set to music and sung on both the Yiddish and English stage, and his stories have appeared in translation in both English and foreign language publications throughout the world. Eight books by Kovner have been published in recent years and include his poems which have received enthusiastic endorsements of noted critics. Charlie Chaplin's famous picture "The Kid" was based on one of this prolific writer's stories. Kovner is well known as a raconteur and has entertained audiences throughout the country in readings of his own stories. Though he came to Miami to recuperate from his arduous efforts and work, he yielded to the pleas of lovers of Yiddish literature in this district and will appear this coming Sunday evening. Together with him, L. Goldberg, well known Yiddish actor and singer, will be heard in several songs and character impersonations. Cantor Arrives for Sunday Concert Arriving in Miami today for several days rest prior to his appearance in a program of liturgical numbers, folk songs and operatic anas. Cantor Joseph Z. Shlisky will be the guest of Beth David synagogue at the services here tonigh* and Saturday. Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock the cantor will be presented by Beth David at the Temple theatre in the first and only concert to be given in the Miami district. Cantor Shlisky. though only 38 years old, has had a meteoric rise to fame after a struggle to earn a livelihood. Coming to this country with the famous Cantor Vollman, he lived and worked in Toronto, appeared in concert tours in the United States, returned to Toronto where he worked in a shop during his attendance at the Tororito Conservatory of Music, and joined the San Carlo Opera Company, under the direction of the renowned conductor Fortuno Gallo. who is now on a visit to Miami. Yielding to his real desires, he turned from the operatic stage and became a cantor with the First Roumanian synagogue of New York City, one of the oldest and largest congregations in America. As the result of his remarkable tenor voice, Shlisky soon became known as one of the foremost singers the Jewish people possess, and has been in demand throughout the far and near parts of the country. Sunday's appearance at the Temple theatre is part of a tour of the southern part of the United States being made to satisfy those who have heard his records or in person. The following program will be heard: 1 "My Arms" (recitative) from Judas Maccabeus; "Sound an Alarm" ; "Al Hatzadikim" itraditional); 2. (a) "Av Horachamin (traditional); (bi "Omar Rabbi Elozor" (traditional); 3. (a) "E Lucevan le Stelle" (aria) Tosca; (b) "La Donna E Mobile" (Rigoletto); 4. (a) "A Dudele" (folk song); (b) "A Brief Zum Rebin" (folk song); 5. (a) "Akavyo" (traditional); (b> "Eloheinu" (traditional). TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI l Reform t 137 N. K. Nineteenth Street DR. JACOB II. KAPLAN. Rabbi Services at Temple Israel will be held tonight beginning at 8:15 when Dr. Kaplan will speak on "Peoples' Houses in Palestine." The public is invited to attend. A social hour will follow. CONGREGATION BETH JACOB (Orthodox) 311 WahinKton Ave., Miami Reach L. AXELROD, Rabbi The regular services begin at 5:30 with the late services following at 8:30. with the rabbi preaching on "The Exodus." Dr. Adler, a noted speaker, will address the audience at the late services on a subject of interest. Saturday morning services begin at 9 o'clock and Earle Barrach. the son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Barrach, will recite the Maftir and Haftoro and will make a brief address in English. Rabbi Axelrod will also speak in English on the Bar Mitzva and will then deliver a discourse in Yiddish on the portion of the week. BETH DAVID CONGREGATION (t'onHervative) 139 N. W. Third Avenue MAX SHAPIRO, Rabbi Regular services begin at 5:30 tonight with the late services at 8 p. m., when Rabbi Shapiro will speak on "Hitler's Prejudice — Is That Permanent." He will base his sermon on Hitler's ascension to the chancellorship of Germany. Cantor Joseph Z. Shlisky will recite the Kiddush at the late service. Cantor Louis Hayman will chant and lead the congregational singing with the choir. Supreme Officers Herein Visit Supreme Commdr. D. J. Coakley and Supreme Record Keeper C. L. Biggs from the home office of the Maccabees in Detroit, are visiting In Miami for a few days in behalf of the local organization and the business welfare of the Maccabees in the state of Florida. State Manager A. M. Coffin has been In Tampa for the last 10 days organizing a new tent in that territory, and returned to Miami Friday to greet Mr. Coakley and Mr. Biggs. They will attend the initiation ceremony of this new organization in Tampa, while in Florida. Rabbi Halpern To Speak Here Rabbi Mordecai Halpern, who occupied a position in New York City, as the result of the dire plight of the Lomza Yeshiva of which he is a graduate and of which his fatherin-law was the founder, is now in Miami on a tour of the country in the interests of raising funds for relief of the students, numbering more than three hundred attending the institution. Not only are these students taught but they are also given their material needs by the yeshiva. Founded about 50 years ago by the renowned Rabbi Eleazer Shulawitz aided by the famous Rabbi Israel Salanter, to speed the learning of Torah throughout Poland it has made an enviable record throughout the world. The present dean. Rabbi I. M. Gordon, a brother-in-law of Rabbi Halpern, visited this country several years ago and was received with wide acclaim. I % 



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Friday. February 3, 1933. THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page Five ETY The Junior Council of Jewish Women met at the Ponce de Leon hotel last Tuesday with Miss Millie nreisen in charge. A very enjoyable evening was spent. The next meeting of the organization will be held M February 7, beginning at 8 o'clock with Miss Sara Kahn, national project chairman, in charge, at tjie same hotel. All members are ureed to bring magazines for distribution to the hospitals in this section. Plans for the Chinese supper to be held on March 5 were discussed and details will be announced shortly. • • • The next meeting of Senior Hadassah will be held at the Miami Acacia" club on February 13, at 2 p. m. All members are urged to attend. • • • A meeting of the board of governors of the Hebrew Athletic club will be held next Wednesday night at the community center and will begin promptly at 9 p. m. All are invited to attend. The complete minstrel show recently sponsored by Beth David will again be produced with the same excellent cast the early part of March at Miami Beach at a place to be announced in an early issue. Attention, I isitors! Tln> pulley of this store, to meet all advertised prices, although well-known and wellestablished among local folks is good news to Miami's visitors. Think of the hours of %  'hopping time you can save by coming here where stocks are complete and where you know prices are guaranteed to be as low or lower than anywhere else. fcED CROSS '£ DRUG DEPARTMENT K. Hauler St. Phone 2-H1S6 lri( Delivery in Greater Miami TOUBS CRl'ISES STEAMSHIP TICKETS TRAVELERS CHEQUES Remittances to All Foreign Countries American Express Company 330 E. I I. At.I lit ST. Miami Tel. 3-3178 By This Sign You are assured of the BEST "•' Electrical Work | BUctrie Stovca and Hefriiternt.irt The Service You Will Appreciate George La Vigne Company, Inc. Klectrical Contractor* and Eniineera 12 N. E. Third Avenue Phone 2-7838 The exact date for the annual Purim ball of Beth David Sisterhood will be announced in our next issue. • • • Meeting at the Beth David Talmud Torah last Wednesday at a special meeting called by its president, Mrs. Lena Simon, the Senior Council of Jewish Women received encouraging reports from its membership committee. Setting welfare relief as its goal for the coining year, all members have been remitted their past dues and everyone will be charged for dues beginning with the present time only, to enable the organization to reach its objectives. A meeting of the organization will be held next Wednesday, February 8, beginning at 2 p. m. at Beth David Talmud Torah and all interested in the work of the senior council are urged to attend. • • • Mrs. Isidor Cohen is chairman of the committee sponsoring the benefit bridge this afternoon at the Blackstone hotel, beginning at 2 p. in. for the Jewish Welfare bureau. The public is invited to attend and enjoy a pleasant afternoon, at the same time helping relieve the distress of the needy Jews of this district. Delicious refreshments will be served and prizes will be awarded for high scores. • • • Mrs. Sender Argintar and son of Asheville, N. C, are visiting their Bister and brother-in-law. Mr. and Mrs. A. Kirschenbaum of this city, and expect to remain here for the balance of the winter season. • • The noted Jewish cantor, M. Kaminsky. arrived last Monday in Miami from New York City to spend the balance of the winter season here. Mr. Kaminsky is renowned throughout the entire Jewish world and has had as his pupils many of the present day famous cantors, ingliding Cantor Shlisky, who will sing here this coming Sunday. SOUTHERN LAUNDRY HI Tamiami Trail (S. W. sth Bt.) Phone 2-252S Wc Call and Delh er CENTRAL BUSINESS COLLEGE Cong-re** KuildinK HI N. K. 2nd Ave. Miami. Kla. Lowest tuition rat.-in hlatory. Prlvale Ultodng i" S|mni"h. l-'rench and all Conunarcial tubjaeta. Bxpwl Initructoi*. OPEN All. THE TIME CENTRAL HOSPITAL 936 Bluravne Blvd. Phone 2-6712 NURSES ON CALL OPEN TO MEMBERS OF THE DADE COl'NTY MEDICAL SOCIETY f RENTALS SALES AND SERVICE J t STEVENS RADIO | SALES CO. + OPEN EVENINGS 115 S. E. lat St. Phone 3-1718 J An enterprising lady in London has won the hand of the governor of the Bank of England in marriage, which proves that bankers do not always say no. A client came to a shadchan to discuss terms, etc. The shadchan, who was not content to let his record speak for itself, began to boast of his great successes of the past, in order to impress the prospect. "People married with my help," he declared proudly, "are so well : satisfied with my services that even I after they get divorced they always return to me again." Father (examining his son, Mose, in general knowledge): "Now, Mose, j name the four seasons." Mose (after much thought): "Salt, | pepper, vinegar and mustard." Moishc: "Let's celebrate our silver wedding anniversary next week." Frieda: "But we've been married only ten years." Moishe: "I know that, but the depression being what it is, we could use the silver." • • • Mr. and Mrs. Philip Liberman entertained with a dinner party at their home in Miami Beach last Friday night honoring Mine. Frances Sebel. Among the guests were Mr. and Mrs. Dorcey Miller. Mr. and Mrs. S. Sebel, Mr. and Mrs. I. Gotlieb, Mr. and Mrs. B. Marcie, Mr. and Mrs. Irwin M. Cassell. Pink rosebuds and yellow tea roses were used m decoration. • • • Temple Israel Sisterhood sponsored a musicale and reception at Temple Israel last Monday night. Mrs, Hannah Spiro Asher, organist and choir director, arranged a program of vocal, piano ensembles and trio numbers. They included "Five Waltzes." iBrahms). Ellouise King and Mildred Greenberg; "A Mon Fils" (Meyerbeer), and "Hills" (La Forgei Evelyn Raff: coronation scene from "Boris Godounoff" (Moussorgsky), Mrs. Asher and Evelyn Plagman Jones; "Wake Up" (Phillips), "The Last Hour" (Kramer), and "The False Prophet" (Scott), Margaret i Nlmmo; "Blue Danube Waltz" 'Strauss-Chasinsi. Mildred Greenberg and Miss King; first movement (it the trio in D minor < Mendelssohn i. Louis Ely. violin; Leonard Rose, cello, and Miss Greenberg, pi%  ano; "Dedication" iSchumani, and "Bird in the Wilderness" (HorsI man), Miss Raff; "Andalusian Dance" (Infante). Mrs. Asher and Mrs. Jones. Mrs. I. L. Rosendorf was in charge I of the reception for members and friends following the musicale. Assisting her in receiving were Mrs. Isaac Levin, president; Mrs. J. H. Kaplan, wife of the rabbi; Mrs. D. J. Apte, Mrs. Morros Cowen and Mrs. Jack Bernstein. Mrs. H. I. MaKid, Mrs. Henry Williams, Mrs. Mitchell Wolfson, Mrs. Herbert Fei•:• •:• •:• •:•> •:• •:• •8* "Plea*inn you keep* u* in bu*ine*s" Miami Mirror & Glass Works | $ MIRRORS & AUTO GLASS f A. H. ROSS + 613 N. Miami Ave. Phone 2-1196 J & .;. •:• •:• •:• t.;. *; •:• •:• %  > •:• •:• •> •:• # GERSON'S %  301 ("llinAve. MIAMI BEACH Phone 5-3989 A Place to Dine in Contentment ROW I for your health! Watkins' Alleys 103 W. FLAGLER ST. Morning Prices — Until Noon 10c per line for llin Pina 5c per line for Duck Pina Evening Prices Bi( Pin* — 2 for 25c Small Pin* — 3 for 25c "Radio Service" WM. SIELER Parts and Accessories 430 NORTH MIAMI AVE. No Charge for Examination belman and Mrs. Sidney Meyer presided at the punch bowls. • • Mr. and Mrs. Herman B. Goldberg, 308 S. W. Eleventh avenue, announce the engagement of their daughter, Louise, to Robert Kasdan Calm, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Cahn of Mount Vernon, N. Y. Miss Goldberg has many friends in Miami and is a graduate of Miami Senior High school. She formerly made her home in Columbus, Ohio. Mr. Cahn attended the university of Miami for several years and is a member of the Omega Delta and Phil Epsilon Pi fraternities. He is associated with the law Arm of Rosenhouse & Rosenhouse. The marriage will take place in the early summer. • • Some idea of the magnitude of "Big City Blues," the Warner Bros, production starring Joan Blondell. at the Tivoli theatre, next Sunday and Monday, may be gained from the fact that its cast list includes no less than seven of the studio's featured contract players, and seven more headliners borrowed from other studios. Joan Blondell heads the cast, while Evelyn Knapp also has an important role. Three new actresses, recently taken to Hollywood from New York successes, make their first screen appearances at this time, although they are also working separately in other productions. They are Gloria Shea, Betty Gilette and Sheila Terry — names to bear in mind. They may be among the stars of the future. Guy Kibbee and Lyle Talbot complete the list of contract artists. Playing opposite Miss Blondell in the sensational drama of life on Broadway is youthful Eric Linden, whose work in "The Crowd Roars." and "Are These Our Children?" will live long in the memories of theatre goers. Josephine Dunn and Inez Courtney are among their partyplaymates, and such personages as that famous comedienne. Jobyna Howland, Walter Catlett, Grant Mitchell and Humphrey Bogart complete the featured cast list that still has many others almost equally well known in smaller supporting roles. The noted Russian tenor, Josef Kallini, a former member of the Philadelphia Opera Company, who made such a splendid impression upon local music lovers in his first concert at the Blackstone hotel last Friday night will again be heard in a recital at the Blackstone hotel next Sunday evening beginning at 9:30 p. m. Guests of the hotel will be permitted to attend without charge while the public will pay a nominal fee. • • • The Junior Maccabees' Rabbit Court 330 is planning a special entertainment program at the Joint meeting of all the Junior courts in Miami, Saturday afternoon at the Studio hall, 2100 W. Flagler street, in honor of our supreme officers. Miss Frances Kane, who has been appearing at the Blackstone hotel in a series of dances is also appearing at the public entertainments sponsored by the City of Miami Beach at Flamingo park. DANNY SHEEHAN "I he Aristocrat of Dancing and Master of Rhythm" Former Inntruetor in Dancing Teacher* Normal School D.M.A. Eight consecutive years of teaching in Cleveland, O. Ten years actual stage experience, KeithOrphcum Circuit Tap and stage dancing in all its form — adagio, limbering and stretching. Every step taught to music, at rates in keeping with the times. ENROLL NOW! THE LESLIE BLDG. 133(8 N. Miami A\e. Phone 2-0528 Plenty of Parking Space ;• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• • :• •;•:• • PIERRE'S t Beauty Shop £ J •:• ,j* Specializing in Haircuts and Finger Waving Hair Dyed £ 2J N. E. lat Ave. Phone 2-3828 >• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •> •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:•"• MADELON beauty shop 17 S. K. l-t Avt, Phune :(-l!7.",l Where you will meet Madam Due, Tea Cup Reader on Mondays and Wednesdays *** &f&f &f&f &f&f&f •:••:••:•*•:••:•*** &f ••••t 1 •j* Ins jut on your (iroccr giving you *** 2 NEW YORK BREAD & CAKE COMPANY % £ BREAD AND CAKES 471 S. W. 8th St. Phone 2-7832 '£ '.-. Branch Store: 155 N. W. 5th St. •> •:• •> .;..;..;. .j..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;. E. C. THRALL & COMPANY I Phone I-MI4 *>.a-.*-.o — State Agent New York Fire Insurance Co. and Metropolitan Assurance I'nderwriters 318-19 MEYER KISER BLDG. K. C. THKAI.I.. President Miami. I l.i V? Sunk Cowra ^fyopjn? (One 111.., k Ka*t of New Po*t Office! Everything in Books, Old and New 410 NORTHEAST SECOND AVENUE Now \on can buy BILTMORE LAUNDRY SERVICE at a price that fits your pocket hook! PHONE 3-3687 21 N. W. 9TH ST. J. P. ALEXANDER, INC. 19 S. E. FIRST AVENUE (In Foster Building) High Grade Shoe Repairing Cripple and Corrective Foot Work Our Specialty t i %  *•*