The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00205

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
^Jewish floridian
I Vol. No. 4.
THE PROPHET
in our MIDST
Oi Margaret Isabel Lawri n< b
LORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY
MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 19J3.
Temple Israel
Sponsor Concert
Price Five Cents
All through history it has been
I the people of romance who have
taken truth to other people. For on-
ly people of romance can carry the
[ feeling of truth to other people. Or
[touch their imaginations with its
| mystery.
It was the feeling of a man cruci-
Ified for his God-like spirit that
I caught the western people and made
I them followers of his name. The
(great awful tragedy of the crucifix-
lion told by men of passionate He-
[braic capacity for feeling and telling
I touched the imaginations of em-
Iperors and rulers. So, it remained
I in the world. But the people to
I whom the Crucified had belonged
I were turned upon by the others,
I which was a far more awful trag-
|edy.
Jews have suffered in silence,
Ifoldini: themselves in part in the
[spiritual consolation of their own
[sacred teachings, and in other part
[within the intellectualism of their
[natures. The story of the persecu-
tion was never told in the writings
[that Gentiles could read. Now, it is
[being told in the languages of the
[persecutors by Jews of passionate
[capacity to feel and tell. It will re-
[main. and have effect in the world,
thouuh the imaginations of emper-
lors and rulers are not so necessary
|as they once were.
His publishers insist, on the cov-
|er oi his books, that Ludwig Lewi-
kohn speaks to the Jews. They quote
pmbeis of the rabbinate saying so.
irtainly Jews read what he writes.
But they do not need to. It is the
Gentile who does. And many Gen-
liles are reading him, and feeling
furious stirrings within themselves,
pr no Gentile with any spiritual
HBltlvlty, or any susceptibility to
(he dramatic pull of history can es-
tape in reading him that acutely
Impersonal sorrow which is at the
Pennine of truth.
Gentiles, educated and uneducat-
alike. do not know what they
?ave done to Jews. The business of
Christian civilization, with its wars
M its nationalistic and economic
[sumptions, la a kaleidescopic pan-
orama with which even the most
innot keep mental pace. Un-
ps a story is forced upon the im-
Rgination it is missed, and peculiar
ihentcd. utterly unreasonable no-
lens about strange people can con-
tinue like weeds. Jews have lived
fctiently beside Christians, either in
[loot racial pride, or in affable as-
we cynicism born out of observa-
tion that the most advantageous
Mod of getting along with Gen-
Wl was to make them feel com- j
prtable about themselves. Which
Plainly never would include re- j
finding them of things, or asking ;
Nil pointed questions at a not
TO propitious time.
wlsohn asks no questions what-
,: the Gentile, but he does a
1 reminding, and it is quite
e. for the good of the Gentile,
there was some reminding
Noted Cantor
To Appear
Noted Actor Is
!
th?nrurrL?e UtStanding events Joseph Z. Shlisky. one of the pres-
the current season will be the
Honor Guest [Announcements
Last Sunday evening the Miami
ceVVsDonsoredrnxW1,',be, ^ C"" mt day Wrld Jewry's noted cantors Jewish Dramatic Players tendered a
cert sponsored by Temple Israel Sis- will appear in Miami for a concert ~~~h~. .- ......* -.ZH _,...
l. ^ un,Mnday even,n*. Janu- on Sunday, February 5. at 3 p. m..
ary 30, beginning at 8:15 o'clock in
the main auditorium of the temple.
reception to the noted Yiddish play-
wright and actor. Max Goebel, who
at the Temple theatre. Presented I is spending a short time at Miami
by Beth David congregation, the Beach. Several hundred people at-
Asher lLT1^,m"h Spir Cant0f Wi" be hcard in a *ro*ram tended enjoyed a very pleasant
of th r "UrtCtona of liturgical numbers, folk song, and | evening. Mr. Joseph Greenberg pre-
territory. | operatic arias which will enable Mi- sided and introduced the entertain-
ami citizens and tourists to judge ers and speakers during the program
why Cantor Shlisky has attained j that was presented. The guests of
the heights of fame in the Jewish i honor included L. Goldberg, prom-
famed as
a pianiste and now a
member of the faculty of the Uni-
versity of Miami conservatory of
music. Other noted artists of the
musical world will appear during
the evening. A reception will be
held following the concert. In
charge of arrangements is a com-
mittee headed by Mrs. I. L. Rosen -
as well as non-Jewish musical world
though young in years.
Cantor Shlisky is a native of Pol-
and and is now 38 years old. He be-
inent Jewish actor, and the well-
known Yiddish writer, B. Kovner.
Those taking part in the program
were L. Goldberg of New York. Hen-
ry Seitlin. Harry Greenberg, Joseph
gan to sing at the age of seven un-
dor the famous Solomon Schoichat. Greenberg, Harry Rose and B. Kov-
dorf as chairman, and Mesdames I Cantor Moses Volman took charge ne. Mr. Goebel responded briefly
^T,'!! ?*f "'. .He"ry D WUUamfl of nim a year later and '"en arrived during the evening and thanked all
with him in Toronto, Can. Under
the direction of a manager. Shlisky
and W. I. Magid. The public is in-
vited to attend.
for the cordial reception accorded
him. In charge of arrangements
Throngs Attend
Annual Dance
One of the largest crowds ot tl-.c
season attended the Talmud Torah
benefit dance sponsored by the lad-
ies auxiliary ot the Miami Jewish
Orthodox congregation last Wednes-
day night at the Mahi Shrine tem-
ple. The hall was beautifully decor-
ated and at one end there were tab-
les laden with goodies to be sold
tor the benefit of the Talmud Torah
fund. A program of entertainment
was presented during the evening
featuring Chester Alexander. Irma
Davis and Hope Parker of the Club
Bagdad. Al Parker of the Silver
Slipper. Betty Jane Lanzer, Albert
Robertson and Betty Ganger of the
Danny Sheehan school of dancing
and numbers through the courtesy
of Billy Buller. Danny Sheehan was
seen in a number of acrobatic danc-
es which aroused enthusiasm. Imi-
tations of Al Jolson and skits by
Chester Alexander and Al Parker
kept the large audience in continual
laughter. In charge of arrangements
were Mrs. J. Louis Shochet. chair-
man; Mrs. Louis Pallott, assistant
chairman: Mesdames Nathan Adel-
man. Lee Weiner. S. Tannenbaum.
Jonah E. Caplan, S. Putterfass. C.
Tannenbaum. Max Rappaport, I.
Buckstein. Charles Feldman and
Moe Harris: and Messrs. Nathan
Adelman. Milton Weiner, H. M.
Drevich. M. Rappaport, and S. Fut-
terfass. A substantial sum was real-
ized, which will be devoted to the
Talmud Torah fund of the organi-
zation.
Junior Hadassa
to Elect Delegates
An important meeting of Junior
Hadassah will be held next Mondav
began a tour of the country and were Mesdames Silverman. Seitlin
finally landed at Scranton. Pa. and Slaviter. During the evening de-
There his manager deserted him. licious refreshments were served.
forcing Shlisky to try out at ama----------------------
teur performances in burlesque
theatres, where his voice was above
the audience. He returned to To-
ronto and there worked in a tailor-
ing shop to earn sufficient to con- ]
tinue his musical training. Winning I
a scholarship at the Toronto Con-
servatory of Music, he remained
there for 10 years under the tute-
lage of the famous voice master.
Prof. Dalton Baker, the English bar-
itone. In 1918 he returned to New-
York and appeared in a series of
concerts at the Aeolian hall, where
he overnight became the toast of
musical critics. He then joined the
ranks of the San Carlo Opera Com-
pany but left them because he dis-
liked the work. Following the work
he most enjoyed he became a cantor
and then was engaged by the first
and oldest Roumanian congregation
of New York City. In a recent tour
of the country, musical authorities
vied with one another in praising
the remarkable tenor voice of Shlis-
ky. the beautiful timbre of his tones
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
(Coni.erv.tivr)
139 N. W. Third Avenue
MAX SHAPIRO. Rabbi
Regular services begin tonight at
5:30 with the late services following
at 8:15 p. m. when Rabbi Max Sha-
piro will preach a sermon on "The
Plagues of Our Present Day Civili-
zation." The congregational singing
and chanting will be directed by
Cantor Louis Hayman, who is being
assisted by the choir. A social hour
follows the late services. Saturday
morning services begin at 8:30 and
Mincha services at 5 p. m.
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION
(Orthodox)
1515 S. W. Third Street
JONAH E. CAPLAN, Rabbi
The usual early services begin at
5:30 with the late Open Forum ser-
vices at 8:30 at which time Rabbi
Jonah E. Caplan will preach on
"The Finger that Points to God."
This sermon will convey a message
particularly appropriate because of
conditions existing in Miami Jewry
today. The usual congregational
singing and chanting will be en-
joyed. Saturday morning services
evening. January 30. in the Spanish begin at a m and specla, servicps
in recognition of this being "Shab-
room of the Ponce de Leon hotel at
8 p. m. At this meeting election of
delegates to the southern regional
convention of Hadassah to be held
at Savannah. Ga., on February 12
and 13, will be held. The winner of
the essay contest will be announced
Many Enjoy
Minstrel Show
Miami to Send
Inaugural Train
pne.
nevertheless, and no matter what
^ may know within oneself about
being time, and to one's incalcul-
r good, it is a shaking experience
f a Gpntile to read Lewisohn. The
FSeous Anglo-Hebraic prose, with
emotional undertones, and its
The large Riverside auditorium
carried a large number of residents
and tourists last Wednesday night
to witness the minstrel show spon-
sored by the junior committee of
Beth David Sisterhood for its Tal-
bos Rosh Chodesh" will be conduct-
ed with the rabbi preaching a ser-
mon in Yiddish. At the late Friday
night service, Mr. Milton Weiner
will make an announcement to lo-
cal Jewry and especially the mem-
and a program will be presented. ,. of the congregation. A socia.
MUlocent Rubin will give a reading. hour will follow.
Rabbi Max Shapiro will speak and
musical numbers will be heard. Ha-
dassagrams will be distributed and
a social hour will follow. All mem-
bers and friends are urged to at-
tend.
Special Rites
Next Monday
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI
I Reform)
117 N. B. Nineteenth Street
DR. JACOB II. KAPLAN, Rabbi
Services will begin tonight at 8:15
and Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan will dis-
cuss the second part of the Presi-
dent's research committee on social
trends dealing with the problems of
the biological heritage and of social
heritage. This is perhaps the mast
important contribution dealing with
the problems of today.
The public is welcome.
A large number of Jewish tourists
are daily visiting the Musa Isle In-
dian village to see the native life of
the Seminole tribe, and to see the
alligators of whom there are a large CONGREGATION BETH JACOB
variety. (Orthodox)
Next Monday afternoon beginning i 1" w"hin,on Mim' Baa*
at 2 o'clock, residents and tourists I L. AXELROD, Rabbi
will have their first opportunity of Regular Friday evening services
seeing alligators being fed their begin at 5:30 with the late services
mud Torah fund. Mrs. Claire Cohen weekiy meaI It is rea, nature ,n tne I at 8:30 p m wnen the nm wi
Weintraub as the interlocutor, vied raw preacn a sermon on "The Jew. a
with the end men for honors and -^ey are only fed about once each j Born Optimist." The congregational
applause. Ida Englcr and Rosalyn week ^ it takes them that ,ong tQ chanting and singing will be direct-
Daum gave a professional exhibition properiy adjust their meal. Of ed by Cantor Boris Schlachman.
of fine dancing, as did Claire Simon course, if there was Just one alii- Saturday morning services begin at
and Ruth Kopplowitz. Bobbie Res- gator to ^ fed everything would 9 a. m.. with the rabbi preaching in
nick in a song performed as well as pr0ceed quietly and minus excite- Yiddish on "Heintige Darshonim."
one of much older age. and Leonard ment But out at Musa IsIe there !
TO In and his fair partner received are several hundred alligators and
their usual well-merited applause, crocodiles within one enclosure and
as did Theresa Rubinstein for their feeding them is a problem. William
Linton M. Collins. Democratic
leader, will be in charge of the j dance numbers. The chorus was Karkeet. the manager of Musa Isle"
Greater Miami special car to be spiendid and the entire performance prepares for the event by obtaining
connected in the Florida Democratic was marked because of the profes- about 800 pounds of nsn in thc
To
Bnai Brith
Install Officers
train going to Washington for the
inauguration of President elect
Franklin D. Roosevelt, March 4.
A special rate, including railroad
and Pullman fare, meals on the I
Beth David Talmud Torah hall
sional manner in which it was car- raw Having the flsh ne equlps a wj ^ the scene q{ jmpressive ,n.
ried through from beginning to end. the maIo Seminoies with long bam- stallation services for the newly-
Mrs. Sam Wlesel was chairman of boo polcs and places them at stra. i elected offlcers Qf sholem ,odge Qf
the committee in charge of arrange- tegic p,,^ around the concrete en- Bnai Brith, next Sunday evening
ments. and she was assisted by Mrs. closure. January 29, at 8 p. m. In addition
piritiiai
kturbinK
overtones, is psychically
train and occupation of thc Pullman j Rose Bogen. Victor Levin was make- As soon as the alllgators smell the to the IoTmai rituaI an evening of
up director, and Mrs. Jake Engler flsh, tney begin t0 cr0wd close to the entertainment including singing,
was in charge of costumes. Louis wan. Then the fish is thrown in to playing by artists, vaudeville sketch-
Hayman directed the production. them about a big shovelful at a es and addresses by prominent
Other acts on the program were time. All the alligatdrs and croco- ; speakers will be provided. Follow-
Mrs. Harry Cohen in a whistling diles go wild. They revert back to ing the program refreshments will
solo, and Mrs. Samuel Resnick in a the time when life was one contin- j be served. No charges of any kind
beautifully rendered interpretation ual struggle for the survival of the will be made and the public is urg-
of "Eili, Efli." (Continued on Page Six) | ed to attend.
in Washington, has been arranged
and reservations may be made
through Mr. Collins.
Special cars from over the state
And no wonder. There will be assembled into a train at
'concentrated racial force behind Jacksonville at 7:15 p. m.. March 2.
I"" and eternal prophetic power arriving in the capitol at noon,
'Continued on I "a Re Three) March 3.
. 1
?


/
Page Two
THE JEWISH FLORIPIAN
Friday, January 27. \y.
Mrs. Isidor Cohen, president of
Beth David Sisterhood, announces
the date of the annual purim ball
and bazaar, to be sponsored by the
sisterhood, has been changed from
March 12 to March 18. on ac-
count of the Jewish Welfare dance.

Fortnightly Book Review club cel-
ebrated its fourth birthday anniver-
sary Monday at a luncheon-bridge
party at the Biltmore hotel. Coral
Gables. Mrs. Milton Weiner was
chairman of this affair. The regular
meeting was held on Tuesday eve-
ning at Mrs. Albert E. Rosenthal's
home, 2152 S. W. Sixteenth terrace.
Ai that time Mrs. Adele Vince Rose
presented a resume of "The Giant
Swing," the new novel by W. R.
Burnett.

Complimenting her slater, Betty
Letaw, daughter of David Letaw,
Mrs. Sidney Beskind entertained at
a party from 3 to 5 p. m. Wednesday
at her home in Tamiami Heights,
Hie occasion being the tenth birth-
day of the honor guest.
Games and contests were the di-
versions offered, and a large white
birthday cake centered the table
where an ice course was served. As-
sisting the hostess was Miss Lyl
Chlslillg, Mrs. M. Ghertler, Mrs. M.
Bertuch. Rubin Wolpert. Mrs. Harry
Leiaw and Mrs. May enisling.

The Miami Beach Jewish Social
8et sponsored a "kid party" Thurs-
day evening at the Miami Beach
Country club. Novelties, favors and
special entertainment will vary the
evening's dance program. Prizes
were awarded to winners of costume
contest. Murray Grossman, presi-
dent of the club, was in charge.
Nightly Dinner
DANCE
...in...
THE
17TH FI.ooK
DINNER SF.RVFD
6 p. m. to 9:30 p. m.
DANCING
7 p. m. to 1 a. m.
$1.50 PEE PERSON
HARRY RICHARDSON
ami hh CAVALIERS
Always Fresh
hjoumnt
Coffee
LA TOURAINE COFFEE
AND
FIFTH AVENUE COFFEE
Roasted, packed and delivered
daily from our Miami plant
to insure
"That Delicious
Fresh Flavor"
.. W. S. QUINBV CO., In<
MIAMI JACKSONVILLE
Owen Pittman. ST., was a guest of
honor.

Mr. Hyman Apte is still a patient
at the Jackson Memorial hospital,
where he would be happy to receive
visits from his many friends.

So far the patrons of the Walka-
thon now under way at the Cinder-
ella ballroom have gathered to see
in- various entertainments offered
by Jack Negley and his Walkatholl-
ers. The Night in Hollywood. Sweet
Pickle Weddutg, Dying Gladiators,
The Sultan's Harem and such. But
the starting ol the 'mind'' last
night Increased their Interest In the
Walkathoners themsi. -
With over 640 hours behind them,
the contestants are well on their
way ami when the "grind" started,
he real periods were eliminated and
he couples and solos walked until
-vne couple of solos dropped out.
This process is rather tough on the
walkers, but the fans get quite a
kirk out of trying to figure out who
will be the ones to pass out and who
viil survive the 'minds."
The Walkathoners have pleased
the patrons nightly with their vari-
ous floor show entertainments
Among the star comedians, the Mc-
Qreevys lead the parade with Jack
Kelly a close second. Sammy How-
ird and Bob Martell also have tak-
n part in most ol the comedy sket-
Jack Montgomery, Wally Ad-
iins. Waller Morris and Mike Mar-
tin have provided most of the vocal
ntertalnment among the boys,
while Christine Christy, Millie Ros-
en, and Connie Moore have upheld
the girl honors In that line. Jerry
ind Frances Smith still continue to
'old their admirers with their waltz
lumbers.
Among the dancers. Cleo Clifford
ind Marjorie Foster, with June Ev-
3ns, offer the pulse quickening
numbers and Fern Tracey. Neil
' appy, Bernie Shapoff. and Julius
At well among the boys.
e
A regular meeting of the ladies'
auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Or-
thodox congregation will be held at
ynagoguc next Tuesday eve-
ning. January 31. beginning at 8 o'-
Clock. All having tickets or money
for the dance are asked to bring
them to the meeting. A social hour
will follow the business meeting.
Mrs. I. Buckstein, president of the
ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jew-
ish Orthodox congregation enter-
tained the members of her organiza-
tion at a social hour following a
brief business meeting last Tuesday
night.

A picnic was held last Sunday af-
ternoon for children of Beth Jacob
Sunday school, with Miss Marion
Levy in charge of arrangements. She
was assisted by the Misses Belle
Siegel, Beatrice Silver. Sylvia Levy
and Mrs. L. Axelrod. Prizes were
presented to Sydney Bcsvlnick, Es-
ther Levy and June Rose Toursh
for the best performances at the
Chanukah play held at the Beth
Jacob synagogue on Sunday morn-
ing, January 1.

Mrs. Milton Weiner is chairman
of the committee arranging the an-
nual benefit bridge for the Hadas-
sah Medical fund which will be held
Tuesday afternoon, February 14, at
a place to be announced in uor next
Refreshments will be served
and prizes Will be awarded lor high
scores.
The seventh annual dance of
Temple Israel Sisterhood will be
held at the Miami Beach Goll and
Country club on Saturday evening,
February 11. beginning at- 0:30 p. m.
Among those who will appear on the
evening's program are Chester Alex-
ander. Lew Hampton. Al Parker.
Danny Sheehan and other noted
performers of this territory. Pria
will be awarded to the best, damns
Admission will be one dollar for |
single and one dollar and a half for
a couple. Mrs Herbert E. Seppler is
; chairman of the committee in
! charge of the affair.
# 0
One of the most enjoyabii
lungs -pent here in a long time was
last Thursday night when the v.
all's club of the Workmen's circle
held a "Night at the Little Art
Theatre.'' starring Al Harris, noted
actor: Maxim Brodin. noted tenor,
and Zelda Zlatin. accompanist. A
group of songs in Russian sung by
Brodin was the highlight of thi
ning's performance and showed the
remarkable range, clarity and tim-
bre ol his splendid tenor voice. His
rendition ol Yiddish songs showed
the innate throb and beating ol the
Jewish heart. Al Harris was well re-
ceived in impersonations of both
tragic and comic characters, His
rendition of "Hammer" to the ca-
dence of the well-known Kipling's
"Boots" was outstanding, All In all
the several hundred who attended
received a liberal education m the
possibilities of Yiddish repertoire,
. both in prose, poetry and song.

Mrs. m. Weilan of Baltimore, Md .
is visiting her brother and sister-in-
law. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Rose ol
this city.
*
The Miami Jewish Dramatic Play-
ers will be seen in a performance of
the "Zushterte Chasono" on Febru-
ary 12, at Miami Beach, where a
benefit performance will be given
for the Beth Jacob congregation.

Mrs. Jack Apte is a patient at the
Victoria hospital where she under-
went a serious operation last week.

To celebrate the ninth birthday
anniversary of its formation. Temple
Israel Sisterhood will be hosts at a
luncheon bridge in the Blackstone
hotel. Miami Beach, on February 9,
at 12:30 p. m. Mrs. J. A. Richter is
chairman of the arrangements com- i
mittee in charge of this affair.
*
The trials and Joys, the bliss and
of "The First Year," that
most trying adjustment pe'iod of
young love, constitute the dramatic
motivation of Janet Gaynor's and
Charles Karrells latest Fox picture
appearing at the new Seventh Ave-
nue theatre, next Sunday and Mon-
day.
"The First Year" primuses a new
Janet. Petite and piquant as ever,
she has forsworn the pathetic for
the positive in her characterisation.
With a new hair dress, with smart
modern frocks, she is stud to bring
an entirely fresh and inspiring por-
trayal to the sen en m this, her first
entirely grown-up role. Farrell. too.
Is different. He will be seen as an
ambitious young business man, ha- j
rassed. it is 'lie. by the difficulties
ill becoming established m a strange
town, but on the whole a capable,
energetic young fellow out to prove
that he can make his way in the
world.
Among the supporting players of
"The First Year" are Minna Gom-
bell, seen in a hilarious comedy role;
Leila Bennett, Dudley Digges. Rob-
erl MrWade. George Meeker. Maude
Eburne and Henry Kolker. all of
whom portray Important parts suit-
id to their capabilities.
William K. Howard directed "The
Iii-i Year." a screen adaptation of
Prank Craven's successful stage
farce by Lynn starling.
Open the year 'round
COLONIAL
TOWERS
Hotel
Formerly Henrietta ]
332 S. E. Second Ate,
Miami, Florida
A more perfect location
could not be desired. Rau,s
reasonable and you wi||
meet your friends at
COLONIAL TOWERS
HOTEL
ROBERT A. MANNl.v
A R E W E keeping
faith with those who trust us. are
we living up t" our obligations if
we risk their future happiness by
ignoring the problems that would
arise for them if, some day, WC
did ""/ come home?
Life Insurance offers the sale and
certain answer. There is no sub-
stitute.
\ Southern Health & Life Insur-
ance Policy on each one is neces-
sary to protect the others from
the privation and expense caused
by the last illness and death.
A few pennies each week is the
total cost.
Southern Life &
Health Insurance
Company
T. S. Cook, Manager
S10 Realty Board Bids. Pbona 2-3419
You Arc Ready
NOW for
paints:
We do not jjive
price per can
We give value
for dollar
PAINTS
PUTT & TINGLE
T
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DISTRIBUTORS
Whotaala Retail
411 Southwest First Strict
Phone 2-5012
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ust rat i>e yvui uruggisl
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I'hi.iu- S-2521
We Call .iiiJ Deliver
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% STANDARDIZED
ACCORDING TO THE J
RULES OF THE
* AMERICAN COLLEGE
% OF SURGEONS
X *
' Open to member* nf Ihe :
.;. Dade County Mediral Society :
.;. Telephone 2-HI7.1 ?
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RAILEY MILAM, INC
27 WEST FI.AGLER STREET


I rid.iy. January 27, 1933.
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
Page Three
THE PROPHET
in our MIDST
PI BUSHED EVERY Friday
by I he
iimI-ii FLORIDIAN PUBLISHING CO.
|2| S. W. Fifteenth Avrnui1
I LOUIS SIIOCIIET, Editor
I'. (). Bo* 2S73
Mlamii I lr'da Phono 2-118.!
.....i the pact Office at Miami, Florid*,
vi of March I, 1879.
WK8T PALM BEACH OFFICE
II I Kiuhlh Strut
Mr-. M. S.'lirrbnii k. Kc|H r 1 .ih\,-
SUBSCRIPTION
. Honlhi.......$1.00
,. v .....tt.M
FRIDAY, JANUARY 27. 1933.
Vol. 6. No. 4.
WHEN it will be
A TOTAL LOSS
I linai Britb Magazine)
I,- late in 1920 that the late
Marshall said: "I regard
(tension of religious education
a. th< most vital need of the com-
munity; more important even than
hospitals, orphan asylums, homes
lor tlic at:ed and all other philan-
thropic institutions, however valu-
able I consider them to be."
Today the need Is not for exten-
sion of Jewish education but we
have conic to a tragic struggle for
:hi' survival of our Jewish schools.
11 id there voices are heard
which suggest that Jewish educa-
tion is a luxury which we ought to
to a minimum in u time like
this
Indeed, this is an attitude that is
directed not only against Jewish ed-
ucation. All over the country men
arc heard denouncing "the frills of
education" by which they mean all
the progress that has been made in
thods of education during the
ns. Again is heard that
argument for social decay: "What
a.s good enough for us is good
inoiiL'ii tor our children."
We Jews, particularly, are under
solemn responsibility for our relig-
ious education. These schools that
men have come to regard as
luxuries are inheritances which
have been handed down to us by
martyr: They perished rather than
surrender this Torah which is the
fundamental of our schools. When
fin fell upon them las it did of-
hen they were pillaged of all
their possessions and expelled, they
conscious of total loss if
'he Scroll of the Law was saved
Tom the synagogue.
Much have Jews lost in these evil
. Houses, stores, stocks,
bonds ... but the loss will be total
only when they have abandoned this
inheritance. The good life that must
be built again can stand solid only
n the foundation of spiritual pow-
er.
We remember the story of the
J' who was dying and called his
children together. Nothing of ma-
terial value had he to leave them;
neither of money, lands of cattle.
"But," he said, "I have been faith-
ful to give you the Torah. Out of
this you Wj]i make your i,ves."
L'ti".ation reveals in the public
Prints that Mrs. Jimmy Walker paid
M5 a pair for shoes and that on one
"ay she bought 18 pair of shoes and
l*o pair of mules for $790. This may
l"xp!ain why Jimmy always walks
ou' on anybody who starts to recite
B<*>t.s! Boots! Boots!"
[CoaUaaaC from |, 0n|
within him. There Is a dramatic
placing of ideas and facts in rela-
tion to each other which is inescap-
able. And he is bravely and pathet-
ically honest. He has put away all
the defenses. And. so. leaves none
to his Gentile readers. Page by
page, book by book, he leads deeper
and deeper into the racial mystery,
the baffling mortal suffering, the
constant consciousness of God. the
puzzling persistent survival, through
persecution by sword, through mi-
grations by government orders,
through starvation and social indig-
nities and even through the com-
pensating financial successes in as-
similated societies. He follows a
sombre pattern in black and crim-
son and gold, weaving his compel-
ling emotionalism in and out, pull-
ing through the colours with phras-
es of tenderness towards the un-
happy world. It is immortal plead-
ing.
But not. as Gentiles might think,
a pleading for their mercy. Not, in
one sentence, Ls there expression of
any desire that this pain may be
lessened which has been the lot of
Israel in the Gentile world.
LewlSOhn has passed that. He has
accepted pain as a blessing. He has
come to what the mystics of all
faiths call "reconciliation.'" the feel-
ing which the Crucified uttered for
all persecuted people when lie cried.
"Father, forgive them; for they
know not what they do." And every
Jew who is altogether Jewish has
passed that. How otherwise would
the race have survived these ages;
hatred being disintegrating, and re-
sentment stealing all the creative
vitality of folk. Grief that is per-
sonal has no place among the peo-
ple of the prophets. The pleading in
the eyes of Jews, as in the words of
Lewisohn, is in no least way con-
cerned with abatement of suffering.
It comes gently from far beyond
that, and has to do with the desire
of the Jew all through history that
the world may not forget the begin-
ning and the ending of life, and the
mystery that suffuses all our mortal
experience.
It is centuries since the Jew has
pleaded In words with the world. He
, has gone his own way. aware of
j what has always happened to pro-
i pheLs. Aware also of time, and its
fulfillment, and the law that works
quietly, protecting truth in its own
j way. It may be that Lewisohn. as a
Jew. and a very great spiritual
teacher, knows that the time has
come, or has nearly come. Whatever
it means, he, who lived among Gen-
tiles, and tried hard to be one of
, them, and felt the gnawing of frus-
; nation, has gathered himself to his
1 own people, and his own peoples
books, and found the peace which
remains. He tells his own story in
two books, Upstream and Midchan-
nel. He tells it over again with
Slight disguise in the fiction of The
Island Within. He tells the story of
his people under assimilation in Is-
I rael. He takes the figure of Shake-
speare's Shylock. and with him tries
to show the Gentile how difficult it
has all been. Never for a moment
does he get away from his message.
Nowhere is there bitterness. Which
is the greatest of miracles. And all
the proof the world will ever need
of the mystery of the chosen people.
And is also all the spiritual war-
(Continued on Page Five)
THE
g^l
Children's Home Society
of Florida
"Florida's Greatest Charity"
428 St. fames Building,
[acksonville, Florida,
January 23, 193J.
Mr. J. I Shochet, Editor,
"The Jewish Floridian,"
Miami, Florida.
My dear Mr. Shochet:
W c will appreciate it very much if you will publish
this letter in the nc\t issue of your paper, "The Jew-
ish Floridian."
Our Society bat iw> little Jewish children, now tin
and n i en yean of age, who ba\ e recently been com-
mitted /<> our Society legally ami permanently to be
placed out for adoption. We place Jewish children
only in Jewish homes. We are exceedingly anxious
to find some good Jewish family willing and able to
provide a suitable foster borne for these two little
this. There are no unfai orable hereditary diseases
in the family history of the children. They are nor-
mal and healths, in every nay and ue know of HO
reason why they should not develop favorably in
ei ery way.
It is the policy of our Society to give to foster par-
ents full information in re to the history of the chil-
dren and we place them for a full year on approval
before we expect or require any permanent arrange-
ment. We shall be glad to send one of our applica-
tion blanks and have one of our field workers call
personally on any family who might be interested
In taking these little girls and will go into the mat-
ter with them personally.
Thanking you for any assistance that you may lend
to us in our effort to find suitable family homes for
these little girls, I am
Very sincerely yours,
Marcus Fagg,
State Superintendent.
A silver thought, a shining thought,
Here at the long day's end;
A thought that paints new gloried
skies,
You are my friend my friend;
Though many miles of winding road
Now stretch between us. yet,
My silver thought is gleaming blight
In Memory's coronet;
I cherish, every passing hour.
Though pathways, severed, wend;
My silver thought, my shining
thought,
You are my friend my friend.
All the world practices the art of
acting.
No girl appreciates a lover who is
unable to hold his own.
Lazy men are dead to the world,
but they remain unburied.
Don't try to raise a disturbance
unless you want to lower yourself.
What he says goes when a man
talks to his wife through a tele-
phone.
If it weren't for occasional lynch-
ings there would be more trials in
this world.
The man who has no enemies
must be good, but it's a question
what he's good for.
It is hard to make some people be-
lieve that the world goes round,
because they have never not their
.share.
It is neither healthful nor neces-
sary to go into the water after a
heavy mealthere are plenty of
restaurants on dry land.
A Chicago burglar stole a hundred
straw hats. In general, though, it
can be said that parlor imitations
of Maurice Chevalier are dying.
Now that the greatest of living sea
pools has come down with mal de
mer. we should like to see a techno-
crat put a clock together.
A wild throw by a Bombay crick-
eteer brought on a riot leading to
three fatalities. It is an appalling
thought that one of our shortstops
could set the eastern world on fire.
Let's see what the senate has done
today toward allowing the governor
of North Carolina and the governor
of South Carolina to resume the
conversation.
An escaped hospital patient, clad
in a bedshcet, was taken in by St.
Louis police on a charge of operat-
ing as a Mahatma without a license.
Tokio doubtless has full descrip-
tions of the bandits it is after, and
it's all the fault of the Chinese for
looking so much alike.
Doctor i before the operation):
"Nine out of every 10 patients die
during this operation. Can I do any-
thing for you before we start?"
Patient: "Yes. Just help me on
with my hat and coat."
A professor of economics is being
sought on a charge of issuing count-
erfeit money. Illustrating the work-
ing of the law of supply and de-
mand. First a supply of money, then
a demand for the professor.
Hubby: "I can't understand why
you should always show such a
mean and cranky disposition in the
morning."
Wife: "At what other time should
I show it, may I ask? You're not
home during the rest of the day."
"What are these "college lectures'
you mention?" wrote the father.
"A college lecture." replied the
son. "is an extended series of re-
marks passing from the notebook of
the professor to the notebook of the
student without entering the
thought of either."
A well known nobleman was
strolling one day when he met a
rustic holding in his right hand a
rope tied to a very frisky calf, and
in his left a staff. The countryman
said, "Good morning," and was
passing on when the nobleman said:
"My good man, don't you know
me?"
"Oh. yes," said the man. "you are
Lord B-----."
"Then why don't you touch your
hat?" asked his lordship.
"Well, my lord, if you don't mind
holding this calf a minute. I will."
responded the rustic.
"You must remember, my boy,
that wealth does not bring happi-
ness." said the fatherly parson.
"I don't expect it to," answered
the modern youth. "I merely want
it so that I may be able to choose
the kind of misery that is most
agreeable to me."
What a man does not alter for
the better, time alters for the worse.
The fatal word had just been
spoken. The rejected suitor was
standing before her listening to her
elaborate explanations of her de-
cision.
"I trust that I have made myself
sufficiently plain," she said.
"Well, I would scarcely go so far,"
he answered as his courage gradu-
ally returned. "It's but fair to give
nature the credit for that," he add-
ed, as he retired in good order.
Around the
Campus
By MILTON A. FRIEDMAN
Hello, folks! Is everybody happy?
Last week in discussing the doings
of the Glee club, I forgot to mention
one Miami boy who played an im-
portant part in making the first
trip of the year a success. The pop-
ular Miami boy I forgot was the
old maestro Ralp Kirsch, who play-
ed two violin solos, "Play, Fiddle,
Play" and "Willow Weep for Me."
The selections were beautifully ren-
dered and received well-merited ap-
plause. Ralph, for your edification,
is guest artist with the Glee club.
The student body was given a rare
treat in the exhibition given by Bill
Tilden, the famous tennis player.
However, for excitement, you should
have been at the basketball games
between Florida and Georgia. Flor-
ida winning both games.
If I were as good a prognosticator
in other matters as in basketball I
wouldn't be worrying today about
those final exams. With these inev-
itably approaching, coming to its
peak this week, they always bring
up foreboding thoughts. This re-
minds me of the famous hanging
song, "It Don't Mean a Thing If It
Hasn't Got a Swing."
I
i


f
Page Four
THE JEWISH FLORI PI AN
Friday, January 27.
193J.
j. .^.;. ^..;..[.+.^+.;..;. ^..;. -t .> ^.;. : -j..;..;. :* : 4 ;.* : > : : > : :- : : : : : : : : : : # : : : :
SJatMn dynagng Uitllrtin
Edited h\ RABBI S. M. MACHTEI
Founder un Si NDAY Mornings WIOD, Miami. FLORIDA
:
:
:
+
*
*
*
.-. Vol. 1. MIAMI. FLORIDA. JANUARY 29, 1933.
.;..;..;. .>.;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;. : :- : : : : : : : : : -: : : : : : : : : : :+;
No. 7. %
:::*:*:
God-given Sons
Sermon delivered Sunday. January 22. 1*S.1
Scripture Reading, Genesis, Chapter \l.\ll. Verses 1 / lO.incl.
(J,HERE are several explanations given by the sages for the question by
Jacob, "Who are these?" when he saw Joseph's sons immediately preced-
ing his blessing, as he lay on hlfl death-bed. The reason given in the verse
immediately following Joseph's answer. "Now the eyes of Israel were dim
for age. so that he could not see." does not seem to justify the lengthy
answer which Joseph gave. Let us assume that Israels eyes were dim with
the natural weakness of age. He would ask, "Who are these?" and Jo.-eph
would say. "Why. father, these are my sons. Menasseh and Ephraim.
Don't you recognize them?" That would be a natural answer because dur-
ing the seventeen years that Jacob lived in Egypt he saw these two boys
almost daily. Then why the sudden failure to recognize them? Why the
peculiar answer by Joseph. "These are my sons, whom God hath given me
in this place."
Recipes for the
Jewish Family
straight beef, a small soup bone, one
*" ] can Torsch's mixed vegetables.
Boil the meat in enough water to
cover well and season to taste; add
the contents of one can of Torsch's
mixed vegetables; continue heating
for 10 minutes. Serve hot.
Beef Stew
Two tablespoons shortening, two
pounds beef, top round, five table-
spoons flour, few grains cayenne,
two tablespoons chopped parsley,
one can Torsch's mixed vegetables,
one small onion, one-eighth tea-
spoon salt, six smalls potatoes, three
cups water.
Slice onions and cook slowly in
i lie shortening five minutes. Cut
bid into uniform pieces. Sprinkle
with two tablespoons of the flour
and a little salt and pepper. Brown
slowly about one hour. Add pota-
toes, salt, pepper, cayenne and cook
one hour longer. Then just before
ready to serve, add the contents of
the can of Torsch's mixed vege-
tables, both the vegetables and the
Stuffed Green Peppers
One fourth cup grated cheese,
one-half cup bread crumbs, one-
fourth cup milk, six green peppers,
seasoning, one can Torsch's mixed
vegetables.
Cut ofT tops and remove seeds
Horn the peppers. Drop into boiling
water and five minutes and drain.
Pour the liquor from one can of
Torsch's mixed vegetables, add bread
crumbs, milk and seasoning. Fill in-
to the pepper shells, sprinkle with
the grated cheese and bake in a
moderate oven until brown. Serve
hot.
Try This Recipe Today
Make a rich cream sauce, using
three tablespoons butter, two table-
spoons flour, and one and one-half
Delaney & Beers
Kodak Finishing and Enlariin.
Commercial Work and Home Portr,;,
50% Off on All Amateur Work
212 N. E. 4th St. Phone 2.jj-
l.quor. Let cook five minutes. Then ^ and ,,, [Q ^
thicken the gravy with three table- j ^ ^ (ne sauce begins to
spoons flour and one-third cup of
bring to the boiling point. Serve hot.
Vegetables Soup
One-half pound bottom round or
iIn. ken; then after draining the
liquor lrom one can of Torsch's
mixed vegetables, add the vegetables
to the cream sauce. Cook until the
vegetables are thoroughly heated.
Serve on slices of crisp, brown toast.
IT appears to me that this is what happened: Joseph received word sud-
denly that his father. Jacob, had taken a sudden turn for the worse
and that he was about to die. Joseph hastily summoned his two sons and *r "* l0 smooth Paste and
rushed with them to his father's bedside. The young men were attired
as befitted Egyptian princes. On their regular visits to their grandfather.
Jacob, they had always dressed in the tribal raiment which distinguished
the Hebrews in Egypt and which was one of the qualities that finally
found favor in the eyes of God and which resulted in their liberation
through Moses. The Midrash teaches that Israel in Egypt retained their they will be more Jewish than you have been. In that lies our salvation,
identity through their garb, their language, their names and their ability Many of thus day. many of the. now, old folks, have lived a life exter-
to retain a secret. In anv event. Menasseh and Ephraim had always ap- Jewish. They have observed the appearance of Jews. I pray to God
peared before Jacob dressed as Hebrews Now. In their haste to reach his that the youth, the generation of whom you despair, will be truly Jewish
bedside before he died, they did not change their clothes, but came dress- regardless oi appearances. To you they may be a lost generation. To me
ed in the royal uniforms-in native garb. In appearance they were no they are the sons God hath given us in this place. Blessed be our sons
different than thousands of other Egyptian youths. Jacob, zealous of the a"d blessed be this place,
faith of his fathers, feared lest these youths should forsake that faith
and become idol-worshippers as were the natives of Egypt. So. for the
moment, a doubt swept across his mind and he asked, "Who are these?"
Joseph, watching his father closely and noting the expression upon his
face, understood what it was that puzzled his father, and he replied.
"These are my sons, whom God hath given me in this place." Joseph con-
veyed this thought to Jacob, "Have no fear. They are my sons. My flesh
and blood just as I am yours. They will remain as loyal to our faith as
did I. I was estranged from you for years and yet I remained loyal. They
have the selfsame qualities. Furthermore, they are not just sons. They are
God-given. They are God-conscious though they dwell in this place.
Though they have the outward appearance of Egyptians, though they look
native they are true sons of Israel." All this is conveyed in the words.
"They are my sons, whom God hath given me in this place."
TIVOLlI
W. Flagler at 8th I'hone M1v. I
Matinee 20c 2 to 11 Kvenin.VJ
BUN. AM) HON. JAN. 25-30 !
Consume Bennett Neil BlBOu. '
...In...
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An- you fully covered) |
Permit a (Julf Life Rtpra. j
sentatiye to mil anil help
you nelect a program of |
Life Insurance '
TODAY
Gulf Life
Insurance Go. I
.116 Seyhold BalMilif I
I'hone 2-1911
IN this very day. in this very land, there are old Jews who look with
deep concern at the Jewish youth of the land and ask, "Who are
these?" They have doubts as to the loyalty of the younger generation to-
wards the faith of their fathers. These old men and women view with
growing alarm the dress and habits of their own children and grand-
children and they wonder whether these will be Jews after they, the old
ones, have gone from this earth. They scan the faces of their descend-
ants and find little to distinguish them from the native sons and daugh-
ters. Deep down in their hearts they tremble with the conviction that the
land has swallowed up their children. They believe that the youth has
been estranged from them and trom the faith of their fathers.
TO these I say, "They are our sons, whom God hath given us in this
place." The youth of today is as much a God-given youth as were the
sons of Joseph. True, it is "in this place." They follow many customs
and practices of the land in which they live, but, that is not sufficient
reason to doubt their sincerity and loyalty to the faith of their fathers.
If you of the old generation have inspired them by your own example and
if you have instilled in them a love and devotion to Israel and its tradi-
tions, you need have no fear of the future of Israel. If you have taught
them, in word and deed, to honor the future and its possibilities as well
as to take pride in the past accomplishments of our people then they will
carry on where you leave off possibly not in the same forms, but surely
in the same essence. That is the meaning of "in this place." Judaism
does not change. The structure always remains the same. The super-
structure, the outer form, varies slightly under different conditions, in
different places, but the faith never need be remolded. That is the final
and conceded verdict of time. Judaism that collection of truths which
we term Judaism, is not revised in every generation. Truth is eternal.
Its application may vary with the needs and with the habits of mankind
in strange lands and under other circumstances, but, although it be
clothed in riches or rags, whether it be expressed in poetry or prose,
whether it be disguised as a chemical formula and a mathematical equa-
tion, it is ever the same truth. Whether I say, "Shema Ylsroel," or you
say, "Hear, O Israel." the truth we both express is one. Each of us uses a
different medium to express the same truth.
IT Is regrettable that your children cannot pray In the language so dear
and so holy to us, but, God understands all languages. If your chil-
dren do not wear the long distinguishing cloaks of the Jews of the middle
ages they are not the less Jewish because of this.
THEY are the sons whom God hath given you "in this place." Never
lose sight of the place. The outward appearance does not make the
Jew. Clothes may make the "man" or the woman, but, a Jew is not a
product of clothing. He is a product of thought of a state of mind.
Don't despair of your children. They are as Jewish as you have been.
Basing my reason on the past of our people, I will venture to say that
NEW 7th
AVE. THEATRE
3933 V W. Tih Am-. PhotM 1-3352
Sunrtn> and Monday. Jan. 19-39
JANET N 1) (HAS.
QAYNOR FARRELL
"The First Year"
Tender situations and merry compli-
rations in the first year of married
life.
Adults 20c Children 10c
Box Office Opens .'.:(.-, on
Sat. and Sun. Only
Oiliest Mepair Shop in Menu
AMHKICAN
SHOE SHOP
Miami'i Best for
Shoe Repairing
. 15 S. MIAMI AVENUE
C. R. IIAKKETT. Prop.
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P I G G L Y
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A .Miami Institution
Seventeen Years of Satisfactory s,
P& A GARAGE
< 11inp11 i( Automobile
Rebuilder* and
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\\ In I \ lit nin.-nt
Brake BptclalUtfl
* !ornn Nail*, Callouses, .
painlessly under antiseptic oonditlotu,
\ ii i roubles corrected
DOCTOR
r. v. i.Ai'ui:.N'iii.\i.
Chiropodist
7-9 Halcyon Arcade
Ground Floor, Opp. Olympii TneaW
Phone 3-309
!dr. chas. beckwih!
OPTOMETRIST |
"22 Years in Slumi"
OPEN
DAILY
AND
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SEE THE PRIMITIVE EVERGLADES AT
MUSA ISLE
Seminole Indian Village
LEADERSHIP CHIEF WILLIAM OSCEOLA
N. V I \>rnty.fifth Avenue and Sixteenth Street
OPEN
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HI ND \v
l,i. Wc-t ..ii I hii-l.r Street to Twenty-seventh Avenue. Turn North
LARGEST COLLECTION OF CAPTIVE ALLIGATOR8
AND CROCODILES
COMPLETE FLORIDA SWAMP ZOO AM) MUSEUM
See Cowboy Hill, a lt.nl Scminole Indian, Wrestle the Alliiralnr
Kl CBT THERE-T.k. an, f., hire ., dri... on nSKi north
on Iwentyseventh Avenue or -,..h. "M.cushla" leaves I'ier 6 th" Yaeht
Buln-1 p. m. .Oil? _.lM on speedboat "Speedee" from Kloridi.n Dock
Miami Bench.
Maccabees
MORI I HAN I || i INS( |,\\< |
A Human Institution
A. M. COFFIN
State Manager
226 Seybold Building : Phone 3-2618
To See I* To lleliix-
Did you know ...
The most important thlruj l "I"!' j
ink' your eye doctor is nin-nli rinic h'* I
experience and reputation? j
"TIME WILL TELL"
22 years of successful operation i j
Miami is the best proof of our ability. .
Ilundreda commit Dr. Backwilt.
36 N. E. FIRST AVENUE .

lec
IS YOUR
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SERVANT..
Use lb!
"%m


cirhv. lanuary 27, 1933.
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page Five
SOCIETY
Next Sunday evening the regular
weekly card party of the Hebrew '
Itbletlc club will be held at its com-
munity center home beginning at 8
o'clock. No charges of any kind will
oe made as thi& is an effort to have
the Jews of Miami learn of the work
0I the organization. Refreshments
Will be served free.

Next Wednesday evening the He-
brew Athletic club is sponsoring a
mass meeting at its community cen-
tre home S. W. Sixteenth avenue
and Fifth street, to which the pub-
lic |a invited. It will be an open
meeting and the recreation rooms
will be open for those desiring to
enjoy them.

Mrs, Hyman N. Levy, chairman of
the annual Jewish Welfare bureau
charity ball Is working earnestly to
awaken the interest of all residents
as well as tourists to the importance
of making this annual event a suc-
I both socially and financially.
The lands raised through this ball
are relied upon in large measure to
the acute distress which is
inevitable particularly in times like
these. Local Jewish organizations
been enlisted in the work and
all shades of Jewry are urged to vol-
unteer their efforts to insure the
desired. Sunday evening,
March 12, the Floridlan hotel will
oe beautifully decorated for the ev-
ent. Prominent nationally known
entertainers will help provide an
evening of unexcelled entertain-
ment.

Mr. and Mrs. M. Weinstock and
family of Far Rockaway, N. Y ar-
rived in Miami last week to spend
the winter season here. Mr. Wein-
-tock is one of the leading com-
munal workers of his city and the
organizer of the Orthodox synagog
there. While in Miami last year he
ne of the most ardent sup-
porters of the Miami Jewish Orlho-
dox congregation.
*
Mr, and Mrs. M. Yudelson of At-
Ga., arrived here last week to
mi the winter visiting their son-
R and daughter, Dr. and Mrs.
Barney Weinkle.

Plans for the benefit bridge being
sponsored by the ladies' auxiliary of
the Jewish Welfare bureau at the
Blackstone hotel next Friday. Feb-
ruary 3, include the giving of prizes
tor high scores and the serving of
delicious refreshments. An oppor-
tunity to spend a pleasant and en-
joyable afternoon in beautiful sur-
roundings and at the same time
v *
1*1 Ml,. ii.,m i, i ,,., k Sylla. black
j 11.50 AnniiNol llemmorthodal Sup.
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I'1'11 Wine Tonic Sherry. Tokay
II1.M (|uick Aborbine Liniment
j-"" Milk MagnMla Tooth Pasta
jl-lh. ran Lactose Dextrin ......
3Sc I
I6r I
Sc I
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s
E. FORREST WITHERS
(IT RATE STORE
244 .Northeast First Avenue
tVU
By This
Sign
You are
assured of the
BF.ST
Electrical Work
Electric Stoves and Kefrigeralors
I'hc Service You Will Appreciate
George La Vigne
Company, Inc.
I lctiri.nl Contrartor and
I M/iiii i i
12 N. E. Third Avenue
Phone 2-7838
help relieve the distress of the needy
will be given to residents and tour-
ists. In charge of arrangements is
a committee headed by Mrs. Isidor
Cohen.

The Hebrew Athletic club basket-
ball team dropped a couple of close
games this week. Miami High school
defeated the Jewish athletes in the
first contest by the close score of
38 to 33. It was a hard-fought match
and was not won until the last few
minutes of play.
The Y.M.C.A. Triangles turned
the team back in the other game
played at Flamingo park Monday
evening. The score was 21 to 18.
The Hebrew team took the lead at
the start and held it to the last few
minutes of play when the Y boys
uncorked some lucky shots to take
the lead and win the game.
The H.A.C. boys played an in-
spired game and came very close to
upsetting the Y team. Silent Sam
Bornstein again led his team mates
in scoring. Mickey Lubel. a new-
comer, bids fair to become one of
the outstanding men on the squad.
The Grossman brothers. Schwartz.
Davis and Reisman, played their us-
ual bang-up game.
Return matches with both the
winning teams will be sought. A
name with the First Baptists will
be played on Thursday night at the
Fust Baptist church on N. E. First
avenue at Fifth street. Another will
be played at Flamingo park on
Monday night.

The visiting circle of the United
Order of True Sisters will meet at
the home of Mrs. Rose Simpson at
2036 Twelfth street next Wednesday
afternoon. February 1. at 2 p. m..
when an interesting program will be
presented. Rosemary Klemtner will
be heard in a number of vocal selec-
tions accompanied by Miss Hortense
Landesman at the piano. Miss
Landesman will also render a num-
ber of piano selections. Capt. F. M.
Tobias will deliver an address and
Mrs. Rose Baran of New York will
give a recitation. All sisters and
friends are urged to attend. A social
hour will follow the program.

The ladies' auxiliary of the Miami
Jewish Orthodox congregation will
hold a luncheon bridge on Tuesday.
February 7. at 1 o'clock, at the home
ill Mrs. Charles Tannenbaum, 2101
S. W. Eleventh street. Proceeds will
be devoted to the Talmud Torah
fund of the organization. In charge
of arrangements are Mrs. Sam Tan-
nenbaum. chairman: Mrs. Moe Har-
ris and Mrs. Charles Tannenbaum.
The public is invited to attend.

Mr. and Mrs, George A. Rubin of
Rockfield. 111., and daughters ar-
rived here last week to spend sev-
eral months in Miami.

Mrs. M. Rubin, prominent in
Brooklyn. N. Y.. sponsored a card !
party last Tuesday afternoon for
Senior Hadassah at the Blackstone
hotel gardens. Miami Beach, when
more than 150 guests attended. As-
sisting Mrs. Rubin were Mesdames
Freda Lutzky. Barney Weinkle, J.
Williamson and M. Loventhal. Priz-
es were given for high scores and
..,..:..:..:..;*.:::: ?+?+**??*? ***
^RENTALS BALES AND SERVICE}
t Stevens Radio
t Sales Go. *
| OPEN EVENINGS ?
* HI s. E. 1st St. Phone MTU ^
. ...;. .:.;. .;.>.;. : : ? ? : : ? ? ? ?
THE PROPHET
in our MIDST
l Continued from Page Three)
rant 'here could be of their mission.
Through these centuries of op-
pression Jews have encouraged
thought among themselves, and in-
tellectualism for its own end. The
result is that the Jewish writers now
saying what they have to say in the
languages of the Gentile are singu-
larly free from illusions. Which is
not quite flattering to the people
who still have their illusions. That
delicious refreshments were served.

Visiting Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Ar-
gintar are Mrs. Joe Newell of Phil-
adelphia, the mother of Mrs. Argin-
tar; Mr. and Mrs. Morris Coolick of
Noonan. Ga.. Mrs. Max Argintar
and Miss Florence Argintar of Tam-
pa. Fla.
a
"Two Against the World," starring
Constance Bennett, which comes to
the Tivoli theatre on next Sunday
and Monday, is said to be one of
the most realistic and dramatic pic-
tures to be presented on the screen.
It is taken from the popular novel
by Marion Dix and Jerry Horwin
and is said to be based on circum-
stance taken from real life.
It carries one of the most dynamic
courtroom trials ever witnessed, in
which a beautiful young society girl
perjures herself to save her brother
from electrocution and her married
sister from scandal. In the very
presence of the man she loves, she
confesses to a series of clandestine
meetings with a man whom her
brother has slain. Her own sister is
the guilty one. but cowardly lets her
shoulder the burden to evade a do-
mestic tangle.
Miss Bennett rises to the emo-
; tional role with real dramatic fer-
; vor. at the same time exercising a
certain amount of restraint which
serves to make the sequences more
realistic and natural. She has an
excellent supporting cast including
Neil Hamilton, Helen Vinson, Gavin
Gordon. Allen Vincent, Walter Wal-
: ker. Roscoe Karns. Alan Mowbray
and Hale Hamilton.
The picture has all the brilliance
of a high society background, with
all the characters living in an ex-
i elusive social whirl. The settings are
j rich and lavish as befits the drama.
I It was directed by Archie Mayo.
i who also directed Miss Bennett in
"Bought" for Warner Brothers.

The third annual purim dance of
the ladies' auxiliary of the Miami
Jewish Orthodox congregation will
be hald on Sunday, February 26, at
a place to be announced in next
week's issue of The Jewish Florid-
ian. Mrs. Sam Tannenbaum and
Mrs. Charles Tannenbaum are in
charge of the committee of arrange-
ments.
GERSON'S
1.101 Collins Ave.
MIAMI BEACH
Phone 5-3989
A Place to Dine
in Contentment
is one of the reasons, in addition to
the inherited tendency, why the
Gentile will become irritable with
the Jew in these times. The Jew,
through his own history, has learned
the futility of force and the fatuous-
ness of war; he has existed, and
continued to exist, without an army,
or a government, while the people
of pompous addiction to banners
and inroads upon other people, have
gone up and gone down in their
groups, and in their turns have dis-
appeared from the face of the earth.
The Jew has had nothing in the
world, but his sacred teachings, and
his racial vitality, and the wit to
make a living in spite of armies and
edicts and the racial notions of
Gentiles. Ludwig Lewisohn says to
the Gentile that there were mighty
people in the times of the Bible who
pushed the Jew out of the way.
Where are they now? The Jew now
is in mast places of the earth. The
racial world within the world sur-
vives. It may be in fulfillment of a
divine command. It may be out of
the consciousness of the mystic,
which knows all things to be in con-
stant change and movement, and
gives itself willingly to the cosmic
undulation, and so is carried on.
But it is far more likely to be a hu-
man wisdom, not very far from sim-
ple common sense, bred into a par-
ticular people for generation upon
generation, that things must be tak-
en as they are in the world, even
though all the prophets teach that
they must be changed. It is this ca-
pacity to look at the facts, in rela-
tion to ideas about them, which is
the outstanding characteristic of the
Jewish intellectuals, whether writers
or talkers. And it is what makes
any friendship between Jew and
Gentile difficult. Centuries of reach-
ing for a sword to finish an argu-
: ment has not served Gentiles intel-
lectually. And reaching for edicts,
and social notions, is not much im-
provement. But it may be that the
time has come, or has nearly come
when it is a book Gentiles will take
into their hands when they get to
argument.
Which, being true, when it does
come to be true, makes Lewisohn a
missioner to the Gentiles. A man of
Jewish spirit and Jewish mind, with
the ardor of the prophets in him,
able to feel that the world is worth
making all one's effort for that
among the masses who live and die
with questions never disturbing
them that among the rulers who
fail manifestly in their ruling
that among these there must be the
few to whom the prophets spoke,
calling them the Remnant. It lives
in the blood of the Jews a mood
of indefinable spirituality, and also
of irrefutable intellectuality, com-
pletely beyond illusion about men
and the governments of the world.
The romance is in the feeling for
truth that somehow it must be su-
, stained, with courage and persist-
j ence, and also with all the art there
I is in words.The Jewish Standard.
1) A N N V
S Hi: E II AN
"The Aristocrat of Dancing
and Master of Rbytbm"
Former Instructor in Dancing
Teachers Normal School D.M.A.
Eight consecutive years of teach-
ing in Cleveland, O. Ten years
actual stage experience, Keith-
Orpheum Circuit Tap and
stage dancing in all its form
adagio, limbering and stretching.
Every step taught to music, at
rates in keeping with the times.
ENROLL NOW!
The Leslie Bldg.
1.136 N. Miami Ave. Phone 2-0528
Plenty nj Parking Space
:
( omplimi n l \ af
PHINEAS E. PAIST
HAROLD 1). STEWARD
ARCHITECTS
j MADKLON
j beauty shop
| 17 S. K. 1-1 Am-. PboM :l-J7.M
Where you will meet
j Madam Due, Tea Cup Reader
on Mondays and Wednesdays
;. .j. .j..;. *.;. .> *.;. ;. > : : : : : : : : :- : :
PIERRE'S
% Beauty Shop i
: -:
Specializing in Haircuts and *
* Finger Waving Hair Dyed :
J 23 N.'k. 1st Ave.' Phone I-Mll 9
;. .; -j..;..;. *.;..;..;. .; : : : :- : : : : : : :
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.; Insist on your (irocer giving you ?
+ NEW YORK BREAD & CAKE *
* COMPANY ?
BREAD AND CAKES *
+ 471 S. W. 8th St. Phone 2-7852 .j.
* Branch Store: lit N. W. 5th St. >
* *
.j..;..;..;..;..;..;. ;. : : : : : : : : : : : :+: :
E. C. THRALL & COMPANY
State Agent New York Fire Insurance Co.
and Metropolitan Assurance Underwriters
318-19 MEYER RISER BLDG.
Phone 2-5824 E. C. THKAI.L. President Miami. JMa^ J
fffill'F toT vour health!
Watkins' Alleys
mi W. rLAGLBR ST.
Morning PricesI'ntil Noon
10c per line for Ilig PbU
5c per line for Duck Pins
Evening Prices
Ilig Pins 2 for lie
Small Pin* 3 for 25c
V? Sunk iCmtrrs ^hnppr
(tine BlMk East of New Poat Office)
Everything in Rooks, Old and New
410 NORTHEAST SECOND AVENUE

Now you can buy
BILTMORE LAUNDRY SERVICE
at a price that fits your pocket book!
PHONE 3-3687 21 N. W. 9TH ST.
"Radio Service"
WM. BIBLBB
Parts and Accessories
430 NORTH MIAMI AVE.
No ChatM for Examination
.;. ...;..;..;..;. .;.;. : : : ? *
"Pleasing you keep" u in huine'
Miami Mirror &
Glass Works
MIRRORS & AUTO GLASS
A. H. ROSS
_. Ill N. Miami Ave. Phone 2-1196 !
^.;. f.;..;. : : 91* ? ? ? *
J. P. ALEXANDER, INC.
19 S. E. FIRST AVENUE tin Foster Building)
High Grade Shoe Repairing
Cripple ami Corrective Foot Work Our Specialty
1
I
-:


Page Six
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Friday, January 27
r
"SWEET WATERS
of MEGIDDO"
By Rabbi Lazarus Axiirod
St. Petersburg
Notes
(Continued from last week)
The tomb of Bar Jochai: A solid
wall of rounded rock, bespattered
with burnt candle grease, saturated
with wax and oil, the outpouring of
suppressed emotions of reverence
for this divine mystic. It is surpris-
ing how one's ideas and ambitions
undergo a quick change in the pres-
ence of a grave or tomb. How petty,
puny and insignificant we seemed
at that moment. It seemed to me as
though the sage lay serenely in his
Makom Menucha, secretly laughing
at this generation, so materialistic,
sophisitcated, and enlightened.
By this time a vast crowd of his
Chasidim and pilgrims had gath-
ered around the tomb, and business
in candles was brisk, three for a pi-
astre being the popular price. The
air now reeked with the pungent
odour of burnt candles, and coupled
with this fragrant aroma, I sensed
another smell which was quickly
permeating the vaults. My nostrils
did not deceive me: thousands of
fried chicken livers were being sold
off rapidly at a piastre apiece. I
wondered hazily where they got so
many livers, and what became of
the chickens. Impromptu tents were
rigged up hastily, and meals a la
carte were being served to the hun-
gry tourists, the feature on the
menu being fried Kinereth fish. Ev-
en in the presence of the divines,
one must eat. but in my opinion
this indulgence in food removed
that beautiful spiritual atmosphere
ol the vault.
The air now echoed with wails
and lamentations, the Sephardic
women adding to the exotic scene
by chanting psalms in a weird nasal
drone. These Sephardic mothers
bring their families to this affair,
and spend the night in the building,
sleeping on blankets thrown hap-
hazardly around the floor. Babes
: : : : : : : > : *.;. *.;...;..;..;..;..;..;..;.
Services at Congregation Bnai
Israel begin tonight at 8 p. m.. when
Rabbi Kleinfeld will speak on "Is
Religion for Man or Man for Relig-
ion?" Saturday morning services
begin at 9 a. m.. Sunday school at
10 a. m.. and Hebrew school daily at
4 to 6 p. m.
The annual concert for the bene-
fit of the building fund will take
place at the temple. 921 Ninth
street, Sunday, January 29 at 8 p.m.
The Ladies Auxiliary and Aid so-
ciety of Bnai Israel is holding a
baked goods sale this week at 400
Central avenue.
At the regular meeting of the Aux-
iliary and Aid society last Tuesday,
ways and means were devised to
raise money for our building fund.
Miss Minnie Bush, a member of
the city welfare department, ad-
dressed the Judaic council at their
meeting held at the home of Mrs. S.
Fyvolent. on January 23. Mrs. H.
Schuster read a very interesting ar-
ticle on "The Transient Boy." The
next meeting of the council will be
held at the home of Mrs. A. A. Es-
rick. 325 Eighteenth avenue, N. E..
on Monday evening. February 6 at
8:15 p. m.
SOCIETY
An important meeting of the Beth
David Sisterhood will be held on
Wednesday, February 1. at the Tal-
mud Torah hall when a luncheon
will be served at 12:30 with Mrs. J.
L. Gordon of New York as the hos-
tess. All having tickets or moneys
of the minstrel show are asked to
bring them to the meeting.

Mr. and Mrs. William Friedman
entertained last week at a dinner in
honor of Mr. and Mrs. J. Lipow of
Nyack, N. Y.

Mr. Leo Levinson of New York
City is visiting his aunt and uncle.
Mr. and Mrs. William Friedman of
this city for a brief vacation.
?
Senior Hadassah is sponsorint: a
card party at the Mayfield Court
gardens. 730 Pennsylvania avenue.
Miami Beach, on Wednesday, Feb-
ruary 8. at 2 p. m. Mrs. F. Lutzky
is chairman in charge of the ar-
rangements. The public is invited
to attend.

Miss Sylvia Dreisen. president of
the Miami Junior Council of Jewish
Women, was recently elected a di-
rector of the national parent organ-
ization.
and round the tribe dances until in
the very exuberance of their feel-
ings, they shoot guns in the air, and
increase their speed. It is remindful
of the old Chassldic dances which
but few of the modern Jews have
been privileged to witness.
Other acts on the special program
will be songs by Indians .,
federal reservation at Danla, A
ing with the alligator by "col
Billie" during which he will pu
head in the alligator's mouth, a,
special wrestling match for thel
time by the 12-year-old son ofl
Indian Chief William Osceola.
? CANTOR JOS. Z. SHIISKY *
j rim BCCtpl MVMVl
Concert Engagements
:-
: ......-*--------- .;.
+ In Florida, Reasonable Arrangement! ";"
TAddrau: Boliteln c!o Jewleh Florldian*
;
j. Bon 2878, Miami, FIh. .;.
: : : *.;. *.;. *.;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;.
WALK A THON
CINDERELLA
BALLROOM
S1.000 CASH PRIZES
21 HOIKS DAILY
PAST THE (S40TII HOIK
GOING ON NOW
Radio Synagog
Rabbi S. M. Machtei, founder and
director oi the Radio Synagog. will
preach over WIOD at 10 o'clock on
Sunday morning on "Prayer For
Whose Benefit?" Leonard Tobin will
1 deliver the sermonette on "Early
Training." In addition to these
there will be prayers, hymns and
music.
At 11 o'clock Rabbi Machtei will
conduct a class in Bible study at the
home of Major Kaulman Mandel.
3012 S. W. Eighth street (Tamiami
Trail i. All those Interested are wel-
come.
and sucklings lay there in a huddle,
snoring soundly and blissfully. Ig-
norant of the fiery enthusiasm dis-
played by their ultra-patriotic par-
ents.
I turned at the touch on my el-
bow. An elderly woman, bewigged
and beshawled. turned to me ap-
pcalingly. "GefTint fir mir. bitte. die
plattz." and she handed me an old
prayer book, full of Techinoth for
all occasions. I fulfilled her wish.
"Danke, danke" she was profuse
in her thanks. A fine old lady, she
must have traveled far for this spir-
itual delight. I pictured her peti-
(To Be Concluded)
Miami's Busiest-
America's Largest
RED CROSS
DRUG
DEPARTMENT
STORE
SI E.Flakier
Phone 2-8196
FREE MOTORCYCLE DELIVERY
In Greater Miami
Special Rites
Next Monday
LCuntinuvd from Page One)
Attest, They grab at the fish and. n
they miss the fish, they grab at one
i another. In fact, one big alligator
grabbed his own tail and two of the
Seminoles had to beat him on the
head witn then- bamboo poles in
make him turn loose. If let alone,
the alligator would very likely have
bitten his own tail completely off!
Big alligators grab smaller ones
| by a leg or a tail, or one of the jaws.
And when they grab, they crunch
down hard. One missed both fish
and alligator and happened to
hold of a coral rock. When he
crunched down on it, the rock was
reduced to pebbles. As for the croc-
odiles, they are just like the alli-
gator only quicker and wilder, if
that is possible. It is easy to sec
why nature gave these beasts such
tough hides. They'd kill each other
olf trying to get food otherwise.
As the helpers shovel the food ov-
er the wall, the Seminoles around
the wall are kept busy wielding
their bamboo poles. The more ex-
cited the alligators and crocodiles
get. the more voluble and perturbed
become- the Seminoles. If a couple
of alligators get all tangled up. each
with a strangle hold on the other,
the Seminoles pry and prod them
with poles in a truly prodigious
manner. During the performance
they address the alligators in
strange words of short syllables.
Whatever it is they mean, the alli-
gators pay not the slightest atten-
tion, but go right on. merrily grab-
bing the nearest thing within grab-
bing distance.
In addition to the alligators being
fed. the Indians will give one of
their tribal dances, rarely shown.
The last one in this district was held
in 1925 at the opening of the 1 ami-
ami Trail at Everglades City. Round
Breakful 7 to ,,
Dinner .....', to -
Lunch II to 2 :S0
AVIS CAFETERIA
:(; N. E. Second \ .
Oppoalta Halcyon Hotel
Efficient Sen Ice
Boyi to carry your tray
I
. Only Bee
Hundred of
Deep See Wonden
Co in Captivity .
Living Bpecimeni .
Miami Aquarium
on the fBmi.u blockade runner
PRINS VALDEMAR
North End Bayfront Park
".ill and BUcayna limilevanl
Admission 25c Children 10c
Open I a.m. t<> 11 p.m.
+
+
*
+
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+
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:
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The Best Way to See the Races .
TAKE BUSSES
At South Entrance of Venetian Arcade, Southeast First
Street, direct to the Grandstand without stop.
FARE 35c
MIAMI TRANSIT COMPANY
! ? : : : : : > : ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? "5* ; ? : : : : .. .. ..
SAMETS KOSHER MARKX
7.17 WASHINGTON AVE. MIAMI BBACH
A COMPLETE LINE OF THE CHOICEST STRICTLY
KOSHER MEATS AND FRESH-KILLED POULTRY
Our imported meats are under the
personal supervision of Rabbi Joseph
Konvitz and Rabbi Isaac Siegel of
Newark, N.J. Come and be convinced.
DELICATESSEN. GROCERIES, DAIRY PRODUCTS
FKESH FRl'ITS AND VEGETABLES
Phone 5-3512 for Free Delivery
> ? : : : : : : : < : : :< ? : :+: : : : $.;.+$.;. .j. $ $.;. $.;..;. ......... ,t, J
For fresh
Sea Foods
STOP AT
GAPT. TOM'S
FISH MART
Hauler St. and Miami River
Phone 1-S1I1 We Never (hue
OUR PRICES ARE THE LOWEST
Our I i-l) .ux the freshest Caught by our own boats dail]
If it .s Sea Food, we have .1 at its very best, and at attractively
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Bervance with all the sanitary rules and regulations.
ONCE ONLY
SUNDAY
February 5th
3 P. M.
BETH
DAVID
Congregation
presents
Cantor
Joseph Z* Shlisky
World Renowned Tenor
at the
TEMPLE THEATRE
345 N. W. THIRD STREET
In a Program of Traditional Melodies,
Folk Songs and Operatic Arias
POPULAR PRICES


Full Text

PAGE 1

cirhv. lanuary 27, 1933. THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page Five SOCIETY Next Sunday evening the regular weekly card party of the Hebrew Itbletlc club will be held at its community center home beginning at 8 o'clock. No charges of any kind will oe made as thi& is an effort to have the Jews of Miami learn of the work 0 I the organization. Refreshments Will be served free. • • • Next Wednesday evening the Hebrew Athletic club is sponsoring a mass meeting at its community centre home S. W. Sixteenth avenue and Fifth street, to which the public |a invited. It will be an open meeting and the recreation rooms will be open for those desiring to enjoy them. • • • Mrs, Hyman N. Levy, chairman of the annual Jewish Welfare bureau charity ball Is working earnestly to awaken the interest of all residents as well as tourists to the importance of making this annual event a sucI both socially and financially. The lands raised through this ball are relied upon in large measure to the acute distress which is inevitable particularly in times like these. Local Jewish organizations been enlisted in the work and all shades of Jewry are urged to volunteer their efforts to insure the desired. Sunday evening, March 12, the Floridlan hotel will oe beautifully decorated for the event. Prominent nationally known entertainers will help provide an evening of unexcelled entertainment. • • • Mr. and Mrs. M. Weinstock and family of Far Rockaway, N. Y„ arrived in Miami last week to spend the winter season here. Mr. Wein-tock is one of the leading communal workers of his city and the organizer of the Orthodox synagog there. While in Miami last year he %  ne of the most ardent supporters of the Miami Jewish Orlhodox congregation. • • Mr, and Mrs. M. Yudelson of AtGa., arrived here last week to MI the winter visiting their sonR and daughter, Dr. and Mrs. Barney Weinkle. • • • Plans for the benefit bridge being sponsored by the ladies' auxiliary of the Jewish Welfare bureau at the Blackstone hotel next Friday. February 3, include the giving of prizes tor high scores and the serving of delicious refreshments. An opportunity to spend a pleasant and enjoyable afternoon in beautiful surroundings and at the same time v 1*1 Ml,. II.,M i, i ,,., k Sylla. black j 11.50 AnniiNol llemmorthodal Sup. |T*e 16-or. Russian Minerol Oil .... I' 1 11 Wine Tonic — Sherry. Tokay II1.M (|uick Aborbine Liniment j-"" Milk MagnMla Tooth Pasta jl-lh. ran Lactose Dextrin 3Sc I I6r I Sc I 61c | s E. FORREST WITHERS (IT RATE STORE 244 .Northeast First Avenue tVU By This Sign You are assured of the BF.ST Electrical Work Electric Stoves and Kefrigeralors I'hc Service You Will Appreciate George La Vigne Company, Inc. I lctiri.nl Contrartor and I M/iiii i i 12 N. E. Third Avenue Phone 2-7838 help relieve the distress of the needy will be given to residents and tourists. In charge of arrangements is a committee headed by Mrs. Isidor Cohen. • • • The Hebrew Athletic club basketball team dropped a couple of close games this week. Miami High school defeated the Jewish athletes in the first contest by the close score of 38 to 33. It was a hard-fought match and was not won until the last few minutes of play. The Y.M.C.A. Triangles turned the team back in the other game played at Flamingo park Monday evening. The score was 21 to 18. The Hebrew team took the lead at the start and held it to the last few minutes of play when the Y boys uncorked some lucky shots to take the lead and win the game. The H.A.C. boys played an inspired game and came very close to upsetting the Y team. Silent Sam Bornstein again led his team mates in scoring. Mickey Lubel. a newcomer, bids fair to become one of the outstanding men on the squad. The Grossman brothers. Schwartz. Davis and Reisman, played their usual bang-up game. Return matches with both the winning teams will be sought. A name with the First Baptists will be played on Thursday night at the Fust Baptist church on N. E. First avenue at Fifth street. Another will be played at Flamingo park on Monday night. • • • The visiting circle of the United Order of True Sisters will meet at the home of Mrs. Rose Simpson at 2036 Twelfth street next Wednesday afternoon. February 1. at 2 p. m.. when an interesting program will be presented. Rosemary Klemtner will be heard in a number of vocal selections accompanied by Miss Hortense Landesman at the piano. Miss Landesman will also render a number of piano selections. Capt. F. M. Tobias will deliver an address and Mrs. Rose Baran of New York will give a recitation. All sisters and friends are urged to attend. A social hour will follow the program. • • • The ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation will hold a luncheon bridge on Tuesday. February 7. at 1 o'clock, at the home ill Mrs. Charles Tannenbaum, 2101 S. W. Eleventh street. Proceeds will be devoted to the Talmud Torah fund of the organization. In charge of arrangements are Mrs. Sam Tannenbaum. chairman: Mrs. Moe Harris and Mrs. Charles Tannenbaum. The public is invited to attend. %  • • Mr. and Mrs, George A. Rubin of Rockfield. 111., and daughters arrived here last week to spend several months in Miami. • • • Mrs. M. Rubin, prominent in Brooklyn. N. Y.. sponsored a card party last Tuesday afternoon for Senior Hadassah at the Blackstone hotel gardens. Miami Beach, when more than 150 guests attended. Assisting Mrs. Rubin were Mesdames Freda Lutzky. Barney Weinkle, J. Williamson and M. Loventhal. Prizes were given for high scores and %  ..•,..:..:..:..;*.:• %  :• %  : %  •:• &f + &f +** &f&f &f *** ^RENTALS BALES AND SERVICE} t STEVENS RADIO t SALES GO. | OPEN EVENINGS &f HI s. E. 1st St. Phone MTU ^ .•..;. .:•.;. .;.•>.;. •:• •:• &f &f •:• •:• • &f • &f • &f &f THE PROPHET in our MIDST l Continued from Page Three) rant 'here could be of their mission. Through these centuries of oppression Jews have encouraged thought among themselves, and intellectualism for its own end. The result is that the Jewish writers now saying what they have to say in the languages of the Gentile are singularly free from illusions. Which is not quite flattering to the people who still have their illusions. That delicious refreshments were served. • • • Visiting Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Argintar are Mrs. Joe Newell of Philadelphia, the mother of Mrs. Argintar; Mr. and Mrs. Morris Coolick of Noonan. Ga.. Mrs. Max Argintar and Miss Florence Argintar of Tampa. Fla. a • • "Two Against the World," starring Constance Bennett, which comes to the Tivoli theatre on next Sunday and Monday, is said to be one of the most realistic and dramatic pictures to be presented on the screen. It is taken from the popular novel by Marion Dix and Jerry Horwin and is said to be based on circumstance taken from real life. It carries one of the most dynamic courtroom trials ever witnessed, in which a beautiful young society girl perjures herself to save her brother from electrocution and her married sister from scandal. In the very presence of the man she loves, she confesses to a series of clandestine meetings with a man whom her brother has slain. Her own sister is the guilty one. but cowardly lets her shoulder the burden to evade a domestic tangle. Miss Bennett rises to the emo; tional role with real dramatic fer; vor. at the same time exercising a certain amount of restraint which serves to make the sequences more realistic and natural. She has an excellent supporting cast including Neil Hamilton, Helen Vinson, Gavin Gordon. Allen Vincent, Walter Wal: ker. Roscoe Karns. Alan Mowbray and Hale Hamilton. The picture has all the brilliance of a high society background, with all the characters living in an exi elusive social whirl. The settings are j rich and lavish as befits the drama. I It was directed by Archie Mayo. i who also directed Miss Bennett in "Bought" for Warner Brothers. • • • The third annual purim dance of the ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation will be hald on Sunday, February 26, at a place to be announced in next week's issue of The Jewish Floridian. Mrs. Sam Tannenbaum and Mrs. Charles Tannenbaum are in charge of the committee of arrangements. GERSON'S 1.101 Collins Ave. MIAMI BEACH Phone 5-3989 A Place to Dine in Contentment is one of the reasons, in addition to the inherited tendency, why the Gentile will become irritable with the Jew in these times. The Jew, through his own history, has learned the futility of force and the fatuousness of war; he has existed, and continued to exist, without an army, or a government, while the people of pompous addiction to banners and inroads upon other people, have gone up and gone down in their groups, and in their turns have disappeared from the face of the earth. The Jew has had nothing in the world, but his sacred teachings, and his racial vitality, and the wit to make a living in spite of armies and edicts and the racial notions of Gentiles. Ludwig Lewisohn says to the Gentile that there were mighty people in the times of the Bible who pushed the Jew out of the way. Where are they now? The Jew now is in mast places of the earth. The racial world within the world survives. It may be in fulfillment of a divine command. It may be out of the consciousness of the mystic, which knows all things to be in constant change and movement, and gives itself willingly to the cosmic undulation, and so is carried on. But it is far more likely to be a human wisdom, not very far from simple common sense, bred into a particular people for generation upon generation, that things must be taken as they are in the world, even though all the prophets teach that they must be changed. It is this capacity to look at the facts, in relation to ideas about them, which is the outstanding characteristic of the Jewish intellectuals, whether writers or talkers. And it is what makes any friendship between Jew and Gentile difficult. Centuries of reaching for a sword to finish an argu: ment has not served Gentiles intellectually. And reaching for edicts, and social notions, is not much improvement. But it may be that the time has come, or has nearly come when it is a book Gentiles will take into their hands when they get to argument. Which, being true, when it does come to be true, makes Lewisohn a missioner to the Gentiles. A man of Jewish spirit and Jewish mind, with the ardor of the prophets in him, able to feel that the world is worth making all one's effort for —that among the masses who live and die with questions never disturbing them —that among the rulers who fail manifestly in their ruling — that among these there must be the few to whom the prophets spoke, calling them the Remnant. It lives in the blood of the Jews —a mood of indefinable spirituality, and also of irrefutable intellectuality, completely beyond illusion about men and the governments of the world. The romance is in the feeling for truth — that somehow it must be su, stained, with courage and persistj ence, and also with all the art there I is in words.—The Jewish Standard. 1) A N N V S Hi: E II AN "The Aristocrat of Dancing and Master of Rbytbm" Former Instructor in Dancing Teachers Normal School D.M.A. Eight consecutive years of teaching in Cleveland, O. Ten years actual stage experience, KeithOrpheum Circuit Tap and stage dancing in all its form — adagio, limbering and stretching. Every step taught to music, at rates in keeping with the times. ENROLL NOW! THE LESLIE BLDG. 1.136 N. Miami Ave. Phone 2-0528 Plenty nj Parking Space •:• — ( omplimi n l \ af PHINEAS E. PAIST HAROLD 1). STEWARD ARCHITECTS j MADKLON j beauty shop | 17 S. K. 1-1 AM-. PboM :l-J7.M Where you will meet j Madam Due, Tea Cup Reader on Mondays and Wednesdays ;. .j. .j..;. *.;. .> *.;. •;. •> •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:•:• •:• • PIERRE'S % Beauty Shop i •: %  -:• £ Specializing in Haircuts and Finger Waving Hair Dyed %  :• J 23 N.'K. 1st Ave.' Phone I-Mll 9 ;. .;• -j..;..;. *.;..;..;. .;• •:• •:• •:• •:•:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• ••• • .;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;. %  :• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •' .;• Insist on your (irocer giving you &f + NEW YORK BREAD & CAKE COMPANY ? BREAD AND CAKES + 471 S. W. 8th St. Phone 2-7852 .j. Branch Store: lit N. W. 5th St. •> .j..;..;..;..;..;..;. •;. •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:•+•:• •:• E. C. THRALL & COMPANY State Agent New York Fire Insurance Co. and Metropolitan Assurance Underwriters 318-19 MEYER RISER BLDG. Phone 2-5824 E. C. THKAI.L. President Miami. JMa^ J fffill'F toT vour health! Watkins' Alleys mi W. rLAGLBR ST. Morning Prices—I'ntil Noon 10c per line for Ilig PbU 5c per line for Duck Pins Evening Prices Ilig Pins — 2 for lie Small Pin* — 3 for 25c V? Sunk iCmtrrs ^hnppr (tine BlMk East of New Poat Office) Everything in Rooks, Old and New 410 NORTHEAST SECOND AVENUE Now you can buy BILTMORE LAUNDRY SERVICE at a price that fits your pocket book! PHONE 3-3687 21 N. W. 9TH ST. "Radio Service" WM. BIBLBB Parts and Accessories 430 NORTH MIAMI AVE. No ChatM for Examination .;. .•..;..;..;..;. .;•.;. •:• •:• •:• &f •*• "Pleasing you keep" u in huine' Miami Mirror & Glass Works MIRRORS & AUTO GLASS A. H. ROSS _. Ill N. Miami Ave. Phone 2-1196 ^.;. f.;..;. •: •:• 9 1* &f • • • • • • &f • &f J. P. ALEXANDER, INC. 19 S. E. FIRST AVENUE tin Foster Building) High Grade Shoe Repairing Cripple ami Corrective Foot Work Our Specialty 1 I -•:•



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I rid.iy. January 27, 1933. THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page Three THE PROPHET in our MIDST PI BUSHED EVERY FRIDAY by I he IIMI-II FLORIDIAN PUBLISHING CO. |2| S. W. Fifteenth Avrnui 1 I LOUIS SIIOCIIET, Editor I'. (). Bo* 2S73 Mlamii I lr'da Phono 2-118.! %  %  ...it.s! Boots! Boots!" [CoaUaaaC from |,„ 0n | within him. There Is a dramatic placing of ideas and facts in relation to each other which is inescapable. And he is bravely and pathetically honest. He has put away all the defenses. And. so. leaves none to his Gentile readers. Page by page, book by book, he leads deeper and deeper into the racial mystery, the baffling mortal suffering, the constant consciousness of God. the puzzling persistent survival, through persecution by sword, through migrations by government orders, through starvation and social indignities — and even through the compensating financial successes in assimilated societies. He follows a •sombre pattern in black and crimson and gold, weaving his compelling emotionalism in and out, pulling through the colours with phrases of tenderness towards the unhappy world. It is immortal pleading. But not. as Gentiles might think, a pleading for their mercy. Not, in one sentence, Ls there expression of any desire that this pain may be lessened which has been the lot of Israel in the Gentile world. LewlSOhn has passed that. He has accepted pain as a blessing. He has come to what the mystics of all faiths call "reconciliation.'" the feeling which the Crucified uttered for all persecuted people when lie cried. "Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do." And every Jew who is altogether Jewish has passed that. How otherwise would the race have survived these ages; hatred being disintegrating, and resentment stealing all the creative vitality of folk. Grief that is personal has no place among the people of the prophets. The pleading in the eyes of Jews, as in the words of Lewisohn, is in no least way concerned with abatement of suffering. It comes gently from far beyond that, and has to do with the desire %  of the Jew all through history that the world may not forget the beginning and the ending of life, and the mystery that suffuses all our mortal experience. It is centuries since the Jew has pleaded In words with the world. He has gone his own way. aware of j what has always happened to proi pheLs. Aware also of time, and its fulfillment, and the law that works quietly, protecting truth in its own j way. It may be that Lewisohn. as a Jew. and a very great spiritual teacher, knows that the time has come, or has nearly come. Whatever it means, he, who lived among Gentiles, and tried hard to be one of them, and felt the gnawing of frus; nation, has gathered himself to his 1 own people, and his own peoples books, and found the peace which remains. He tells his own story in two books, Upstream and Midchannel. He tells it over again with Slight disguise in the fiction of The Island Within. He tells the story of his people under assimilation in IsI rael. He takes the figure of Shakespeare's Shylock. and with him tries to show the Gentile how difficult it has all been. Never for a moment does he get away from his message. Nowhere is there bitterness. Which is the greatest of miracles. And all the proof the world will ever need of the mystery of the chosen people. And is also all the spiritual war(Continued on Page Five) THE g^l Children's Home Society of Florida "Florida's Greatest Charity" 428 St. fames Building, [acksonville, Florida, January 23, 193J. Mr. J. I • Shochet, Editor, "The Jewish Floridian," Miami, Florida. My dear Mr. Shochet: W c will appreciate it very much if you will publish this letter in the nc\t issue of your paper, "The Jewish Floridian." Our Society bat iw> little Jewish children, now tin and n i en yean of age, who ba\ e recently been committed /<> our Society legally ami permanently to be placed out for adoption. We place Jewish children only in Jewish homes. We are exceedingly anxious to find some good Jewish family willing and able to provide a suitable foster borne for these two little this. There are no unfai orable hereditary diseases in the family history of the children. They are normal and healths, in every nay and ue know of HO reason why they should not develop favorably in ei ery way. It is the policy of our Society to give to foster parents full information in re to the history of the children and we place them for a full year on approval before we expect or require any permanent arrangement. We shall be glad to send one of our application blanks and have one of our field workers call personally on any family who might be interested In taking these little girls and will go into the matter with them personally. Thanking you for any assistance that you may lend to us in our effort to find suitable family homes for these little girls, I am Very sincerely yours, Marcus Fagg, State Superintendent. A silver thought, a shining thought, Here at the long day's end; A thought that paints new gloried skies, You are my friend — my friend; Though many miles of winding road Now stretch between us. yet, My silver thought is gleaming blight In Memory's coronet; I cherish, every passing hour. Though pathways, severed, wend; My silver thought, my shining thought, You are my friend — my friend. All the world practices the art of acting. No girl appreciates a lover who is unable to hold his own. Lazy men are dead to the world, but they remain unburied. Don't try to raise a disturbance unless you want to lower yourself. What he says goes when a man talks to his wife through a telephone. If it weren't for occasional lynchings there would be more trials in this world. The man who has no enemies must be good, but it's a question what he's good for. It is hard to make some people believe that the world goes round, because they have never not their .share. It is neither healthful nor necessary to go into the water after a heavy meal—there are plenty of restaurants on dry land. A Chicago burglar stole a hundred straw hats. In general, though, it can be said that parlor imitations of Maurice Chevalier are dying. Now that the greatest of living sea pools has come down with mal de mer. we should like to see a technocrat put a clock together. A wild throw by a Bombay cricketeer brought on a riot leading to three fatalities. It is an appalling thought that one of our shortstops could set the eastern world on fire. Let's see what the senate has done today toward allowing the governor of North Carolina and the governor of South Carolina to resume the conversation. An escaped hospital patient, clad in a bedshcet, was taken in by St. Louis police on a charge of operating as a Mahatma without a license. Tokio doubtless has full descriptions of the bandits it is after, and it's all the fault of the Chinese for looking so much alike. Doctor i before the operation): "Nine out of every 10 patients die during this operation. Can I do anything for you before we start?" Patient: "Yes. Just help me on with my hat and coat." A professor of economics is being sought on a charge of issuing counterfeit money. Illustrating the working of the law of supply and demand. First a supply of money, then a demand for the professor. Hubby: "I can't understand why you should always show such a mean and cranky disposition in the morning." Wife: "At what other time should I show it, may I ask? You're not home during the rest of the day." "What are these "college lectures' you mention?" wrote the father. "A college lecture." replied the son. "is an extended series of remarks passing from the notebook of the professor to the notebook of the student without entering the thought of either." A well known nobleman was strolling one day when he met a rustic holding in his right hand a rope tied to a very frisky calf, and in his left a staff. The countryman said, "Good morning," and was passing on when the nobleman said: "My good man, don't you know me?" "Oh. yes," said the man. "you are Lord B ." "Then why don't you touch your hat?" asked his lordship. "Well, my lord, if you don't mind holding this calf a minute. I will." responded the rustic. "You must remember, my boy, that wealth does not bring happiness." said the fatherly parson. "I don't expect it to," answered the modern youth. "I merely want it so that I may be able to choose the kind of misery that is most agreeable to me." What a man does not alter for the better, time alters for the worse. The fatal word had just been spoken. The rejected suitor was standing before her listening to her elaborate explanations of her decision. "I trust that I have made myself sufficiently plain," she said. "Well, I would scarcely go so far," he answered as his courage gradually returned. "It's but fair to give nature the credit for that," he added, as he retired in good order. Around the Campus By MILTON A. FRIEDMAN Hello, folks! Is everybody happy? Last week in discussing the doings of the Glee club, I forgot to mention one Miami boy who played an important part in making the first trip of the year a success. The popular Miami boy I forgot was the old maestro Ralp Kirsch, who played two violin solos, "Play, Fiddle, Play" and "Willow Weep for Me." The selections were beautifully rendered and received well-merited applause. Ralph, for your edification, is guest artist with the Glee club. The student body was given a rare treat in the exhibition given by Bill Tilden, the famous tennis player. However, for excitement, you should have been at the basketball games between Florida and Georgia. Florida winning both games. If I were as good a prognosticator in other matters as in basketball I wouldn't be worrying today about those final exams. With these inevitably approaching, coming to its peak this week, they always bring up foreboding thoughts. This reminds me of the famous hanging song, "It Don't Mean a Thing If It Hasn't Got a Swing." I • i



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^Jewish floridian I Vol. *•• No. 4. THE PROPHET in our MIDST Oi MARGARET ISABEL LAWRI N< B LORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 19J3. Temple Israel Sponsor Concert Price Five Cents All through history it has been I the people of romance who have taken truth to other people. For only people of romance can carry the [ feeling of truth to other people. Or [touch their imaginations with its | mystery. It was the feeling of a man cruciIfied for his God-like spirit that I caught the western people and made I them followers of his name. The (great awful tragedy of the crucifixlion told by men of passionate He[braic capacity for feeling and telling I touched the imaginations of emIperors and rulers. So, it remained I in the world. But the people to I whom the Crucified had belonged I were turned upon by the others, I which was a far more awful trag|edy. Jews have suffered in silence, Ifoldini: themselves in part in the [spiritual consolation of their own [sacred teachings, and in other part [within the intellectualism of their [natures. The story of the persecution was never told in the writings [that Gentiles could read. Now, it is [being told in the languages of the [persecutors by Jews of passionate [capacity to feel and tell. It will re[main. and have effect in the world, thouuh the imaginations of emperlors and rulers are not so necessary |as they once were. His publishers insist, on the cov|er oi his books, that Ludwig Lewikohn speaks to the Jews. They quote pmbeis of the rabbinate saying so. irtainly Jews read what he writes. But they do not need to. It is the Gentile who does. And many Genliles are reading him, and feeling furious stirrings within themselves, pr no Gentile with any spiritual HBltlvlty, or any susceptibility to (he dramatic pull of history can estape in reading him that acutely Impersonal sorrow which is at the Pennine of truth. Gentiles, educated and uneducatalike. do not know what they % ave done to Jews. The business of Christian civilization, with its wars M its nationalistic and economic [sumptions, la a kaleidescopic panorama with which even the most • innot keep mental pace. Unps a story is forced upon the imRgination it is missed, and peculiar ihentcd. utterly unreasonable nolens about strange people can continue like weeds. Jews have lived fctiently beside Christians, either in [loot racial pride, or in affable asw e cynicism born out of observation that the most advantageous Mod of getting along with GenWl was to make them feel comj prtable about themselves. Which Plainly never would include rej finding them of things, or asking ; Nil pointed questions at a not TO propitious time. wlsohn asks no questions what,: the Gentile, but he does a 1 reminding, and it is quite e. for the good of the Gentile, there was some reminding Noted Cantor To Appear Noted Actor Is th? n rurrL? e UtStanding events Joseph Z. Shlisky. one of the presthe current season will be the Honor Guest [Announcements Last Sunday evening the Miami ceVVsDonsoredr n x W1, ', be ^ C "" mt day W rld Jewry s noted cantors Jewish Dramatic Players tendered a cert sponsored by Temple Israel Siswill appear in Miami for a concert ~~~H~. .. -.ZH _,... „l. ^ u n M nday even,n *. Januon Sunday, February 5. at 3 p. m.. ary 30, beginning at 8:15 o'clock in the main auditorium of the temple. reception to the noted Yiddish playwright and actor. Max Goebel, who at the Temple theatre. Presented I is spending a short time at Miami by Beth David congregation, the Beach. Several hundred people atAsher lLT 1 ^ ,m h Spir Cant0f Wi be hcard in a ro ram tended !" enjoyed a very pleasant of th r "UrtCtona of liturgical numbers, folk song, and | evening. Mr. Joseph Greenberg preterritory. | operatic arias which will enable Misided and introduced the entertainami citizens and tourists to judge ers and speakers during the program why Cantor Shlisky has attained j that was presented. The guests of the heights of fame in the Jewish i honor included L. Goldberg, promfamed as a pianiste and now a member of the faculty of the University of Miami conservatory of music. Other noted artists of the musical world will appear during the evening. A reception will be held following the concert. In charge of arrangements is a committee headed by Mrs. I. L. Rosen as well as non-Jewish musical world though young in years. Cantor Shlisky is a native of Poland and is now 38 years old. He beinent Jewish actor, and the wellknown Yiddish writer, B. Kovner. Those taking part in the program were L. Goldberg of New York. Henry Seitlin. Harry Greenberg, Joseph gan to sing at the age of seven undor the famous Solomon Schoichat. Greenberg, Harry Rose and B. Kovdorf as chairman, and Mesdames I Cantor Moses Volman took charge ne. Mr. Goebel responded briefly ^T,'!! ?*f "'. He ry D WUUamfl of nim a y ear later and '"en arrived during the evening and thanked all with him in Toronto, Can. Under the direction of a manager. Shlisky and W. I. Magid. The public is invited to attend. for the cordial reception accorded him. In charge of arrangements Throngs Attend Annual Dance One of the largest crowds ot tl-.c season attended the Talmud Torah benefit dance sponsored by the ladies auxiliary ot the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation last Wednesday night at the Mahi Shrine temple. The hall was beautifully decorated and at one end there were tables laden with goodies to be sold tor the benefit of the Talmud Torah fund. A program of entertainment was presented during the evening featuring Chester Alexander. Irma Davis and Hope Parker of the Club Bagdad. Al Parker of the Silver Slipper. Betty Jane Lanzer, Albert Robertson and Betty Ganger of the Danny Sheehan school of dancing and numbers through the courtesy of Billy Buller. Danny Sheehan was seen in a number of acrobatic dances which aroused enthusiasm. Imitations of Al Jolson and skits by Chester Alexander and Al Parker kept the large audience in continual laughter. In charge of arrangements were Mrs. J. Louis Shochet. chairman; Mrs. Louis Pallott, assistant chairman: Mesdames Nathan Adelman. Lee Weiner. S. Tannenbaum. Jonah E. Caplan, S. Putterfass. C. Tannenbaum. Max Rappaport, I. Buckstein. Charles Feldman and Moe Harris: and Messrs. Nathan Adelman. Milton Weiner, H. M. Drevich. M. Rappaport, and S. Futterfass. A substantial sum was realized, which will be devoted to the Talmud Torah fund of the organization. Junior Hadassa to Elect Delegates An important meeting of Junior Hadassah will be held next Mondav began a tour of the country and %  were Mesdames Silverman. Seitlin finally landed at Scranton. Pa. and Slaviter. During the evening deThere his manager deserted him. licious refreshments were served. forcing Shlisky to try out at amateur performances in burlesque theatres, where his voice was above the audience. He returned to Toronto and there worked in a tailoring shop to earn sufficient to con] tinue his musical training. Winning I a scholarship at the Toronto Conservatory of Music, he remained there for 10 years under the tutelage of the famous voice master. Prof. Dalton Baker, the English baritone. In 1918 he returned to NewYork and appeared in a series of concerts at the Aeolian hall, where he overnight became the toast of musical critics. He then joined the ranks of the San Carlo Opera Company but left them because he disliked the work. Following the work he most enjoyed he became a cantor and then was engaged by the first and oldest Roumanian congregation of New York City. In a recent tour of the country, musical authorities vied with one another in praising the remarkable tenor voice of Shlisky. the beautiful timbre of his tones BETH DAVID CONGREGATION (Coni.erv.tivr) 139 N. W. Third Avenue MAX SHAPIRO. Rabbi Regular services begin tonight at 5:30 with the late services following at 8:15 p. m. when Rabbi Max Shapiro will preach a sermon on "The Plagues of Our Present Day Civilization." The congregational singing and chanting will be directed by Cantor Louis Hayman, who is being assisted by the choir. A social hour follows the late services. Saturday morning services begin at 8:30 and Mincha services at 5 p. m. MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CONGREGATION (Orthodox) 1515 S. W. Third Street JONAH E. CAPLAN, Rabbi The usual early services begin at 5:30 with the late Open Forum services at 8:30 at which time Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan will preach on "The Finger that Points to God." This sermon will convey a message particularly appropriate because of conditions existing in Miami Jewry today. The usual congregational singing and chanting will be enjoyed. Saturday morning services evening. January 30. in the Spanish begin at „ a m and specla servicps in recognition of this being "Shabroom of the Ponce de Leon hotel at 8 p. m. At this meeting election of delegates to the southern regional convention of Hadassah to be held at Savannah. Ga., on February 12 and 13, will be held. The winner of the essay contest will be announced Many Enjoy Minstrel Show Miami to Send Inaugural Train pne. nevertheless, and no matter what ^ may know within oneself about being time, and to one's incalculr good, it is a shaking experience f a Gp ntile to read Lewisohn. The FSeous Anglo-Hebraic prose, with emotional undertones, and its The large Riverside auditorium carried a large number of residents and tourists last Wednesday night to witness the minstrel show sponsored by the junior committee of Beth David Sisterhood for its Talbos Rosh Chodesh" will be conducted with the rabbi preaching a sermon in Yiddish. At the late Friday night service, Mr. Milton Weiner will make an announcement to local Jewry and especially the memand a program will be presented. „,.„ of the congreg ation. A socia. MUlocent Rubin will give a reading. hour will follow. Rabbi Max Shapiro will speak and musical numbers will be heard. Hadassagrams will be distributed and a social hour will follow. All members and friends are urged to attend. Special Rites Next Monday TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI I Reform) 117 N. B. Nineteenth Street DR. JACOB II. KAPLAN, Rabbi Services will begin tonight at 8:15 and Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan will discuss the second part of the President's research committee on social trends dealing with the problems of the biological heritage and of social heritage. This is perhaps the mast important contribution dealing with the problems of today. The public is welcome. A large number of Jewish tourists are daily visiting the Musa Isle Indian village to see the native life of the Seminole tribe, and to see the alligators of whom there are a large CONGREGATION BETH JACOB variety. (Orthodox) Next Monday afternoon beginning i 1 w hin ,on *•• Mi m Baa* at 2 o'clock, residents and tourists I L. AXELROD, Rabbi • will have their first opportunity of Regular Friday evening services seeing alligators being fed their begin at 5:30 with the late services mud Torah fund. Mrs. Claire Cohen week i y meaI It is rea nature n tne I at 8:30 p m wnen the nm wi „ Weintraub as the interlocutor, vied raw preacn a sermon on "The Jew. a with the end men for honors and -^ey are only fed about once each j Born Optimist." The congregational applause. Ida Englcr and Rosalyn week ^ it takes them that ong tQ chanting and singing will be directDaum gave a professional exhibition pro p er i y adjust their meal. Of ed by Cantor Boris Schlachman. of fine dancing, as did Claire Simon course, if there was Just one aliiSaturday morning services begin at and Ruth Kopplowitz. Bobbie Resgator to ^ fed everything would 9 a. m.. with the rabbi preaching in nick in a song performed as well as pr0 ceed quietly and minus exciteYiddish on "Heintige Darshonim." one of much older age. and Leonard ment But out at Musa IsIe there TO In and his fair partner received are several hundred alligators and their usual well-merited applause, crocodiles within one enclosure and as did Theresa Rubinstein for their feeding them is a problem. William Linton M. Collins. Democratic leader, will be in charge of the j dance numbers. The chorus was K arkeet. the manager of Musa Isle" Greater Miami special car to be sp i e ndid and the entire performance pre pares for the event by obtaining connected in the Florida Democratic was marked because of the profesabout 800 pounds of nsn in thc To Bnai Brith Install Officers train going to Washington for the inauguration of President elect Franklin D. Roosevelt, March 4. A special rate, including railroad and Pullman fare, meals on the I Beth David Talmud Torah hall sional manner in which it was carraw Having the flsh ne equlps a „ wj „ ^ the scene Q{ jmpressive n ried through from beginning to end. the maIo Semin oies with long bamstallation services for the newlyMrs. Sam Wlesel was chairman of boo polcs and places them at stra i elected offlcers Qf sholem odge Qf the committee in charge of arrangetegic p,,^ around the concrete en Bnai Brith, next Sunday evening ments. and she was assisted by Mrs. closure. January 29, at 8 p. m. In addition piritiiai k turbinK overtones, is psychically train and occupation of thc Pullman j Rose Bogen. Victor Levin was makeAs soon as the alllgators smell the to the IoTmai rituaI an evening of up director, and Mrs. Jake Engler flsh tney begin t0 cr0 wd close to the entertainment including singing, was in charge of costumes. Louis wa n. Then the fish is thrown in to playing by artists, vaudeville sketchHayman directed the production. them about a big shovelful at a es and addresses by prominent Other acts on the program were time. All the alligatdrs and croco; speakers will be provided. FollowMrs. Harry Cohen in a whistling diles go wild. They revert back to ing the program refreshments will solo, and Mrs. Samuel Resnick in a the time when life was one continj be served. No charges of any kind beautifully rendered interpretation ual struggle for the survival of the will be made and the public is urgof "Eili, Efli." (Continued on Page Six) | ed to attend. in Washington, has been arranged and reservations may be made through Mr. Collins. Special cars from over the state And no wonder. There will be assembled into a train at 'concentrated racial force behind Jacksonville at 7:15 p. m.. March 2. I"" and eternal prophetic power arriving in the capitol at noon, 'Continued on I "a Re Three) March 3. 1 &f •



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/ Page Two THE JEWISH FLORIPIAN Friday, January 27. \y. Mrs. Isidor Cohen, president of Beth David Sisterhood, announces the date of the annual purim ball and bazaar, to be sponsored by the sisterhood, has been changed from March 12 to March 18. on account of the Jewish Welfare dance. • • • Fortnightly Book Review club celebrated its fourth birthday anniversary Monday at a luncheon-bridge party at the Biltmore hotel. Coral Gables. Mrs. Milton Weiner was chairman of this affair. The regular meeting was held on Tuesday evening at Mrs. Albert E. Rosenthal's home, 2152 S. W. Sixteenth terrace. Ai that time Mrs. Adele Vince Rose presented a resume of "The Giant Swing," the new novel by W. R. Burnett. • • • Complimenting her slater, Betty Letaw, daughter of David Letaw, Mrs. Sidney Beskind entertained at a party from 3 to 5 p. m. Wednesday at her home in Tamiami Heights, Hie occasion being the tenth birthday of the honor guest. Games and contests were the diversions offered, and a large white birthday cake centered the table where an ice course was served. Assisting the hostess was Miss Lyl Chlslillg, Mrs. M. Ghertler, Mrs. M. Bertuch. Rubin Wolpert. Mrs. Harry Leiaw and Mrs. May enisling. • • • The Miami Beach Jewish Social 8et sponsored a "kid party" Thursday evening at the Miami Beach Country club. Novelties, favors and special entertainment will vary the evening's dance program. Prizes were awarded to winners of costume contest. Murray Grossman, president of the club, was in charge. Nightly Dinner DANCE ...in... THE 17TH FI.ooK DINNER SF.RVFD 6 p. m. to 9:30 p. m. DANCING 7 p. m. to 1 a. m. $1.50 PEE PERSON HARRY RICHARDSON ami hh CAVALIERS Always Fresh hjoumnt Coffee LA TOURAINE COFFEE AND FIFTH AVENUE COFFEE Roasted, packed and delivered daily from our Miami plant to insure "That Delicious Fresh Flavor" .. W. S. QUINBV CO., IN< MIAMI JACKSONVILLE Owen Pittman. ST., was a guest of honor. • • • Mr. Hyman Apte is still a patient at the Jackson Memorial hospital, where he would be happy to receive visits from his many friends. • • • So far the patrons of the Walkathon now under way at the Cinderella ballroom have gathered to see invarious entertainments offered by Jack Negley and his Walkathollers. The Night in Hollywood. Sweet Pickle Weddutg, Dying Gladiators, The Sultan's Harem and such. But the starting ol the 'mind'' last night Increased their Interest In the Walkathoners themsi. With over 640 hours behind them, the contestants are well on their way ami when the "grind" started, he real periods were eliminated and he couples and solos walked until -vne couple of solos dropped out. This process is rather tough on the walkers, but the fans get quite a kirk out of trying to figure out who will be the ones to pass out and who viil survive the 'minds." The Walkathoners have pleased the patrons nightly with their various floor show entertainments Among the star comedians, the McQreevys lead the parade with Jack Kelly a close second. Sammy Howird and Bob Martell also have takn part in most ol the comedy sketJack Montgomery, Wally Adiins. Waller Morris and Mike Martin have provided most of the vocal ntertalnment among the boys, while Christine Christy, Millie Rosen, and Connie Moore have upheld the girl honors In that line. Jerry ind Frances Smith still continue to 'old their admirers with their waltz lumbers. Among the dancers. Cleo Clifford ind Marjorie Foster, with June Ev3ns, offer the pulse quickening numbers and Fern Tracey. Neil appy, Bernie Shapoff. and Julius At well among the boys. • • e A regular meeting of the ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation will be held at ynagoguc next Tuesday evening. January 31. beginning at 8 o'Clock. All having tickets or money for the dance are asked to bring them to the meeting. A social hour will follow the business meeting. Mrs. I. Buckstein, president of the ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation entertained the members of her organization at a social hour following a brief business meeting last Tuesday night. • • • A picnic was held last Sunday afternoon for children of Beth Jacob Sunday school, with Miss Marion Levy in charge of arrangements. She was assisted by the Misses Belle Siegel, Beatrice Silver. Sylvia Levy and Mrs. L. Axelrod. Prizes were presented to Sydney Bcsvlnick, Esther Levy and June Rose Toursh for the best performances at the Chanukah play held at the Beth Jacob synagogue on Sunday morning, January 1. • • Mrs. Milton Weiner is chairman of the committee arranging the annual benefit bridge for the Hadassah Medical fund which will be held Tuesday afternoon, February 14, at a place to be announced in uor next Refreshments will be served and prizes Will be awarded lor high scores. The seventh annual dance of Temple Israel Sisterhood will be held at the Miami Beach Goll and Country club on Saturday evening, February 11. beginning at0:30 p. m. Among those who will appear on the evening's program are Chester Alexander. Lew Hampton. Al Parker. Danny Sheehan and other noted performers of this territory. Pria will be awarded to the best, damns Admission will be one dollar for | single and one dollar and a half for a couple. Mrs Herbert E. Seppler is ; chairman of the committee in charge of the affair. # • 0 One of the most enjoyabii lungs -pent here in a long time was last Thursday night when the v. all's club of the Workmen's circle held a "Night at the Little Art Theatre.'' starring Al Harris, noted actor: Maxim Brodin. noted tenor, and Zelda Zlatin. accompanist. A group of songs in Russian sung by Brodin was the highlight of thi %  ning's performance and showed the remarkable range, clarity and timbre ol his splendid tenor voice. His rendition ol Yiddish songs showed the innate throb and beating ol the Jewish heart. Al Harris was well received in impersonations of both tragic and comic characters, His rendition of "Hammer" to the cadence of the well-known Kipling's "Boots" was outstanding, All In all the several hundred who attended received a liberal education m the possibilities of Yiddish repertoire, both in prose, poetry and song. • • • Mrs. M. Weilan of Baltimore, Md is visiting her brother and sister-inlaw. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Rose ol this city. • The Miami Jewish Dramatic Players will be seen in a performance of the "Zushterte Chasono" on February 12, at Miami Beach, where a benefit performance will be given for the Beth Jacob congregation. • • • Mrs. Jack Apte is a patient at the Victoria hospital where she underwent a serious operation last week. • • • To celebrate the ninth birthday anniversary of its formation. Temple Israel Sisterhood will be hosts at a luncheon bridge in the Blackstone hotel. Miami Beach, on February 9, at 12:30 p. m. Mrs. J. A. Richter is chairman of the arrangements comi mittee in charge of this affair. • • The trials and Joys, the bliss and of "The First Year," that most trying adjustment pe'iod of young love, constitute the dramatic motivation of Janet Gaynor's and Charles Karrells latest Fox picture appearing at the new Seventh Avenue theatre, next Sunday and Monday. "The First Year" primuses a new Janet. Petite and piquant as ever, she has forsworn the pathetic for the positive in her characterisation. With a new hair dress, with smart modern frocks, she is stud to bring an entirely fresh and inspiring portrayal to the sen en m this, her first entirely grown-up role. Farrell. too. Is different. He will be seen as an ambitious young business man, haj rassed. it is %  lie. by the difficulties ill becoming established m a strange town, but on the whole a capable, energetic young fellow out to prove that he can make his way in the world. Among the supporting players of "The First Year" are Minna Gombell, seen in a hilarious comedy role; Leila Bennett, Dudley Digges. Roberl MrWade. George Meeker. Maude Eburne and Henry Kolker. all of whom portray Important parts suitid to their capabilities. William K. Howard directed "The Iii-i Year." a screen adaptation of Prank Craven's successful stage farce by Lynn starling. Open the year 'round COLONIAL TOWERS Hotel • Formerly Henrietta ] 332 S. E. Second Ate, Miami, Florida A more perfect location could not be desired. R au s reasonable — and you wi|| meet your friends at COLONIAL TOWERS HOTEL ROBERT A. MANNl.v A R E W E keeping faith with those who trust us. are we living up t" our obligations if we risk their future happiness by ignoring the problems that would arise for them if, some day, WC did ""/ come home? Life Insurance offers the sale and certain answer. There is no substitute. \ Southern Health & Life Insurance Policy on each one is necessary to protect the others from the privation and expense caused by the last illness and death. A few pennies each week is the total cost. SOUTHERN LIFE & HEALTH INSURANCE COMPANY T. S. COOK, Manager S10 Realty Board Bids. Pbona 2-3419 You Arc Ready NOW for PAINTS: We do not jjive price per can We give value for dollar PAINTS PUTT & TINGLE T "Miami's First Exclusive Paint Store" DISTRIBUTORS Whotaala Retail 411 Southwest First Strict Phone 2-5012 "Let me l>e your /)> %  ust rat i>e yvui uruggisl • i BROOKS' DRUG STORKS STORE NO. 1 I J l-'laRlcr at 17th Ave. Phone J.:;,to j I STORE NO. 2 j | 17th Ave. al Trail I'honr .'.OTtl j | Accurate Prescription Service j Prenrription* Called Fur and Drlhcrri Without Extra Cat) JUST TELEPHONE Riverside [Hospital.Inci SOUTHERN LAl'NDRY Ml Tamiami trail (8. W. Mil SI. I I'hi.iuS-2521 We Call .iiiJ Deliver &f &f&f&f&f ** &f&f&f ****•:••:•*•:••:•::; + | i X 1450 S. W. 7TH ST. j MHS. ELIZABETH SIIAW. spt. J % STANDARDIZED £ ACCORDING TO THE J RULES OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE % OF SURGEONS X — '£ Open to member* nf Ihe %  :• .;. Dade County Mediral Society •: .;. Telephone 2-HI7.1 &f .;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;. .;• .;• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• MARINE HARDWARE YACHT SUPPLIES FISHING TACKLE PAINTS OILS DISTRIBUTORS OF DEV0E PAINTS & VARNISHES Prices Now Much Lower PHILLIPS HARDWARE CO. 801-303 N. M i.i ini Avenue Phone 2-8445 EVERYTHING FOR THE BEACH BATHING Sins Catalina and Queen Knit BEACH ROBES and PAJAMM For Men. Women and Children 100-1 OS \. |;. IND AVENl'E "THE SHOP of QUALITY" IRVINE'S SWt One Block North of Kasl Flanler Street Till: .MIAMI LAUNDRY Noted for the line Quality of Its Work J 28 N. E. 3rd St. Phone 2-5111 ] I louse Furnishings Dishes Cooking Utensils Faints General I lardwarc I Intel is; Restaurant Supplies Wcstinghouse Electrical Appliances RAILEY MILAM, INC 27 WEST FI.AGLER STREET



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f Page Four THE JEWISH FLORI PI AN Friday, January 27. 193J. j. .^.;. ^..;..[.+.^+.;..;. ^..;. -t .> ^.;. •:• -j..;..;. •: %  •:• 4 •;.* •:• •> •:• •:• •> •:• •:•:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• # •:• •:• •:• •:• SJatMn dynagng Uitllrtin Edited h\ RABBI S. M. MACHTEI Founder un.;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;. •:• •:•:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• -:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:•+ •; No. 7. % • •:••:••:•*•:•*•: %  God-given Sons Sermon delivered Sunday. January 22. 1*S.1 Scripture Reading, Genesis, Chapter \l.\ll. Verses 1 / lO.incl. (J,HERE are several explanations given by the sages for the question by Jacob, "Who are these?" when he saw Joseph's sons immediately preceding his blessing, as he lay on hlfl death-bed. The reason given in the verse immediately following Joseph's answer. "Now the eyes of Israel were dim for age. so that he could not see." does not seem to justify the lengthy answer which Joseph gave. Let us assume that Israels eyes were dim with the natural weakness of age. He would ask, "Who are these?" and Jo.-eph would say. "Why. father, these are my sons. Menasseh and Ephraim. Don't you recognize them?" That would be a natural answer because during the seventeen years that Jacob lived in Egypt he saw these two boys almost daily. Then why the sudden failure to recognize them? Why the peculiar answer by Joseph. "These are my sons, whom God hath given me in this place." Recipes for the Jewish Family — straight beef, a small soup bone, one *" ] can Torsch's mixed vegetables. Boil the meat in enough water to cover well and season to taste; add the contents of one can of Torsch's mixed vegetables; continue heating for 10 minutes. Serve hot. Beef Stew Two tablespoons shortening, two pounds beef, top round, five tablespoons flour, few grains cayenne, two tablespoons chopped parsley, one can Torsch's mixed vegetables, one small onion, one-eighth teaspoon salt, six smalls potatoes, three cups water. Slice onions and cook slowly in i lie shortening five minutes. Cut bid into uniform pieces. Sprinkle with two tablespoons of the flour and a little salt and pepper. Brown slowly about one hour. Add potatoes, salt, pepper, cayenne and cook one hour longer. Then just before ready to serve, add the contents of the can of Torsch's mixed vegetables, both the vegetables and the Stuffed Green Peppers One fourth cup grated cheese, one-half cup bread crumbs, onefourth cup milk, six green peppers, seasoning, one can Torsch's mixed vegetables. Cut ofT tops and remove seeds Horn the peppers. Drop into boiling water and five minutes and drain. Pour the liquor from one can of Torsch's mixed vegetables, add bread crumbs, milk and seasoning. Fill into the pepper shells, sprinkle with the grated cheese and bake in a moderate oven until brown. Serve hot. Try This Recipe Today Make a rich cream sauce, using three tablespoons butter, two tablespoons flour, and one and one-half Delaney & Beers Kodak Finishing and Enlariin. Commercial Work and Home Portr,;, 50% Off on All Amateur Work 212 N. E. 4th St. Phone 2.JJ„l.quor. Let cook five minutes. Then ^ and „„,„,„, [Q ^ thicken the gravy with three tablej ^ ^ (ne sauce begins to spoons flour and one-third cup of bring to the boiling point. Serve hot. Vegetables Soup One-half pound bottom round or iIn. ken; then after draining the liquor lrom one can of Torsch's mixed vegetables, add the vegetables to the cream sauce. Cook until the vegetables are thoroughly heated. Serve on slices of crisp, brown toast. I T appears to me that this is what happened: Joseph received word suddenly that his father. Jacob, had taken a sudden turn for the worse and that he was about to die. Joseph hastily summoned his two sons and !" r %  "* l0 smooth P aste and rushed with them to his father's bedside. The young men were attired as befitted Egyptian princes. On their regular visits to their grandfather. Jacob, they had always dressed in the tribal raiment which distinguished the Hebrews in Egypt and which was one of the qualities that finally found favor in the eyes of God and which resulted in their liberation through Moses. The Midrash teaches that Israel in Egypt retained their they will be more Jewish than you have been. In that lies our salvation, identity through their garb, their language, their names and their ability Many of thus day. many of the. now, old folks, have lived a life exterto retain a secret. In anv event. Menasseh and Ephraim had always ap* Jewish. They have observed the appearance of Jews. I pray to God peared before Jacob dressed as Hebrews Now. In their haste to reach his that the youth, the generation of whom you despair, will be truly Jewish bedside before he died, they did not change their clothes, but came dressregardless oi appearances. To you they may be a lost generation. To me ed in the royal uniforms-in native garb. In appearance they were no they are the sons God hath given us in this place. Blessed be our sons different than thousands of other Egyptian youths. Jacob, zealous of the a "d blessed be this place, faith of his fathers, feared lest these youths should forsake that faith and become idol-worshippers as were the natives of Egypt. So. for the moment, a doubt swept across his mind and he asked, "Who are these?" Joseph, watching his father closely and noting the expression upon his face, understood what it was that puzzled his father, and he replied. "These are my sons, whom God hath given me in this place." Joseph conveyed this thought to Jacob, "Have no fear. They are my sons. My flesh and blood just as I am yours. They will remain as loyal to our faith as did I. I was estranged from you for years and yet I remained loyal. They have the selfsame qualities. Furthermore, they are not just sons. They are God-given. They are God-conscious though they dwell in this place. Though they have the outward appearance of Egyptians, though they look native they are true sons of Israel." All this is conveyed in the words. "They are my sons, whom God hath given me in this place." TIVOLlI W. Flagler at 8th I'hone M 1v I Matinee 20c 2 to 11 Kvenin.VJ BUN. AM) HON. JAN. 25-30 Consume Bennett Neil BlBOu. ...In... j "TWO AGAINST the WORLD Can you l>ass an Examination)] Anyou fully covered) | Permit a (Julf Life Rtpra. j sentatiye to mil anil help you nelect a program of | Life Insurance TODAY Gulf Life Insurance Go. I .116 Seyhold BalMilif I I'hone 2-1911 I N this very day. in this very land, there are old Jews who look with deep concern at the Jewish youth of the land and ask, "Who are these?" They have doubts as to the loyalty of the younger generation towards the faith of their fathers. These old men and women view with growing alarm the dress and habits of their own children and grandchildren and they wonder whether these will be Jews after they, the old ones, have gone from this earth. They scan the faces of their descendants and find little to distinguish them from the native sons and daughters. Deep down in their hearts they tremble with the conviction that the land has swallowed up their children. They believe that the youth has been estranged from them and trom the faith of their fathers. T O these I say, "They are our sons, whom God hath given us in this place." The youth of today is as much a God-given youth as were the sons of Joseph. True, it is "in this place." They follow many customs and practices of the land in which they live, but, that is not sufficient reason to doubt their sincerity and loyalty to the faith of their fathers. If you of the old generation have inspired them by your own example and if you have instilled in them a love and devotion to Israel and its traditions, you need have no fear of the future of Israel. If you have taught them, in word and deed, to honor the future and its possibilities as well as to take pride in the past accomplishments of our people then they will carry on where you leave off — possibly not in the same forms, but surely in the same essence. That is the meaning of "in this place." Judaism does not change. The structure always remains the same. The superstructure, the outer form, varies slightly under different conditions, in different places, but the faith never need be remolded. That is the final and conceded verdict of time. Judaism — that collection of truths which we term Judaism, is not revised in every generation. Truth is eternal. Its application may vary with the needs and with the habits of mankind in strange lands and under other circumstances, but, although it be clothed in riches or rags, whether it be expressed in poetry or prose, whether it be disguised as a chemical formula and a mathematical equation, it is ever the same truth. Whether I say, "Shema Ylsroel," or you say, "Hear, O Israel." the truth we both express is one. Each of us uses a different medium to express the same truth. I T Is regrettable that your children cannot pray In the language so dear and so holy to us, but, God understands all languages. If your children do not wear the long distinguishing cloaks of the Jews of the middle ages they are not the less Jewish because of this. T HEY are the sons whom God hath given you "in this place." Never lose sight of the place. The outward appearance does not make the Jew. Clothes may make the "man" or the woman, but, a Jew is not a product of clothing. He is a product of thought —of a state of mind. Don't despair of your children. They are as Jewish as you have been. Basing my reason on the past of our people, I will venture to say that NEW 7th AVE. THEATRE 3933 V W. Tih AM-. PhotM 1-3352 — Sunrtn> and Monday. Jan. 19-39 — JANET N 1) (HAS. QAYNOR FARRELL "The First Year" Tender situations and merry complirations in the first year of married life. Adults 20c — Children 10c Box Office Opens .'.:(.-, on Sat. and Sun. Only Oiliest Mepair Shop in Menu AMHKICAN SHOE SHOP Miami'i Best for Shoe Repairing 15 S. MIAMI AVENUE C. R. IIAKKETT. Prop. 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Page Six THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Friday, January 27 r "SWEET WATERS of MEGIDDO" By RABBI LAZARUS AXIIROD St. Petersburg Notes (Continued from last week) The tomb of Bar Jochai: A solid wall of rounded rock, bespattered with burnt candle grease, saturated with wax and oil, the outpouring of suppressed emotions of reverence for this divine mystic. It is surprising how one's ideas and ambitions undergo a quick change in the presence of a grave or tomb. How petty, puny and insignificant we seemed at that moment. It seemed to me as though the sage lay serenely in his Makom Menucha, secretly laughing at this generation, so materialistic, sophisitcated, and enlightened. By this time a vast crowd of his Chasidim and pilgrims had gathered around the tomb, and business in candles was brisk, three for a piastre being the popular price. The air now reeked with the pungent odour of burnt candles, and coupled with this fragrant aroma, I sensed another smell which was quickly permeating the vaults. My nostrils did not deceive me: thousands of fried chicken livers were being sold off rapidly at a piastre apiece. I wondered hazily where they got so many livers, and what became of the chickens. Impromptu tents were rigged up hastily, and meals a la carte were being served to the hungry tourists, the feature on the menu being fried Kinereth fish. Even in the presence of the divines, one must eat. but in my opinion this indulgence in food removed that beautiful spiritual atmosphere ol the vault. The air now echoed with wails and lamentations, the Sephardic women adding to the exotic scene by chanting psalms in a weird nasal drone. These Sephardic mothers bring their families to this affair, and spend the night in the building, sleeping on blankets thrown haphazardly around the floor. Babes •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •> •:• *.;. ••. *.;.••..;..;..;..;..;..;..;. Services at Congregation Bnai Israel begin tonight at 8 p. m.. when Rabbi Kleinfeld will speak on "Is Religion for Man or Man for Religion?" Saturday morning services begin at 9 a. m.. Sunday school at 10 a. m.. and Hebrew school daily at 4 to 6 p. m. The annual concert for the benefit of the building fund will take place at the temple. 921 Ninth street, Sunday, January 29 at 8 p.m. The Ladies Auxiliary and Aid society of Bnai Israel is holding a baked goods sale this week at 400 Central avenue. At the regular meeting of the Auxiliary and Aid society last Tuesday, ways and means were devised to raise money for our building fund. Miss Minnie Bush, a member of the city welfare department, addressed the Judaic council at their meeting held at the home of Mrs. S. Fyvolent. on January 23. Mrs. H. Schuster read a very interesting article on "The Transient Boy." The next meeting of the council will be held at the home of Mrs. A. A. Esrick. 325 Eighteenth avenue, N. E.. on Monday evening. February 6 at 8:15 p. m. SOCIETY An important meeting of the Beth David Sisterhood will be held on Wednesday, February 1. at the Talmud Torah hall when a luncheon will be served at 12:30 with Mrs. J. L. Gordon of New York as the hostess. All having tickets or moneys of the minstrel show are asked to bring them to the meeting. • • • Mr. and Mrs. William Friedman entertained last week at a dinner in honor of Mr. and Mrs. J. Lipow of Nyack, N. Y. • • • Mr. Leo Levinson of New York City is visiting his aunt and uncle. Mr. and Mrs. William Friedman of this city for a brief vacation. • • &f Senior Hadassah is sponsorint: a card party at the Mayfield Court gardens. 730 Pennsylvania avenue. Miami Beach, on Wednesday, February 8. at 2 p. m. Mrs. F. Lutzky is chairman in charge of the arrangements. The public is invited to attend. • • • Miss Sylvia Dreisen. president of the Miami Junior Council of Jewish Women, was recently elected a director of the national parent organization. and round the tribe dances until in the very exuberance of their feelings, they shoot guns in the air, and increase their speed. It is remindful of the old Chassldic dances which but few of the modern Jews have been privileged to witness. Other acts on the special program will be songs by Indians ., federal reservation at Danla, A ing with the alligator by "col Billie" during which he will pu head in the alligator's mouth, a special wrestling match for thel time by the 12-year-old son ofl Indian Chief William Osceola. &f CANTOR JOS. Z. SHIISKY j£ rim BCCtpl MVMVl Concert Engagements •:•:• -* • .;. + In Florida, Reasonable Arrangement! ";" TAddrau: Boliteln c!o Jewleh Florldian* ••• •;• •j. Bon 2878, Miami, FIH. .;. •:• •:• •:• *.;. *.;. *.;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;. WALK A THON CINDERELLA BALLROOM S1.000 CASH PRIZES 21 HOIKS DAILY PAST THE (S40TII HOIK — GOING ON NOW — Radio Synagog Rabbi S. M. Machtei, founder and director oi the Radio Synagog. will preach over WIOD at 10 o'clock on Sunday morning on "Prayer — For Whose Benefit?" Leonard Tobin will 1 deliver the sermonette on "Early Training." In addition to these there will be prayers, hymns and music. At 11 o'clock Rabbi Machtei will conduct a class in Bible study at the home of Major Kaulman Mandel. 3012 S. W. Eighth street (Tamiami Trail i. All those Interested are welcome. and sucklings lay there in a huddle, snoring soundly and blissfully. Ignorant of the fiery enthusiasm displayed by their ultra-patriotic parents. I turned at the touch on my elbow. An elderly woman, bewigged and beshawled. turned to me appcalingly. "GefTint fir mir. bitte. die plattz." and she handed me an old prayer book, full of Techinoth for all occasions. I fulfilled her wish. "Danke, danke" — she was profuse in her thanks. A fine old lady, she must have traveled far for this spiritual delight. I pictured her peti(To Be Concluded) Miami's BusiestAmerica's Largest RED CROSS DRUG DEPARTMENT STORE SI E.Flakier Phone 2-8196 FREE MOTORCYCLE DELIVERY In Greater Miami Special Rites Next Monday LCuntinuvd from Page One) Attest, They grab at the fish and. n they miss the fish, they grab at one i another. In fact, one big alligator grabbed his own tail and two of the Seminoles had to beat him on the head witn thenbamboo poles in make him turn loose. If let alone, the alligator would very likely have bitten his own tail completely off! Big alligators grab smaller ones — | by a leg or a tail, or one of the jaws. And when they grab, they crunch down hard. One missed both fish and alligator and happened to hold of a coral rock. When he crunched down on it, the rock was reduced to pebbles. As for the crocodiles, they are just like the alligator only quicker and wilder, if that is possible. It is easy to sec why nature gave these beasts such tough hides. They'd kill each other olf trying to get food otherwise. As the helpers shovel the food over the wall, the Seminoles around the wall are kept busy wielding their bamboo poles. The more excited the alligators and crocodiles get. the more voluble and perturbed becomethe Seminoles. If a couple of alligators get all tangled up. each with a strangle hold on the other, the Seminoles pry and prod them with poles in a truly prodigious manner. During the performance they address the alligators in strange words of short syllables. Whatever it is they mean, the alligators pay not the slightest attention, but go right on. merrily grabbing the nearest thing within grabbing distance. In addition to the alligators being fed. the Indians will give one of their tribal dances, rarely shown. The last one in this district was held in 1925 at the opening of the 1 amiami Trail at Everglades City. Round Breakful 7 to %  ,, Dinner .....', to Lunch II to 2 :S0 AVIS CAFETERIA :(• %  ; N. E. Second \ Oppoalta Halcyon Hotel Efficient Sen Ice Boyi to carry your tray —I Only Bee Hundred of Deep See Wonden Co in Captivity Living Bpecimeni Miami Aquarium on the fBmi.u blockade runner PRINS VALDEMAR North End Bayfront Park ".ill and BUcayna limilevanl Admission 25c — Children 10c Open I a.m. t<> 11 p.m. + + + + &f &f + &f •:• •:• The Best Way to See the Races TAKE BUSSES At South Entrance of Venetian Arcade, Southeast First Street, direct to the Grandstand without stop. FARE 35c MIAMI TRANSIT COMPANY !• &f •:• •:• •:• •: %  •:• •> •:• &f • • • &f &f &f &f &f &f • • • • &f &f &f &f &f &f "5* • •! •;• •*• &f • •:• •:• •:• •:• ••. .•. .•. .. SAMETS KOSHER MARKX 7.17 WASHINGTON AVE. MIAMI BBACH A COMPLETE LINE OF THE CHOICEST STRICTLY KOSHER MEATS AND FRESH-KILLED POULTRY Our imported meats are under the personal supervision of Rabbi Joseph Konvitz and Rabbi Isaac Siegel of Newark, N.J. Come and be convinced. DELICATESSEN. GROCERIES, DAIRY PRODUCTS FKESH FRl'ITS AND VEGETABLES Phone 5-3512 for Free Delivery •> &f •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• <• •:• •:• •:< &f •:• •:•+•:• •:• •:• •:• $.;. + $.;. .j. $ $.;. $.;..;. ......... t J For fresh Sea Foods STOP AT GAPT. TOM'S FISH MART Hauler St. and Miami River Phone 1-S1I1 We Never (hue OUR PRICES ARE THE LOWEST Our I i-l) .ux the freshest — Caught by our own boats dail] If it .s Sea Food, we have .1 at its very best, and at attractively low prices. Our method of handling and selling Sea Food is in ob'Bervance with all the sanitary rules and regulations. ONCE ONLY SUNDAY February 5th 3 P. M. BETH DAVID Congregation presents Cantor Joseph Z* Shlisky World Renowned Tenor at the TEMPLE THEATRE 345 N. W. THIRD STREET In a Program of Traditional Melodies, Folk Songs and Operatic Arias — POPULAR PRICES —


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