The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00204

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewisti Fiondfi'&in
Vol. 6, No. 3.
LORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY
MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 1933.
Price Five Cents
lAnnouncementsi
CONGREGATION BETH JACOB
{Orthodox)
111 Wa-hington Ave.. Miami Beach
L. AXELBOD, Babbi
Regular Friday evening services
begin at 5:30 with the late services
at 8:15 p rn., when the rabbi will
preach a sermon on "Hebrew
Slaves.' The congregational chant-
ing and singing will be directed by
Cantor Boris Schlachman. Saturday
morning services begin at 9 a. m.,
with the rabbi preaching in Yiddish
on the weekly portion of the law.
MIAMI JEWISH OBTHODOX
CONGBEGATION
(Orthodox)
|Mi S. W. Third Street
JONAH E. CAPLAN. Babbi
The usual early services begin at
530. and the late services at 8:30,
when Rabbi Caplan will preach on
By Their Deeds Shall Ye Know
Them" The usual chanting and
congregational singing will be en-
joyed. Saturday morning services
Mgin at 9 a. m.
Beth David
Sponsors Show
Next Wednesday night, January
25. beginning at 8:15, the minstrel
show sponsored by the junior com-
mittee of Beth David congregation
will ring up the curtain for what
promises to be one of the outstand-
ing entertainments of the season, at
the Riverside school auditorium, 221
S. W. Twelfth avenue. In charge
of the show is Louis Hayman, vet-
eran .showman. Professional dancers
Dramatic Club
Is Organized
As a result of the enthusiastic re-
ception of the recent Yiddish play
given by local Jewish talent inter-
ested in the formation of a perman-
ent Yiddish dramatic organization
in Miami, the "Miami Jewish Dra-
matic Players" was organized last
week Joseph Greenberg was elect-
ed president; Harry Rose, secretary
and Mrs. M. Silverman. treasurer.
Mr. Harry Greenberg will be direc-
appear during the evening's tor of the plays that will be pro-
duced by the organization. In an-
nouncing the plans of the organiza-
tion, it was stressed that every ef-
BETII DAVID CONGREGATION
(Conservative)
139 N. W. Third Avenue
MAX SHAPIBO. Rabbi
will
performance and will furnish addi-
tional entertainment. Mrs. Sam
Weisel is chairman of the commit-
tee in charge of arrangements, and | fort will be made to interest local
tickets are only 50 cents. Jews to take part in the presents -
The cast is composed of the fol- tions from time to time, so that Mi-
lowing: Interlocutor. Claire Cohen ami may be given the opportunity
Weintraub: end men. Katie Marko- to see Yiddish plays which other-
witz. Jeanette Falk. Juliette Stone wise could not be presented. The
and Rose Bogen. Specialty acts will first play to be given by the new or-
be a tap dance by Dorothy Kopplo- ganization will be announced short-
witz and Claire Simon: Dance of I ly.
the Soldiers by Ida Engler and Ros-
alyn Daum; adagio dance by Leon-
ard Tobin and Rose Chintaling:
song by Bobbie Resnick; tap dance
by Theresa Rubenstein. The chorus
s composed of Sadie Oliphant, Hel-
ene Friedman, Fae Weintraub, Sad-
ye Resnick. Bert Friedman. Freda
Markowitz. Reba Hayman. Ida Gold-
herg. Sadie Pepper. Iris Blumberg.
Kashrus Work
To Begin Soon
Talmud Torah
Ball Wednesday
Final preparations for the annual
Talmud Torah benefit ball to be
held at the Mahi Shrine temple on
Biscayne boulevard next Wednes-
day, January 25. beginning at 9 p.
m include stars of night club shows
now in the Greater Miami district.
The beautiful hall will be specially
decorated for the event and booths
will be placed in and about the hall
showing historical scenes. Dancing
will begin at 9 o'clock and the vaud-
eville acts and floor show will be
given during intermissions in the
dancing. The affair is an annual
event of the Ladles Auxiliary of the
Miami Jewish orthodox congrega-
tion and the proceeds are devoted
solely to the Talmud Torah fund
which provides free tuition and
school books to those otherwise un-
able to pay for their religious train-
ing.
In charge of arrangements is a
committee headed by Mrs. J. Louis
Shochet, who is being assisted by
a ticket committee in charge of Mrs.
Charles Tannenbaum, Sam Futter-
fass and Milton Weiner; cake and
food committee In charge of Mes-
dames William Mechlowltz, Morris
Rappaport and Max Rappaport;
flower committee in charge of Mes-
dames Sam Tannenbaum and Max
Sophie Sapero, Clara Fine. Reva .T, Kupferstein; candies and cigarettes
H H conferences have been held and i '
I .u.;. mi vacs begin at 5:30 p. m.
nth the late services at 8:15 when
Rabbi Shapiro will preach on "A
New Jewish Nation in the Making."
The congregational singing and
chantinu will be led by Cantor Louis
Hayman. who will be assisted by
he choir. Saturday morning ser-
vices begin at 8:30 and Rabbi Sha-
piro will preach a sermon in Yid-
dish on the portion of the law.
Silverman, Esther Lichtenstein and
Ruth Dubbin.
Beach Kennel
Club To
Open
As a result of a stirring appeal
made by Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan
last Friday night at the Miami Jew-
ish orthodox congregation, several |
a
:oc-al kosher committee is now being
formed. Last Wednesday night Rab-
bi Caplan and Rabbi Max Shapiro
of Beth David congregation met
with Miami's butchers and plans for ;cents each' and transportation to
' immediate functioning of a kosher I and Irom u'e bal1 ma* "f arraned
committee were discussed. All three \ ** callln8 V mber of the com-
' local butchers were invited to this
in charge of Mrs. Nathan Abram-
son; sandwiches. Mrs. Nathan Ad-
elman and Max Kupferstein.
Tickets for this affair are only 50
mittee.
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI
I Reform
III N. K. Nineteenth Street
DR. JACOB II. KAPLAN. Rabbi
The Miami Beach Kennel club meeting but only two attended and
will reopen its beautiful ocean-side ; offered to comply with all rules that
plant on Tuesday evening. January may be adopted by the local rabbis
SI, with a number of important and the kosher committee. The
changes effected for the purpose of third refused to heed the call of the
j.eaner and better dog racing. One two rabbis. A meeting of the kosher
The President's Committee on
Social Trends" will be discussed by
Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan at Temple Is-
rael, 137 N. E. Nineteenth street, at
the services on Friday evening,
''hich begin at 8:15.
In the autumn of 1929 the Presi-
dent of the United States appoint-
ed a committee to examine the so-
cial trends in the United States. The
"port of this committee has Just
bten issued, and is the outstanding
contribution to an understanding of
the problems of our civilization. The
full title is: "A Review of the Find-
ing! by the President's Research
Committee on Social Trends." Com-
ments on this Important document
*i!l be the subject matter of the
lecture by Dr. Kaplan at Temple Is-
rael this Friday night. The public
'Bnai Brith
S Elects Officers
I At a meeting held on January 12.
' the Hebrew Athletic club,
tiie Sholom lodge of Bnai Brith
the following officers for the
irear: President, W. L. Wil-
lir-st vice president. William
Medman; second vice president, W.
Cohen; secretary. Nat L. Williams;
r Edward Friedman; moni-
tor, Stanley Myers; assistant moni-
tor, Leo Rosen; trustees, Lewis
Brown, M. Rapaport, H. M. Dre-
"uch, j. Bernstein, H. Rayvis. Wil-
'iam Mechlowitz.
Of the features tills year is the
leal timing clock, which begins
:o work simultaneously with the re-
lease of the dogs from the harness
or box. This insures accurate timing
o permit proper handicapping and
record! of races. By use of the Keen
! starting harness and the electrical
! iming clock formful racing and ac-
' .urate records are assured. Both
1 l'.ese devices are protected by U. S.
|and foreign patents. The Miami
| 3each Kennel club is the only track
! now using these devices. A new pat-
1 nted track to carry the rabbit has
..placed the old wooden one. and
because of its all-steel and concrete
obstruction, prevents any lure
trouble. A new marl and sand rac-
ng strip has been laid in place of
the old turf track and insures firmer
footing and speedier racing by the
dogs.
This Is the fifth season the track
has operated and the same manage-
ment of O'Hara and Anderson will
again direct activities for the 52
; v- of racing. The public is invited
to attend the nightly schooling rac-
es which begin at 7 o'clock ano arc
,.,,. (0 the public until the actual
peaing night. A colorful season is
predicted for the Beach oval.
Noted Orator
To Arrive
committee will be held next week
when the actual work of organiza-
tion will begin.
A Philosopher
Looks At Yiddish
By Prof. Morris Raphael Cohen
Cemetery Report
Is Adopted
A large number of Miami's Jewish
men and women attended a mass
meeting of local Jewry at Odd Fel-
lows hall last Tuesday night to dis-
cuss the local Jewish Cemetery as-
ociation. Leaders of Greater Mi-
ami Jewry were present and heard
the report of the cemetery adjust-
ment committee given by Harry I.
Lipton. prominent attorney of this
city. After a brief discussion the
recommendations of the committee
were unanimously approved. A con-
siderable saving in the principal
sum. a reduction in Interest charges
and title to a large part of the cem-
etery free and clear of debts, was
effected by the committee. Messrs.
Joint Distribution
Campaigns Begin
NEW YORK Local campaigns
for funds for relief activities among
the Jews of eastern and central Eur-
ope start this week in a number of
cities throughout the country. Rab-
bi Jonah E. Wise, chairman of the
fund-raising committee of the joint
distribution committee.
The Jews of Denver. Colo., under
the chairmanship of Noah A. Atler.
initiate a drive this week for $5,000
for the purposes of the joint distri-
bution committee. Another cam-
paign in the western part of the
country opens in Sacramento. Cal..
this week. Isador Brown is chair-
man, and the HcM. Albert Elkus. ol
the Joint distribution committee's
national council, is honorary chair-
man of the effort.
The Allied Jewish campaign in
Schenectady. N. Y., in which the
Joint distribution committee is a
chief participant, got under way last
week under the chairmanship of
Abraham Ferber. Other campaigns
now going on are in Memphis.
Harry I Lipton and Louis Heiman.
attorneys, will represent the assocl- | Tenn.. under the chairmanship of
ation in making final arrangements David Stemberg, and in San An-
with the cemetery company.
Rabbi M. Freed of New York, not-
Pd Yiddish orator, is expected to ar-
Jewish Scout
Troop Planned
tonio. Tex.
All Jewish girls between the ages
of 10 and 15 who are interested in
Girl Scout work are invited to at-
nve in Miami shortly on a lecture terd an organization meeting for a
tour of the country in the interests Jewlsh tr00p at Beth David Talmud physical training which Scout work
Torah hall Tuesday afternoon. Jan- i provides. Mrs. Sadye Oliphant Is
uary 24, at 4 o'clock. The Miami j Scout leader.
branch of the Senior Council of
Jewish Women is sponsoring this
move in the interest of a wider
training for local Jewish girls in
Scout work in a distinct Jewish at-
mosphere. In beginning this work
the senior council feels that local
Jewish girls should receive the ad-
vantages of character building and
of Jewish education, according to
word received here this week.
It is true that my work has been
in the field of technical philosophy
where Yiddish has been of no help
to me. and I have lost active con-
tact with the Jewish press or with
the efforts to keep up high stand-
ards in Yiddish literature. I have
not lost my love for my mother's
-ongue. in which I was brought up
and which can never be entirely re-
placed by any other tongue as the
expression of Intimate affection.
Though 40 years' inactivity has
made me tongue-tied when it comes
to speaking, I still can read Peretz
and I deem it a great honor to tes-
tify to my high regard for his worth
as a literary fixture, as well as a
great, noble and beneficent person-
ality.
Perhaps the very fact that I have
become an outsider to Yiddish lit-
erature may give some value to my
testimony as to its great merit. Yid-
dish literature and the Yiddish
press have had the great misfortune
of being constantly assailed by two
powerful parties, those who insist on
the claims of the language of the
country in which we live and those
who espouse the claims of Hebrew,
the language which has a unique
sentimental value for all Jews. And
I am glad to defend the value of
Yiddish in substantial agreement
with what Peretz himself once de-
clared to be the relative necessities
of the three languages for the Jews.
First, as to the relative claims of
Yiddish and Hebrew. I do not wish
on an occasion of this sort to add to
the acrimonious debate which has
raged so long. I do not wish to deny
that Hebrew will always have some
passionate claim on Jewish senti-
ment. But as one who, at one time,
at least, read and spoke both of
these languages I may express my
opinion that Hebrew has not the
fluency and is not so redolent of the
actual experience of the Jewish peo-
ple for the last few centuries as is
the Yiddish language. Let me testi-
fy from my own personal history.
In the first period of my life I had
an orthodox Hebrew education and
I never read anything In Yiddish.
My grandfather had charge of my
education and he saw to it that no
Yiddish reached me. When my
mother wrote to him that I ought
to learn to read and write Yiddish
he replied: "I am giving your son
the substance of life and education,
the trimmings will come later." The
society of which my grandfather
was an Illustrious representative had
its virtues, but It was barren and
out of tune with the current of
modern life. There were Maskilim,
who read Hebrew books, wrote He-
brew letters to each other in stilted,
figurative language and some were
wen said to have kept their busi-
ness books and records in Hebrew.
But the whole thing was highly art-
ificial and pedantic and the neo-
Hebraic literature was completely
divorced from the life of the great
masses of the peP,e: and' having
no roots, it bore no fruit. Perhaps
the most significant incident in this
connection is the fact that in the
town of Nesviesh. where I was
brought up. a town containing
about six thousand Jews. I heard of
only one who received a Hebrew
newspaper, the Hazflroh. But his
piety was rather suspected and few-
showed any interest, though there
was a great deal of gossipy news
(Contlnned on Pare Three)

i
I
I ..
I


Page Two
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Friday, January ?n .^
/
II'
Finally hitting their winning
stride, the Hebrew Athletic club,
with a large and enthusiastic crowd
cheering them along, trounced the
St. Pats in a cage tilt at Flamingo
Park Monday night. The score was
39 to 15.
With the Jewish boys hitting the
hoop consistently and presenting a
well played offensive, they had no
trouble in piling up an early lead
which was held without trouble
throughout the game.
Sam Bornstein, center, who comes
from where basketball is played all
the time, is a welcome addition to
the team as is Joe Davis, rangy
guard from orackerland. The local
boys on the team are the Grossman
brothers, Izzie Schwartz, and Al
Reisman.
Ralph Grossman led his team-
mates in scoring with 14 points fol-
lowed by Bornstein with 11 and Al
Grossman with eight points.
Coach Art Webb is getting his
squad into shape and more men will
be added next week. The next con-
test will be held at Flamingo Park
Monday evening at 8 p. m. sharp.

To Anna Appel, middle-aged star
of the Yiddish Art theatre, fame is
something more than electric lights
and the trumpeting of her name.
For 15 years she has appeared at
the head of one of the most select
group of stage artists in the world.
With the Yiddish Art theatre she
has seldom seen her name displayed
in glaring electric bulbs.
They do not do things like that
in a serious theatre, and Anna Ap-
pel is serious.
Miss Appel was born in Buchar-
est. Roumania. At 14 with her par-
ents she emigrated from the old
world to Canada. At 15 she was
playing in a Montreal stock com-
pany in a series of classical plays.
Her New York debut was with
Jacob Adler in a series of plays by
Tolstoi and later with Rudolph
Schildkraut. Then, for 15 years she
played steadily with the Yiddish
Art theatre.
"Symphony of Six Million" is her
first motion picture venture in Am-
erica, although she made a silent
film in Vienna.
Appearing with her is Ratoff, a
Jewish actor of note, having per-
formed for many years abroad and
for a number of years with the Yid-
dish Art theatre where he estab-
lished a unique reputation for char-
acterization.
Both of these artists had persist-
ently refused to appear in films but
were eventually induced to make
their debut because of the human
theme of the story which was writ- ;
ten by Fannie Hurst.
"Symphony of Six Million," which
will appear at the Seventh Avenue j
theatre this coming Sunday, is a
human interest saga of New York's I
Jewish East Side and tells the pow-
erful dramatic story of a doctor torn
between the sufferings of his people
and the human urge for wealth. It
is a thrilling story of Jewish life.
*
Members of Beth David choir who
assist at the late Friday night ser-
vices are Mesdames Charles Marko-
witz. William Weintraub. Albert
Dubbin. Edward Friedman, William
Friedman and the Misses Rosalyn
Daum and Rosalyn Bader.

The physical culture class under
the direction of Mrs. Bertha Berko-
witch Levy meets every morning
from 9 to 10:30 in the tennis courts
of Mrs. Joseph N. Morris. All are
invited to Join this class, whose pro-
ceeds are devoted exclusively to the
work of the Jewish Welfare bureau.
A benefit bridge for the ladies'
auxiliary of the Jewish Welfare bu-
reau will be held at the Blackstone
hotel. Miami Beach, Friday after-
noon, February 3, beginning at 2 o'-
clock. Mrs. Isidor Cohen is chairman
of the committee in charge.

With Norma Shearer as its star,
and one of the most brilliant sup-
porting casts yet assembled for the
speaking screen, Metro-Goldwyn-
Mayer's lavish production of "Smil-
in' Through" will play Sunday.
Monday and Tuesday at the Tivoli
theatre.
Miss Shearer in the feminine lead
follows in the footsteps of Jane
Cowl, who achieved one of her
neatest successes in the record-
jreaking New York stage run of the
play from which the screen produc-
tion was adapted. Opposite her is
Fredric March, borrowed from Par-
amount to play the dual role of Jer-
my Wayne in the mid-Victorian
APPEARING AT TIVOLI
THEATRE THIS WEEK
are well on their way to lose more
couples before that point is reached.
and Mr. Brown of Brooklyn nrr,
inent members of Beth jfcJJJ
gregation, and Sam Steiner of rZ
cago, 111. '*
Presidents of every Jewish worn-
en'i organization in Miami have ,
been named on the Jewish Welfare j A large crowd attended the Bar
Bail committee by Mrs. Bertha B. j Mitzvah of Robert Kurland of ft.
York last Saturday morning at &.,
Jacob synagogue. Rabbi Axelrod d
livered an earnest exhortation h
English to the confirmant, deimn,
the existing theory that the Ba-
Mitzvah ceremony in this coota
is nothing more than a theatrical
act.
.
Nearly 100 children now enrolled,
at the Beth Jacob Sundav -h.i
,,. are arranging a reception at ,0 ,?*'
which will be held in his honor
shortly.
I., \y. chairman of the annual Wel-
iare ball, in addition to the mem-
bers already serving.

Max Goebel. noted Jewish actor
and playwright, is spending a vaca-
Uon al Miami Beach to recuperate
from las recent illness. Goebel is
internationally known on the Yid-
dlsh stage and a number of his ad-
NORMA SHEARER-
rram which la i>
concert tour.
At a well attended meeting of the
ladies' auxiliary of the Jewish Wel-
tare bureau held Monday afternoon
aTToTa national Kaplan hall, Mrs. Meyer
Schwartz, prominent communal
worker of this city, was unanimous-
The ladies' auxiliary of th. Mlwnl U- <""" *""* J1"- Hert*rt
Jewish orthodox congregation held Kleinman was elected first v.ce
one of its regular card parties a. Indent, and Mrs. Harry Isaacs,
the synagog last Tuesday night with >*>nd vice president. These weie
Mesdames A. Daum and Charles chosen to fill vacancies which re-
Feldman as the hostesses. Individ- suited because of several recent res-
ual prizes were awarded to the high- i ignations. Mrs. Lena Simon was
cquences of the story and Kenneth est score at each table and Mrs. elected publicity chairman. Mrs.
Wayne, his son, in the modern Rosenblum of Butler. Pa., was Sadye G. Rose, executive secretary
cenes.
Leslie Howard and O. P. Heggie,
who left the screen to fulfill stage
engagements on Broadway during
he past season, were brought back
.o Hollywood to add further lustre
o Miss Shearer's cast.
"Smilin' Through" is the story of
an old man who seeks to shed the
. t lentless bitterness of his blighted
.omance on a pair of young lovers.
awarded the door prize.
The annual Charity ball of the
Jewish Welfare bureau to raise
funds to carry on its work will be
given this year at the beautiful
Floridian hotel at Miami Beach The
affair, which will take the form of a
supper dance this year, has lor the
ast .sevi ral years been one of the
jutstanding events of the social sea-
Ihe colorful background provides a ... ._,. .,
__r I son, and will be held on Sunday
ontrast between the England of
.'.68 and modern days.

Coining to Miami some years ago,
vir. H. Samet and J. E. Samet. his
en. first opened under the name of
Samet's" at Miami Beach on No-
vember 26, 1929, and since that time
Slave established an enviable repu-
ation for fair dealing and clean
business. At all times insisting upon
the handling of only strictly kosher
ielicatessen. "Samet's" has jecome
yr.onymous with "kashrus.'' Ac-
veding to the request of a large
lumber of their customers and pa-
eons, "Samet's" will today open
heir kosher meat and poultry de-
partment in their attractive and
pacious store at 737 Washington
ivenue. Miami Beach, where they
trill be happy to welcome all who
insist upon strict adherence to all
xuirements which insures kosher
meats and poultry. The meat de-
partment will be closed on Satur-
days and every Jewish holiday. Mr.
Frost of Bradley Beach. N. J.. will
.'r in charge of the meat depart-
ment, and has had a long experi-
?nce in this line in a number of
jrcminent tourist cities.

Mr. and Mrs. I. Kwart are being
congratulated upon the birth of a
baby daughter at the Jackson Mem-
orial hospital last week. Mother and
fcaby are now at home and are do-
ing nicely. The little girl was named
Mashe Yocheved.

With Mrs. I. Buckstein. its pres-
ident, as hostess, the ladies' auxil-
iary of the Miami Jewish orthodox
congregation will entertain its mem-
bers and friends at a "social" next
Tuesday evening, January 24. at the
synagog. A program of entertain-
ment will be presented and refresh-
ments will be served. The oublic is
'nvited to attend.

As we go to press the Women's
club of the Workmen's circle is
sponsoring a concert for the benefit
of the tool campaign for the Jews of
eastern Europe with the noted art-
ists. Al Harris. Maxine Brodin and
Zelda Zlatin appearing on the pro-
vening, March 12. All local Jew-
ish organizations are cooperating to
make this affair an outstanding
success.
Local friends and members of the
Workmen's circle arc sponsoring ;i
:eception in honor of Max Goebel,
noted Jewish playwright and actor,
this coming Sunday evening, Janu-
ary 22. at the Workmen's circle hall.
roi N. w. Fifth avenue, beginning
.it 8:30. A program will be presented
and refreshments will be served.
1 lu public is invited
of the Jewish Welfare bureau, told
ol the cases arising daily and urged
continued efforts to raise funds to
cany on the work of relief. A social
hour followed.

Officers recently elected by the
local Bnai Brith lodge will be in-
stall* d at a public ceremony at Beth
David Talmud Torah hall on Sun-
daj evening, January 29. beginning
at 8 p. m. A splendid program will
be presented in addition to the us-
ual impressive Bnai Brith ritual.
The public Is invited to attend. No
charges ol any kind will be made
and refreshments will be served.
o'clock
Services for the children are inclurj.
ed in the weekly assembly, which is
thoroughly enjoyed by all.
It pays to advertise in The Jems,-.
Floridian.
Watch For
"The Inside
93
Story"
e s
The Hebrew Athletic club held
econd of a series of card par-
ties tor the benefit of its commun-
ity centre building fund last Sun-
day night. Quite a large number of
guests attended and enjoyed a very
delightful evening. Refreshments
were served by the committee in
charge, Prises were won by Mrs
Henry Seltlln, Raymond Bain. M.
Every night is a bin night at the Manowltl and L. Spiegelman.
rValkathon contest and the Increas-
d attendance is due to the efforts
.1 jack Negley, master ol ceremon- Rm,,lt vMUm :" Mlami B,arh
ies and the contestants, as well as toclude Brenner, of Cleveland, O..
Che floor shows from the various ***** *..,.:. **.............j.......... .
night clubs. it, t
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Synagogs...
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Tracy, tap dancers, and the Smiths. *
Jerry and Frances, in their waltz +
numbers, and Millie Rosen, the *
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The walkers, now thinned down
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passed the 400-hour mark and are
nearing the 500, which means thev
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Friday, January 20, 1933.
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
P?8eThr,
THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
/
I
Pl'BLISHKD EVERY FRIDAY
by the
JEWISH FLORIDIAN PUBLISHING CO.
621 S. W. Fifteenth Avenue
J. LOUIS S3IOCHET, Editor
P. O. Box 29:3
Miami, Florida Phone 2-1183
Intend u -, >nd cla utter July 4.
198(1. at the Post Offico ul Miami. Florida.
Under (he Act of March 8, 18TB,
WEST PALM BEACH OFFICE
414 l.i. lull Street
Mr*. M. S.hrebnick. K"pre*entut. w-
si 38CKIPTII N
Six Month*.......$1.00
One Year.......82.00
FRIDAY. JANUARY 20, 1933.
Vol. 6, No. 3.
Around the
Campus
By MILTON A. FRIEDMAN
A Philosopher
Looks At Yiddish
[Continued from Pago One]
.:ased on letters that people received
.iom America.
When I moved from Nesviesh to
Minsk and began to read Yiddish
or Jargon, as we called it a new
world opened itself up to me. Even
Shomer's Shundromanen had a high
educational value because of theii
liberalism, of their admiration for
educated people and the contempt
for the old-fashioned fanaticism.
But the real enlightenment came
from Mendele Meicher Sphorim and
the Volksbibliothek, to which Sho-
lem Aleichem contributed. Then I
came to America and began reading
the Jewish press, principally the old
Arbeiter Zeitung, which Abraham
Cahan, Feigenbaum and Phillip
Kraoi edited and to which the old
grandfather of the Jewish social
movement. Winchevsky, frequently
sent letters from England. I am
glad to testify that I owe a good
deal of my education to it. It taught
me to look at world news from a
cosmopolitan instead of a focal or
provincial point of view, and it
Hello, folks! Is everybody happy?
You people in Miami should feel
great at this time of the year. Up tauglU me l0 1,1,e'Plel Politi real-
here in OoinesvlllB .., *~., >.., Utlcally, instead of being misled by
mpty phrases.
here in Gainesville we've been hav-
ing freezing weather, including a
little rain thrown in for good meas-
ure. Just imagine. Only 400 miles
away there is a sun shining forth in
all its splendor, beaches are crowd-
ed, and an overcoat is just a frag-
ment of the imagination. As my
stiff fingers play lovingly over the
keyboard of the typewriter my soul
is not in my work. I wouldst be
back in the laps of the gods where
a blue sky looks down on the green
below and a sun bursts forth in all
its glorification on the mecca of the
world. Ah me, the thought is futile,
it will do me no good, alas, alack-
a-day.
While discussing climatic condi-
tions I might mention an amusing
incident of which fxo Miami boys
unfortunately were the victims. This
is a story of a heater that decided
to go berserk. Al Cassel and Phil
Breman live in a little cottage in
back of the fraternity house in
which they have a heater. The oth-
er day they turned on the heater
and left it on while they went to
class, expecting thereby to have a
warm room when they returned.
Such things you know occasionally
happen; the stove went bad. Lo and
behold, what should greet the eyes
of the returning students but a
blackness that was never pictured
in the dwelling place of the devil.
The soot covered the ceilings, walls,
dresser drawers, clothing, blankets,
everything, with a layer one-half an
inch thick. This was one surprise
that didn't come in a small pack-
age. Al and Phil, after a hard day's
labor, are now again holding open
house.
The University of Florida Glee
club gave its first concert of the
year a few days ago at Williston. a
little town 30 miles from here. Marx
Feinberg and Milt Friedman made
the trip. The affair was a howling
success from every angle. I was end
man and it fell my lot to pull the
curtains between our numbers. Im-
agine the embarrassment when I
had to stand before the audience
trying to pull the curtain and it ob-
stinately refused to budge. The aud-
ience got a kick out of my discom-
fiture especially when I got mad
once and pulled too hard and the
whole curtain fell down. Was my
face red! Marx sang a baritone solo
that went over nicely. He sang, in
character. "Brother, Can You Spare
a Dime?" After the concert the city
gave us a dance. And what a dance
it was! I can't imagine where so
many beautiful girls could have
come from. Peculiarly enough (or
is it so peculiar?) most of the girls
were blondes. The boys are still
As I look back on the Yiddish and
the English press in that last dec-
ade of the nineteenth century I can-
not help feeling that the former did
more for the education of its read-
ers than the latter. Having no army
ol reporters to rim up sensational
news, the Jewish press necessarily
paid more attention to things of
permanent interest. It tried to give
its readers something of permanence
and substantial value. The English
press, I am glad to say. has made a
great deal of progress in this re-
spect in the last 10 years, since the
var h.is made some Americans real-
ze that there is a world outside of
he United States with which we
save not only commercial, but cul-
tural relations. But, even to this
lav. though some of the methods of
the English press have been adopt-
?d by the Yiddish newspapers, the
'atter are still characterized by a
more unified point of view, which
?ives news, comments and informa-
Iw articles a unity which no Eng-
lish newspaper seeks to attain.
I also want to express my great
indebtedness to what Jacob Gordon
did to educate whatever taste I have
for dramatic literature. Gordon
might have made a name for him-
self in Russian or Engl'sh literature.
But he preferred to stick to Yiddish
and portray the life of his own peo-
ple. We ought to honor his memory.
And now. as to the relation be-
tween Yiddish and English. I need
not express my belief that so long
as the Jews wish to live in this
country and to participate in its
cultural life, in its science, literature
and drama, as well as in its politi-
cal and industrial activities. English
is bound to prevail as the language
of the Jewish people. The Jews
have ever been ready to adopt the
language of the peoples among
whom they have lived. Did they
not drop Hebrew and adopt Aramaic
as their national tongue? And was
not Aramaic succeeded by Greek.
Arabic. Spanish and German? Nev-
ertheless. I think that Yiddish is
rendering a great cultural service
and will continue to do so for con-
siderable time. I cannot share the
views of my fellow citizens who look
upon the very existence of a foreign
press as a sort of treason, who would
make the speaking or writing of a
foreign language a crime. These
people are doubtless influenced by
patriotic motives, but their concep-
:ion of Americanism is narrow and
unworthy of the great traditions of
American liberalism. The patriotism
jf these people is a narrow nation-
alism, copied from or in imitation
of European nationalism. The Am-
rica ntradition Is Federalism, which
illows for diversity instead of dull
uniformity. The very name United
States and our motto "E Pluribus
Unum" express this. We have no
national church as French and Ital-
.an nationalists want.
America has been settled by many
peoples and each must contribute
freely to the common stock the
Germans have contributed their love
nf music, the Italians have contrib-
uted their love of nature, gardening
and certain household arts. Why-
should not the Jews contribute their
specific gifts in the way of enthus-
iasm for the arts, for social ideal-
ism, as well as their peculiar love of
intellectual life for its own sake?
The idea that all Immigrants should
wipe out their past and become sim-
ple imitations ol the existing type
la neither possible nor desirable. The
past cannot be wiped out. And we
make ourselves ridiculous In the ef-
fort to do so.
All great civilizations have been
the resultants of the cintributinns
of many peoples, and a richer Am-
erican culture can come only if the
i o like other elements, are given
i chance to develop under favor-
ible conditions their peculiar gen-
ius. The Jewish press can therefore
lock back upon Its worth of the last
50 years with pride. It has pre-
pared millions of Jewish people to
take a worthy part in American
Civilisation while also promoting the
natural self-respect to which Jews
are entitled because of their char-
acter and history.
But what of the future?
It is often said that the Yiddish
press is f r a disappearing genera-
tion. That as our young people are
educated in the public schools and
'earn to speak English of a sort in
their daily life and business, Yiddish
is bound to disappear. That may
be. but, not being a prophet, I ven-
ture no opinion. Languages have a
peculiar way of persisting, for they
express experiences not so readily |
expressible in other languages. In ''
any case. I think, there is a great
social value in maintaining Yiddish,
not only for the cultural opportun-
ities in English, but also to keep
some, portion of the Jewish people
in touch with the life of our own
mmeriiate past and in touch with
.he vast majority of the Jewish peo-
ple abroad, whose language is pre-
dominantly Yiddish. Perhaps 50
yean from now the Yiddish press
may celebrate its centennary. I hope
hat when it does so its past will be
o less honorable than it Ls today.
The ma.i who flirts with servant
girls has domestic tastes.
When a man hasn't a ghost of a
chance he Is naturally out of spir-
its.
It is hard to convince doctors and
druggists that health is wealth.
Silence is the only thing that will
ever improve some people's conver-
sation.
The trouble with mast handsome
women: They think nothing else is
neocssaiy.
It is not always wise to tell all one
knows, but it is well to know all one
tells.
Turn about is fair play. If a girl
steals a young man's heart she
should not be alarmed if he Steals
a kiss.
The latest recruit ol the theatri-
cal colony at Hollywood is an Iowa
hog. The animal, which won a |
world's championship as a ho^i
has been invited to the film capital
to appear as a character actor in a j
motion picture. Notwithstanding
the seventy of the competition in
these roles, the hog's unspoiled nat-
uralness will stand it in good stead,
I think, and it has every pri
of a brilliant career.
And not on the screen only. It Is
a very fat hog and. appropriately,
after being filmed, it will make a
tour of the country appearing "in
the flesh.'' Among ham actors it is
considered certain to have an out-
standing success.
Perhaps the only practical objec-
tion so far advanced is that any |
w-rry that may be drowned in the |
3.2 stuff would be trivial at the ut-
most,
The winner of a national contest
to pick the tallest story teller hails
from Denver, which naturally gives
him the advantage of a mile in al-
titude at the start.
The dog catcher at Council Bluff,
Iowa, earns $1,926 a year, and th,
mayor only $1,500.
A man at Jackson, Mich., was ar
rested for wounding a bystander ,n
an attempt to take his own life
Fellow at Ann Arbor gave him*.],
up to the police, together with his
revolver, for fear he would commit
a crime.
Fired at by a bandit, a Chicago
man was hit on the toe, and rejoices
in the removal of a corn that had
bothered him for 25 years.
A deep sea diver of Houston, Tex.
flies an airplane for diversion be-
tween dives.
Police were called at Flint to
evict indigent dogs which had taken
possession of a well-to-do dog's ken-
nel for sleeping purposes.
An Adriap farmer claims to hav.-
mortgaged his farm to buy teeth for
his divorced wife.
A Kalamazoo motorist, alaimed
by curious sounds in his engine, fi-
nally raised the hood and released
a cat.
. O, nothing extraordinary!
These old cranks that think mon-
ey is the root of all evil ought to be
happy now, since most of us are
leading a life with little or no evil.
An escaping burglar became
wedged in a Missouri chimney, with
no means of getting in touch with
counsel for a habeas corpus.
A man's talk shows up best alter
a good dinner.
Some people take steps for a di-
vorce at public dances.
Why is it that a large man alway-
takes a small woman seriously?
A chicken "that lays eggs an-i
crows" is held up for admiration In
a strange-as-it-seems column. Crow
of course are extremely hard to lay
Client: "What do you think of the
idea of giving the money back to
the bank and asking for a light
sentence?"
3u iMnttflrutm
raving, and if the other trips will conclude.
come up to this, happy days will
really have come again.
On the way back the driver of our
bus got sick so that it afforded me
the novel experience a driving a big
bus. Marx, who was sitting next to
me, felt reminiscent. He said that
he would have sung much better
but that he had had his mind off
and had been thinking about a
beautiful girl friend in Miami. I
wonder whom he meant?
Looking forward to a nice warm
bed and heavy blankets, I gladly
MOTHER
She traveled the journey
before you.
She has known all the
cost of the way,
She paid out the price to
its fullness
That Motherhood only
can pay.
She loved when the world
was against you.
She hoped when your
hope sank and died.
She clung to your hand
when the clinging
left scars in her heart
deep and wide.
She labored and loved
and was happy,
lor down deep in her
kind heart she knew
Your kindness and love
would repay her
Pot all that she did
just for you.
A. S. Shochet.
IDA SHOCHET
DIED 23RD OF TEBETH. 5688 (JANUARY 1 5. 1 928)
/>/ loving Rtmtmbmce Her CbUiren


Pig
Four
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Friday, January 20, 193 3.
Slabin g'imannrt IitUrtm 1
:
A
:
?
- +
: Vo) ,. MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 22, 1933. No. 6. t
^?????* 11 ft ^ tf1 ft t tf tt f t ttt 1H11 tt :: ??#
Edited by RABBI S. M. MACHTEI
Founder rid Director. Radio Synafoir of America
% Sunday Mornings_______________________WIOD, Miami, Florida i
MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 22, 1933.
Good and Evil
(Sermon delivered en Sunday. January is. 1933)
Scripture Reading, Genesis Chapter II, Verses \S-\7 Incl.
am very little concerned with theology. But, I am very much inter-
3 acted in religion. To a reasoning person to a student of religion
many problems must present themselves when studying the scriptures.
Certain parts must appear unreasonable. We shall endeavor, from time
lo time, to clear the mists and to pierce the veil with a ray of light from
Uie torch of Judaism. Judaism is compared to a torch from which other
tapers have been kindled but whose own light has not been diminished,
thereby, in the least. Other religions have had their origins in Judaism
and have grown away from it but the truth of the word of God,
through the prophets in Israel has not been diminished in the least. Juda-
ism is all-embracing and looks upon all true, moral religions as branches
of the same tree all reaching upward towards a common heaven and
bearing beneficial fruit for all the children of men.
ff>HIS thought has been beautifully expressed in a poem by Harry Ro-
1 maine:
At the Muezzin's call for prayer
The kneeling faithful thronged the square,
And on Pushkara's lofty height
The dark priest chanted Brahma's might.
Amid a monastery's weeds
An old Franciscan told his beads;
While to the synagogue there came
A Jew to praise Jehovah's name.
The one great God looked down and smiled,
And counted each his loving child;
For Turk and Brahmin, monk and Jew
Had reached Him through the gods they knew.
LET us try to understand our common Father. Chapter II, verse 17, of
Genesis reads, "But of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil,
thou shalt not eat of it; for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou
shall surely die." Notice that God does not say "I shall kill you." but He
says, 'thou shalt surely die." You wtjl become extinct. The word of God
states a consequence, a result of the act. Death, extinction, follows mans
eating of the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil. But. that
does not seem reasonable. God must be mistaken. Or is He a Parent with
a perverted sense? Just think of it. We spend money on the education
oi our children with the object of training them to become good men
and women. A parent who sends his child to college would be happy to
learn from the dean that his child had learned to distinguish good from
evil Why, that's almost perfection! Once you know the good from the
evil, it is easy to do the good and to shun the evil. Most of the difficulty
arises in being able to differentiate good from evil. The Bible tells us
that because Adam and Eve ate of the fruit of the tree of knowledge of
good and evil they were banished from the Garden of Eden. Life.for
them, ceased to be a paradise; that, as a result, death came to mankind.
It is clear that, at the outset, the holy scripBures depict God in an un-
favorable light. The God of the Hebrews must be cruel to have punished
Adam and Eve for a disobedience that resulted in such good to them.
Good? Why, just think of it! They learned to distinguish good from evil.
YES. and that was the beginning ol the end. On that day the degen-
eration of mankind began. "Thou shalt surely die." Yes. moral and
physical death is the result of our standard of good and evil. Our stand-
ard, not God's standard. Man was created in the image of God. Gods
standard is the rule of right and wrong-Just and unjust. Man. created
in the image and with the attributes of God, Is endowed With a sense, a
heavenly sense, of right and wrong. This standard permits promises, knows no reservations. A thing, an act. is cither right or wrong
Just or unjust. It cannot be both- But an act can be both good and evil.
IT is wrong to steal. It is right to return what you have borrowed. It is
1 right to pay your debts. It is wrong to murder. It is right to help an-
other in need. But. it is good to steal-for the th.ef because he Jthere-
by, increases his own possessions. It is good for him and evil for the one
who is robbed. It is bad for you to return what you have borrowed or to
pay what you owe because you. thereby, deprive yourself of money, or o
some comfort. It is evil in your personal point of view, though it is right
in principle. Though it is wrong to murder, it is good for you If you rid
yourself of an enemy who annoys you. Though it is right to help another
in time of need, it is bad for you because it requires a sacrifice on your
Congregation Bnai Israel will hold
regular services tonight with Rabbi
A. 8. Klelnfeld preaching a sermon
on Manhood." Saturday morning
services begin at 9 o'clock. Sunday
school at 10 a. m. Sunday and He-
brew school from 4 to 6 p. m. daily.
The building committee of Bnai
Israel has arranged a concert to be
given at the temple, Sunday. Janu-
ary 29, at 8 p. m. The committee
has been able to secure some very
high class talent and artists., and
assures all who will attend a very
enjoyable time.
The Judaic council will have their
next meeting at the Horowitz hotel,
Monday evening, January 23, at 8:15
o'clock.
The next meeting of the Young
Maccabees will be held at the home
of Shelby Trager, 1104 Twenty-
fourth avenue, north. Monday eve-
ning, January 23. at 7:30 o'clock.
Radio Synagog
Rabbi S. M. Machtei. founder and
director of the Radio Synagog. will
preach over WIOD at 10 o'clock on
Sunday morning on "God-Given
Children." In addition to the ser-
mon there will be prayers, music,
and a question box.
Why People
Go To Church
Some go to church just for a walk.
Some to stare and laugh and talk;
Some go there to meet a friend,
Some their idle time to spend,
Some for general observation,
Some for private speculation.
Some to seek or find a lover.
Some a courtship to discover;
Some go there to use their eyes,
And newest fashions criticise,
Some to show their own smart dress,
Some their neighbors to assess,
Some to scan a robe or bonnet,
Some to price the trimming on it,
Some to learn the latest news
That friends at home they may
amuse.
Some to gossip false and true.
Sale within the sheltering pew;
Some go there to please the squire.
Some his daughter to admire.
Some the parson go to fawn.
Some to lounge and some to yawn,
Some to claim the parish doles,
Some for bread and some for coals.
Some because it's thought genteel,
Some to vaunt their pious zeal,
Some to show how sweet they sing.
Some how loud their voices ring.
Some the preacher go to hear.
His style of voice to praise or jeer.
Some their sins to vanish o'er.
Some to sit and doze and nod.
But few to kneel and worship God.
Rev. J. S. Boughier.
p. S. The above is printed at the
request of many who heard it read
by Rabbi S. M. Machtei during last
Sunday's Radio Synagog Question
Box period.
Recipes for the
Jewish Family
our personal lives and in our international relationships. We live for our
good, and for the evil done our neighbors by our acts, we care not. You
can't expect life to be a Oarden of Eden under such conditions.
THE same, in some measure, Is true of religions and their various de-
nominations. We think only of our own our point of view. Each
to his people. Mine. My own. But "Who or my people?" I ask in the
words of Rosa Zagnonl Marlnonl:
My people? Who are they?
I went into the church where the congregation
Worshipped my God. Were they my people?
I felt no kinship to them as they knelt there.
My people! Where are they?
I went Into the land where I was born,
Where men spoke my language .
I was a stranger there.
"My people!" my soul cried, "who are my people?"
Last night in the rain I met an old man
Who spoke a language I do not speak.
Which marked him as one who does not know my God.
With apologetic smile he offered me
The shslter of his patched umbrella.
I met his eyes And then I knew.
Lebkuchen
Four eggs, one pound brown sug-
ar, one-eighth pound shredded cit-
ron, one-eighth pound shelled wal-
nuts ibroken), three and one-half
cups flour, one teaspoon baking
powder, two teaspoons cinnamon,
one-fourth teaspoon allspice.
Beat eggs and sugar well. Add cit-
ron, walnuts, flour, baking powder,
cinnamon and allspice. Spread
dough about one-half Inch thick
with well-floured hands. Use long
pans. Bake in moderate oven, then
cut in squares and spread with ic-
ing. Dry in cool stove or in the sun.
Tastes best when allowed to stand
for a week.
Cheese Bllntzes
One cup flour, one cup cold water,
two eggs (beaten), one-fourth tea-
spoon baking powder, one-half tea-
spoon salt, one egg. one and one-
half cups cottage cheese, salt and
pepper to taste.
Add salt and water to eggs iwell
beaten) and add flour slowly until
batter is smooth. Pour batter on
heated and greased iron pan. tip-
ping the pan on all sides to cover
bottom with thin layer of batter.
Bake one side only until the thin
cake blisters, then tip out in one
piece on board. Now mix the cheese,
egg, salt and pepper and place fill-
ing in center of each cake, folding
over opposite corners to form a rect-
angle or square. Fry both sides in
butter until golden brown. Serve
with powdered sugar, cinnamon, or
sour cream. Blintzes may also be
baked in oven for crispness.
Delaney & Beers
Kodak Finishing and Enlarging
Commercial Work and Home Portrait*
50% Off on All Amateur Work
212 N. E. 4th St. Phone 2-S38S
part. You must give up something that you
could use lor yourself. Good
and evil are not universal principles. They are persona ~nvenlences.
Right and wrong are universal standards Gods everlastag truth*
While a thing cannot be both right and wrong, it may be both good and
evil. Life affords us many examples of this difference in standard of good
and evil, depending on the persons affected. These are either right or
wrong in principle. They cannot be both-
CO long as mankind lives as created In God's image-by the Heavenly
0 standards of right and wrong. Just and unjust -manklndjj" "*
Vive; but when it substitutes the results of its eating of JtoftuMi fJ
tree of knowledge when it substitutes personal conveniences jof good
and evil for the universal, unequivocal truths of the Divine, standards,
right and wrong. Just and unjust-then, "thou shalt surely,dle^ The
substitution spells destruction and extinction for mankind. The Garden
of Eden ceases to be. Man takes himself out of Paradise Our presen
^te. nationally and internationally, is. irl my humble opinion.topt*
measure due to our neglect of the Divine truths of right and wrong in
led
IS YOUR
CHEAPEST
SERVANT
tUeitt

DR. CHAS. BECKWITT
OPTOMETRIST
"22 Years in Miami"
pMPM<,
To See 1- Ta Dalieve
Did you know ...
The rnont important thing In select-
ing your eye doctor In ronnidering his
experience and reputation?
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January 20, 1933.
E -JE_^ISH FLORIDIAN
Page Five
"Sweet Water of Megiddo"
Lag Bo'omer Scenes in Palestine
By RABBI LAZARUS AXELROD
Rabbi Trustees
& Congregation
By DAVID A. BROWN
ntinued from Last Week)
Remaining
in second gear, the
six roared and tore its way
Gnfully up the steep slopes that
L to Safed and Miron, the reced-
Kinereth gradually fading into
L cnificance behind the crags and
Eg, of Galilee. There was a tern-
ary lull in the conversation. The
[orily passenger had ceased brood-
jnc over her young across the her-
Lng pond, the agronomist was over-
Led by the towering hills in the
[dance, and even the voluble jour-
2iist had given the English prep-
ositions a rest. Passing scenery leads
L. to meditation, and I fell to
[.using on the quaint custom of cel-
[brating the aniversary of Simeon
tar Jochai on Lag Bo'Omer, the
(forty-third day of Omer.
Hilluloh Dbar Jochai, it is called
...:.. and is an event of the year,
ver seven thousand Jews making
[he pilgrimage to Mlron every year.
Children who have attained their
Ihird birthday are brought here to
lave their locks shorn at the tomb
ihe creator of the Zohar, who,
tith his son Eleazar. remained en-
:mbed in a cave for 24 years, ex-
iting on carob beans and water
om a neighboring spring. Seven
thousand enthusiasts pay annual
Ir.bute and homage to this immor-
}.: soul, one of the greatest of Tan-
ka.m. whose body lies interred in
Kiron. the final resting place of
hundreds of Tannaim, including
Bid the prince, and Shammai. his
krj opponent in Mishnaic debate, i
k-.th their train of devoted disciples.
Sated, a multitudinous gathering
\'. Jews, jostling and chattering, ef- *
I nesting with childish impatience,
laser to dispense with the last 10
riles of the pilgrimage. Safed, that
Irelustoric city, where over a thous-
and lives were lost in a disastrous
lutbquake not more than a century
ho. the fragile structures toppling
per each other, hurling their occu-
nts to a terrible death.
"I'nirty minutes later, the Dodge
fcame to rest in Miron. Our first
i fenpu of this remote and insig-
fc.ncant village was one of two
ptewashed buildings standing out
-ainst a black background. As we
Brew near, the buildings assumed a
nore distinct shape, a massive sign
oarc.greets the visitor -"YeshiV-
ith Simeon Bar Jochai"-the rab-
a.nical school of the learned sage
^nd the "Moshab Zekanim," home
or the aged. We pass on through
M binding path and find ourselves
n a small unassuming shtibel, a
e:ic of former days when the syna-
;cgue among Jews was the club-
house, the social center and the rec-
eation ground of its members. No
minister preached from its pulpit;
io cantor filled its space with his
ted renderings of the most
: autiful selections of our liturgy.
petty rivalry existed as to the
pectlve offices of the synagog. A
imple, homely institution, a Shtibel.
where its members met three times
i day to pray, to discuss politics,
-heir troubles and the fate of their
-hildren across the waters in the
and of the heathen.
The second building was a true
specimen of an ancient mausoleum.
Tall, stately, black with age and
with turrets running along its sides,
it could be easily distinguished from
its neighbor, inside this edifice
.vhere the bodies of Rabbi Simeon
nd his son Eleazar are interred, a
Sephardic Shammas greeted us
.ith numerous bows and oily ges-
.ures, spreading out the palms of
Is hands in gleeful expectancy of
handsome remuneration from
such an opulent group. In this
uilding. there is another Yeshiva, a
Sephardic school of learning. We
ntered this sanctum, and disco' -
red a group of Sephardim squatting
;ii the ground, reclining leisure';-
imidst luxurious carpets and rug;,
perusing huge volumes of Maimon-
di's to the tune of eastern melodies.
Their sing song reminded me
trongly of the muezzin call, as the
Arab Shammas stands on the para-
pet wall of the minaret, and calls
his flock to piayer at eventide:
Ireary, creepy and monotonous. We
wander further, and suddenly, with
.aits that beat a little faster, we
:ame upon the most important fea-
ture of this awesome mausoleum, a
sight at once inspiring and sooth-
ing, the tomb of the venerable sage
and master Kabbalist. Rabbi Simeon
Bar Jochai.
(To Be Continued)
Reprint American Hebrew
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TALMUD TORAH BENEFIT BALL
Wednesday, Jan. 25, at 9 p. m.
at the
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BISCAYNE BLVD. AT 14TH ST.
it has been said of me (and with
.ome truth! that I have a more in-
timate acquaintance with the rab-
binate than any other layman In
he country. This, in a measure, is
due to those activities I have been
engaged in, during the past 20 years
which have impelled me to every
eetion of the country east and
west, north and south crossing the
continent some 15 or 16 times in
that period.
In this work the rabbi has played
in important part, and I have often
been compelled to lean upon him as
my mainstay in an emergency. Oth-
er work has brought me into con-
tact with the trustees. I have work-
ed with them, talked to them and
at them, have been rough with
them, and in turn, have been treat-
ed rather roughly by them. Congre-
gations I have come to know from
my intimate contacts with the in-
dividual members. I have had the
privilege of addressing congrega-
tions of all groups: Orthodox, Con-
: servative, Reform, and have ad-
I dressedthem with a hat, without a
hat, and with a hat and tails. With
this background, I might well qual-
I ify in any court of the land as an
expert lay witness on the subject
matter of this brief article.
Upon numerous occasions, and
j particularly within the past four or
five years. I have had dinned into
I my ears complaints by the rabbi
about his board of trustees and his
: congregation; by the board of trus-
j .re.s about the rabbi and the COO-
regation; by the members of the
congregation about the trustees and
the rabbi. These complaints are
:eneral in character.
The Rabbi
By the rabbi: that the trustees
forget that the synagogue is a re-
ligious institution and he. the rabbi,
its spiritual leader. That there is
too much cold blooded business
mixed up with the activities of the
board. That he is not free to say
what he pleases when he pleases.
That he is compelled to speak from
a censored pulpit. That his position
at times is a precarious one, being
lected from year to your and apt
;o be thrown into the discard with-
out too much warning.
He complains about his congrega-
ion: He is only sure of a full con-
regation on the high holidays, the
;alance of the year, although he
may plead and scold, his congrega-
tion is limited to a mere handful of
he very religious or those who come
for special reasons or upon a spe-
.ial occasion. Instead of being the
spiritual leader, he finds himself the
spiritual "shamos." His sermons
rarely ever please all of the congre-
gation. His voice lacks coloring. His
subjects are too religious or too
spectacular. They have heard bet-
ter sermons, much better, by Rabbi
So-and-So, and So-and-So.
All of which comes to the rabbi
from confiding friends who tell him
the choiee morsels of gossip that
the congregation is indulging in on-
ly because they are his friends and
think he ought to know.
Trustees
The trustees have their stock of
complaints: The rabbi does not hold
the interest of the congregation. He
is only a fair preacher and not
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VI \MI BEACH
Phone 5-3989
A Place to Dine
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much of a teacher. As a business
man, he would starve to death. We
would get rid of him, if we could.
He has outlived his usefulness to
this congregation, but has been with
us so long that we don't like to hurt
him.
As for the congregation, the trus-
tees would like to know what they
want for their few dollars. Services
throughout the year. Sabbath and
Sunday schools for their children,
the use of the temple or the syna-
gogue for every conceivable func-
tion. But when it comes to reliev-
ing the trustees of their financial
burden, with an exception here and
there, the congregants are Just not
interested. It's a thankless task at
best, time consuming and costly.
Congregation
And now come the members of
the congregation, and their com-
plaints are no less numerous: Proud
of i heir place of worship, their Sab-
bath school, their center building.
But they cost too much money. The
mortgage is eating us up. Support-
ing religious institutions is an ex-
pensive luxury what with member-
ship fees, costs of seats and other
incidental taxes and assessments
that are piled upon us from time
.o time. It would be much cheaper
to withdraw and just buy seats for
the holy days. The board of trus-
tees must think we are made of
money. They operate as though we
were a closed corporation. To get
on the board you have to have a
blood test to trace your ancestry and
where you were born. If some of
them would only resign and give
the rest of us a chance we would
show them how to run a religious
institution. And as for the rabbi,
you can get as many opinions as
there are members in the congrega-
tion:
His sermons are too long. Why
doesn't he give us something snappy
once in a while? The rabbi's duty
is to preach the Word of God. The
pulpit is no place for politics or
book reviews. What we want is re-
ligion, unadulterated. If the rabbi
would only stop preaching about
anti-Semitism. The rabbi is a Zion-
ist. The rabbi is not a Zionist. Why
should the rabbi get two months'
vacation? How come he goes to
Europe every year? The rabbi is too
old. The rabbi is too young. Why
doesn't the rabbi get married? What
right has a rabbi to live like a
priest? Have you heard about the
rabbi? (Then follows a whispered
conversation.) You don't say so! I
would never believe it. You would
think butter couldn't melt in his
mouth. If his wife would only stop
butting in. I wonder if she thinks
we can't run our women's organiza-
tion without her having to tell us
what we should do all the time?
The rabbi is just a darling. He plays
a fine game of golf, and as a story
teller none of the men has anything
on him. He's a good sport. He's a
man among men. That he tells his
stories in the presence of ladles,
well, the rabbi is a human being,
too.
What Is tne Solution?
One would conclude from the
above recital that all is not well
with the forces that make up the
religious institutions in this coun-
try. But not to paint the other side
of the picture would be unfair, even
though the purpose of this article is
to present the disturbing factors
that enter into the congregational
life of our religious organizations
and possibly offer a solution.
Throughout the country there are
many congregations that enjoy, if
not a perfect relationship, at least
as fine a one as is possible, when
you consider that a congregation Is
composed of many types and kinds
of people. And it is because I know
many of these congregations in a
rather intimate way that I dare to
venture "where Angels fear to
tread."
All of our religious organizations
have practically the same structure.
If I were to draw a chart, I would
place the president at the head, to
the left of him the board of trus-
tees, to the right the rabbi, and di-
rectly underneath, the congregation.
If this were to take form, it would
look like a pyramid, with the con-
gregation supporting the rabbi, the
trustees and the president.
Leadership is just as essential in
a religious institution as it Is in any
successful enterprise, whether it be
commercial, political or social. Good
leadership makes for perfect coor-
dination and an harmonious whole.
Therefore it is essential in selecting
the president of a temple, that he
possess those qualities of leadership
as are befitting in the head of a re-
! ligious institution. Being merely a
good business man. or being weal-
I thy, or having plenty of time, none
of these in itself is sufficient. Pri-
marily, he must be a religious man
1 religious in the truest sense of
' the word. In addition he must have
I ability to organize. He must be wil-
j ling to make the sacrifice of time
that an office of this nature de-
mands. Each member of the board
must have the potentialities of a
president. They should be the "pick"
of your congregation, men of char-
acter, men with a fine religious
background. They too must be
ready to make such sacrifice of time
as may be necessary in the interest
of the temple or synagogue.
Tne board of trustees should be
broad enough to permit the rabbi to
be an ex-officio member. He should
be invited at all times to participate
in the discussions of the board, for
(Continued on Next Pa*e)
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Page Six
THE ifwiSH FLORIPIAN
Friday, January ^a,^

J
I
the rabbi from his close contact
with the congregation and the fam-
ilies of the congregants, may give
the board the benefit of his direct
knowledge, also so that he in turn
may be in touch with all phases of
the organization of which he is an
Important part.
No board of trustees should be
self-perpetuating. There should be
constant rotation among the mem-
bers on the board. Nor should any
president no matter how good
be permitted to hold office for too
long a time. The board should be
composed of men and women,
wherever this is possible, and where
it is not, such women's organiza-
tions as are affiliated with the syn-
agogue should be consulted on all
major matters affecting the congre-
gation. Members of the congrega-
tion should be specially invited from
time to time, to sit in at board
meetings so that in the course of
the year, the entire membership of
the congregation will have been able
to participate actively in the man-
agement of the congregation's ac-
tivities.
At least once every year, there
should be an open meeting of the
board to which members of the con-
gregation should be invited. This
in addition to the annual meeting
when formal reports are presented
and the election of officers, etc.,
takes place. This open meeting of
the board should be dedicated, first,
to the transaction of the business at
hand and, second, to holding an op-
en forum.
Relationship of Board and Rabbi
The relationship of the board to
the rabbi must be one of complete |
confidence. He must be looked upon
as the spiritual leader and must be j
accorded full respect at all times, i
He should be given a free hand in
the conduct of the religious activi- |
ties of the congregation, and per- j
mitted freedom of speech. To ex-
pect the best from a rabbi, the I
board must give him their best. A
rabbi cannot give his best unless he ;
is given the time to do so. If you
want him to be a good preacher, i
you must give him full opportunity i
to prepare his sermons. This means |
time for research. Time for reading.
Time for thought.
If you expect him to be a good
teacher, he must have time to plan
and prepare his program. Time for
conferences with his assistants and
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Telephones 2-4S25. 2-9197, 2-9805
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lis teachers. He must have time to
visit the classes.
You must give him time, if you
expect him to properly prepare your
children for confirmation or "bar
mitzvah." You expect him to play
a part in the life of the congrega-
tion upon occasions of Joy or sor-
row. You expect him to meet with
you socially. But you must make it
possible for him to do all of this.
even though it may mean having to
furnish him with assistants to take
care of the grinding details that
come into every rabbi's life.
It is true that the rabbi is human
and must be treated as a human
being with his physical limitations
oi time. The rabbi has a responsi-
bility not only toward the congrega-
| tion which he heads, but to the
j community in which he functions.
| The mantle of leadership is auto-
| matically placed upon his shoulders
and he must lead In such a manner
I as will redound to the credit of his
congregation, to the Jews as a whole
and to his citieznship in particular.
It is expected of the rabbi that he
shall play his full part in the re-
'igious, social and civic life of the
community. As the religious leader,
he must so conduct himself at all
times that no breath of scandal or
suspicion shall ever fall upon him.
There is no place in the rabbinate
for the pawing, mauling, kissing
rabbi. There is no place in the rab-
binate for the vulgar story-telling,
wisecracking, smart-aleck rabbi, not
even in the presence of his inti-
mates, let alone in the presence of
women, should he be other than
a clean minded, clean mouthed
man. A religious leader In every
sense of the word. To be respected,
one must first respect himself. Many
B rabbi has lost his hold on his
congregation by a? times forgetting
that he is the rabbi. They may at
first laugh with him, and then laugh
it him.
Wherever you find a fine rabbi, a
real spiritual force, look for a fine
congregation, a religious congrega-
tlon, a congregation that is a power
for good in its community. A rabbi
should be unafiaid. There is no re-
spect for the coward in the pulpit.
It is better for his own well being
and for the peace of his soul that
he maintain the right to speak his
mind than to be a mere job holder,
drawing a salary.
It should not be expected of the
rabbi to perform miracles. It is his
duty to be the peace-maker, to be
the friend, to bring contending for-
ces together and to at all times be
for the congregation and with the
congregation. As a leader he must
not be led. And his leadership
hould not be confined to the pres-
ident of the congregation and the
board of trustees, but to the men
and women, boys and girls who
make up his congregation. He
should at all times be a shining ex-
ample to the youth within his con-
gregation. He should find time to
play, to be part of the life of his
congregation. He should stand with
the board of trustees in presenting
the needs of the congregation. He
should always be ready to instill in-
to the minds and the hearts of his
congregants that they should give
In proportion to their means for the
j religious efforts conducted by the
' congregation.
Thank God. there are many rab-
bis and many congregations in this
: country who meet in the essentials
the requirements that make for a
wholesome, sane, sound, religious
congregation.
Additional
Gloom Chaser
SOCIETC
r
> : : : : : : : > : -: : : : : -. : : : > *.;. .
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Do You Want STRICTLY
KOSHER Meats and Poultry?
Patronize
I Satinet's Kosher Market
t '37 WASHINGTON AVENl'E. MIAMI BEACH
A Complete Line of Strictly Kosher
Meats and Fresh Killed Poultry
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An invitation is extended every Jew to personally in-
spect our store to convince himself that every precau-
tion to insure Kosher Products is strictly adhered to.
The seventh regional conference
of Hadassah will be held in Savan-
nah. Ga.. on Sunday and Monday.
February 12-13. both the senior and
junior organizations meeting at the
same time. Business sessions will be
held separately of each organiza-
tion, though the social affairs in-
cluding the concluding banquet ai"d
dance will be Joint affairs. Special
rates have been arranged for the
benefit of those wishing to attend
Delegates will be elected by the jun-
ior Miami organization at the next
meeting on January 30, at a place
which will be announced in oui
next issue. Those desiring to attend
even though not delegates, are urged
to communicate with Miss Lena
Wcinkle. phone 2-7185.
At the joint Hadassah ball last
week those providing entertainment
were Milt Trager, Al Parker and
Chester Alexander. Leo Ackerman
was master of ceremonies. In charge
of arrangements for the Senior Ha-
dassah was a committee headed by
Mrs. Alex Goldstein. Representing
the Junior Hadassah were Sylvia
Miles. Goldie Elman. Lillian Melcli-
er. Bea Silver. Dora Rasenhou.se and
Jennie Rotfort.
o
The local A.Z.A. chapter is spon-
soring a February frolic on Sunday
evening. February 12. for the bene-
fit of the organization. A popularity
contest to choose Miami's mast pop-
ular Jewish girl will be conducted
and votes will be sold at one cent
each. The winner of the contest
will choose a male companion and
a mock marriage will be performed.
Tickets to admit a couple will be
only 50 cents. Entertainment will be-
provided.

Temple Israel Sisterhood will cel-
ebrate its annual birthday anniver-
sary with a bridge luncheon at the
Blackstone hotel. Monday. February
6. at 12:30 p. m. In charge of ar-
rangements is a committee headed
by Mrs. J. A. Richter.

Eeth Jacob Sisterhood is sponsor-
ing its annual dance on Tuesday
VI ning. January 31. at the ballroom
I 1 the beautiful Pier. Miami Beach.
A special floor show is to be pre-
enb d and every effort to make this
an evening of outstanding enter-
ainment will be made. Mrs. Sam
3ohen is chairman of the commit-
ee in charge of arrangements.
Leary: "Is tnat fellow McFa11 aI1
right to take on a fishing trip?"
Wyse: "Is he? Say, besides doing
the cooking he'll think up lies for
the whole bunch."
Boise: "Did you see that pedes-
trian who was struck by the auto
dare the driver to try it again?"
Noyce: "No: did the autoist take
up the challenge?"
Boise: "No. He said it nearly
broke his heart to pass up the
chance, but he had to meet a train."
Billswiggle: "I suppose in these
times you live in apprehensive trep-
idation, don't you?"
Dinklesproof: "No. I live in the
suburbs."
Bricklayer first day on job':
"Guess I can't work here there's
no place to park my auto."
Boss: "No. you won't do. We can
only Dae bricklayers who have their
own chauffeurs."
"How did the detectives dlscovei
that the gangster was disguised ai
a woman?"
"He passed a milliner's window
without looking In."
Lawyer: "Rotten! How would yor
be able to pay me then?"
The use of profanity at bull fights
will bring immediate arrest and im-
prisonment, according to an edict
issued by Mexico's chief of police.
But I understand that the bull, be-
fore dying, will be permitted to say
"O. pshaw!"
What's the News Today?
O. nothing extraordinary.
A hen at Rickey. Oregon, laid a
purple egg.
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CHIROPODIST
HALCYON ARCADE
noor, Opp. Olympia n
Phone 3-30S9
A man at Owensville, Indian,?
eaten 26.280 eggs in t**
years, six eggs a day.
A Washington dispatch on .
Eastern affairs reveals that j.J*
Pounced "Rey-Hoi." which 1
ly alters an earlier conception J
it might be "Chumley." "*
A $15,000 jeweled egg ta lnc,,
in a collection of Romanoff ^
now on show. The goose that 2
It, however, is no longer of 2
world.
Pike's Peak's recent loss in .
ure is now attributed to the iisi.
pearance of an ice cap. ifs a m
world, where even mountains
collegiate.
The dispatch further states tlw
the hog has been invited to attend
a night club as the guest of honor
but will investigate the repuutm
of the place before accepting.
There is probably no foundatict
for the rumor that if the appm.
ances of this personality are
cessful Patty Arbuckle may attempt
another comeback.
It pays to advertise in The Jeinsr.
Ploridian.
NEW 7th
AVE. THEATRE
30SS N. W. 7th Ave. Phone 2ISS
Sunday and Monday, Jan. 22-21
F'NNIK HI'RST'S
"SYMPHONY
SIX MILLION'
with
Irene Dunne Ricardo Cortn
A human story ... life's laughter..
life's hopes written into an im-
perishable soni' of love.
Box Office Opens 5.IS
Adults 20c Children lie

THE,
Maccabees
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A Human Institution
Only Five Insurance Companies as Strong as the Maccabees
Over One Million Dollars in the Relief Fund
Homes for Aged Without Cost to Members
W ntcs .ill of the usual forms of Certificates on Men and Women
on a Legal Reserve Basis $1,000 to $100,000
All Certificates have Special Accidental Clauses and
Total and Permanent Disability Benefits
JUNIOR CERTIFICATES
Ordinary Life
Twenty Payment I ife
Twenty Year Endowment
Educational Annuity
Single Premium AH Policies Participating
All Junior Certificates Pay Full Benefits at Age Four
Special Framing for Children in Music, Dancing and
Dramatic Art Free
A. M. COFFIN
State Manager
226 Seybold Building : Phone 3-2618


Full Text
Page Two
THE JEWISH FLORIPIAN
Friday, January 20. 193,
Finally hitting their winning
stride, the Hebrew Athletic club,
with a large and enthusiastic crowd
cheering them along, trouncea the
St. Pats in a cage tilt at Flamineo
Park Monday night. The score was
39 to 15.
With the Jewish boys hitting the
hoop consistently and presenting a
well played offensive, they had no
trouble in piling up an early lead
which was held without trouble
throughout the game.
Sam Bornsteln, center, who comes
from where basketball is played all
the time, is a welcome addition to
the team as is Joe Davis, rangy
guard from orackerland. The local
bilya on the team are the Grossman
brothers. Izzie Schwartz, and Al
Reisman.
Ralph Grossman led his team-
mate.- in scoring with 14 points fol-
lowed by Bornstein with 11 and Al
Grossman with eight points.
Coach Art Webb is getting his
squad into shape and more men will
be added next week. The next con-
tesl will be held at Flamingo Park
Monday evening at 8 p. m. sharp.
To Anna Appel. middle-aged star
of the Yiddish Art theatre, fame is
something more than electric lights
and the trumpeting of her name.
For 15 years she has appeared at
the head of one of the most select
group of stage artists in the world.
With the Yiddish Art theatre she
seldom seen her name displayed
in glaring electric bulbs.
They do not do things like that
1 serious theatre, and Anna Ap-
pel is serious.
Miss Appel was born in Buchar-
est. Roumania. At 14 with her par-
ents she emigrated from the old
world to Canada. At 15 .she was
playing in a Montreal stock com-
pany in a series ol classical plays.
Her New York debut was with
Jacob Adler in a series of plays by
Tolstoi and later with Rudolph
lldkraut. Then, lor 15 years she
played steadily with the Yiddish
Art theatre.
"Symphony of Six Million" is her
motion picture venture in Am-
a, although she made a silent
film in Vienna.
Appearing with her is Ratoff. a
Jewish actor of note, having per-
formed for many years abroad and
.. number of years with the Yid-
dish Art theatre where he estab-
lished a unique reputation for char-
acterization.
Both of these artists had persist-
ently refused to appear in films but
were eventually induced to make
their debut because of the human
theme of the story which was writ-
ten by Fannie Hurst.
"Symphony of Six Million," which
will appear at the Seventh Avenue
theatre this coming Sunday, is a
human interest saga of New York's
Jewish Fast side and lolls the pow-
erful dramatic story of a doctor torn
between the sufferings of his people
and the human urge lor wealth. It
: 1 thrilling story of Jewish life.

Members of Beth David choir who
assist at the late Friday night ser-
vices are Mesdames Charles Marko-
witz. William Weintraub. Albert
Dubbin. Edward Friedman. William
Friedman and the Misses Rosalyn
Daum and Rosalyn Bader.

The physical culture class under
the direction of Mrs. Bertha Berko-
witch Levy meets every morning
from 9 to 10:30 In the tennis courts
of MY.s. Joseph N. Morris. All are
invited to join this class, whose pro-
ceeds are devoted exclusively to the
work of the Jewish Welfare bureau.
A benefit bridge for the ladies'
auxiliary of the Jewish Welfare bu-
reau will be held at the Blackstone
hotel. Miami Beach. Friday after-
noon, February 3. beginning at 2 o'-
clock. Mrs. Isidor Cohen is chairman
of the committee in charge.

With Norma Shearer as its .star,
and one of the most brilliant sup-
porting casts yet assembled for the
speaking screen. Metro-Goldwyn-
Mayer's lavish production of "Smil-
in' Through" will play Sunday.
Monday and Tuesday at the Tivoh
theatre.
Mis.s shearer in the feminine lead
follows in the loot.steps of Jane
Cowl, who achieved one of her
reatest successes in the record-
n .iking New York stage run of the
play from which the screen produc-
ion was adapted. Opposite her is
. drlc March, borrowed from Par-
1 mount to play the dual role of Jer-
my Wayne in the mid-Victorian
luences of the story and Kenneth
Wayne. his son. in the modern
C( lies
Leslie Howard and O. P. Heggie,
who left the screen to fulfill stage
ngagements on Broadway during
he past season, were brought back
o Hollywood to add further lustre
Mis.- Shearers cast.
'Smilin' Through" is the story of
an old man who seek to shed the
.elentless bitterness of his blighted
romance on a pair ol young lovers.
the colorful background provides a
contrast between the England of
68 and modern days.

Ci ming to Miami some years ago,
.ir. H. Samet and .1 E, Samet, his
en, first opened under the name ol
Samet's" at Miami Beach or. No-
ember Jli. 1!29. and since that time
lave established an enviable repu-
ItlOH lor tan dealing and clean
lusiness Al all times insisting upon
the handling ol only strictly kosher
a atl SSI 1.. "Samet's l-.a- In< OR1I
ynonymous with "kashrus." Ac-
eding to the request ol a large
lumber ol their customers and pa-
'ons, "Samet's" will today open
:: kO tier meat and poult! de-
rtment in their attractive and
oua store at 737 Washington
venue, Miami Beach where they
vlll be happy to welcome all who
upon strict adherence to all
cuirements which insures kosher
m ats and poultry. The meat de-
iitment will be closed on Satur-
lays and every Jewish holiday Mr
Frost of Bradley Beach. N. J. will
. 1 in charge of the meat depart-
ment, and has had a long experi-
nce m this line in a number of
..< minent tourist cltli

Mr. and Mrs. I. Kwart are being
ongratulated upon the birth of a
ally daughter at the Jackson Mem-
orial hospital last week. Mother and
!:aby arc now at home and are do-
Ing nicely. The little girl was named
Mashe Yocheved.
With Mrs. I. Buckstoin. its pres-
Ident, as hostess, the ladies' auxil-
iary of the Miami Jewish orthodox
congregation will entertain its mem-
bers and friends at a "social" next
Tuesday evening, January 24. at the
'-ynagog. A program of entertain-
ment will be presented and refresh-
ments will be served. The public is
nvited to attend.

As we go to press the Women's
club of the Workmen's circle ls
sponsoring a concert for the benefit
of the tool campaign for the Jews of
eastern Europe with the noted art-
ists. Al Harris. Maxine Brodin and
Zelda Zlatin appearing on the pro-
APPEARING AT T1VOI.I
THEATRE THIS WEEK

are well on their way to lose more and Mr. Brown of Brooklyn. pron,
couples before that point is reached, inent members of Beth Jacob con
gregation, and Sam Steiner. 0f Chi
cago. 111.
presidents of every Jewish worn- > ( (
en's organization in Miami have
been named on the Jewish Welfare A large crowd attended the Bar
Ball committee by Mrs. Bertha B. Mltevah of Robert Kurland of w
Lew chairman of the annual Wei- York last Saturday morning at Beth
fare ball in addition to the mem- Jacob synagogue. Rabbi Axelrod de.
bera already serving. "vered a "*t exhortation m
English to the confirmant. denyine
the existing theory that the Ba'
Max Goebel, noted Jewish actor Mitzvah ceremony in this count-
and playwright, Is spending a vaca- u nothing more than a theatrical
,. al Miaim Beach to recuperate act
from las recent illness. Goebel 1- .
nationally known on the Yid- Near,y 100 ^.^ nw
dish stage and a number of his ad- rJ ^ Beth Jacob g
,,,. are arranging a reception mee|> cvery Simday at ^ **
' Services for the children are iclud.
ed in the weekly assembly, which u
thoroughly enjoyed by all.
NORMA SHEARER-
jram which is part ol a national
oncert tour.
The ladies' auxiliary ol the Miami
Jewish orthodox congregation held
one of its regular card parties at
the synagog last Tuesday night with
Mesdames a. Daum and Charles
Feldman as the hostesses. Individ-
ual prizes were awarded to the high-
est score at each table and Mrs.
Rosenblum of Butler. Pa., was
awarded the door prize,
a
The annual Charity ball ol tl
Jewish Welfare bureau to raise
funds to carry on Us work will be
-mn this year at the beautiful
Ploridian hotel at Miami Beach. The
affair, which will take the form ol a
SUpper dance tins year, has lor the
:.,] year- been om ol the
UtStanding events Ol the social -ca-
ll, and will be held on Sunday
venitlg, March 12. All local .lew -
: h organizations are cooperating to
make this affair an outstanding
.inces.-.

1 ical : 1 lends and members
Workmen's circle are sponsoring a
leception In honor o: Max Goebel,
noted Jewish playwright an.;
this coming Sunday evening
ary 22. at tin- Workmen's circle hall
i 701 N. w. Fifth avenue, beginning
" h-30. a program will be pn ei ted
and refreshments' will be served.
Ublic 1- united.
1 hortly.
0
At a well attended meeting ol the
ladies' auxiliary ol the Jewish Wel-
i.irc bureau held Monday afternoon
at Kaplan hall, Mrs. Meyer
Schwartz, prominent communal
worker ol this city, was unanimous-
ly elected president. Mrs. Herbert
K Kleminan was elected first vice
president, and Mrs. Harry Isaac-.
second vice president These were
chosen to iill vacancies which re-
sulted because ol several recent res-
ignations. Mrs. Lena Simon was
elected publicity chairman. Mrs.
Sadye G. Rose, executive secretary
ol the Jewish Welfare bureau, told
ol the ca.-e- arising daily and urged
continued efforts to raise funds 10
cany on the work ol relief. A social
our followed.

1 nleers recently elected by the
al Bnai Britli lodge will be in-
stalled at a public ceremony at Hi Ul
David Talmud Torah hall on sun-
laj evening. Januarj 29, beginning
at 8 p. 111. A splendid program will
be presented in addition to the us-
ual impressive Bnai Brith ritual.
public 1- Invited to attend. No
charges ol any kind will be made
and refreshments will be served
It pays to advertise in Tin
Fiorldian.
93
Watch For
"The Inside
Story'
Revelations of
Greater Miami
Jewish Life ...
Kashrus...
S\na^ogs...
Cemetery ...
Talmud Torahs ...
AND?...
Coming Soon
The Hebrew Athletic club held
rid of a series ol card par-
tie- lor the benefit ol Its cnmmun-
i' litre building nind last Sun-
Quite a large number of
guests attended and enjoyed a very
delightlul evening. Refreshments
'.....ved by the committee In
chargi Prizes were won by Mi
ii' 1 Rajmond Main. M.
Evcrj night is a bin night at the Manowitz and L. Spiegelman.
talkathon contest and the Increas-
d attendance is due to the efforts
I Jack Negley, mastei ol ceremon-
nd the contestants, as well as
lie floor shows from the various
night club.-.
Recent visitors at Miami Beach
include 1 Brenni r, ol Cli veland, o..
>*::::::::::::: : :. .
;. ln-nt on row Grocer Klvlni roa
The Silver Slipper. Bagdad club, *
Moulin Rouge and Pier have pre- % NEW VOItK ,5' < AKK
::
sented their star talent to packed $
houses and made it necessary lor :
the management to install 500 new *
bleacher seats.
The McGreevys, Blllle and Mai
Jack Norton, the singing cowboy;
Christine Christy, the flame of the
Walkathon; Collapsible Neil Cappy.
the loose-legged hoofer; Waltei
Morris. Jack Montgomery. Johnny
McKay and Eric Weibe. son
supreme; Mickey Sinclair and Eve
Whitmer, super strutters; Jack Kel-
ley, the Stanley Laurel of the walk-
er.-: June Evans, queen 01 hula
dancers; Bernard Shapoll and Pern
Tracy, tap dancers, and the Smiths.
Jerry and Frances, in then wait/
numbers, and Millie Rosen, the
whistling sensation, are all among
the contestants
The walkers, now thinned down
to 16 couples and three solos, have
passed the 400-hour mark and are
nearing the 500, which means they
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PAGE 1

^Jewish Tlcridiar LORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY^ JANUARY 27, 1933. Price Five Cents [THE PROPHET m our MIDST MARGARET ISABEL LAWRENCE All through history it has been he people of romance who have ten truth to other people. For only people of romance can carry the feeling of truth to other people. Or uch ttipir imaginations with Its nystery. It was the feeling of a man crucifor his God-like spirit that aught the western people and made |bem followers of his name. The teat awful tragedy of the crucifixion told by men of passionate Heaic capacity for feeling and telling louched the imaginations of emlerors and rulers. So, it remained the world. But the people to thorn the Crucified had belonged Lere turned upon by the others, thich was a far more awful tragm. Jews have suffered in silence, folding themselves in part in the jiritual consolation of their own acred teachings, and in other part (ithin the intellectualism of their atures. The story of the persecution was never told In the writings |hat Gentiles could read. Now. it is King told in the languages of the lersecutors by Jews of passionate apacity to feel and tell. It will retain, and have effect in the world, Ihough the imaginations of emperprs and rulers are not so necessary i they once were. His publishers insist, on the covers of his books, that Ludwig Lewiohn speaks to the Jews. They quote Members of the rabbinate saying so. Certainly Jews read what he writes. put they do not need to. It Is the ientile who does. And many Gentles are reading him, and feeling pious stirrings within themselves. for no Gentile with any spiritual Sensitivity, or any susceptibility to |he dramatic pull of history can espe in reading him that acutely mpersonal sorrow which is at the tinning of truth. Gentiles, educated and uneducatalike. do not know what they ave done to Jews. The business of Christian civilization, with its wars its nationalistic and economic Gumptions, Is a kaleidescopic panjrama with which even the most pert cannot keep mental pace. Unfa a story is forced upon the imfcmation it is missed, and peculiar perited, utterly unreasonable noJons about strange people can connue like weeds. Jews have lived •tiently beside Christians, either In Nf racial pride, or in affable as|e cynicism born out of observation that the most advantageous f ethod of getting along with Genes %as to make them feel compiable about themselves. Which Mainly never would Include reminding them of things, or asking Ni pointed questions at a not FV propitious time. I Lewisohn asks no questions whatP r of the Gentile, but he does a Temple Israel Sponsor Concert One of the outstanding events of the current season will be the concert sponsored by Temple Israel Sisterhood on Monday evening, January 30, beginning at 8:15 o'clock in the main auditorium of the temple. It will be directed by Hannah Spiro Asher, one of the leading musicians of the Greater Miami territory, famed as a pianlste and now a member of the faculty of the University of Miami conservatory of music. Other noted artists of the musical world will appear during the evening. A reception will be held following the concert. In charge of arrangements is a committee headed by Mrs. I. L. Rosendorf as chairman, and Mesdames Morris Cowen. Henry D. Williams and W. I. Magid. The public is invited to attend. Throngs Attend Annual Dance One of the largest crowds of the season attended the Talmud Torah benefit dance sponsored by the ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation last Wednesday night at the Mahi Shrine temple. The hall was beautifully decorated and at one end there were tables laden with goodies to be sold for the benefit of the Talmud Torah fund. A program of entertainment was presented during the evening featuring Chester Alexander. Irma Davis and Hope Parker of the Club Bagdad. Al Parker of the Silver Slipper, Betty Jane Lanzer, Albert Robertson and Betty Ganger of the Danny Sheehan school of dancing and numbers through the courtesy of Billy Buller. Danny Sheehan was seen in a number of acrobatic dances which aroused enthusiasm. Imitations of Al Jolson and skits by Chester Alexander and Al Parker kept the large audience in continual laughter. In charge of arrangements were Mrs. J. Louis Shochet, chairman; Mrs. Louis Pallott, assistant chairman; Mesdames Nathan Adelman. Lee Weiner, S. Tannenbaum, Jonah E. Caplan. S. Putterfass. C. Tannenbaum. Max Rappaport. I. Bucksteln. Charles Feldman and Moe Harris; and Messrs. Nathan Adelman. Milton Weiner. H. M. Drevich, M. Rappaport. and S. Futterfass. A substantial sum was realized, which will be devoted to the Talmud Torah fund of the organization. Vof reminding, and it is quite fie. for the good of the Gentile, at the re was some reminding ne. [Nevertheless, and no matter what ** may know within oneself about 'king time, and to one's incalcull We good, it is a shaking experience : a Gentile to read Lewlsohn. The ^eous Anglo-Hebraic prose, with "notional undertones, and its F'tual overtones, is psychically pturbing. And no wonder. There "•"ncentrated racial force behind l" 1, ar "d eternal prophetic power Continued on Page Three) Noted Cantor To Appear Joseph Z. Shlisky, one of the present day world Jewry's noted cantors will appear in Miami for a concert on Sunday, February 5, at 3 p. m.. at the Temple theatre. Presented by Beth David congregation, the cantor will be heard in a program of liturgical numbers, folk song, and operatic arias which will enable Miami citizens and tourists to judge why Cantor Shlisky has attained the heights of fame in the Jewish as well as non-Jewish musical world though young in years. Cantor Shlisky is a native of Poland and Is now 38 years old. He began to sing at the age of seven under the famous Solomon Schoichat. Cantor Moses Volman took charge of him a year later and then arrived with him in Toronto, Can. Under the direction of a manager, Shlisky began a tour of the country and finally landed at Scranton, Pa. There his manager deserted him. forcing Shlisky to try out at amateur performances in burlesque theatres, where his voice was above the audience. He returned to Toronto and there worked in a tailoring shop to earn sufficient to continue his musical training. Winning a scholarship at the Toronto Conservatory of Music, he remained there for 10 years under the tutelage of the famous voice master. Prof. Dalton Baker, the English baritone. In 1918 he returned to New York and appeared in a series of concerts at the Aeolian hall, where he overnight became the toast of musical critics. He then joined the ranks of the San Carlo Opera Company, but left them because he disliked the work. Following the work he most enjoyed he became a cantor and then was engaged by the first and oldest Roumanian congregation of New York City. In a recent tour of the country, musical authorities vied with one another in praising the remarkable tenor voice of Shlisky. the beautiful timbre of his tones Miami to Send Inaugural Train Llnton M. Collins, Democratic I leader, will be in charge of the j Greater Miami special car to be connected in the Florida Democratic train going to Washington for the inauguration of President elect Franklin D. Roosevelt, March 4. A special rate, including railroad and Pullman fare, meals on the train and occupation of the Pullman in Washington, has been arranged and reservations may be made through Mr. Collins. Special cars from over the state will be assembled into a train at Jacksonville at 7:15 p. m.. March 2, arriving in the capltol at noon. March 3. Many Enjoy Minstrel Show The large Riverside auditorium carried a large number of residents and tourists last Wednesday night to witness the minstrel show sponsored by the Junior committee of Beth David Sisterhood for its Talmud Torah fund. Mrs. Claire Cohen Weintraub as the interlocutor, vied with the end men for honors and applause. Ida Engler and Rosalyn Daum gave a professional exhibition of fine dancing, as did Claire Simon and Ruth Kopplowitz. Bobbie Resnick in a song performed as well as one of much older age, and Leonard Tobin and his fair partner received their usual well-merited applause, as did Theresa Rubinstein for their dance numbers. The chorus was splendid and the entire performance was marked because of the professional manner in which it was carried through from beginning to end. Mrs. Sam Wiesel was chairman of the committee in charge of arrangements, and she was assisted by Mrs. Rose Bogen. Victor Levin was makeup director, and Mrs. Jake Engler was in charge of costumes. Louis Hayman directed the production. Other acts on the program were Mrs. Harry Cohen in a whistling solo, and Mrs. Samuel Resnick in a beautifully rendered interpretation of "Eill, EDI." Noted Actor Is Honor Guest Last Sunday evening the Miami Jewish Dramatic Players tendered a reception to the noted Yiddish playwright and actor. Max Goebel, who is spending a short time at Miami Beach. Several hundred people attended and enjoyed a very pleasant evening. Mr. Joseph Greenberg presided and introduced the entertainers and speakers during the program that was presented. The guests of honor included L. Goldberg, prominent Jewish actor, and the wellknown Yiddish writer. B. Kovner. Those taking part in the program were L. Goldberg of New York, Henry Seitlin. Harry Greenberg, Joseph Greenberg, Harry Rose and B. Kovne. Mr. Goebel responded briefly during the evening and thanked all for the cordial reception accorded him. In charge of arrangements were Mesdames Silverman. Seitlin and Slaviter. During the evening delicious refreshments were served. [Announcements! BETH DAVID CONGREGATION (Conservative) 13* N. W. Third Avenue MAX SHAPIRO. Rabbi Regular services begin tonight at 5:30 with the late services following at 8:15 p. m. when Rabbi Max Shapiro will preach a sermon on "The Plagues of Our Present Day Civilization." The congregational singing and chanting will be directed by Cantor Louis Hayman, who is being assisted by the choir. A social hour follows the late services. Saturday morning services begin at 8:30 and Mincha services at 5 p. m. MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CONGREGATION (Orthodox) 1545 S. W. Third Street Junior Hadassa to Elect Delegates An important meeting of Junior Hadassah will be held next Monday evening, January 30, in the Spanish room of the Ponce de Leon hotel at 8 p. m. At this meeting election of delegates to the southern regional convention of Hadassah to be held i at Savannah, Ga., on February 12 and 13, will be held. The winner of. the essay contest will be announced and a program will be presented. Millooent Rubin will give a reading, j Rabbi Max Shapiro will speak and musical numbers will be heard. Hadassagrams will be distributed and a social hour will follow. All memj bers and friends are urged to at[ tend. JONAH E. CAPLAN, Rabbi The usual early services begin at 5:30 with the late Open Forum services at 8:30 at which time Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan will preach on "The Finger that Points to God." This sermon will convey a message particularly appropriate because of conditions existing in Miami Jewry today. The usual congregational singing and chanting will be enjoyed. Saturday morning services begin at 9 a. m. and special services in recognition of this being "Shabbos Rosh Chodesh" will be conducted with the rabbi preaching a sermon in Yiddish. At the late Friday night service, Mr. Milton Weiner will make an announcement to local Jewry and especially the members of the congregation. A social hour will follow. TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI (Reform) 1.17 N. K. Nineteenth Street Special Rites Next Monday A large number of Jewish tourists are daily visiting the Musa Isle Indian village to see the native life of the Seminole tribe, and to see the alligators of whom there are a large variety. Next Monday afternoon beginning at 2 o'clock, residents and tourists will have their first opportunity of seeing alligators being fed their weekly meal. It is real nature in the raw. They are only fed about once each week as it takes them that long to properly adjust their meal. Of course, if there was just one alligator to be fed, everything would proceed quietly and minus excitement. But out at Musa Isle there are several hundred alligators and crocodiles within one enclosure and feeding them is a problem. William Karkeet, the manager of Musa Isle, prepares for the event by obtaining about 800 pounds of fish — in the raw. Having the fish, he equips all the male Seminoles with long bamboo poles and places them at strategic points around the concrete enclosure. As soon as the alligators smell the fish, they begin to crowd close to the wall. Then the fish is thrown in to them about a big shovelful at a time. All the alligatdrs and crocodiles go wild. They revert back to the time when life was one continual struggle for the survival of the (Continued on Page Six) DR. JACOB H. KAPLAN, Rabbi Services will begin tonight at 8:15 and Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan will discuss the second part of the President's research committee on social trends dealing with the problems of the biological heritage and of social heritage. This is perhaps the most important contribution dealing with the problems of today. The public is welcome. CONGREGATION BETH JACOB (Orthodox) .111 Whin< ton Ave.. Miami Beach L. AXELROD, Rabbi • Regular Friday evening services begin at 5:30 with the late services at 8:30 p. m., when the rabbi will preach a sermon on "The Jew, a Born Optimist." The congregational chanting and singing will be directed by Cantor Boris Schlachman. Saturday morning services begin at 9 a. m.. with the rabbi preaching in Yiddish on "Heintige Darshonim." Bnai Brith To Install Officers Beth David Talmud Torah hall will be the scene of impressive Installation services for the newlyelected officers of Sholem lodge of Bnai Brith, next Sunday evening. January 29, at 8 p. m. In addition to the formal ritual an evening of entertainment including singing, playing by artists, vaudeville sketches and addresses by prominent speakers will be provided. Following the program refreshments will be served. No charges of any kind will be made and the public is urged to attend.



PAGE 1

Page Two THE JEWISH FLORIPIAN Friday, January 20. 193, Finally hitting their winning stride, the Hebrew Athletic club, with a large and enthusiastic crowd cheering them along, trouncea the St. Pats in a cage tilt at Flamineo Park Monday night. The score was 39 to 15. With the Jewish boys hitting the hoop consistently and presenting a well played offensive, they had no trouble in piling up an early lead which was held without trouble throughout the game. Sam Bornsteln, center, who comes from where basketball is played all the time, is a welcome addition to the team as is Joe Davis, rangy guard from orackerland. The local bilya on the team are the Grossman brothers. Izzie Schwartz, and Al Reisman. Ralph Grossman led his teammate.in scoring with 14 points followed by Bornstein with 11 and Al Grossman with eight points. Coach Art Webb is getting his squad into shape and more men will be added next week. The next contesl will be held at Flamingo Park Monday evening at 8 p. m. sharp. To Anna Appel. middle-aged star of the Yiddish Art theatre, fame is something more than electric lights and the trumpeting of her name. For 15 years she has appeared at the head of one of the most select group of stage artists in the world. With the Yiddish Art theatre she seldom seen her name displayed in glaring electric bulbs. They do not do things like that 1 serious theatre, and Anna Appel is serious. Miss Appel was born in Bucharest. Roumania. At 14 with her parents she emigrated from the old world to Canada. At 15 .she was playing in a Montreal stock company in a series ol classical plays. Her New York debut was with Jacob Adler in a series of plays by Tolstoi and later with Rudolph lldkraut. Then, lor 15 years she played steadily with the Yiddish Art theatre. "Symphony of Six Million" is her • motion picture venture in Ama, although she made a silent film in Vienna. Appearing with her is Ratoff. a Jewish actor of note, having performed for many years abroad and %  .. number of years with the Yiddish Art theatre where he established a unique reputation for characterization. Both of these artists had persistently refused to appear in films but were eventually induced to make their debut because of the human theme of the story which was written by Fannie Hurst. "Symphony of Six Million," which will appear at the Seventh Avenue theatre this coming Sunday, is a human interest saga of New York's Jewish Fast side and lolls the powerful dramatic story of a doctor torn between the sufferings of his people and the human urge lor wealth. It : 1 thrilling story of Jewish life. • • • Members of Beth David choir who assist at the late Friday night services are Mesdames Charles Markowitz. William Weintraub. Albert Dubbin. Edward Friedman. William Friedman and the Misses Rosalyn Daum and Rosalyn Bader. • • • The physical culture class under the direction of Mrs. Bertha Berkowitch Levy meets every morning from 9 to 10:30 In the tennis courts of MY.s. Joseph N. Morris. All are invited to join this class, whose proceeds are devoted exclusively to the work of the Jewish Welfare bureau. A benefit bridge for the ladies' auxiliary of the Jewish Welfare bureau will be held at the Blackstone hotel. Miami Beach. Friday afternoon, February 3. beginning at 2 o'clock. Mrs. Isidor Cohen is chairman of the committee in charge. • • • With Norma Shearer as its .star, and one of the most brilliant supporting casts yet assembled for the speaking screen. Metro-GoldwynMayer's lavish production of "Smilin' Through" will play Sunday. Monday and Tuesday at the Tivoh theatre. Mis.s shearer in the feminine lead follows in the loot.steps of Jane Cowl, who achieved one of her reatest successes in the recordn .iking New York stage run of the play from which the screen producion was adapted. Opposite her is drlc March, borrowed from Par1 mount to play the dual role of Jermy Wayne in the mid-Victorian luences of the story and Kenneth Wayne. his son. in the modern C( lies Leslie Howard and O. P. Heggie, who left the screen to fulfill stage ngagements on Broadway during he past season, were brought back o Hollywood to add further lustre Mis.Shearers cast. 'Smilin' Through" is the story of an old man who seek to shed the .elentless bitterness of his blighted romance on a pair ol young lovers. the colorful background provides a contrast between the England of 68 and modern days. • • • Ci ming to Miami some years ago, .ir. H. Samet and .1 E, Samet, his en, first opened under the name ol Samet's" at Miami Beach or. Noember Jli. 1!29. and since that time lave established an enviable repuItlOH lor tan dealing and clean lusiness Al all times insisting upon the handling ol only strictly kosher a atl SSI 1.. "Samet's l-.aIn %  < OR1I ynonymous with "kashrus." Aceding to the request ol a large lumber ol their customers and pa'ons, "Samet's" will today open :: kO tier meat and poult! •, dertment in their attractive and oua store at 737 Washington venue, Miami Beach where they vlll be happy to welcome all who upon strict adherence to all %  cuirements which insures kosher m ats and poultry. The meat de•iitment will be closed on Saturlays and every Jewish holiday Mr Frost of Bradley Beach. N. J. will 1 in charge of the meat department, and has had a long experince m this line in a number of .•.< minent tourist cltli • • • • Mr. and Mrs. I. Kwart are being ongratulated upon the birth of a ally daughter at the Jackson Memorial hospital last week. Mother and !:aby arc now at home and are doIng nicely. The little girl was named Mashe Yocheved. With Mrs. I. Buckstoin. its presIdent, as hostess, the ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish orthodox congregation will entertain its members and friends at a "social" next Tuesday evening, January 24. at the '-ynagog. A program of entertainment will be presented and refreshments will be served. The public is nvited to attend. • • • As we go to press the Women's club of the Workmen's circle ls sponsoring a concert for the benefit of the tool campaign for the Jews of eastern Europe with the noted artists. Al Harris. Maxine Brodin and Zelda Zlatin appearing on the proAPPEARING AT T1VOI.I THEATRE THIS WEEK are well on their way to lose more and Mr. Brown of Brooklyn. pron couples before that point is reached, inent members of Beth Jacob co n gregation, and Sam Steiner. 0 f C hi cago. 111. presidents of every Jewish worn> ( ( en's organization in Miami have been named on the Jewish Welfare A large crowd attended the Bar Ball committee by Mrs. Bertha B. Mltevah of Robert Kurland of w Lew chairman of the annual WeiYork last Saturday morning a t Beth fare ball in addition to the memJacob synagogue. Rabbi Axelrod d e bera already serving. "vered a !" *t exhortation m English to the confirmant. denyine • the existing theory that the Ba' Max Goebel, noted Jewish actor Mitzvah ceremony in this countand playwright, Is spending a vacau nothing more than a theatrical ,. al Miaim Beach to recuperate act from las recent illness. Goebel 1• • nationally known on the YidNear y 100 ^.^ nw dish stage and a number of his adRJ ^ Beth Jacob g ,„„,,. are arranging a reception mee|> cvery Simday at ^ ** Services for the children are i„cl ud ed in the weekly assembly, which u thoroughly enjoyed by all. NORMA SHEARERjram which is part ol a national oncert tour. The ladies' auxiliary ol the Miami Jewish orthodox congregation held one of its regular card parties at the synagog last Tuesday night with Mesdames A. Daum and Charles Feldman as the hostesses. Individual prizes were awarded to the highest score at each table and Mrs. Rosenblum of Butler. Pa., was awarded the door prize, • a The annual Charity ball ol tl Jewish Welfare bureau to raise funds to carry on Us work will be -mn this year at the beautiful Ploridian hotel at Miami Beach. The affair, which will take the form ol a SUpper dance tins year, has lor the :.,] yearbeen om ol the UtStanding events Ol the social -call, and will be held on Sunday venitlg, March 12. All local .lew : h organizations are cooperating to make this affair an outstanding .inces.-. • • • 1 ical : 1 lends and members Workmen's circle are sponsoring a leception In honor o: Max Goebel, noted Jewish playwright an.; this coming Sunday evening ary 22. at tinWorkmen's circle hall i 701 N. w. Fifth avenue, beginning H -30. A program will be pn ei ted and refreshments' will be served. Ublic 1united. 1 hortly. • • 0 At a well attended meeting ol the ladies' auxiliary ol the Jewish Weli.irc bureau held Monday afternoon at Kaplan hall, Mrs. Meyer Schwartz, prominent communal worker ol this city, was unanimously elected president. Mrs. Herbert K Kleminan was elected first vice president, and Mrs. Harry Isaac-. second vice president These were chosen to iill vacancies which resulted because ol several recent resignations. Mrs. Lena Simon was elected publicity chairman. Mrs. Sadye G. Rose, executive secretary ol the Jewish Welfare bureau, told ol the ca.-earising daily and urged continued efforts to raise funds 10 cany on the work ol relief. A social •our followed. • • • 1 nleers recently elected by the al Bnai Britli lodge will be installed at a public ceremony at Hi Ul David Talmud Torah hall on sunlaj evening. Januarj 29, beginning at 8 p. 111. A splendid program will be presented in addition to the usual impressive Bnai Brith ritual. public 1Invited to attend. No charges ol any kind will be made and refreshments will be served It pays to advertise in Tin Fiorldian. 93 Watch For "The Inside Story' Revelations of Greater Miami Jewish Life .. Kashrus... S\na^ogs... Cemetery ... Talmud Torahs ... AND? Coming Soon The Hebrew Athletic club held rid of a series ol card partielor the benefit ol Its cnmmuni' litre building nind last SunQuite a large number of guests attended and enjoyed a very delightlul evening. Refreshments v ed by the committee In chargi Prizes were won by Mi ii' 1 Rajmond Main. M. Evcrj night is a bin night at the Manowitz and L. Spiegelman. talkathon contest and the Increasd attendance is due to the efforts I Jack Negley, mastei ol ceremonnd the contestants, as well as lie floor shows from the various night club.-. Recent visitors at Miami Beach include 1 Brenni r, ol Cli veland, o.. •>*•:••:••:••:• %  :• %  :••:••:••:••:••:••: %  •: •:••• %  :•. •;. ln-nt on row Grocer Klvlni roa The Silver Slipper. Bagdad club, Moulin Rouge and Pier have pre% NEW VOItK ,5 ' < AKK %  : % %  : %  sented their star talent to packed $ houses and made it necessary lor •:• the management to install 500 new bleacher seats. The McGreevys, Blllle and Mai Jack Norton, the singing cowboy; Christine Christy, the flame of the Walkathon; Collapsible Neil Cappy. the loose-legged hoofer; Waltei Morris. Jack Montgomery. Johnny McKay and Eric Weibe. son supreme; Mickey Sinclair and Eve Whitmer, super strutters; Jack Kelley, the Stanley Laurel of the walker.-: June Evans, queen 01 hula dancers; Bernard Shapoll and Pern Tracy, tap dancers, and the Smiths. Jerry and Frances, in then wait/ numbers, and Millie Rosen, the whistling sensation, are all among the contestants The walkers, now thinned down to 16 couples and three solos, have passed the 400-hour mark and are nearing the 500, which means they COMPANY BREAD AND CAKE8 171 8. W. Mh Si. Phono 2-7851 llranih Slorr: I$5 N. W. Ml, si. :-*********v***.:.. : ..-.. : ..-.-.. Always Fresh Mburdi/K Coffee LA TOURAINE COFFEE AND FIFTH AVENUE COFFEE Roasted, packed and delivered daily from our Miami plant to insure "That Delicious Fresh Flavor" .. W. S. QUINBY CO.. !N<. MIAMI JACKSONVILLE •: %  •:• •:• •:• •: %  •:• •:• *.;..;. *.;..;..;.. : .. : .. : ......................... ... ... ... ... ........................................ : ., : .. : ..;..% .;• v THE Hill JAM PENN HCTEL WASHINGTON AVENUE AT SIXTH STKKKT. MIAMI BEACH y True "Colonial" I lospitality Comfortable and Convenient I lomelike and Pleasant •• %  :• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• %  :• •:•.;. •;. *.:..;..;. 4, %  •. .;. %  PIERRE'S t Reautv Shop % Spcci.ili/ing in Haircuts and ;•• Finger Waving I lair Dyed 23 N. F. ll Av. I'hnnr 2-382>. 1 Delightful Spot for a Real Vacation ONE OF THE FAMOUS "COLONIAL HOTELS" &f&f&f&f&f&f ++++++++4*+* &f&f&f &f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f •***



PAGE 1

Four THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Friday, January 20. 193 3. *+ &f&f&f &f &f&f &f &f &f &f &f&f &f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f &f&f < &f &f &f < &f&f&f&f + t Kairtfl S>gnagtig SitUrtw Edited by RABBI S. M. MACHTEI l-'uuniler and Director, Radio Synatroir of America •> SUNDAY MORNINGS WIOD. MIAMI, FLORIDA I Vol. 1. MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 22. 1933. No. 6. + Good and Evil (Sermon delivered nn Sunday. January 15. 1133) Scripture Reading, Genesis Chapter II, Verses 15-17 hicl. St. Petersburg Notes _. am very little concerned with theology. But. I am very much inter4\ ested in religion. To a reasoning person — to a student of religion — many problems must present themselves when studying the scriptures. Certain parts must appear unreasonable. We shall endeavor, from time to lime, to clear the mists and to pierce the veil with a ray of light from tl)c torch of Judaism. Judaism is compared to a torch from which other tapers have been kindled but whose own light has not been diminished. thereby, III the least. Other religions have had their origins in Judaism and have grown away from it — but the truth of the word of God, through the prophets in Israel has not been diminished in the least. Judaism la all-embracing and looks upon all true, moral religions as branches oi the same tree — all reaching upward towards a common heaven and bearing beneficial fruit for all the children of men. T HIS thought has been beautifully expressed in a poem by Harry Romaine: At the Muezzin's call for prayer The kneeling faithful thronged the square. And on Pushkara's lofty height The dark priest chanted Brahma's might. Amid a monastery's weeds An old Franciscan told his beads; While to the synagogue there came A Jew to praise Jehovah's name. The one great God looked down and smiled, And counted each his loving child; For Turk and Brahmin, monk and Jew Had reached Him through the gods they knew. L ETT us try to understand our common Father. Chapter II. verse 17, of Genesis reads, "But of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it; for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die." Notice that God does not say "I shall kill you." but He says, "thou shalt surely die." You will become extinct. The word of God states a consequence, a result of the act. Death, extinction, follows man's eating of the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil. But. that does not seem reasonable. God must be mistaken. Or is He a Parent with a perverted sense? Just think of it. We spend money on the education oi our children with the object of training them to become good men and women. A parent who sends his child to college would be happy to learn from the dean that his child had learned to distinguish good from evil. Why, that's almost perfection! Once you know the good from the evil, it is easy to do the good and to shun the evil. Most of the difficulty arises in being able to differentiate good from evil. The Bible tells us that because Adam and Eve ate of the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil they were banished from the Garden of Eden. Life, for them, ceased to be a paradise; that, as a result, death came to mankind. It is clear that, at the outset, the holy scriptures depict God in an unfavorable light. The God of the Hebrews must be cruel to have punished Adam and Eve for a disobedience that resulted in such good to them. Ciuod? Why, just think of it! They learned to distinguish good from evil. Y ES, and that was the beginning ol the end. On that day the degeneration of mankind began. "Thou shalt surely die." Yes, moral and physical death Is the result of our standard of good and evil. Our standard, not Gods standard. Man was created in the image of God. Gods standard is the rule of right and wrong-Just and unjust. Man, created in the image and with the attributes of God, is endowed With a sense, a heavenly sense, of right and wrong. This standard permits of no compromises, knows no reservations. A thing, an act. is either right or wrong, just or unjust. It cannot be bothBut an act can be both good a J IT Is wrong to steal. It is right to return what you have borrowed. It Is I right to pay your debts. It is wrong to murder. It Is right to help another in need. But. it is good to steal-for the thief because he thereby, increases his own possessions. It is good for him and evil for the one who is robbed. It is bad for you to return what you have borrowed or to pay what you owe because you, thereby, deprive yourself of money, or of some comfort. It is evil in your personal point of view, though it is right to principle. Though it is wrong to murder, it is good for you if you rid yourself of an enemy who annoys you. Though it is right to help another m time of need, it is bad for you because it requires a sacrifice on your part. You must give up something that you could use for yourself Good and evil are not universal principles. They are personal conveniences. Right and wrong are universal standards God's everlasting truths While a thing cannot be both right and wrong, it may be both good and evil. Life affords us many examples of this difference in standard of good and evil, depending on the persons affected. These are either right or wrong in principle. They cannot be bothS O long as mankind lives as created in God* image-by the Heavenly standards of right and wrong. Just and unjust mankind will Survive; but when It substitutes the results of its eating of the fruit of tne tree of knowledge when it substitutes personal conveniences of good and evil for the universal, unequivocal truths of the Divine* standards, right and wrong, just and unjust-then, "thou shalt surely die." The substitution spells destruction and extinction for mankind. The Garden of Eden ceases to be. Man takes himself out of Paradise. Our present state, nationally and internationally, is. in my humble opinion, in great measure due to our neglect of the Divine truths of right and wrong in Congregation Bnai Israel will hold regular services tonight with Rabbi A. S. Kleinfeld preaching a sermon on "Manhood." Saturday morning services begin at 9 o'clock. Sunday school at 10 a. m. Sunday and Hebrew school from 4 to 6 p. m. daily. The building committee of Bnai Israel has arranged a concert to be ?iven at the temple. Sunday. January 29. at 8 p. m. The committee has been able to secure some very high class talent and artists., and assures all who will attend a very enjoyable time. Tlie Judaic council will have their next meeting at the Horowitz hotel. Monday evening. January 23. at 8:15 o'clock. The next meeting of the Young Maccabees will be held at the home of Shelby Trager. 1104 Twentyfourth avenue, north. Monday evening. January 23. at 7:30 o'clock. Radio Synagog Rabbi S. M. Machtei. founder and director of the Radio Synagog. will preach over WIOD at 10 o'clock on Sunday morning on "God-Given Children." In addition to the sermon there will be prayers, music, and a question box. Why People Go To Church Some go to church just for a walk. Some to stare and laugh and talk; Some go there to meet a friend. Some their idle time to spend, Some for general observation, Some for private speculation, Some to seek or find a lover. Some a courtship to discover; Some go there to use their eyes, Anci newest fashions criticise. Some to show their own smart dress. Some their neighbors to assess. Some to scan a robe or bonnet. Some to price the trimming on it, fome to learn the latest news That friends at home they may amuse. Some to gessip false and true. Sale within the sheltering pew; Some go there to please the squire, Some his daughter to admire. Some the parson go to fawn. Seme to lounge and some to yawn, Some to claim the parish doles. Some for bread and some for coals. Some because it's thought genteel. Some to vaunt their pious zeal. Some to show how sweet they sing Some how loud their voices ring, Some the preacher go to hear. His style of voice to praise or Jeer, Some their sins to vanish o'er. Some to sit and doze and nod. But few to kneel and worship God. — Rev. J. S. Boughier. p. S. — The above is printed al the request of many who heard il read by Rabbi S. M. Machtei during last Sunday's Radio Synagog Question Box period. our personal lives and In our International relationships. We live for our good, and for the evil done our neighbors by our acts, we care not. You can't expect life to be a Garden of Eden under such conditions. T HE same. In some measure, Is true of religions and their various denominations. We think only of our own —our point of view. Each to his people. Mine. My own. But "Who or my people?" I ask in the words of Rosa Zagnoni Marlnonl; My people? Who are they? I went into the church where the congregation Worshipped my God. Were they my people? I felt no kinship to them as they knelt there. My people! Where are they? I went into the land where I was born, Where men spoke my language I was a stranger there. "My people!" my soul cried, "who are my people?" Last night in the rain I met an eld man Who spoke a language I do not speak, Which marked him as one who does not know my God. With apologetic smile he offered me The shelter of his patched umbrella. I met his eyes And then I knew. BECKWITT OPTOMETRIST 22 Years in Miami" To s j Did you know ... The most important thins In nelrrt* Ins your vyv doctor f* considcrinjr hi* I experience nd reputation? •n :K WII.I. TILL" 22 yearn uf mcCMlfttl operation in 1 Miami ia the bent proof of our ability. J Hundred* ronult lir. Herkwitt. | 36 N. E. FIRflT AVEM'E Recipes for the Jewish Family SEE THE PRIMITIVE EVERGLADES AT MUSA ISLE 25 MUSA ISLE SB SUNDAY Seminole Indian Village HJHOAY LKAPKKSHIP CIIIKi WILLIAM OS< KOLA N. W. Tleenly-llflh Anu and Sixteenth Htrrel Go Wo't en Klnuler Street to Twenty-aevrnth Avenue. Turn North LARGEST COLLECTION OF CAPTIVE ALLIGATORB AND CROCODILES COMPLETE FLORIDA HWAMP ZOO AND MUSEl'M Sec Cowboy Hill. • Real Seminolt Indian. WreMle the Alligator TO GET TIIKRE — Take any for hire cur or drive went on Klaaler and north on Twenty-eventh Avenue, or yarht "Maruahla" — leaven Pier 6. Citv Yarht M, .In 2 p. m, dally — eUo n Mpeedboat "Speedee" from Plor'dian Dork. Miami Hrarh. Lebkurhen Four eggs, one pound brown sugar, one-eighth pound shredded citron, one-eighth pound shelled walnuts i broken i, three and one-half cups flour, one teaspoon baking powder, two teaspoons cinnamon, one-fourth teaspoon allspice. Beat eggs and sugar well. Add citron, walnuts, flour, baking powder, cinnamon and allspice. Spread dough about one-half inch thick with well-floured hands. Use long pans. Bake in moderate oven, then cut in squares and spread with icing. Dry in cool stove or in the sun Ta.stes best when allowed to stand for a week. Cheese Blintzes One cup flour, one cup cold water, two eggs ibeateni. one-fourth teaspoon baking powder, one-half teaspoon salt, one egg, one and onehalf cups cottage cheese, salt and pepper to taste. Add salt and water to eggs (well beaten) and add flour slowly until batter is smooth. Pour batter on heated and greased iron pan. tipping the pan on all sides to cover bottom with thin layer of batter. Bake one side only until the thin cake blisters, then tip out in one piece on board. Now mix the cheese, egg, salt and pepper and place filling in center of each cake, folding over opposite corners to form a rectangle or square. Fry both sides in butter until golden brown. Serve with powdered sugar, cinnamon, or sour cream. Blintzes may also be Ixiked in oven for crispness. Delaney & Beers Kodak I iin.hiiiL and Knlaruing ( omim'rrial Work and Home Portrait* 50% Off on All Amateur Work 212 N. E. 4th St. Phone 2-53KS EMPLOY FEDERATION ORCHESTRAS WHY? Reliable — Dependable Experienced — Organized Rehearsed And trying to maintain a %  i. in.; wave %  rait. Miami Federation I of Musicians LOUI8 J. MITT. Secretary PHONE 2-3912 The World's Most Uidiiidual Playing Cards Yuur favorite photograph a HWHTt* heart a friend n ehild perfeetiv reproduced on the backi of a .vicard dock .if PHOTO PLAYING CARDS. An Ideal irift never bofore offered at thN low price. SEND No MONEY. Jus) lend your favorite photo, -nn; -In or neu'iitivc (any llxel. If will be returned with your order, Pay mailman only II. %  Special limited time offer ttcmi I iniineiliwtely. | THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN P. (1. Box t78 Miami, Florida i WALK A THON CINDERELLA BALLROOM • 1.000 (ASH PRIZES 21 IIOI'KS DAILY PAST THE 475th HOIK — GOING ON NOW — %  dMiaHk^HaaM • <


Friday, January 20, 193 3.
THE JEWISH FLORIDI AN
P?ge Thr
THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
II BLI8BBO KVKin FRIDAY
by the
JEWISH FLORIDIAN PUBLISHING CO.
621 S. W. Fifteenth Avcnnf
J. LOUIS 8HOCHET, Kditor
P. (). Box 29.3
Miami. Florida Phone 2-1183
Entered attar July 4,
IBM, nt the Po i mi, Miami. Florida,
the A.i ..' March S, 1879.
WEST PALM BBACH OPPICH
n I Btchth Strut
.Mi M. s lirt'hniik. Repraaantatlva
SI 38CRIPTH N
till Manilla.......11.00
nil,- year.......$2.00
FRIDAY. JANUARY 20. 1933.
Vol. 6. No. 3.
Around the
Campus
By MILTON A. FRIEDMAN
H llo, folks! Is everybody happy?
Von people 111 Miami should feel
great a) this time of the year. Up
here 111 Gainesville we've been hav-
ing freezing weather, including a
intii rain thrown In for good meas-
ure. Just imagine. Only 400 miles
away there is a sun shining forth in
all its splendor, beaches are crowd-
id. and an overcoat is just a frag-
ment of the imagination. As my
stifT fingers play lovingly over the
keyboard ol the typewriter my soul
is not in my work. I wouldst be
back in the laps of the nods where
a blue sky looks down on the green
below and a sun bursts forth in all
its [loriflcation on the mecca of the
world. Ah me, the thought is futile.
It will do me no good. alas, alack-
a-day.
While discussing climatic condi-
I might mention an amusing
Incident ol which ffwo Miami boys
unfortunate the victims. This
in a story ol a heater that decided
berserk. Al Cassel and Phil
Breman live in a little cottage in
back 01 the fraternity house in
which they have a heater. The oth-
er day they turned on the heater
and left it on while they went to
expecting thereby to have a
warm room when they returned.
Such things you know occasionally
happen; thestovi went bad. Lo and
I, what should greet the eyes
of the returning students but a
blackness that was never pictured
in the dwelling place of the devil.
: 1 1 ovi n d the ceilings, walls.
r drawers, clothing, blankets.
everything, with a layer one-half an
inch thick. This was one surprise
thai didn't come In a small pack-
age Al and Phil, alter a hard day's
labor, are now again holding open
house.
The University of Florida Glee
club gave its first concert of the
year .1 tew days ago at Willlston, a
little town 30 miles from here. Marx
Pelnberg and Milt Friedman made
the trip, The affair was a howling
m every angle. I was end
man and it fell my lot to pull the
curtains between our numbers. Im-
the embarrassment when 1
had to .stand before the audience
trying to pull the curtain and it ob-
stlnateiy refused to budge. The aud-
ience got a kick out of my discom-
fiture especially when I got mad
once and pulled too hard and the
whole curtain fell down. Was my
face red! Marx sang a baritone solo
that went over nicely. He sang, In
character. "Brother, Can You Spare
a Dime?" After the concert the city
gave us a dance. And what a dance
it was! I can't imagine where so
many beautiful girls could have
come from. Peculiarly enough (or
is it so peculiar?) most of the girls
were blondes. The boys are still
ravin.' and it the other trips will
A Philosopher
Looks At Yiddish
[Continued from Patio One]
.;ased on letters that people received
.10m America.
When I moved from Nesviesh to
Minsk and began to read Yiddish
or jargon, as we called it a new
world opened itself up to me. Even
Shomer's Shundromanen had a high
educational value because of theii
liberalism, of their admiration for
educated people and the contempt
for the old-fashioned fanaticism.
But the real enlightenment came
from Mendele Meicher Sphorim and
the Volksbibliothek. to which Sho-
ll ;n Aleichem contributed. Then I
came to America and began reading
the Jewish press, principally the old
Arbiiter Zeitung. which Abraham
Cahan. Feigenbaum and Phillip
Kranz edited and to which the old
grandfather of the Jewish social
movement. Winchevsky. frequently
sent letters Horn England. I am
glad to testify that I owe a good
deal of my education to it. It taught
me to look at world news from a
cosmopolitan Instead of a focal or
provincial point ol view, and it
taught me to Interpret politics real-
istically, instead of being misled by
mpty phrases.
As I look back on the Yiddish and
the English press In that last dec-
ade 1,1 the nineteenth century 1 can-
elp feeling thai the former did
more for the education ol its read-
ers than the latter. Having no army
01 reporters to dig up sensational
news, the Jewish pre necessarily
paid more attention to thin
permanent Interest, it tried to give
Its readers something of permanence
ind subs! intial value The English
press, 1 .mi glad to say, has marie j
jn 11 deal ol progress in this re-
pi in I hi la 10 years, sine., the
uit has madi tome Americans real-
/' thai then is a world outside ol
he United States with which we
nol only commercial, but cul-
tural 11 lations. Bui. even to this
lay. though some Ol the method- of
the English press have been adopt-
d by the Yiddish newspapers, the
atter are still characterized by a
mori' unified point ol view, which
-'ive- news, comments and Informa-
ivi articles a unity which no Eng-
lish newspaper seeks to attain
I also want to express my great
Indebtedness to what Jacob Gordon
did to educate whatever taste 1 have
for dramatic literature. Gordon
might have made a nnme for him-
self in Russian or Engl'sh literature.
But he preferred lo slick to Yiddish
ind portray the life of his own peo-
ple we ought 10 honor his memory.
And now. as to the relation be-
tween Yiddish and English. I need
not express my belief that so long
BS 1 he Jews wish lo live m Ihis
country and to participate In its
Cultural life. In Its science, literature
and drama, as well as in its politi-
cal and industrial activities, English
is bound to prevail as the language
of the Jewish people. The Jews
have ever been ready to adopt the
language of the peoples among
whom they have lived. Did they
not drop Hebrew and adopt Aramaic
as their national tongue? And was
not Aramaic succeeded by Greek.
Arabic. Spanish and German? Nev-
ertheless. I think that Yiddish is
rendering a great cultural service
and will continue to do so for con-
come up to this, happy days will
really have come again.
On the way back the driver of our
bus got sick so that It afforded me
the novel experience a driving a big
bus. Marx, who was sitting next to
me. felt reminiscent. He said that
he would have sung much better
but that he had had his mind off
and had been thinking about a
beautiful girl friend In Miami. I
wonder whom he meant?
Looking forward to a nice warm
bed and heavy blankets. I gladly
conclude.
siderable time. I cannot share the
views of my fellow citizens who look
upon the very existence of a foreign
press as a sort of treason, who would
make the speaking or writing of a
foreign language a crime. These
people are doubtless influenced by
patriotic motives, but their concep-
tlon of Americanism is narrow and
unworthy of the great traditions of
American liberalism. The patriotism
)I these people is a narrow nation-
alism, copied from or in imitation
of European nationalism. The Am-
irica ntradition is Federalism, which
lilows for diversity instead of dull
uniformity. The very name United
and our motto "E Pluribus
Jnum" express this. We have no
national church as French and Ital-
an nationalists want.
America has been settled by many
peoples and each must contribute
Freely to the common stock the
Ciermans have contributed their love
:if music, the Italians have contrib-
uted their love of nature, gardening
and certain household arts. Why
should not the Jews contribute their
specific gifts in the way of enthus-
iasm for the arts, for social ideal-
ism, as well as 1 heir peculiar love of
intellectual life for its own sake.'
The idea that all immigrants should
wipe out their past and become sim-
ple imitations ol the existing type
is neither possible nor desirable. The
past cannot be wiped out. And we
make ourselves ridiculous 111 the ef-
fort to do so
All meat civilizations have been
the resultants of the emu lbulions
Of many peoples, and a richer Am-
erican culture can come only il the
: 0 like other elements, are given
1 chance to develop under favor-
ible conditions then- peculiar gen-
ii- The Jewish press can therefore
lot k back upon i'.s worth of the last
hi years with pilde. It has pre-
pared millions Ol Jewish people to
take a worthy part iii American
satlon while also promoting the
natural self-respect to which Jews
are entitled because ol their char-
acter and history.
But what ol the future?
!' Is often said that the Yiddish
press 1- f r a disappearing genera-
tion. That as our young people are
ducated in the public schools and
earn to -peak English of a sort in
'heir daily life and business. Yiddish
is bound to disappear. That may
be, but, not being a prophet, I ven-
'ure no opinion. Languages have a
peculiar way of persisting, for they
express experiences not so readily
expressible In other languages in
my case. I think, there Is a great
social value in maintaining Yiddish.
not only for the cultural opportun-
ities In English, but also to keep
some portion of the Jewish people
in touch with the life of our own
Immediate past and In touch with
si majority Of the Jewish peo-
p'e abrcad. whose language Is pre-
dominantly Yiddish Perhaps 50
from now the Yiddish press
may celebrate its centennary 1 hope
v hen 11 does so its past will be
o less honorable than it is today.
The man who flirts with servant
girls has domestic tastes.
When a man hasn't a ghost of a
chance he i.s naturally out ol spir-
its.
It is hard to convince doctors and
druggists that health is wealth.
Silence is the only thing that will
ever Improve some people's conver-
sation.
The trouble with mosl handsomi
women: They think nothing else is
.lec.is.-aiy.
It Is not always wise to tell all one
knows, but it Is well to know all one
tells.
Turn about Is fair play. 11 a girl
steals a young man's heart she
should not be alarmed il he -teals
a kiss.
The latest recruit oi the theatri-
cal colony at Hollywood Is an Iowa
hog. The animal, which won a
worlds championship as a h
has been invited to the film capital
to appear as a character actor in a
motion picture Notwithstanding
the severity ol thi competition I
rile., the hog's unspoiled nat-
uralness will stand II In good stead.
I think, and it has every pi
ol a brilliant career
And not on the 3( n en only, fi is
.1 very fat hog and. appropriately,
after being filmed, it will make 3
tour ot the country appearing "in
the flesh." Among ham actors it Is
lonsidered certain to have an out-
standing IUI
Perhaps the only practical objec-
tion so far advanced i- that any
w rry that may be drowned in the
:!.:' stuff would be trivial at the ut-
most.
The winner oi a national CO!
to pick the tallest story tellei hails
from Denver, which naturally gives
him the advantage ol a mile In al-
titude at the stall
The dog catcher at Council Bluffs,
Iowa, earns $1,926 a year, and the
mayor only $1,500.
A man at Jackson, Mich., was ar-
rested for wounding a bystander to
an attempt to take his own life.
Fellow at Ann Arbor gave himself
up to the police, together with bis
revolver, for fear he would commit
a crime.
Fired at by a bandit, a Chicago
man was hit on the toe. and rejoices
in the removal of a corn that had
bothered him for 25 years.
A deep sea diver of Houston, Tex.,
flies an airplane for diversion be-
tween dives.
Police were called at Flint to
evict indigent dogs which had taken
possession of a well-to-do dog's ken-
nel for sleeping purposes.
An Adrian farmer claims to have
mortgaged his farm to buy teeth fa
his divorced wile.
A Kalamazoo motorist, alarmed
bj curious sounds in his engine, ii-
nally raised the hood and released
a cat.
. O, nothing extraordinary!
These old cranks that think mon-
ey is the root of all evil ought to In-
happy now, since most of us ar
leading a life with little or no evil
An escaping burglar became
wedged in a Missouri Chimney, with
no means of getting in touch with
counsel for a habeas corpus
A man's talk shows up be
a good dinner.
Some people take steps for 3 di-
vorce at public dances.
Why is it that a large man always
takes a small woman seriously?
A chicken "that lays eggs awl
crows" is held up for admiration In
a strange-as-it-seems column Crow
of course are extremely hard lo lav
Client: "What do you think oi the
idea of giving the money back to
the bank and asking lor a
sentence?"
3n iflnmniam
MOTHER
She traveled the journey
before you,
She has known all CM
cost of the way.
She paid out the price to
its fullness
That Motherhood only
can pay.
She loved when the world
was against you.
She hoped when your
hope sank and died.
She clung to your hand
when the clinging
Left scars in her heart
deep and wide.
Mi? labored and loved
and was happy.
For down deep in her
kind heart she knew
" in- kindness and love
would repay her
For all that she did
just for you.
A. S. Shoe he t.
IDA SHOCHET
DIED 23RD OF TEBETH. 5688 (JANUARY 15. 19281
/'/ loving Remembrance II, 1 Children



PAGE 1

Friday, January 20, 1933. THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN P?8eThr, THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN / I Pl'BLISHKD EVERY FRIDAY by the JEWISH FLORIDIAN PUBLISHING CO. 621 S. W. Fifteenth Avenue J. LOUIS S3IOCHET, Editor P. O. Box 29:3 Miami, Florida Phone 2-1183 Intend u -, >nd cla utter July 4. 198(1. at the Post Offico ul Miami. Florida. Under (he Act of March 8, 18TB, WEST PALM BEACH OFFICE 414 l.i. lull Street Mr*. M. S.hrebnick. K"pre*entut. wsi 38CKIPTII N Six Month* $ 1.00 One Year 8 2.00 FRIDAY. JANUARY 20, 1933. Vol. 6, No. 3. Around the Campus By MILTON A. FRIEDMAN A Philosopher Looks At Yiddish [Continued from Pago One] .:ased on letters that people received .iom America. When I moved from Nesviesh to Minsk and began to read Yiddish — or Jargon, as we called it — a new world opened itself up to me. Even Shomer's Shundromanen had a high educational value because of theii liberalism, of their admiration for educated people and the contempt for the old-fashioned fanaticism. But the real enlightenment came from Mendele Meicher Sphorim and the Volksbibliothek, to which Sholem Aleichem contributed. Then I came to America and began reading the Jewish press, principally the old Arbeiter Zeitung, which Abraham Cahan, Feigenbaum and Phillip Kraoi edited and to which the old grandfather of the Jewish social movement. Winchevsky, frequently sent letters from England. I am glad to testify that I owe a good deal of my education to it. It taught me to look at world news from a cosmopolitan instead of a focal or provincial point of view, and it Hello, folks! Is everybody happy? You people in Miami should feel great at this time of the year. Up tauglU me l0 1,1,e 'P lel P oliti realhere in OoinesvlllB „.•., *~„., >.„., Utlcally, instead of being misled by mpty phrases. here in Gainesville we've been having freezing weather, including a little rain thrown in for good measure. Just imagine. Only 400 miles away there is a sun shining forth in all its splendor, beaches are crowded, and an overcoat is just a fragment of the imagination. As my stiff fingers play lovingly over the keyboard of the typewriter my soul is not in my work. I wouldst be back in the laps of the gods where a blue sky looks down on the green below and a sun bursts forth in all its glorification on the mecca of the world. Ah me, the thought is futile, it will do me no good, alas, alacka-day. While discussing climatic conditions I might mention an amusing incident of which fxo Miami boys unfortunately were the victims. This is a story of a heater that decided to go berserk. Al Cassel and Phil Breman live in a little cottage in back of the fraternity house in which they have a heater. The other day they turned on the heater and left it on while they went to class, expecting thereby to have a warm room when they returned. Such things you know occasionally happen; the stove went bad. Lo and behold, what should greet the eyes of the returning students but a blackness that was never pictured in the dwelling place of the devil. The soot covered the ceilings, walls, dresser drawers, clothing, blankets, everything, with a layer one-half an inch thick. This was one surprise that didn't come in a small package. Al and Phil, after a hard day's labor, are now again holding open house. The University of Florida Glee club gave its first concert of the year a few days ago at Williston. a little town 30 miles from here. Marx Feinberg and Milt Friedman made the trip. The affair was a howling success from every angle. I was end man and it fell my lot to pull the curtains between our numbers. Imagine the embarrassment when I had to stand before the audience trying to pull the curtain and it obstinately refused to budge. The audience got a kick out of my discomfiture especially when I got mad once and pulled too hard and the whole curtain fell down. Was my face red! Marx sang a baritone solo that went over nicely. He sang, in character. "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" After the concert the city gave us a dance. And what a dance it was! I can't imagine where so many beautiful girls could have come from. Peculiarly enough (or is it so peculiar?) most of the girls were blondes. The boys are still As I look back on the Yiddish and the English press in that last decade of the nineteenth century I cannot help feeling that the former did more for the education of its readers than the latter. Having no army ol reporters to rim up sensational news, the Jewish press necessarily paid more attention to things of permanent interest. It tried to give its readers something of permanence and substantial value. The English press, I am glad to say. has made a great deal of progress in this respect in the last 10 years, since the var h.is made some Americans realze that there is a world outside of he United States with which we save not only commercial, but cultural relations. But, even to this lav. though some of the methods of the English press have been adopt?d by the Yiddish newspapers, the 'atter are still characterized by a more unified point of view, which ?ives news, comments and informaIw articles a unity which no English newspaper seeks to attain. I also want to express my great indebtedness to what Jacob Gordon did to educate whatever taste I have for dramatic literature. Gordon might have made a name for himself in Russian or Engl'sh literature. But he preferred to stick to Yiddish and portray the life of his own people. We ought to honor his memory. And now. as to the relation between Yiddish and English. I need not express my belief that so long as the Jews wish to live in this country and to participate in its cultural life, in its science, literature and drama, as well as in its political and industrial activities. English is bound to prevail as the language of the Jewish people. The Jews have ever been ready to adopt the language of the peoples among whom they have lived. Did they not drop Hebrew and adopt Aramaic as their national tongue? And was not Aramaic succeeded by Greek. Arabic. Spanish and German? Nevertheless. I think that Yiddish is rendering a great cultural service and will continue to do so for considerable time. I cannot share the views of my fellow citizens who look upon the very existence of a foreign press as a sort of treason, who would make the speaking or writing of a foreign language a crime. These people are doubtless influenced by patriotic motives, but their concep:ion of Americanism is narrow and unworthy of the great traditions of American liberalism. The patriotism jf these people is a narrow nationalism, copied from or in imitation of European nationalism. The Am%  rica ntradition Is Federalism, which illows for diversity instead of dull uniformity. The very name United States and our motto "E Pluribus Unum" express this. We have no national church as French and Ital.an nationalists want. America has been settled by many peoples and each must contribute freely to the common stock — the Germans have contributed their love nf music, the Italians have contributed their love of nature, gardening and certain household arts. Whyshould not the Jews contribute their specific gifts in the way of enthusiasm for the arts, for social idealism, as well as their peculiar love of intellectual life for its own sake? The idea that all Immigrants should wipe out their past and become simple imitations ol the existing type la neither possible nor desirable. The past cannot be wiped out. And we make ourselves ridiculous In the effort to do so. All great civilizations have been the resultants of the cintributinns of many peoples, and a richer American culture can come only if the i o like other elements, are given i chance to develop under favorible conditions their peculiar genius. The Jewish press can therefore lock back upon Its worth of the last 50 years with pride. It has prepared millions of Jewish people to take a worthy part in American Civilisation while also promoting the natural self-respect to which Jews are entitled because of their character and history. But what of the future? It is often said that the Yiddish press is f r a disappearing generation. That as our young people are educated in the public schools and 'earn to speak English of a sort in their daily life and business, Yiddish is bound to disappear. That may be. but, not being a prophet, I venture no opinion. Languages have a peculiar way of persisting, for they express experiences not so readily | expressible in other languages. In '' any case. I think, there is a great social value in maintaining Yiddish, not only for the cultural opportunities in English, but also to keep some, portion of the Jewish people in touch with the life of our own mmeriiate past and in touch with .he vast majority of the Jewish people abroad, whose language is predominantly Yiddish. Perhaps 50 yean from now the Yiddish press may celebrate its centennary. I hope hat when it does so its past will be o less honorable than it Ls today. The ma.i who flirts with servant girls has domestic tastes. When a man hasn't a ghost of a chance he Is naturally out of spirits. It is hard to convince doctors and druggists that health is wealth. Silence is the only thing that will ever improve some people's conversation. The trouble with mast handsome women: They think nothing else is neocssaiy. It is not always wise to tell all one knows, but it is well to know all one tells. Turn about is fair play. If a girl steals a young man's heart she should not be alarmed if he Steals a kiss. The latest recruit ol the theatrical colony at Hollywood is an Iowa hog. The animal, which won a | world's championship — as a ho^—i has been invited to the film capital to appear as a character actor in a j motion picture. Notwithstanding the seventy of the competition in these roles, the hog's unspoiled naturalness will stand it in good stead, I think, and it has every pri of a brilliant career. And not on the screen only. It Is a very fat hog and. appropriately, after being filmed, it will make a tour of the country appearing "in the flesh.'' Among ham actors it is considered certain to have an outstanding success. Perhaps the only practical objection so far advanced is that any | w-rry that may be drowned in the | 3.2 stuff would be trivial at the utmost, The winner of a national contest to pick the tallest story teller hails from Denver, which naturally gives him the advantage of a mile in altitude at the start. The dog catcher at Council Bluff, Iowa, earns $1,926 a year, and th, mayor only $1,500. A man at Jackson, Mich., was ar rested for wounding a bystander n an attempt to take his own life Fellow at Ann Arbor gave him*.], up to the police, together with his revolver, for fear he would commit a crime. Fired at by a bandit, a Chicago man was hit on the toe, and rejoices in the removal of a corn that had bothered him for 25 years. A deep sea diver of Houston, Tex. flies an airplane for diversion between dives. Police were called at Flint to evict indigent dogs which had taken possession of a well-to-do dog's kennel for sleeping purposes. An Adriap farmer claims to hav.mortgaged his farm to buy teeth for his divorced wife. A Kalamazoo motorist, alaimed by curious sounds in his engine, finally raised the hood and released a cat. O, nothing extraordinary! These old cranks that think money is the root of all evil ought to be happy now, since most of us are leading a life with little or no evil. An escaping burglar became wedged in a Missouri chimney, with no means of getting in touch with counsel for a habeas corpus. A man's talk shows up best alter a good dinner. Some people take steps for a divorce at public dances. Why is it that a large man alwaytakes a small woman seriously? A chicken "that lays eggs an-i crows" is held up for admiration In a strange-as-it-seems column. Crow of course are extremely hard to lay Client: "What do you think of the idea of giving the money back to the bank and asking for a light sentence?" 3u iMnttflrutm raving, and if the other trips will conclude. come up to this, happy days will really have come again. On the way back the driver of our bus got sick so that it afforded me the novel experience a driving a big bus. Marx, who was sitting next to me, felt reminiscent. He said that he would have sung much better but that he had had his mind off and had been thinking about a beautiful girl friend in Miami. I wonder whom he meant? Looking forward to a nice warm bed and heavy blankets, I gladly MOTHER She traveled the journey before you. She has known all the cost of the way, She paid out the price to its fullness That Motherhood only can pay. She loved when the world was against you. She hoped — when your hope sank and died. She clung to your hand when the clinging left scars in her heart deep and wide. She labored — and loved — and was happy, lor down deep in her kind heart she knew Your kindness and love would repay her Pot all that she did — just for you. — A. S. Shochet. IDA SHOCHET DIED 23RD OF TEBETH. 5688 (JANUARY 1 5. 1 928) />/ loving Rtmtmbmce Her CbUiren



PAGE 1

Page Six THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Friday, January 20. f the rabbi from his close contact with the congregation and the families of the congregants, may give the board the benefit of his direct knowledge, also so that he in turn may be in touch with all phases of the organization of which he is an important part. No board of trustees should be self-perpetuating. 'There should be constant rotation among the members on the board. Nor should any president — no matter how good — be permitted to hold office for too long a time. The board should be composed of men and women, wherever this is possible, and where it is not, such women's organizations as are affiliated with the synagogue should be consulted on all major matters affecting the congregation. Members of the congregation should be specially invited from time to time, to sit in at board meetings so that in the course of the year, the entire membership of the congregation will have been able to participate actively in the management of the congregation's activities. At least once every year, there should be an open meeting of the board to which members of the congregation should be invited. This in addition to the annual meeting when formal reports are presented and the election of officers, etc.. takes place. This open meeting of the board should be dedicated, first, to the transaction of the business at hand and. second, to holding an oprn forum. Relationship of Board and Rabbi The relationship of the board to the rabbi must be one of complete confidence. He must be looked upon as the spiritual leader and must be accorded full respect at all times. He should be given a free hand in the conduct of the religious activities of the congregation, and permitted freedom of speech. To expect the best from a rabbi, the board must give him their best. A rabbi cannot give his best unless he is given the time to do so It you want him to be a good preacher, you must give him full opportunity to prepare his sermons. This mean.s time for research. Time for rradm-:. Time for thought. 11 you expect him to be a good teacher, he must have time to plan and prepare his program. Time for conferences with his assistants and Fairfax Pharmacy Prescriptions Accurately ( 0 ••: I" i/t u.lt .1 Ttlfphonu :-\*:-. MIST, ^-'.'-o-, :;.- EAST FI.AGI.ER STREET iis teachers. He must have time to visit the classes. You must give him time, if you expect him to properly prepare your children for confirmation or "bar mitzvah." You expect him to play .v part in the life of the congrega t>on upon occasions of joy or sorrow. You expect him to meet with you socially. But you must make it possible for him to do all of this, even though it may mean having to furnish him with assistants to take care of the grinding details that come into every rabbi's life. It is true that the rabbi is human and must be treated as a human being with his physical limitations of time. The rabbi has a responsibility not only toward the congregation which he heads, but to the community in which he functions. The mantle of leadership is automatically placed upon his shoulders and he must lead in such a manner as will redound to the credit of his congregation, to the Jews as a whole and to his citieznship in particular. It is expected of the rabbi that he shall play his full part in the re'lgious. social and civic life of the community. As the religious leader, he must so conduct himself at all times that no breath of scandal or suspicion shall ever fall upon him. There is no place in the rabbinate for the pawing, mauling, kissing rabbi. There Is no place in the rabbinate tor the vulgar story-telling. racking -mart-aleck rabbi, not in tlie presence of his intimates, let alone in the presence of women, should he be other than i clean minded, clean mouthed man. A religious leader in every of the word. To be respected one must fust respect himself. Many a rabbi has lost his hold on his roneresatior. by a? times forgetting that he is the rabbi. They may al first laugh with him. and then it him. Wherever you find a fine rabbi, a nritual force, look for a fine congregation, a religious congrri;;ition. a congregation that is a power lor good in its community. A rabbi should be unafraid. There is no respect for the coward in the pulpit It is better for his own well being and for the peace of his soul that he maintain the right to speak his mind than to be a mere job holder. drawing a salary. It should not be expected of the rabbi to perform miracles. It is his duty to be the peace-maker, to be the friend, to bring contending forces together and to at all times be for the congregation and with the egation, As a leader he must not be led. And his leadership l-.ould not be confined to the pres*•:• &f *•:••: %  *' Do You Want STRICTLY KOSHER Meats and Poultry? f Patronize Sanmet's Kosher Market I :::: WASHINGTON IVEXI'E. Mi\Mi m:\(ii &f •:• A Complete Line of Strictly Kosher Meats and Fresh Killed Poultry An Invitation is extended every Jew to personally inrpect our itore to convince himself that every precaution u Insure Kosher Products Is strictly adhered t<>. ident of the congregation and the board of trustees, but to the men and women, boys and girls who make up his congregation. He should at all times be a shining example to the youth within his congregation. He should find time to play, to be part of the life of his congregation. He should stand with the board of trustees in presenting the needs of the congregation. He should always be ready to instill into the minds and the hearts of his congregants that they should give in proportion to their means for the religious efforts conducted by the congregation. Thank God. there are many rabbis and many congregations in this country who meet in the essentials the requirements that make for a wholesome, sane, sound, religious congregation. SOCIETY The seventh regional conference of Hadassah will be held in Savannah. Ga.. on Sunday and Monday. February 12-13, both the senior and junior organizations meeting at the same tune Business sessions will b;held separately of each organization, though the social affairs including the concluding banquet ai'd dance Will be joint affairs. Special rates have been arranged for tin benefit of those wishing to attend Delegates will be elected by the junior Miami organization at the next meeting on January 30, at a place which will be announced in oiu next issue. Those desiring to attend even though not delegates, are urged to communicate with Miss Lena W ilnkle. phone 2-7185. • • • At the joint Hadassah ball last providing entertainment were Milt Trager, Al Parker and r Alexander. Leo Ackerman was master of ceremonies. In chargi ements for the Senior Hadassah was a committee headed by Mrs Alex Goldstein. Repress •he Junior Hadassah were Sylvia Miles. Goldie Elman. Lillian Melcher, Bea Silver. Dora Rosenhouse and Jennie Rotfort. The local A.Z.A. chapter is sponsoring a February frolic on Sunday evening. February 12, for the benefit of the organization. A popularitj contest to choose Miami's mast popular Jewish girl will be cone and votes will be sold at one cent ai h The winner of the conte I will choose a male companion and Ck marriage will be performed Tickets to admit a couple will be only 50 cents. Entertainment will b provided. rempli Israel Sisterhood will celebrate Its annual birthday am sary with a bridge luncheon at the Blackstone hotel. Monday February 12:30 p. m In charge of arI s a i ommil U i headi %  %  ••• %  • %  • •' %  ••'• %  •:••:••:••:••:••:••:• •:••;••;••: •:••:••:••:• %  :•; : %  ••• %&f&f&f&f&f #4 %  %  %  1) I. I"! >|{ I". X. I.\t HKXTIIAI, i HIROPOD1S I HALCYON ARCADE I'honr 14(8) A man at Owensville, Indiana h eaten 26,280 eggs in the last years, six eggs a day. 2 A Washington dispatch on P, Eastern affairs reveals that Jehn." pronounced "Rey-Hoi," which w„ J ly alters an earlier conception u!" it might be "Chumley." A $15,000 jeweled egg t s lncl in a collection of Romanoff ge T now on show. The goose that 2 it, however, is no longer of a world. Pike's Peak's recent loss in stt. ure is now attributed to the disap pearance of an ice cap. It's a ma world, where even mountains gc collegiate. The dispatch further states thi: the hog has been invited to atte* a night club as the guest of hot but will investigate the reputation of the place before accepting. There is probably no foundation for the rumor that if the appearances of this personality are suecessful Patty Arbuckle may attempt mother comeback. It pays to advertise in The Jewish Ploridian. NEW 7th AVE. THEATRE .10.1.1 N. W. 7th Avt. I'lionr 28", Sunday and Monday, Jan. 22-21 F'NNIB IHHsi s "SYMPHONY SIX MILLION" \v i I b Irrnr Dunne Kicardo Cortn A human Htory IliVi lauchter litVhopes written Into an irrperlshahle MITV of love. ROK Office Open* .">.: Adults 20( Children 10c MACCABEES "S" MORI I MAN I II | INSURANCE A Human Institution Only 1 ive Insurance ( ompanies .is Strong as the Maccabees Over (W Million Dollars in the Relief Fund Homes for Aged Without Cost to Members Writes .ill of the usual forms of Certificates on Men and Women on a Legal Reserve ISasis — > 1,000 to $100,000 All Certificates have Special Accidental Clauses and Iot.il and Permanent Disability Benefits JUNIOR CERTIFICATES Twenty Year Endowment Educational Annuity Ordinary Life Twenty Payment 1 ifc Single Premium — All Policies Participating All Junior Certificates Pay Full Benefits at Age Four Special ["raining for Children in Music. Dancing wd Dramatic Art I'rce A. M. COFFIN State VlanufJer 226 Seybold Building : Phone 3-2618


Four
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Friday, January 20. 193 3.
*+?????????*?*??*????????????? t Kairtfl S>gnagtig SitUrtw !
!
Edited by RABBI S. M. MACHTEI
l-'uuniler and Director, Radio Synatroir of America
> Sunday Mornings
WIOD. Miami, Florida
I Vol. 1.
MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 22. 1933.
No. 6. +
Good and Evil
(Sermon delivered nn Sunday. January 15. 1133)
Scripture Reading, Genesis Chapter II, Verses 15-17 hicl.
St. Petersburg
Notes
_. am very little concerned with theology. But. I am very much inter-
4\ ested in religion. To a reasoning person to a student of religion
many problems must present themselves when studying the scriptures.
Certain parts must appear unreasonable. We shall endeavor, from time
to lime, to clear the mists and to pierce the veil with a ray of light from
tl)c torch of Judaism. Judaism is compared to a torch from which other
tapers have been kindled but whose own light has not been diminished.
thereby, III the least. Other religions have had their origins in Judaism
and have grown away from it but the truth of the word of God,
through the prophets in Israel has not been diminished in the least. Juda-
ism la all-embracing and looks upon all true, moral religions as branches
oi the same tree all reaching upward towards a common heaven and
bearing beneficial fruit for all the children of men.
THIS thought has been beautifully expressed in a poem by Harry Ro-
maine:
At the Muezzin's call for prayer
The kneeling faithful thronged the square.
And on Pushkara's lofty height
The dark priest chanted Brahma's might.
Amid a monastery's weeds
An old Franciscan told his beads;
While to the synagogue there came
A Jew to praise Jehovah's name.
The one great God looked down and smiled,
And counted each his loving child;
For Turk and Brahmin, monk and Jew
Had reached Him through the gods they knew.
LETT us try to understand our common Father. Chapter II. verse 17, of
Genesis reads, "But of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil,
thou shalt not eat of it; for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou
shalt surely die." Notice that God does not say "I shall kill you." but He
says, "thou shalt surely die." You will become extinct. The word of God
states a consequence, a result of the act. Death, extinction, follows man's
eating of the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil. But. that
does not seem reasonable. God must be mistaken. Or is He a Parent with
a perverted sense? Just think of it. We spend money on the education
oi our children with the object of training them to become good men
and women. A parent who sends his child to college would be happy to
learn from the dean that his child had learned to distinguish good from
evil. Why, that's almost perfection! Once you know the good from the
evil, it is easy to do the good and to shun the evil. Most of the difficulty
arises in being able to differentiate good from evil. The Bible tells us
that because Adam and Eve ate of the fruit of the tree of knowledge of
good and evil they were banished from the Garden of Eden. Life, for
them, ceased to be a paradise; that, as a result, death came to mankind.
It is clear that, at the outset, the holy scriptures depict God in an un-
favorable light. The God of the Hebrews must be cruel to have punished
Adam and Eve for a disobedience that resulted in such good to them.
Ciuod? Why, just think of it! They learned to distinguish good from evil.
YES, and that was the beginning ol the end. On that day the degen-
eration of mankind began. "Thou shalt surely die." Yes, moral and
physical death Is the result of our standard of good and evil. Our stand-
ard, not Gods standard. Man was created in the image of God. Gods
standard is the rule of right and wrong-Just and unjust. Man, created
in the image and with the attributes of God, is endowed With a sense, a
heavenly sense, of right and wrong. This standard permits of no com-
promises, knows no reservations. A thing, an act. is either right or wrong,
just or unjust. It cannot be both- But an act can be both good a"J
IT Is wrong to steal. It is right to return what you have borrowed. It Is
I right to pay your debts. It is wrong to murder. It Is right to help an-
other in need. But. it is good to steal-for the thief because he there-
by, increases his own possessions. It is good for him and evil for the one
who is robbed. It is bad for you to return what you have borrowed or to
pay what you owe because you, thereby, deprive yourself of money, or of
some comfort. It is evil in your personal point of view, though it is right
to principle. Though it is wrong to murder, it is good for you if you rid
yourself of an enemy who annoys you. Though it is right to help another
m time of need, it is bad for you because it requires a sacrifice on your
part. You must give up something that you could use for yourself Good
and evil are not universal principles. They are personal conveniences.
Right and wrong are universal standards God's everlasting truths
While a thing cannot be both right and wrong, it may be both good and
evil. Life affords us many examples of this difference in standard of good
and evil, depending on the persons affected. These are either right or
wrong in principle. They cannot be both-
SO long as mankind lives as created in God* image-by the Heavenly
standards of right and wrong. Just and unjust mankind will Sur-
vive; but when It substitutes the results of its eating of the fruit of tne
tree of knowledge when it substitutes personal conveniences of good
and evil for the universal, unequivocal truths of the Divine* standards,
right and wrong, just and unjust-then, "thou shalt surely die." The
substitution spells destruction and extinction for mankind. The Garden
of Eden ceases to be. Man takes himself out of Paradise. Our present
state, nationally and internationally, is. in my humble opinion, in great
measure due to our neglect of the Divine truths of right and wrong in
Congregation Bnai Israel will hold
regular services tonight with Rabbi
A. S. Kleinfeld preaching a sermon
on "Manhood." Saturday morning
services begin at 9 o'clock. Sunday
school at 10 a. m. Sunday and He-
brew school from 4 to 6 p. m. daily.
The building committee of Bnai
Israel has arranged a concert to be
?iven at the temple. Sunday. Janu-
ary 29. at 8 p. m. The committee
has been able to secure some very
high class talent and artists., and
assures all who will attend a very
enjoyable time.
Tlie Judaic council will have their
next meeting at the Horowitz hotel.
Monday evening. January 23. at 8:15
o'clock.
The next meeting of the Young
Maccabees will be held at the home
of Shelby Trager. 1104 Twenty-
fourth avenue, north. Monday eve-
ning. January 23. at 7:30 o'clock.
Radio Synagog
Rabbi S. M. Machtei. founder and
director of the Radio Synagog. will
preach over WIOD at 10 o'clock on
Sunday morning on "God-Given
Children." In addition to the ser-
mon there will be prayers, music,
and a question box.
Why People
Go To Church
Some go to church just for a walk.
Some to stare and laugh and talk;
Some go there to meet a friend.
Some their idle time to spend,
Some for general observation,
Some for private speculation,
Some to seek or find a lover.
Some a courtship to discover;
Some go there to use their eyes,
Anci newest fashions criticise.
Some to show their own smart dress.
Some their neighbors to assess.
Some to scan a robe or bonnet.
Some to price the trimming on it,
fome to learn the latest news
That friends at home they may
amuse.
Some to gessip false and true.
Sale within the sheltering pew;
Some go there to please the squire,
Some his daughter to admire.
Some the parson go to fawn.
Seme to lounge and some to yawn,
Some to claim the parish doles.
Some for bread and some for coals.
Some because it's thought genteel.
Some to vaunt their pious zeal.
Some to show how sweet they sing
Some how loud their voices ring,
Some the preacher go to hear.
His style of voice to praise or Jeer,
Some their sins to vanish o'er.
Some to sit and doze and nod.
But few to kneel and worship God.
Rev. J. S. Boughier.
p. S. The above is printed al the
request of many who heard il read
by Rabbi S. M. Machtei during last
Sunday's Radio Synagog Question
Box period.
our personal lives and In our International relationships. We live for our
good, and for the evil done our neighbors by our acts, we care not. You
can't expect life to be a Garden of Eden under such conditions.
THE same. In some measure, Is true of religions and their various de-
nominations. We think only of our own our point of view. Each
to his people. Mine. My own. But "Who or my people?" I ask in the
words of Rosa Zagnoni Marlnonl;
My people? Who are they?
I went into the church where the congregation
Worshipped my God. Were they my people?
I felt no kinship to them as they knelt there.
My people! Where are they?
I went into the land where I was born,
Where men spoke my language .
I was a stranger there.
"My people!" my soul cried, "who are my people?"
Last night in the rain I met an eld man
Who spoke a language I do not speak,
Which marked him as one who does not know my God.
With apologetic smile he offered me
The shelter of his patched umbrella.
I met his eyes And then I knew.
BECKWITT
OPTOMETRIST
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Recipes for the
Jewish Family
SEE THE PRIMITIVE EVERGLADES AT
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sunday Seminole Indian Village hjhoay
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Miami Hrarh.
Lebkurhen
Four eggs, one pound brown sug-
ar, one-eighth pound shredded cit-
ron, one-eighth pound shelled wal-
nuts i broken i, three and one-half
cups flour, one teaspoon baking
powder, two teaspoons cinnamon,
one-fourth teaspoon allspice.
Beat eggs and sugar well. Add cit-
ron, walnuts, flour, baking powder,
cinnamon and allspice. Spread
dough about one-half inch thick
with well-floured hands. Use long
pans. Bake in moderate oven, then
cut in squares and spread with ic-
ing. Dry in cool stove or in the sun
Ta.stes best when allowed to stand
for a week.
Cheese Blintzes
One cup flour, one cup cold water,
two eggs ibeateni. one-fourth tea-
spoon baking powder, one-half tea-
spoon salt, one egg, one and one-
half cups cottage cheese, salt and
pepper to taste.
Add salt and water to eggs (well
beaten) and add flour slowly until
batter is smooth. Pour batter on
heated and greased iron pan. tip-
ping the pan on all sides to cover
bottom with thin layer of batter.
Bake one side only until the thin
cake blisters, then tip out in one
piece on board. Now mix the cheese,
egg, salt and pepper and place fill-
ing in center of each cake, folding
over opposite corners to form a rect-
angle or square. Fry both sides in
butter until golden brown. Serve
with powdered sugar, cinnamon, or
sour cream. Blintzes may also be
Ixiked in oven for crispness.
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PAGE 1

Friday, January 20, 1933. THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page Five "Sweet Water of Megiddo" Lag Bo'omer Scenes in Palestine By RABBI LAZARlS AMI KOI) Rabbi Trustees & Congregation By DAVID A. BROWN Continued from Last Week) Remaining In second gear, the bodge six roared and t01e its wav Csdalnfully up the steep slopes that led to Safed and Miron, the recedI. Kinereth gradually fading into Insignificance behind the crags and I Galilee. There was a temtorary Hill in the conversation. The f ortly passenger had ceased broodinq over her young across the her[ :: iu; pond, the agronomist was overDv the towering hills in the I i. and even the voluble jourI had given the English preptsinons a rest. Passing scenery leads |o:;e lo meditation, and I fell to |r,".usiiit! n the quaint custom of cel[bratiiii; the aniversary of Simeon fear Jochai on Lag BoOmer. the thirty-third day of Omer. Hilluloh Dbar Jochai. it is called [ and is an event of the year. lever seven thousand Jews making b.. pilgrimage to Miron every year. |c:::!dren who have attained their [third birthday are brought here to have their locks shorn at the tomb M the creator of the Zohar, who, nth his son Eleazar, remained enmbed in a cave for 24 years, exbting on carob beans and water (from a neighboring spring. Seven rid enthusiasts pay annual k::bute and homage to this immorj, one of the greatest of TanI m whose body lies interred in f!::on, the final resting place of undreds of Tannaim, including the prince, and Shammai. his [ pponent in Mishnaic debate, ctli their train of devoted disciples. Safed, a multitudinous gathering \ Jem, jostling and chattering, efrvetcing wfth childish impatience, to dispense with the last 10 ; : the pilgrimage. Safed. that < historic city, where over a thousl:.d lives were lost in a disastrous ike not more than a century \:o. the fragile structures toppling %  >h other, hurling their occu| ntt to ii terrible death. Vnirtj minutes later, the Dodge I i rest in Miron. Our first I • ol this remote and msigi village was one of two (i buildings standing out | a black background. As we I i ar, the buildings assumed a "ore distinct shape. A massive a >oard greets the visitor -"Yeshivth Simeon Bar Jochai" the rabo meal school of the learned sage >nd Hie "Moshab Zekanim." home •or the aged. We pass on through Ce winding path and find ourselves n a small unassuming shtibel. a He ol former days when the synaxgue among Jews was the club%  ouse. the social center and the receatlon ground of its members. No nlnister preached from Its pulpit; io cantor filled its space with his llstorted renderings of the most autiful selections of our liturgy. NO petty rivalry existed as to the pective offices of the synagog. A miple. homely institution, a Shtibel. where its members met three times a day to pray, to discuss politics, -heir troubles and the fate of their •hildren across the waters in the and of the heathen. The second building was a true specimen of an ancient mausoleum. Tall, stately, black with age and with turrets running along its sides, it could be easily distinguished from ils neighbor. Inside this edifice %  h ere the bodies ot Rabbi 8imeo l lid his son Eleazar are interred, a iephardic Shammas gre< led us ith numerous bows and oily gesures, spreading out the palms 11 Is hands In gleeful expectancy of : handsome remuneration from ueh an opulent group. In this Uildlng, there is another Yeslnva. a 'ephardic school ol learning. We ntered this sanctum, and disco .%  -i a group of Sephardim squatting sn the ground, reclining leisure y imldst luxurious carpetand rugs, .erasing huge volumes ol Maimon0 the tune Of eastern melodies. i heir sing song reminded me trongly of the muezzin call, as the Arab Shainna.'stands on the para. wall ol the minaret, and calls his flock to prayer at eventide: Ireary, creepy and monotonous We wander further, and suddenly. With that beat a little taster, we ame upon the most important feature of this awesome mausoleum, a ight at once Inspiring and soothing, the tomb ol the venerable and master Kabbalist, Rabbi Simeon Bar JOChal. I To Be Continued) Rel>nnt American Hebrew Now in our New Home Everything in Furniture at Bargain Prices MIAMI-MATHER Co, 25-27-29 N. W. First Street Boot Forget! AIJV1UD TOR AH BENEFIT BALL Wednesday, Jan. 25, at 9 p. m. at the MAHl SHRINE TEMPLE B1SCAYNE BLVD. AT 14TH ST. %  • nas been said of me land with ome truth) that I have a more intimate acquaintance with the rabUinate than any other layman in he. country. This, in a measure, is due to those activities I have been engaged in, during the past 20 years which have impelled me to every ectlon of the country —east and west, north and south — crossing the continent some 15 or 16 times in hat period. In this work the rabbi has played .11 important part, and I have often been compelled to lean upon him as my mainstay in an emergency. Oth1 r work has brought me into contact with the trustees. I have worked with them, talked to them and at them, have been rough with 'lain, and in turn, have been treated rather roughly by them. Congregations I have come to know from my intimate contacts with the individual members. I have had the privilege of addressing congregations of all groups: Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, and have addressed^ them with a hat. without a hat. and with a hat and tails. With this background. I might well qualify in any court ol the land as an expert lay witness on the subject matter ot this brief article. Upon numerous occasions, and particularly within the past lour or five years. I have had dinned into my ears complaints by the rabbi about his board ol trustees and his ongregatlon; by the board 01 trusibOUl the rabbi and the 1011regation; by the members of the congregation about the trustees and the rabbi. These complaints are i neral In character. The Rabbi By the rabbi: that the trustees forget that the synagogue is a re!iglous institution and he. the rabbi. .is spiritual leader. That there is < o much cold blooded business mixed up with the activities of the board. That he is not tree to say vhal hi' pleases when he pleases That he is compelled to speak from a censored pulpit. That his position at times is a precarious one, being lected from year to your and apt .0 be thrown into the discard withIU! too much warning. He complains about his congrecaion: He is only sure ot a lull conregatlon on the high holidays, the ialance of the year, although he may plead and scold, his congregation is limited to a mere handful of he very religious or those who come for special reasons or upon a special occasion. Instead of being the spiritual leader, he finds himself the p] ritual "shamos." His sermons rarely ever please all of the congregation. His voice lacks coloring. His subjects are too religious or too spectacular. They have heard better sermons, much better, by Rabbi So-and-So, and So-and-So. All of which comes to the rabbi from confiding friends who tell him the choiae morsels of gossip that the congregation is indulging in only because they are his friends and think he ought to know. Trustees The trustees have their stock of complaints: The rabbi does not hold the interest of the congregation. He is only a fair preacher and not GERSON'S 1101 COUIM V *. MIAMI IIKACH Phone S-S989 A Place to Dine in Contentment much of a teacher. As a business man, he would starve to death. We would get rid of him. if we could. He has outlived his usefulness to' this congregation, but has been with us so long that we don't like to hurt him. As for the congregation, the trus! tees would like to know what they want for their few dollars. Services throughout the year. Sabbath and Sunday schools for their children, the use of the temple or the syna• gogue for every conceivable function. But when it comes to relievj ing the trustees of their financial I burden, with an exception here and | there, the congregants are just not interested. It's a thankless task at best, time consuming and costly. Congregation And now come the members of i the congregation, and their com, plaints are no less numerous: Proud \ of their place of worship, their SabI bath school, their center building. But they cost too much money. The mortgage is eating us up. Supporting religious institutions is an expensive luxury what with membership fees, costs of seats and other incidental taxes and assessments that are piled upon us from time 00 time. It would be much cheaper to withdraw and just buy seats for j the holy days. The board of trustees must think we are made of money. They operate as though we were a closed corporation. To get on the board you have to have a blood test to trace your ancestry and where you were born. If some of them would only resign and give the rest of us a chance we would show them how to run a religious institution. And as for the rabbi, you can get as many opinions as in re are members in the congregation: Hisermons are too long. Why doesn't he give us something ."nappy once in a while'' The rabbi's duty is to preach the Word of God. The pulpit is no place for politics or took reviews. What we want is religion, unadulterated. If the rabbi would only stop preaching about anti-Semitism. The rabbi is a Zionist. The rabbi is not a Zionist, lVliy should the rabbi get two months' vacation? How come he goes to Europe every year? The rabbi is too old. The rabbi is too young. Why doe n't the rabbi get married? What i right has a rabbi to live like a ; priest? Have you heard about the | rabbi? 'Then follows a whispered conversation.) You don't say so! I would never believe it. You would ; think butter couldn't melt in his mouth. If his wife would only stop butting in. I wonder if she thinks we can't run our women's organization without her having to tell us what we should do all the time? The rabbi is just a darling. He plays a fine game of golf, and as a story teller none of the men has anything on him. He's a good sport. He's a man among men. That he tells his -:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •> •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• &f ••• •' stories in the presence of ladies, well, the rabbi is a human being, too. What Is tne Solution? One would conclude from the above recital that all is not well with the forces that make up the religious institutions in this country. But not to paint the other side of the picture would be unfair, even though the purpose of this article is to present the disturbing factors that enter into the congregational life of our religious organizations and possibly offer a solution. Throughout the country there are many congregations that enjoy, if not a perfect relationship, at least as fine a one as is possible, when you consider that a congregation is composed of many types and kinds of people. And it is because I know many of these congregations in a rather intimate way that I dare to venture "where Angels fear to tread." All of our religious organizations have practically the same structure. If I were to draw a chart. I would place the president at the head, to the left of him the board of trustees, to the right the rabbi, and directly underneath, the congregation. II this were to take form, it would look like a pyramid, with the congregation supporting the rabbi, the trustees and the president. Leadership is just as essential in a religious institution as it Is In any sue cessful enterprise, whether it be commercial, political or social. Good leadership makes for perfect coordination and an harmonious whole. Therefore it is essential in selecting the president of a temple, that he possess those qualities of leadership as are befitting in the head of a religious institution. Being merely a good business man, or being wealthy, or having plenty of time, none of these in itself is sufficient. Primarily, he must be a religious man — religious in the truest sense of the word. In addition he must have ability to organize. He must be willing to make the sacrifice of time that an office of this nature demands. Each member of the board must have the potentialities of a president. They should be the "pick" of your congregation, men of character, men with a fine religious background. They too must be ready to make such sacrifice of time as may be necessary in the interest of the temple or synagogue. The board of trustees should be broad enough to permit the rabbi to be an ex-officio member. He should be invited at all times to participate in the discussions of the board, for 1 Continued on Next Page) Splendid Opportunity To study Hebrew with nationally-known Hebrew educator and writer. Private lessons, also group instruction can be arranged by calling evenings: EVERGREEN 77J-J, APT. 12. •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• &f •:• •:• •:• •:• •> • %  TIVOLI W. Fla*l*r at Sth Phone I-1SI1 ninu 25c | I I I • M.n in, %  20c I" 11 Kven ( Sunday, Monday and Tuesday January IS-SI-M I N'orma Shearer I'redrie March j I "Smilm Through" "Radio Service" WM. BIBLES Parts and Accessories 430 NORTH MIAMI AVE. No Chance •*<>•* Examination Vt Innk iCmtrra £>hnppf (One Block Kaal of HW Pout Office) Everything in Books, Old and New 410 NORTHEAST SECOND AVENUE \

^Jewish Tlcridiar
LORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY
MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY^ JANUARY 27, 1933.
Price Five Cents
[the prophet
m our MIDST
Margaret Isabel Lawrence
All through history it has been
he people of romance who have
ten truth to other people. For on-
ly people of romance can carry the
feeling of truth to other people. Or
uch ttipir imaginations with Its
nystery.
It was the feeling of a man cruci-
for his God-like spirit that
aught the western people and made
|bem followers of his name. The
teat awful tragedy of the crucifix-
ion told by men of passionate He-
aic capacity for feeling and telling
louched the imaginations of em-
lerors and rulers. So, it remained
the world. But the people to
thorn the Crucified had belonged
Lere turned upon by the others,
thich was a far more awful trag-
m.
Jews have suffered in silence,
folding themselves in part in the
jiritual consolation of their own
acred teachings, and in other part
(ithin the intellectualism of their
atures. The story of the persecu-
tion was never told In the writings
|hat Gentiles could read. Now. it is
King told in the languages of the
lersecutors by Jews of passionate
apacity to feel and tell. It will re-
tain, and have effect in the world,
Ihough the imaginations of emper-
prs and rulers are not so necessary
i they once were.
His publishers insist, on the cov-
ers of his books, that Ludwig Lewi-
ohn speaks to the Jews. They quote
Members of the rabbinate saying so.
Certainly Jews read what he writes.
put they do not need to. It Is the
ientile who does. And many Gen-
tles are reading him, and feeling
pious stirrings within themselves.
for no Gentile with any spiritual
Sensitivity, or any susceptibility to
|he dramatic pull of history can es-
pe in reading him that acutely
mpersonal sorrow which is at the
tinning of truth.
Gentiles, educated and uneducat-
alike. do not know what they
ave done to Jews. The business of
Christian civilization, with its wars
its nationalistic and economic
Gumptions, Is a kaleidescopic pan-
jrama with which even the most
pert cannot keep mental pace. Un-
fa a story is forced upon the im-
fcmation it is missed, and peculiar
perited, utterly unreasonable no-
Jons about strange people can con-
nue like weeds. Jews have lived
tiently beside Christians, either In
Nf racial pride, or in affable as-
|e cynicism born out of observa-
tion that the most advantageous
f ethod of getting along with Gen-
es %as to make them feel com-
piable about themselves. Which
Mainly never would Include re-
minding them of things, or asking
Ni pointed questions at a not
FV propitious time.
I Lewisohn asks no questions what-
Pr of the Gentile, but he does a
Temple Israel
Sponsor Concert
One of the outstanding events of
the current season will be the con-
cert sponsored by Temple Israel Sis-
terhood on Monday evening, Janu-
ary 30, beginning at 8:15 o'clock in
the main auditorium of the temple.
It will be directed by Hannah Spiro
Asher, one of the leading musicians
of the Greater Miami territory,
famed as a pianlste and now a
member of the faculty of the Uni-
versity of Miami conservatory of
music. Other noted artists of the
musical world will appear during
the evening. A reception will be
held following the concert. In
charge of arrangements is a com-
mittee headed by Mrs. I. L. Rosen-
dorf as chairman, and Mesdames
Morris Cowen. Henry D. Williams
and W. I. Magid. The public is in-
vited to attend.
Throngs Attend
Annual Dance
One of the largest crowds of the
season attended the Talmud Torah
benefit dance sponsored by the lad-
ies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish
Orthodox congregation last Wednes-
day night at the Mahi Shrine tem-
ple. The hall was beautifully decor-
ated and at one end there were tab-
les laden with goodies to be sold
for the benefit of the Talmud Torah
fund. A program of entertainment
was presented during the evening
featuring Chester Alexander. Irma
Davis and Hope Parker of the Club
Bagdad. Al Parker of the Silver
Slipper, Betty Jane Lanzer, Albert
Robertson and Betty Ganger of the
Danny Sheehan school of dancing
and numbers through the courtesy
of Billy Buller. Danny Sheehan was
seen in a number of acrobatic danc-
es which aroused enthusiasm. Imi-
tations of Al Jolson and skits by
Chester Alexander and Al Parker
kept the large audience in continual
laughter. In charge of arrangements
were Mrs. J. Louis Shochet, chair-
man; Mrs. Louis Pallott, assistant
chairman; Mesdames Nathan Adel-
man. Lee Weiner, S. Tannenbaum,
Jonah E. Caplan. S. Putterfass. C.
Tannenbaum. Max Rappaport. I.
Bucksteln. Charles Feldman and
Moe Harris; and Messrs. Nathan
Adelman. Milton Weiner. H. M.
Drevich, M. Rappaport. and S. Fut-
terfass. A substantial sum was real-
ized, which will be devoted to the
Talmud Torah fund of the organi-
zation.
V- of
reminding, and it is quite
fie. for the good of the Gentile,
at there was some reminding
ne.
[Nevertheless, and no matter what
** may know within oneself about
'king time, and to one's incalcul-
lWe good, it is a shaking experience
: a Gentile to read Lewlsohn. The
^eous Anglo-Hebraic prose, with
"notional undertones, and its
F'tual overtones, is psychically
pturbing. And no wonder. There
""ncentrated racial force behind
l"1, ar"d eternal prophetic power
Continued on Page Three)
Noted Cantor
To Appear
Joseph Z. Shlisky, one of the pres-
ent day world Jewry's noted cantors
will appear in Miami for a concert
on Sunday, February 5, at 3 p. m..
at the Temple theatre. Presented
by Beth David congregation, the
cantor will be heard in a program
of liturgical numbers, folk song, and
operatic arias which will enable Mi-
ami citizens and tourists to judge
why Cantor Shlisky has attained
the heights of fame in the Jewish
as well as non-Jewish musical world
though young in years.
Cantor Shlisky is a native of Pol-
and and Is now 38 years old. He be-
gan to sing at the age of seven un-
der the famous Solomon Schoichat.
Cantor Moses Volman took charge
of him a year later and then arrived
with him in Toronto, Can. Under
the direction of a manager, Shlisky
began a tour of the country and
finally landed at Scranton, Pa.
There his manager deserted him.
forcing Shlisky to try out at ama-
teur performances in burlesque
theatres, where his voice was above
the audience. He returned to To-
ronto and there worked in a tailor-
ing shop to earn sufficient to con-
tinue his musical training. Winning
a scholarship at the Toronto Con-
servatory of Music, he remained
there for 10 years under the tute-
lage of the famous voice master.
Prof. Dalton Baker, the English bar-
itone. In 1918 he returned to New
York and appeared in a series of
concerts at the Aeolian hall, where
he overnight became the toast of
musical critics. He then joined the
ranks of the San Carlo Opera Com-
pany, but left them because he dis-
liked the work. Following the work
he most enjoyed he became a cantor
and then was engaged by the first
and oldest Roumanian congregation
of New York City. In a recent tour
of the country, musical authorities
vied with one another in praising
the remarkable tenor voice of Shlis-
ky. the beautiful timbre of his tones
Miami to Send
Inaugural Train
Llnton M. Collins, Democratic I
leader, will be in charge of the j
Greater Miami special car to be
connected in the Florida Democratic
train going to Washington for the
inauguration of President elect
Franklin D. Roosevelt, March 4.
A special rate, including railroad
and Pullman fare, meals on the
train and occupation of the Pullman
in Washington, has been arranged
and reservations may be made
through Mr. Collins.
Special cars from over the state
will be assembled into a train at
Jacksonville at 7:15 p. m.. March 2,
arriving in the capltol at noon.
March 3.
Many Enjoy
Minstrel Show
The large Riverside auditorium
carried a large number of residents
and tourists last Wednesday night
to witness the minstrel show spon-
sored by the Junior committee of
Beth David Sisterhood for its Tal-
mud Torah fund. Mrs. Claire Cohen
Weintraub as the interlocutor, vied
with the end men for honors and
applause. Ida Engler and Rosalyn
Daum gave a professional exhibition
of fine dancing, as did Claire Simon
and Ruth Kopplowitz. Bobbie Res-
nick in a song performed as well as
one of much older age, and Leonard
Tobin and his fair partner received
their usual well-merited applause,
as did Theresa Rubinstein for their
dance numbers. The chorus was
splendid and the entire performance
was marked because of the profes-
sional manner in which it was car-
ried through from beginning to end.
Mrs. Sam Wiesel was chairman of
the committee in charge of arrange-
ments, and she was assisted by Mrs.
Rose Bogen. Victor Levin was make-
up director, and Mrs. Jake Engler
was in charge of costumes. Louis
Hayman directed the production.
Other acts on the program were
Mrs. Harry Cohen in a whistling
solo, and Mrs. Samuel Resnick in a
beautifully rendered interpretation
of "Eill, EDI."
Noted Actor Is
Honor Guest
Last Sunday evening the Miami
Jewish Dramatic Players tendered a
reception to the noted Yiddish play-
wright and actor. Max Goebel, who
is spending a short time at Miami
Beach. Several hundred people at-
tended and enjoyed a very pleasant
evening. Mr. Joseph Greenberg pre-
sided and introduced the entertain-
ers and speakers during the program
that was presented. The guests of
honor included L. Goldberg, prom-
inent Jewish actor, and the well-
known Yiddish writer. B. Kovner.
Those taking part in the program
were L. Goldberg of New York, Hen-
ry Seitlin. Harry Greenberg, Joseph
Greenberg, Harry Rose and B. Kov-
ne. Mr. Goebel responded briefly
during the evening and thanked all
for the cordial reception accorded
him. In charge of arrangements
were Mesdames Silverman. Seitlin
and Slaviter. During the evening de-
licious refreshments were served.
[Announcements!
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
(Conservative)
13* N. W. Third Avenue
MAX SHAPIRO. Rabbi
Regular services begin tonight at
5:30 with the late services following
at 8:15 p. m. when Rabbi Max Sha-
piro will preach a sermon on "The
Plagues of Our Present Day Civili-
zation." The congregational singing
and chanting will be directed by
Cantor Louis Hayman, who is being
assisted by the choir. A social hour
follows the late services. Saturday
morning services begin at 8:30 and
Mincha services at 5 p. m.
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION
(Orthodox)
1545 S. W. Third Street
Junior Hadassa
to Elect Delegates
An important meeting of Junior
Hadassah will be held next Monday
evening, January 30, in the Spanish
room of the Ponce de Leon hotel at
8 p. m. At this meeting election of
delegates to the southern regional
convention of Hadassah to be held i
at Savannah, Ga., on February 12
and 13, will be held. The winner of.
the essay contest will be announced !
and a program will be presented.
Millooent Rubin will give a reading, j
Rabbi Max Shapiro will speak and
musical numbers will be heard. Ha-
dassagrams will be distributed and
a social hour will follow. All mem- j
bers and friends are urged to at- [
tend.
JONAH E. CAPLAN, Rabbi
The usual early services begin at
5:30 with the late Open Forum ser-
vices at 8:30 at which time Rabbi
Jonah E. Caplan will preach on
"The Finger that Points to God."
This sermon will convey a message
particularly appropriate because of
conditions existing in Miami Jewry
today. The usual congregational
singing and chanting will be en-
joyed. Saturday morning services
begin at 9 a. m. and special services
in recognition of this being "Shab-
bos Rosh Chodesh" will be conduct-
ed with the rabbi preaching a ser-
mon in Yiddish. At the late Friday
night service, Mr. Milton Weiner
will make an announcement to lo-
cal Jewry and especially the mem-
bers of the congregation. A social
hour will follow.
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI
(Reform)
1.17 N. K. Nineteenth Street
Special Rites
Next Monday
A large number of Jewish tourists
are daily visiting the Musa Isle In-
dian village to see the native life of
the Seminole tribe, and to see the
alligators of whom there are a large
variety.
Next Monday afternoon beginning
at 2 o'clock, residents and tourists
will have their first opportunity of
seeing alligators being fed their
weekly meal. It is real nature in the
raw.
They are only fed about once each
week as it takes them that long to
properly adjust their meal. Of
course, if there was just one alli-
gator to be fed, everything would
proceed quietly and minus excite-
ment. But out at Musa Isle there
are several hundred alligators and
crocodiles within one enclosure and
feeding them is a problem. William
Karkeet, the manager of Musa Isle,
prepares for the event by obtaining
about 800 pounds of fish in the
raw. Having the fish, he equips all
the male Seminoles with long bam-
boo poles and places them at stra-
tegic points around the concrete en-
closure.
As soon as the alligators smell the
fish, they begin to crowd close to the
wall. Then the fish is thrown in to
them about a big shovelful at a
time. All the alligatdrs and croco-
diles go wild. They revert back to
the time when life was one contin-
ual struggle for the survival of the
(Continued on Page Six)
DR. JACOB H. KAPLAN, Rabbi
Services will begin tonight at 8:15
and Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan will dis-
cuss the second part of the Presi-
dent's research committee on social
trends dealing with the problems of
the biological heritage and of social
heritage. This is perhaps the most
important contribution dealing with
the problems of today.
The public is welcome.
CONGREGATION BETH JACOB
(Orthodox)
.111 Whin L. AXELROD, Rabbi
Regular Friday evening services
begin at 5:30 with the late services
at 8:30 p. m., when the rabbi will
preach a sermon on "The Jew, a
Born Optimist." The congregational
chanting and singing will be direct-
ed by Cantor Boris Schlachman.
Saturday morning services begin at
9 a. m.. with the rabbi preaching in
Yiddish on "Heintige Darshonim."
Bnai Brith To
Install Officers
Beth David Talmud Torah hall
will be the scene of impressive In-
stallation services for the newly-
elected officers of Sholem lodge of
Bnai Brith, next Sunday evening.
January 29, at 8 p. m. In addition
to the formal ritual an evening of
entertainment including singing,
playing by artists, vaudeville sketch-
es and addresses by prominent
speakers will be provided. Follow-
ing the program refreshments will
be served. No charges of any kind
will be made and the public is urg-
ed to attend.



PAGE 1

Page Six THE IFWISH FLORIPIAN Friday, January ^a,^ J I the rabbi from his close contact with the congregation and the families of the congregants, may give the board the benefit of his direct knowledge, also so that he in turn may be in touch with all phases of the organization of which he is an Important part. No board of trustees should be self-perpetuating. There should be constant rotation among the members on the board. Nor should any president —no matter how good — be permitted to hold office for too long a time. The board should be composed of men and women, wherever this is possible, and where it is not, such women's organizations as are affiliated with the synagogue should be consulted on all major matters affecting the congregation. Members of the congregation should be specially invited from time to time, to sit in at board meetings so that in the course of the year, the entire membership of the congregation will have been able to participate actively in the management of the congregation's activities. At least once every year, there should be an open meeting of the board to which members of the congregation should be invited. This in addition to the annual meeting when formal reports are presented and the election of officers, etc., takes place. This open meeting of the board should be dedicated, first, to the transaction of the business at hand and, second, to holding an open forum. Relationship of Board and Rabbi The relationship of the board to the rabbi must be one of complete | confidence. He must be looked upon as the spiritual leader and must be j accorded full respect at all times, i He should be given a free hand in the conduct of the religious activi| ties of the congregation, and perj mitted freedom of speech. To expect the best from a rabbi, the I board must give him their best. A rabbi cannot give his best unless he ; is given the time to do so. If you want him to be a good preacher, i you must give him full opportunity i to prepare his sermons. This means | time for research. Time for reading. Time for thought. If you expect him to be a good teacher, he must have time to plan and prepare his program. Time for conferences with his assistants and Fairfax Pharmacy Prescriptions Accurately Compounded Telephones 2-4S25. 2-9197, 2-9805 225 EAST FLAGLER STREET lis teachers. He must have time to visit the classes. You must give him time, if you expect him to properly prepare your children for confirmation or "bar mitzvah." You expect him to play a part in the life of the congregation upon occasions of Joy or sorrow. You expect him to meet with you socially. But you must make it possible for him to do all of this. even though it may mean having to furnish him with assistants to take care of the grinding details that come into every rabbi's life. It is true that the rabbi is human and must be treated as a human being with his physical limitations oi time. The rabbi has a responsibility not only toward the congrega| tion which he heads, but to the j community in which he functions. | The mantle of leadership is auto| matically placed upon his shoulders and he must lead In such a manner I as will redound to the credit of his congregation, to the Jews as a whole and to his citieznship in particular. It is expected of the rabbi that he shall play his full part in the re'igious, social and civic life of the community. As the religious leader, he must so conduct himself at all times that no breath of scandal or suspicion shall ever fall upon him. There is no place in the rabbinate for the pawing, mauling, kissing rabbi. There is no place in the rabbinate for the vulgar story-telling, wisecracking, smart-aleck rabbi, not even in the presence of his intimates, let alone in the presence of women, should he be other than a clean minded, clean mouthed man. A religious leader In every sense of the word. To be respected, one must first respect himself. Many B rabbi has lost his hold on his congregation by a? times forgetting that he is the rabbi. They may at first laugh with him, and then laugh it him. Wherever you find a fine rabbi, a real spiritual force, look for a fine congregation, a religious congregatlon, a congregation that is a power for good in its community. A rabbi should be unafiaid. There is no respect for the coward in the pulpit. It is better for his own well being and for the peace of his soul that he maintain the right to speak his mind than to be a mere job holder, drawing a salary. It should not be expected of the rabbi to perform miracles. It is his duty to be the peace-maker, to be the friend, to bring contending forces together and to at all times be for the congregation and with the congregation. As a leader he must not be led. And his leadership hould not be confined to the president of the congregation and the board of trustees, but to the men and women, boys and girls who make up his congregation. He should at all times be a shining example to the youth within his congregation. He should find time to play, to be part of the life of his congregation. He should stand with the board of trustees in presenting the needs of the congregation. He should always be ready to instill into the minds and the hearts of his congregants that they should give In proportion to their means for the j religious efforts conducted by the congregation. Thank God. there are many rabbis and many congregations in this : country who meet in the essentials the requirements that make for a wholesome, sane, sound, religious congregation. Additional Gloom Chaser SOCIETC r •> •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •> •:• -:• •:• •:• •:• -•• ••• ••• •:• %  -. %  •:• •:• •:• •> *.;. .•• •:• •:• •:• •:• -:•:&f + -:• •:Do You Want STRICTLY KOSHER Meats and Poultry? Patronize I Satinet's Kosher Market t '37 WASHINGTON AVENl'E. MIAMI BEACH A Complete Line of Strictly Kosher Meats and Fresh Killed Poultry + + An invitation is extended every Jew to personally inspect our store to convince himself that every precaution to insure Kosher Products is strictly adhered to. The seventh regional conference of Hadassah will be held in Savannah. Ga.. on Sunday and Monday. February 12-13. both the senior and junior organizations meeting at the same time. Business sessions will be held separately of each organization, though the social affairs including the concluding banquet ai"d dance will be Joint affairs. Special rates have been arranged for the benefit of those wishing to attend Delegates will be elected by the junior Miami organization at the next meeting on January 30, at a place which will be announced in oui next issue. Those desiring to attend even though not delegates, are urged to communicate with Miss Lena Wcinkle. phone 2-7185. At the joint Hadassah ball last week those providing entertainment were Milt Trager, Al Parker and Chester Alexander. Leo Ackerman was master of ceremonies. In charge of arrangements for the Senior Hadassah was a committee headed by Mrs. Alex Goldstein. Representing the Junior Hadassah were Sylvia Miles. Goldie Elman. Lillian Melclier. Bea Silver. Dora Rasenhou.se and Jennie Rotfort. • o • The local A.Z.A. chapter is sponsoring a February frolic on Sunday evening. February 12. for the benefit of the organization. A popularity contest to choose Miami's mast popular Jewish girl will be conducted and votes will be sold at one cent each. The winner of the contest will choose a male companion and a mock marriage will be performed. Tickets to admit a couple will be only 50 cents. Entertainment will beprovided. • • • Temple Israel Sisterhood will celebrate its annual birthday anniversary with a bridge luncheon at the Blackstone hotel. Monday. February 6. at 12:30 p. m. In charge of arrangements is a committee headed by Mrs. J. A. Richter. • • • Eeth Jacob Sisterhood is sponsoring its annual dance on Tuesday %  VI ning. January 31. at the ballroom I 1 the beautiful Pier. Miami Beach. A special floor show is to be preenb d and every effort to make this an evening of outstanding enterainment will be made. Mrs. Sam 3ohen is chairman of the commitee in charge of arrangements. Leary: Is tnat fellow McFa11 aI1 right to take on a fishing trip?" Wyse: "Is he? Say, besides doing the cooking he'll think up lies for the whole bunch." Boise: "Did you see that pedestrian who was struck by the auto dare the driver to try it again?" Noyce: "No: did the autoist take up the challenge?" Boise: "No. He said it nearly broke his heart to pass up the chance, but he had to meet a train." Billswiggle: "I suppose in these times you live in apprehensive trepidation, don't you?" Dinklesproof: "No. I live in the suburbs." Bricklayer %  first day on job': "Guess I can't work here —there's %  no place to park my auto." Boss: "No. you won't do. We can only Dae bricklayers who have their own chauffeurs." "How did the detectives dlscovei that the gangster was disguised ai a woman?" "He passed a milliner's window without looking In." Lawyer: "Rotten! How would yor be able to pay me then?" The use of profanity at bull fights will bring immediate arrest and imprisonment, according to an edict issued by Mexico's chief of police. But I understand that the bull, before dying, will be permitted to say "O. pshaw!" What's the News Today? O. nothing extraordinary. A hen at Rickey. Oregon, laid a purple egg. Delicatessen of All Kinds Fancy Groceries %  Dairy Products FYesh Fruits and Vegetables For Free Delivery PHONE 5-3512 V + •:• l &f + + mw +*+++*#*******************: : -* &f&f&f &f &f &f&f i .i i hitntiMpl Ann troublM com %  ••!. i>< u n nt r. v. I.AI m:\-ni.\i. CHIROPODIST HALCYON ARCADE noor, Opp. Olympia n Phone 3-30S9 A man at Owensville, Indian,? eaten 26.280 eggs i n t £*£* years, six eggs a day. A Washington dispatch on Eastern affairs reveals that j.J* Pounced "Rey-Hoi." which 1 ly alters an earlier conception J it might be "Chumley." "* A $15,000 jeweled egg ta lnc ,, in a collection of Romanoff ^ now on show. The goose that 2 It, however, is no longer of 2 world. Pike's Peak's recent loss in ure is now attributed to the iisi pearance of an ice cap. if s a m world, where even mountains collegiate. The dispatch further states tlw the hog has been invited to attend a night club as the guest of honor but will investigate the repuutm of the place before accepting. There is probably no foundatict for the rumor that if the appm. ances of this personality are cessful Patty Arbuckle may attempt another comeback. It pays to advertise in The Jeinsr. Ploridian. NEW 7th AVE. THEATRE 30SS N. W. 7th Ave. Phone 2ISS Sunday and Monday, Jan. 22-21 F'NNIK HI'RST'S "SYMPHONY SIX MILLION' with Irene Dunne Ricardo Cortn A human story ... life's laughter.. life's hopes written into an imperishable soni' of love. Box Office Opens 5.IS Adults 20c Children lie THE, MACCABEES MORI I II AN I II 1 INSURANCE A Human Institution Only Five Insurance Companies as Strong as the Maccabees Over One Million Dollars in the Relief Fund Homes for Aged Without Cost to Members W ntcs .ill of the usual forms of Certificates on Men and Women on a Legal Reserve Basis— $1,000 to $100,000 All Certificates have Special Accidental Clauses and Total and Permanent Disability Benefits JUNIOR CERTIFICATES Ordinary Life Twenty Payment I ife Twenty Year Endowment Educational Annuity Single Premium — AH Policies Participating All Junior Certificates Pay Full Benefits at Age Four Special Framing for Children in Music, Dancing and Dramatic Art Free A. M. COFFIN State Manager 226 Seybold Building : Phone 3-2618



PAGE 1

%  January 20, 1933. !" E JE _^ I S H F L O R I D I A N Page Five "Sweet Water of Megiddo" Lag Bo'omer Scenes in Palestine By RABBI LAZARUS AXELROD Rabbi Trustees & Congregation By DAVID A. BROWN ntinued from Last Week) Remaining in second gear, the six roared and tore its way Gnfully up the steep slopes that L to Safed and Miron, the recedKinereth gradually fading into L cnificance behind the crags and Eg, of Galilee. There was a ternary lull in the conversation. The [orily passenger had ceased broodjnc over her young across the herL ng pond, the agronomist was overLed by the towering hills in the [dance, and even the voluble jour2iist had given the English prepositions a rest. Passing scenery leads L. to meditation, and I fell to [•.using on the quaint custom of cel[brating the aniversary of Simeon tar Jochai on Lag Bo'Omer, the (forty-third day of Omer. Hilluloh Dbar Jochai, it is called ...:•.. and is an event of the year, ver seven thousand Jews making [he pilgrimage to Mlron every year. %  Children who have attained their Ihird birthday are brought here to lave their locks shorn at the tomb ihe creator of the Zohar, who, tith his son Eleazar. remained en:mbed in a cave for 24 years, exiting on carob beans and water om a neighboring spring. Seven thousand enthusiasts pay annual Ir.bute and homage to this immor}.: soul, one of the greatest of Tanka.m. whose body lies interred in Kiron. the final resting place of hundreds of Tannaim, including Bid the prince, and Shammai. his krj opponent in Mishnaic debate, i k-.th their train of devoted disciples. Sated, a multitudinous gathering \'. Jews, jostling and chattering, ef* I nesting with childish impatience, laser to dispense with the last 10 riles of the pilgrimage. Safed, that Irelustoric city, where over a thousand lives were lost in a disastrous lutbquake not more than a century ho. the fragile structures toppling per each other, hurling their occunts to a terrible death. "I'nirty minutes later, the Dodge fcame to rest in Miron. Our first i fenpu of this remote and insigfc.ncant village was one of two ptewashed buildings standing out -ainst a black background. As we Brew near, the buildings assumed a nore distinct shape, A massive sign oarc.greets the visitor -"Yeshi V ith Simeon Bar Jochai"-the raba.nical school of the learned sage ^nd the "Moshab Zekanim," home %  or the aged. We pass on through M binding path and find ourselves •n a small unassuming shtibel, a e:ic of former days when the syna;cgue among Jews was the clubhouse, the social center and the receation ground of its members. No minister preached from its pulpit; io cantor filled its space with his • ted renderings of the most : autiful selections of our liturgy. petty rivalry existed as to the pectlve offices of the synagog. A imple, homely institution, a Shtibel. where its members met three times i day to pray, to discuss politics, -heir troubles and the fate of their -hildren across the waters in the and of the heathen. The second building was a true specimen of an ancient mausoleum. Tall, stately, black with age and with turrets running along its sides, it could be easily distinguished from its neighbor, inside this edifice .vhere the bodies of Rabbi Simeon nd his son Eleazar are interred, a Sephardic Shammas greeted us .ith numerous bows and oily ges.ures, spreading out the palms of Is hands in gleeful expectancy of handsome remuneration from such an opulent group. In this uilding. there is another Yeshiva, a Sephardic school of learning. We ntered this sanctum, and disco' red a group of Sephardim squatting ;ii the ground, reclining leisure';imidst luxurious carpets and rug;, perusing huge volumes of Maimondi's to the tune of eastern melodies. Their sing song reminded me •trongly of the muezzin call, as the Arab Shammas stands on the parapet wall of the minaret, and calls his flock to piayer at eventide: Ireary, creepy and monotonous. We wander further, and suddenly, with .••aits that beat a little faster, we :ame upon the most important feature of this awesome mausoleum, a sight at once inspiring and soothing, the tomb of the venerable sage and master Kabbalist. Rabbi Simeon Bar Jochai. (To Be Continued) Reprint American Hebrew Now in our New Home Everything in Furniture at Bargain Prices IAMI-MATHER Co, 25-27-29 N. W. First Street Dont Forget! TALMUD TORAH BENEFIT BALL Wednesday, Jan. 25, at 9 p. m. at the MAHI SHRINE TEMPLE BISCAYNE BLVD. AT 14TH ST. it has been said of me (and with .ome truth! that I have a more intimate acquaintance with the rabbinate than any other layman In he country. This, in a measure, is due to those activities I have been engaged in, during the past 20 years which have impelled me to every eetion of the country —east and west, north and south — crossing the continent some 15 or 16 times in that period. In this work the rabbi has played in important part, and I have often been compelled to lean upon him as my mainstay in an emergency. Other work has brought me into contact with the trustees. I have worked with them, talked to them and at them, have been rough with them, and in turn, have been treated rather roughly by them. Congregations I have come to know from my intimate contacts with the individual members. I have had the privilege of addressing congregations of all groups: Orthodox, Con: servative, Reform, and have adI dressedthem with a hat, without a hat, and with a hat and tails. With this background, I might well qualI ify in any court of the land as an expert lay witness on the subject matter of this brief article. Upon numerous occasions, and j particularly within the past four or five years. I have had dinned into I my ears complaints by the rabbi about his board of trustees and his : congregation; by the board of trusj .re.s about the rabbi and the COO%  regation; by the members of the congregation about the trustees and the rabbi. These complaints are :eneral in character. The Rabbi By the rabbi: that the trustees forget that the synagogue is a religious institution and he. the rabbi, its spiritual leader. That there is too much cold blooded business mixed up with the activities of the board. That he is not free to say what he pleases when he pleases. That he is compelled to speak from a censored pulpit. That his position at times is a precarious one, being lected from year to your and apt ;o be thrown into the discard without too much warning. He complains about his congregaion: He is only sure of a full con• regation on the high holidays, the ;alance of the year, although he may plead and scold, his congregation is limited to a mere handful of he very religious or those who come for special reasons or upon a spe.ial occasion. Instead of being the spiritual leader, he finds himself the spiritual "shamos." His sermons rarely ever please all of the congregation. His voice lacks coloring. His subjects are too religious or too spectacular. They have heard better sermons, much better, by Rabbi So-and-So, and So-and-So. All of which comes to the rabbi from confiding friends who tell him the choiee morsels of gossip that the congregation is indulging in only because they are his friends and think he ought to know. Trustees The trustees have their stock of complaints: The rabbi does not hold the interest of the congregation. He is only a fair preacher and not GERSON'S 1301 Colllnn Ave. VI \MI BEACH Phone 5-3989 A Place to Dine in Contentment much of a teacher. As a business man, he would starve to death. We would get rid of him, if we could. He has outlived his usefulness to this congregation, but has been with us so long that we don't like to hurt him. As for the congregation, the trustees would like to know what they want for their few dollars. Services throughout the year. Sabbath and Sunday schools for their children, the use of the temple or the synagogue for every conceivable function. But when it comes to relieving the trustees of their financial burden, with an exception here and there, the congregants are Just not interested. It's a thankless task at best, time consuming and costly. Congregation And now come the members of the congregation, and their complaints are no less numerous: Proud of i heir place of worship, their Sabbath school, their center building. But they cost too much money. The mortgage is eating us up. Supporting religious institutions is an expensive luxury what with membership fees, costs of seats and other incidental taxes and assessments that are piled upon us from time .o time. It would be much cheaper to withdraw and just buy seats for the holy days. The board of trustees must think we are made of money. They operate as though we were a closed corporation. To get on the board you have to have a blood test to trace your ancestry and where you were born. If some of them would only resign and give the rest of us a chance we would show them how to run a religious institution. And as for the rabbi, you can get as many opinions as there are members in the congregation: His sermons are too long. Why doesn't he give us something snappy once in a while? The rabbi's duty is to preach the Word of God. The pulpit is no place for politics or book reviews. What we want is religion, unadulterated. If the rabbi would only stop preaching about anti-Semitism. The rabbi is a Zionist. The rabbi is not a Zionist. Why should the rabbi get two months' vacation? How come he goes to Europe every year? The rabbi is too old. The rabbi is too young. Why doesn't the rabbi get married? What right has a rabbi to live like a priest? Have you heard about the rabbi? (Then follows a whispered conversation.) You don't say so! I would never believe it. You would think butter couldn't melt in his mouth. If his wife would only stop butting in. I wonder if she thinks we can't run our women's organization without her having to tell us what we should do all the time? The rabbi is just a darling. He plays a fine game of golf, and as a story teller none of the men has anything on him. He's a good sport. He's a man among men. That he tells his stories in the presence of ladles, well, the rabbi is a human being, too. What Is tne Solution? One would conclude from the above recital that all is not well with the forces that make up the religious institutions in this country. But not to paint the other side of the picture would be unfair, even though the purpose of this article is to present the disturbing factors that enter into the congregational life of our religious organizations and possibly offer a solution. Throughout the country there are many congregations that enjoy, if not a perfect relationship, at least as fine a one as is possible, when you consider that a congregation Is composed of many types and kinds of people. And it is because I know many of these congregations in a rather intimate way that I dare to venture "where Angels fear to tread." All of our religious organizations have practically the same structure. If I were to draw a chart, I would place the president at the head, to the left of him the board of trustees, to the right the rabbi, and directly underneath, the congregation. If this were to take form, it would look like a pyramid, with the congregation supporting the rabbi, the trustees and the president. Leadership is just as essential in a religious institution as it Is in any successful enterprise, whether it be commercial, political or social. Good leadership makes for perfect coordination and an harmonious whole. Therefore it is essential in selecting the president of a temple, that he possess those qualities of leadership as are befitting in the head of a re! ligious institution. Being merely a good business man. or being wealI thy, or having plenty of time, none of these in itself is sufficient. Primarily, he must be a religious man 1 — religious in the truest sense of the word. In addition he must have I ability to organize. He must be wilj ling to make the sacrifice of time that an office of this nature demands. Each member of the board must have the potentialities of a president. They should be the "pick" of your congregation, men of character, men with a fine religious background. They too must be ready to make such sacrifice of time as may be necessary in the interest of the temple or synagogue. Tne board of trustees should be broad enough to permit the rabbi to be an ex-officio member. He should be invited at all times to participate in the discussions of the board, for (Continued on Next Pa*e) &f &f &f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f &f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f Splendid Opportunity To study Hebrew with nationally-known Hebrew educator and" writer. Private lessons, also group instruction can be arranged by calling evenings: EVERGREEN 775-J, APT. 12. &f > + # &f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f *> &f &f&f &f&f&f &f&f&f *' TIVOLI W. Flakier t 8th Phone 2-3352 Matinee 20r 2 Io 11 Kreninl 25c Sunday. Monday and Tuesday January 22-23-24 Norma Shearer Fredrlc March "Smilin' Through" "Radio Service" WM. SIELER Parts and Accessories 430 NORTH MIAMI AVE. 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Page Six
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Indav, January 13
The Source of
Christian Ethics
[i uniinued from Page One]
repent so as not again to
vim. lie may also honor
.. '.. / peace with thee. And
meleea end persist in his
].'. even so forgive him
the heart and leave to God
: .ting."
i en outdoes the
(i credo of Jesus which sug-
the turning Ol the other cheek
n The entire concep-
love, humility, and
rabbinic one. Con-
niti t.s in Jewish writings
against hatred,
S pride Innunier-
:., paaaagea extolling the
love, truth, humility, and
Hi ring.
atlc and charitable
US towards publicans
enerally been
; out in contrast to the cold
i If-rlghteous superl-
ti.i Scribes and Pharisees.
bbinic literature Is replete
i love and kind-
ilnners There was r.
not only forgiving
in robbers and
tided them!
Ji u and
'.' i: dene can com-
trangely moving
R Ibbl Abbahu and 1'cnte-
: ilmud Jer .
Ime : a great
; : I man
tin
. d him about I
Pei Eekaka 'Five
with harlot.-. I
' thl V68-
bath i amuse the bathers
nd i play the flute.'
tbbahu asked:
evei doni a good
red:
ul the the-
v. omaii Btanding
an bitterly weeping.
.uned that
. prisoner. She
frei dom only by
tity. So I sold
pillow and all my
1 ;avi the money
hi go ransom her
d not sell her honor to
saintly R.
been on hi
ascertain
i eplj to Pente-
man lit to pray
.: Ol trouble!' '
u .i..tin" la this
11 morality
Idea that
ind sinner was
; for Israel
R.
: the per-
beautlful
' P"' aching
thai
Ji v Ish
i readily
in and hi

n .
.< all
v and
ntin eth-
been
the Old
literature,
* d that In
been
ftafiatMl and the
Mank Directs Show
On January 26, Burton Mi |
well-known trouper and shov
Will dlrecl the Beth David ml
show at the Riverside school
ti rium. Members of the
Ittee Ol Beth David .c:
hood will be starred In thi perform-
ance, which is being given for the
benefit of the Talmud Torah fund
Sisterhood. A number of lo-
Clement, Eusebius, Jerome, and j
Augustine, with miracles and a mor- I
bid love of suffering, which is un-
Jewish. This they probably bor-
rowed from Mithraisni and other
oriental mystic cults.
An excellent example of this plag-
larl in wi find in the earnest exhor-
tation In the Book of Sirach:
"Forgive thy neighbor the hurt
that he hath done unto thee;
"So shall thy sins also be forgiven
when thou prayest."
Now let us compare these lines
with similar lines in the "Lord's
Prayer":
"Forgive us our sins as we forgive
lose that trespass against u-."
Philo, the greal Jewish philoso-
-. too. said till same tiling:
"If you ask iorgiveness for your
sins do you also forgive those that
trespass against you. For remission
s granted for remission."
It become-, apparent, therefore,
that the much-despised Pharisaism
is the source from which not only
-pels but all of Jesus" ethical
: achings sprang. As if to corrob-
irate :1ns very point, we find that
moving passage In Mldrash Le'-
Olam:
: shall a man bestow lovin i
kindness even on one who does evil
i": Hi shall not be vengeful
or bear a grudge. This is tile \mh
lael ."
For, Israel is uoort and forgiving
i l- Clod. Since man is
in His Image, there he must
Ite Him. This is whal 'ho rab-
bls who preceded Jesus taught .
hical revolution which
:.limed Jesus made in human-
Ion and robbing it of its
rrnalism and inhuman
ism, we oiler a 'characteristic ex-
from the Talmud to refutt
intention:
told of Micah, the
Jew. who offered sacri-
raphim, yet no divine pun-
: was meted out to Juni. The
came ijefore God
and said:
Lord, the smoke from Thy
altars mingles with that of the of-
ferings to Mlcah's idol."
And God said:
i eave him in peace. His bread is
"tiered to poor travelers."
Similarly "formalistic" is the
beaut it ul story of Rabbi Ze-ira who
Hi dieated his life to the poor, the
ts and the sinners even as
Jesus Is reputed to have done. When
the rabbi died, the sinners wept ami
lamented:
"Hitherto the little rabbi with
burnt leet prayed for us. but now
who is going to pray for us?" They
thi n lore repented .
Of penitents the Talmud sa;
"The just the perfect, will not be
worthy ol sitting with penitents In
I i world to come ."
Do the gospels say as much?
Xot onlj are the humaniti
li nts of brotherly love and
in-- succinctly expressed in
the Torah and all rabbinic li'' n
:: bill their expression is tlv
i e ot Judaism, They thus an
m! to become both a euicli
and an Inspiration to a higher and
i of man on i
This is nowhere better exemplified
iban in the evening prayer recited
by all pious Jews before retiring at
night:
"Master ol the world. I pardon
ry sin and every wrong done to
my person, to my property, to my
honor and to all that I possess. la t
no one be punished on my account;
St, Petersburg
Notes
Services Friday night Congretta-
Itlon B'nai Israel, with A. S. Klein-
feld, rabbi, begin at K o'clock
the rabbi will deliver a sermon on
"Judaism in Action." Saturday -it
vici at 9 a. m.: Sunday school 10
a. m.: Hebrew school daily at 4 p. m
Miss Sarah Gelman. of 1025 Fif-
teenth avenue, south, has just re-
turned home after a six months' va-
cation in the North.
Mrs. Lazaraus I.ehrer of Ashe-
ville. N. C, is a guest at the Horo-
witz hotel.
At the meeting of the Judaic
council, held January 9 at the Horo-
witz hotel. Mrs. M. Rosenberg, who
was in charge ol the pn rai
the evening, gave a very Interesting
report on the life and work of Flor-
ence Nightingale, The next meeting
of the Judaic council will be at the
home of Miss Miriam Miller, i'7-ii
Bayside drive, south. Monday eve-
January m;. at 8:15 p. m.
The Young Maccabeans met last
Monday evening at the homi
Fern Goldberg. Plans were made
tor a vaudeville review to be
at a later date. The hostess served
is refreshments. The next
meetinc will be at Hie home of Tiby
Rothblatt, 4401 Filth avenue
Monday evening, January 16 at 7:30
p. m.
eal Jewish artist- appear in tin-
cast which is being n olght-
ly to insure a real professional per-
formance. A number of specialty
acts will be shown during the eve-
ning and an effort will be mai
give the maximum of entertainment
possible.
Don't force your advice upon peo- Many
pie whose friendship you care for. | made hi
i- a man who can't write h,
is dollar mark in the oJ
ime Maccabees
MORI I 11 w Ml 1 iNst RAN< I
A Human Institution
Only I ivc Insurance Companies as Strong as the Maccabees
Over One Million Dollars in the Relief Fund
Homes tor Aged Without Cost to Members
\\ rites .ill of the usual forms of Certificates on Men ,md Women
on a I egal Reserve ISasis $1,000 to $100,000
All ( crtificatcs have Special Accidental Clauses and
Total and Permanent Disability Benefits
JUNIOR CERTIFICATES
Ordinary Life
Twenty Payment lite
Twenty Year Endowment
Educational Annuity
Single Premium All Policies Participating
All Junior ( ertificates Pay 1 nil Benefits at Age lour
il Training lor ( hildren in Music, Dancing and
I Ir.im.uic Art I rcc
n
\.
M. COFFIN
State Manager
226 Seybold Building : Phone 3-2618
MERCANTILE BANK
,-J TRUST COMPANY
7(il WASHINGTON AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
Condensed Statement. December 31. 1932
(Comptroller's Call)
.!ssets:
ash on I land and in Banks $197,975.67
I S. Government Securities 146\788.32
Mate Bonds 57 149.21
Municipal Bonds (-..4(10.00
Short Term Bonds, Due 1933 and ">4 38,809.25
Shon Term Bonds, Due 1935 and '56 J3.O9O.O0
I quipment Bonds j | 492.8 ">
Railroad Bonds 56. "<
Public Utility Bond. 30 435.00
lustrial Bonds 14*074.50
--------!----------- $612,549.71
Guaranteed by I iquidator 44,0
1 hange and Seemed Loans
I o.in- .md Discounts 103,583 !
I urniture and I ixturcs 10,000.0
( 'thev Assets 19,467-22
rOTAl ASSETS .........................$817,763.04
Liabilities:
' apital Stock $100,000.00
surplus Fund 50,000.00
Reserve for Undivided Profits ........ 39,640.67
' Mates Bond Account
DEPOSITS 5,822.37
U I I Mill [Til S $817,763.04
PHILIP LIBERMAN, President



PAGE 1

Friday, January 20, 193 3. THE JEWISH FLORIDI AN P?ge Thr THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN II BLI8BBO KVKin FRIDAY by the JEWISH FLORIDIAN PUBLISHING CO. 621 S. W. Fifteenth Avcnnf J. LOUIS 8HOCHET, Kditor P. (). Box 29.3 Miami. Florida Phone 2-1183 Entered attar July 4, IBM, nt the Po i mi, Miami. Florida, the A.i ..' March S, 1879. WEST PALM BBACH OPPICH n I Btchth Strut .Mi M. s lirt'hniik. Repraaantatlva SI 38CRIPTH N till Manilla 1 1.00 nil,year $ 2.00 FRIDAY. JANUARY 20. 1933. Vol. 6. No. 3. Around the Campus By MILTON A. FRIEDMAN H llo, folks! Is everybody happy? Von people 111 Miami should feel great a) this time of the year. Up here 111 Gainesville we've been having freezing weather, including a intii rain thrown In for good measure. Just imagine. Only 400 miles away there is a sun shining forth in all its splendor, beaches are crowdid. and an overcoat is just a fragment of the imagination. As my stifT fingers play lovingly over the keyboard ol the typewriter my soul is not in my work. I wouldst be back in the laps of the nods where a blue sky looks down on the green below and a sun bursts forth in all its [loriflcation on the mecca of the world. Ah me, the thought is futile. It will do me no good. alas, alacka-day. While discussing climatic condiI might mention an amusing Incident ol which ffwo Miami boys unfortunate the victims. This IN a story ol a heater that decided berserk. Al Cassel and Phil Breman live in a little cottage in back 01 the fraternity house in which they have a heater. The other day they turned on the heater and left it on while they went to expecting thereby to have a warm room when they returned. Such things you know occasionally happen; thestovi went bad. Lo and I, what should greet the eyes of the returning students but a blackness that was never pictured in the dwelling place of the devil. : 1 1 ovi n d the ceilings, walls. r drawers, clothing, blankets. everything, with a layer one-half an inch thick. This was one surprise thai didn't come In a small package Al and Phil, alter a hard day's labor, are now again holding open house. The University of Florida Glee club gave its first concert of the year .1 tew days ago at Willlston, a little town 30 miles from here. Marx Pelnberg and Milt Friedman made the trip, The affair was a howling m every angle. I was end man and it fell my lot to pull the curtains between our numbers. Imthe embarrassment when 1 had to .stand before the audience trying to pull the curtain and it obstlnateiy refused to budge. The audience got a kick out of my discomfiture especially when I got mad once and pulled too hard and the whole curtain fell down. Was my face red! Marx sang a baritone solo that went over nicely. He sang, In character. "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" After the concert the city gave us a dance. And what a dance it was! I can't imagine where so many beautiful girls could have come from. Peculiarly enough (or is it so peculiar?) most of the girls were blondes. The boys are still ravin.' and it the other trips will A Philosopher Looks At Yiddish [Continued from Patio One] .;ased on letters that people received .10m America. When I moved from Nesviesh to Minsk and began to read Yiddish — or jargon, as we called it — a new world opened itself up to me. Even Shomer's Shundromanen had a high educational value because of theii liberalism, of their admiration for educated people and the contempt for the old-fashioned fanaticism. But the real enlightenment came from Mendele Meicher Sphorim and the Volksbibliothek. to which Sholl ;n Aleichem contributed. Then I came to America and began reading the Jewish press, principally the old Arbiiter Zeitung. which Abraham Cahan. Feigenbaum and Phillip Kranz edited and to which the old grandfather of the Jewish social movement. Winchevsky. frequently sent letters Horn England. I am glad to testify that I owe a good deal of my education to it. It taught me to look at world news from a cosmopolitan Instead of a focal or provincial point ol view, and it taught me to Interpret politics realistically, instead of being misled by mpty phrases. As I look back on the Yiddish and the English press In that last decade 1,1 the nineteenth century 1 canelp feeling thai the former did more for the education ol its readers than the latter. Having no army 01 reporters to dig up sensational news, the Jewish pre necessarily paid more attention to thin permanent Interest, it tried to give Its readers something of permanence ind subs! intial value The English press, 1 .mi glad to say, has marie j jn 11 deal ol progress in this repi %  in I hi la 10 years, sine., the uit has madi tome Americans real/' %  thai then is a world outside ol he United States with which we nol only commercial, but cultural 11 lations. Bui. even to this •lay. though some Ol the methodof the English press have been adopt%  d by the Yiddish newspapers, the atter are still characterized by a mori' unified point ol view, which -'ivenews, comments and Informaivi articles a unity which no English newspaper seeks to attain I also want to express my great Indebtedness to what Jacob Gordon did to educate whatever taste 1 have for dramatic literature. Gordon might have made a nnme for himself in Russian or Engl'sh literature. But he preferred lo slick to Yiddish ind portray the life of his own people we ought 10 honor his memory. And now. as to the relation between Yiddish and English. I need not express my belief that so long BS 1 he Jews wish lo live m Ihis country and to participate In its Cultural life. In Its science, literature and drama, as well as in its political and industrial activities, English is bound to prevail as the language of the Jewish people. The Jews have ever been ready to adopt the language of the peoples among whom they have lived. Did they not drop Hebrew and adopt Aramaic as their national tongue? And was not Aramaic succeeded by Greek. Arabic. Spanish and German? Nevertheless. I think that Yiddish is rendering a great cultural service and will continue to do so for concome up to this, happy days will really have come again. On the way back the driver of our bus got sick so that It afforded me the novel experience a driving a big bus. Marx, who was sitting next to me. felt reminiscent. He said that he would have sung much better but that he had had his mind off and had been thinking about a beautiful girl friend In Miami. I wonder whom he meant? Looking forward to a nice warm bed and heavy blankets. I gladly conclude. siderable time. I cannot share the views of my fellow citizens who look upon the very existence of a foreign press as a sort of treason, who would make the speaking or writing of a foreign language a crime. These people are doubtless influenced by patriotic motives, but their conceptlon of Americanism is narrow and unworthy of the great traditions of American liberalism. The patriotism )I these people is a narrow nationalism, copied from or in imitation of European nationalism. The Amirica ntradition is Federalism, which lilows for diversity instead of dull uniformity. The very name United and our motto "E Pluribus Jnum" express this. We have no national church as French and Italan nationalists want. America has been settled by many peoples and each must contribute Freely to the common stock —the Ciermans have contributed their love :if music, the Italians have contributed their love of nature, gardening and certain household arts. Why should not the Jews contribute their specific gifts in the way of enthusiasm for the arts, for social idealism, as well as 1 heir peculiar love of intellectual life for its own sake.' The idea that all immigrants should wipe out their past and become simple imitations ol the existing type is neither possible nor desirable. The past cannot be wiped out. And we make ourselves ridiculous 111 the effort to do so All meat civilizations have been the resultants of the emu lbulions Of many peoples, and a richer American culture can come only il the : 0 like other elements, are given 1 chance to develop under favorible conditions thenpeculiar geniiThe Jewish press can therefore lot k back upon i'.s worth of the last HI years with pilde. It has prepared millions Ol Jewish people to take a worthy part iii American satlon while also promoting the natural self-respect to which Jews are entitled because ol their character and history. But what ol the future? !' Is often said that the Yiddish press 1f r a disappearing generation. That as our young people are ducated in the public schools and %  earn to -peak English of a sort in 'heir daily life and business. Yiddish is bound to disappear. That may be, but, not being a prophet, I ven'ure no opinion. Languages have a peculiar way of persisting, for they express experiences not so readily expressible In other languages in my case. I think, there Is a great social value in maintaining Yiddish. not only for the cultural opportunities In English, but also to keep some portion of the Jewish people in touch with the life of our own Immediate past and In touch with si majority Of the Jewish peop'e abrcad. whose language Is predominantly Yiddish Perhaps 50 from now the Yiddish press may celebrate its centennary 1 hope v hen 11 does so its past will be o less honorable than it is today. The man who flirts with servant girls has domestic tastes. When a man hasn't a ghost of a chance he I.S naturally out ol spirits. It is hard to convince doctors and druggists that health is wealth. Silence is the only thing that will ever Improve some people's conversation. The trouble with mosl handsomi women: They think nothing else is .lec.is.-aiy. It Is not always wise to tell all one knows, but it Is well to know all one tells. Turn about Is fair play. 11 a girl steals a young man's heart she should not be alarmed il he -teals a kiss. The latest recruit oi the theatrical colony at Hollywood Is an Iowa hog. The animal, which won a worlds championship as a h has been invited to the film capital to appear as a character actor in a motion picture Notwithstanding the severity ol thi competition I rile., the hog's unspoiled naturalness will stand II In good stead. I think, and it has every pi ol a brilliant career And not on the 3( n en only, fi is .1 very fat hog and. appropriately, after being filmed, it will make 3 tour ot the country appearing "in the flesh." Among ham actors it Is lonsidered certain to have an outstanding IUI • Perhaps the only practical objection so far advanced ithat any w rry that may be drowned in the :!.:' stuff would be trivial at the utmost. The winner oi a national CO! to pick the tallest story tellei hails from Denver, which naturally gives him the advantage ol a mile In altitude at the stall The dog catcher at Council Bluffs, Iowa, earns $1,926 a year, and the mayor only $1,500. A man at Jackson, Mich., was arrested for wounding a bystander to an attempt to take his own life. Fellow at Ann Arbor gave himself up to the police, together with bis revolver, for fear he would commit a crime. Fired at by a bandit, a Chicago man was hit on the toe. and rejoices in the removal of a corn that had bothered him for 25 years. A deep sea diver of Houston, Tex., flies an airplane for diversion between dives. Police were called at Flint to evict indigent dogs which had taken possession of a well-to-do dog's kennel for sleeping purposes. An Adrian farmer claims to have mortgaged his farm to buy teeth fa his divorced wile. A Kalamazoo motorist, alarmed bj curious sounds in his engine, iinally raised the hood and released a cat. O, nothing extraordinary! These old cranks that think money is the root of all evil ought to Inhappy now, since most of us ar leading a life with little or no evil An escaping burglar became wedged in a Missouri Chimney, with no means of getting in touch with counsel for a habeas corpus A man's talk shows up be a good dinner. Some people take steps for 3 divorce at public dances. Why is it that a large man always takes a small woman seriously? A chicken "that lays eggs awl crows" is held up for admiration In a strange-as-it-seems column Crow of course are extremely hard lo lav Client: "What do you think oi the idea of giving the money back to the bank and asking lor a sentence?" 3n iflnmniam MOTHER She traveled the journey before you, She has known all CM cost of the way. She paid out the price to its fullness That Motherhood only can pay. She loved when the world was against you. She hoped — when your hope sank and died. She clung to your hand when the clinging Left scars in her heart deep and wide. Mi? labored — and loved — and was happy. For down deep in her kind heart she knew inkindness and love would repay her For all that she did— just for you. — A. S. Shoe he t. IDA SHOCHET DIED 23RD OF TEBETH. 5688 (JANUARY 15. 19281 /'/ loving Remembrance II, 1 Children



PAGE 1

wJewish Fiondlian Vol. No' %  (Announcements! LORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY MIAMI, ILORIDA, IRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 1933. Price Five Cents CONGREGATION BETH JACOB (Orthodox) •HI Washington Av.. Miami Hcarh I.. AXELROD, Rabbi Regular Friday evening services begin al 5:30 with the late services at 8:15 Pm.. when the rabbi will preach a sermon on "Hebrew Slaves." The congregational chanting and singing will be directed by Cantor Boris Schlachman. Saturday morning .services begin at 9 a. m„ with the rabbi preaching in Yiddish on the weekly portion of the law. MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CONGREGATION (Orthodox) IMS S. W. Third Strict JONAH E. CAPLAN. Rabbi The usual early services begin at 5:30. and the late services at 8:30, when Rabbi Caplan will preach on By Their Deeds Shall Ye Know Them." The usual chanting and congregational singing will be enjoyed. Saturday morning services Begin at 9 a. m. BKTII DAVID CONGREGATION (Conservative* IU N. W. Third Avrniaa MAX SHAPIRO. Rabbi services begin at 5:30 p. m. with the late services at 8:15 when Rabbi Shapiro will preach on "A Sew Jewish Nation in the Making." The congregational singing and chanting will be led by Cantor Louis Hayman. who will be assisted by nil. Saturday morning serbegln at 8:30 and Rabbi Shapiro will preach a sermon in Yiddish on the portion of the law. TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI (Reform! 131 N. K. Nineteenth Street l)K. JACOB II. KAPLAN. Rabbi The President's Committee on Social Trends" will be discussed by Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan at Temple IsW N. E. Nineteenth street, at vires on Friday evening, in at 8:15. In the autumn of 1929 the President HI the United States appointtumittee to examine the sonds in the United States. The report of this committee has just ucd, and is the outstanding contribution to an understanding of Menu of our civilization. The lull title is: "A Review of the Findby the President's Research Committee on Social Trends." Coinon this important document Kill be the subject matter of the lecture by Dr. Kaplan at Temple Israel this Friday night. The public Mile. Beth David Sponsors Show Next Wednesday night, January 25, beginning at 8:15, the minstrel show sponsored by the Junior committee of Beth David congregation will ring up the curtain for what promises to be one of the outstanding entertainments of the season, at the Riverside school auditorium. 221 S. W. Twelfth avenue. In charge of the show is Louis Hayman. veteran showman. Professional dancers will appear during the evenings performance and will furnish additional entertainment. Mrs. Sam Welsel Is chairman of the committee in charge ot arrangements, and tickets are only 50 cents. The cast is composed of the following: Interlocutor. Claire Cohen Weintraub: end men. Katie Markowitz. Jeanette Falk, Juliette Stone and Rose Bogen. Specialty acts will be a tap dance by Dorothy Kopplowitz and Claire Simon: Dance of the Soldiers by Ida Engler and Rosalyn Daum; adagio dance by Leonard Tobin and Rose Chintaling; song by Bobbie Resnick: tap dance by Theresa Rubenstein. The chorus s composed of Sadie Oliphant. Helene Friedman. Fae Weintraub. Sadve Resnick. Bert Friedman. Freda Maikowitz. Reba Hayman. Ida GoldSadie Pepper Iris Blumberg. Sophie Sapero, Clara Fine. Reva Sllverman, Esther Llchtensteln and Ruth Dubbin. Dramatic Club Is Organized As a result of the enthusiastic reception of the recent Yiddish play I given by local Jewish talent inter| ested in the formation of a permanI ent Yiddish dramatic organization j m Miami, the "Miami Jewish Dramatic Players" was organized last I week. Joseph Greenberg was elected president; Harry Rose, secretary and Mrs. M. Silverman. treasurer. Mr. Harry Greenberg will be director of the plays that will be produced by the organization. In announcing the plans of the organiza' tion, it was stressed that every effort will be made to interest local Jews to take part in the presenta, tions from time to time, so that Mi1 ami may be given the opportunity io see Yiddish plays which otherI wise could not be presented. The fust play to be given by the new organization will be announced! shortly. tenai Brith Elects Officers meeting held on January 12. the Hebrew Athletic club, liolom lodge of Bnai Brith the following officers for the fear: President. W. L. WilNams; tii. t vice president, William an; second vice president, W. retary, Nat L. Wi! I er, Edward Friedman; monianley Myers; assistant moni'•r. Leo Rosen; trustees. Lewis. M. Rapaport. H. M. Dre"itch, j. Bernstein, H. Rayvis. William Mechlowltz. Beach Kennel Club To Open The Miami Beach Kennel club will reopen its beautiful ocean-side plant on Tuesday evening. January 31, with a number of important • hanges effected for the purpose of eaner and better dog racing. One of the features thus year is the rical timing clock, which bei'ins ;o work simultaneously with the re;ease of the dogs from the harness or box. This insure.-, accurate timing permit proper handicapping and I i ords ol races. By use of the Keen Starting harness and the electrical .iming clock lormtul racing anil acurate records are assured. Both devices are protected by V. S. and foreign patents. The Miami Beach Kennel club is the only track now using these devices. A new painted track to cany the rabbit has eplaced the old wooden one. and becau.se of its all-steel and concrete traction, prevents any lure trouble. A new marl and sand racng strip has been laid in place ol the old turl track and insures firmer footing and speedier racing by the dogs. This IS the fifth season the track has operated and the same management of OHara and Anderson will again direct activities lor the 52 ;. ... ol n.cmg. The public is invited to attend the nightly schooling races which begin at 7 o'clock and are free to the public until the actual pening night, A colorful season Is predicted lor the Beach oval. Kashrus Work To Begin Soon As a result of a stirring appeal made by Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan J I Friday night at the Miami Jewish orthodox congregation, several conferences have been held and a Oca! kosher committee is now being formed. Last Wednesday night Rabbl Caplan and Rabbi Max Shapiro of Beth David congregation met with Miami's butchers and plans tor immediate functioning of a kosher committee were discussed. All three local butchers were invited to this meeting but only two attended and offered to comply with all rules that may be adopted by the local rabbis | and the kosher committee. The third refused to heed the call ol the %  two rabbis. A meeting of the kosher committee will be held next week when the actual work of organization will begin Talmud Torah Ball Wednesday Final preparations for the annual Talmud Torah benefit ball to be held at the Mahi Shrine temple on Biscayne boulevard next Wednesday, January 25. beginning at 9 p. m., include stars of night club shows now in the Greater Miami district. The beautiful hall will be specially decorated for the event and booths will be placed in and about the hall showing historical scenes. Dancing will begin at 9 o'clock and the vaudeville acts and floor show will be given during intermissions in the dancing. The affair is an annual event of the Ladies Auxiliary of the Miami Jewish orthodox congregation and the proceeds are devoted solely to the Talmud Torah fund which provides free tuition and school books to those otherwise unable to pay for their religious training. In charge of arrangements is a committee headed by Mrs. J. Louis Shochet. who is being assisted by a ticket committee in charge of Mrs. Charles Tannenbaum. Sam FuttertaSS and Milton Weiner; cake and food committee in charge of Mesdames William Mechlowltz, Morris Rappaport and Max Rappaport; flower committee in charge of Mesdames Sam Tannenbaum and Max Kupferstein; candies and cigarettes in charge of Mrs. Nathan Abrainson: sandwiches. Mrs. Nathan Adelman and Max Kupferstein. Tickets lor this affair are only 50 cents each, and transportation to and from the ball may be arranged by calling any member of the committee. Noted Orator To Arrive • : ed of New York, noted Yiddish orator, is expected to ar... Miami shortly on a lecture tour of the country in the interests of Jewish education, according to word received here this week. Cemetery Report Is Adopted A large number of Miami's Jewish in n and women attended a mass meiting of local Jewry at Odd Fellows hall last Tuesday night to discuss the local Jewish Cemetery asociation. leaders of Greater Miami Jewry were present and heard 'lie report of the cemetery adjustment committee given by Harry I. Lipton. prominent attorney of this city. Alter a brief discussion the recommendations of the committee were unanimously approved. A considerable saving in the principal sum. a reduction in interest charges and title to a large part of the cemetery free and clear of debts, was effected by the committee. Messrs. Harry I Lipton and Louis Heiman. attorneys, will represent the association in making final arrangements with the cemetery company. Jewish Scout Troop Planned All Jewish girls between the ages of 10 and 15 who are interested in ciirl Scout work are invited to attend an organization meeting for a Jewish troop at Beth David Talmud Torah hall Tuesday afternoon. January 24, at 4 o'clock. The Miami Joint Distribution Campaigns Begin NEW YORK —Local campaigns for funds for relief activities among the Jews of eastern and central Europe start this week in a number of cities throughout the country. Rabbi Jonah E. Wise, chairman of the fund-raising committee of the joint distribution committee. The Jews of Denver. Colo., under the chairmanship of Noah A. Atler. initiate a drive this week for S5 000 for the purposes of the joint disribution committee. Another a mpaign in the western part of the country opens in Sacramento, Cal.. this week. Isador Brown is chairman, and the Hc\i. Albert Elkus ol the joint distribution committee's national council, is honorary chairman of the effort. The Allied Jewish campaign in Schenectady. N. Y., in which the joint distribution committee is a chief participant, got under way last week under the chairmanship of Abraham Ferber. Other campaigns MOW going on are in Memphis. Tenn.. under the chairmanship of David Steinberg, and in San Antonio, Tex. branch of the Senior Council of .Jewish Women is sponsoring this move in the interest of a wider training lor local Jewish girls in Scout work in a distinct Jewish atmosphere. In beginning this work the senior council feels that local mild receive the advantages of character building and physical training which Scout work provides. MTS. Sadye Oliphant is Scout leader. A Philosopher Looks At Yiddish By Prof. Morris Raphael Cohen It is true that my work has been in the field of technical philosophy where Yiddish has been of no help to me, and I have lost active contact with the Jewish press or with the efforts to keep up high standards in Yiddish literature. I have not lost my love for my mother's -ongue, in which I was brought up and which can never be entirely replaced by any other tongue as the expression of intimate affection. Though 40 years' inactivity has made me tongue-tied when it comes to speaking, I still can read Peretz and I deem it a great honor to testify to my high regard for his worth as a literary fixture, as well as a great, noble and beneficent personality. Perhaps the very fact that I have become an outsider to Yiddish literature may give some value to my testimony as to its great merit. Yiddish literature and the Yiddish press have had the great misfortune of being constantly assailed by two powerful parties, those who insist on the claims of the language of the country in which we live and those who espouse the claims of Hebrew, the language which has a unique sentimental value for all Jews. And I am glad to defend the value of Yiddish in substantial agreement with what Peretz himself once declared to be the relative necessities of the three languages for the Jews. First, as to the relative claims of Yiddish and Hebrew. I do not wish on an occasion of this sort to add to the acrimonious debate which has raged so long. I do not wish to deny that Hebrew will always have some passionate claim on Jewish sentiment. But as one who, at one time, at least, read and spoke both of these languages I may express my opinion that Hebrew has not t.he fluency and is not so redolent of the actual experience of the Jewish people for the last few centuries as is the Yiddish language. Let me testify from my own personal history. In the first period of my life I had an orthodox Hebrew education and I never read anything in Yiddish. My grandfather had charge of my education and he saw to it that no Yiddish reached me. When my mother wrote to him that I ought to learn to read and write Yiddish he replied: "I am giving your son the substance of life and education. the trimmings will come later." The society of which my grandfather was an illustrious representative had its virtues, but it was barren and out of tune with the current of modern life. There were Maskilim, who read Hebrew books, wrote Hebrew letters to each other in stilted, figurative language and some were tven said to have kept their business books and records in Hebrew. Rut the whole thing was highly artificial and pedantic and the neoHebraic literature was completely divorced from the life of the great masses of the people; and, having no roots, it bore no fruit. Perhaps the most significant incident in this connection is the fact that in the town of Nesviesh. where I was brought up. a town containing about six thousand Jews. I heard of only one who received a Hebrew newspaper, the Hazfiroh. But his piety was rather suspected and few showed any Interest, though there was a great deal of gossipy news (Continued on Pe Three) I • •


Page Six
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Friday, January 20.
f
the rabbi from his close contact
with the congregation and the fam-
ilies of the congregants, may give
the board the benefit of his direct
knowledge, also so that he in turn
may be in touch with all phases of
the organization of which he is an
important part.
No board of trustees should be
self-perpetuating. 'There should be
constant rotation among the mem-
bers on the board. Nor should any
president no matter how good
be permitted to hold office for too
long a time. The board should be
composed of men and women,
wherever this is possible, and where
it is not, such women's organiza-
tions as are affiliated with the syn-
agogue should be consulted on all
major matters affecting the congre-
gation. Members of the congrega-
tion should be specially invited from
time to time, to sit in at board
meetings so that in the course of
the year, the entire membership of
the congregation will have been able
to participate actively in the man-
agement of the congregation's ac-
tivities.
At least once every year, there
should be an open meeting of the
board to which members of the con-
gregation should be invited. This
in addition to the annual meeting
when formal reports are presented
and the election of officers, etc..
takes place. This open meeting of
the board should be dedicated, first,
to the transaction of the business at
hand and. second, to holding an op-
rn forum.
Relationship of Board and Rabbi
The relationship of the board to
the rabbi must be one of complete
confidence. He must be looked upon
as the spiritual leader and must be
accorded full respect at all times.
He should be given a free hand in
the conduct of the religious activi-
ties of the congregation, and per-
mitted freedom of speech. To ex-
pect the best from a rabbi, the
board must give him their best. A
rabbi cannot give his best unless he
is given the time to do so It you
want him to be a good preacher,
you must give him full opportunity
to prepare his sermons. This mean.s
time for research. Time for rradm-:.
Time for thought.
11 you expect him to be a good
teacher, he must have time to plan
and prepare his program. Time for
conferences with his assistants and
Fairfax Pharmacy
Prescriptions Accurately
( 0 : I"i/t u.lt .1
Ttlfphonu :-\*:-. MIST, ^-'.'-o-,
:;.- EAST FI.AGI.ER STREET
iis teachers. He must have time to
visit the classes.
You must give him time, if you
expect him to properly prepare your
children for confirmation or "bar
mitzvah." You expect him to play
.v part in the life of the congrega
t>on upon occasions of joy or sor-
row. You expect him to meet with
you socially. But you must make it
possible for him to do all of this,
even though it may mean having to
! furnish him with assistants to take
' care of the grinding details that
come into every rabbi's life.
It is true that the rabbi is human
and must be treated as a human
being with his physical limitations
of time. The rabbi has a responsi-
bility not only toward the congrega-
tion which he heads, but to the
community in which he functions.
The mantle of leadership is auto-
matically placed upon his shoulders
and he must lead in such a manner
as will redound to the credit of his
congregation, to the Jews as a whole
and to his citieznship in particular.
It is expected of the rabbi that he
shall play his full part in the re-
'lgious. social and civic life of the
community. As the religious leader,
he must so conduct himself at all
times that no breath of scandal or
suspicion shall ever fall upon him.
There is no place in the rabbinate
for the pawing, mauling, kissing
rabbi. There Is no place in the rab-
binate tor the vulgar story-telling.
racking -mart-aleck rabbi, not
in tlie presence of his inti-
mates, let alone in the presence of
women, should he be other than
i clean minded, clean mouthed
man. A religious leader in every
of the word. To be respected
one must fust respect himself. Many
a rabbi has lost his hold on his
roneresatior. by a? times forgetting
that he is the rabbi. They may al
first laugh with him. and then
it him.
Wherever you find a fine rabbi, a
nritual force, look for a fine
congregation, a religious congrri;;i-
tion. a congregation that is a power
lor good in its community. A rabbi
should be unafraid. There is no re-
spect for the coward in the pulpit
It is better for his own well being
and for the peace of his soul that
he maintain the right to speak his
mind than to be a mere job holder.
drawing a salary.
It should not be expected of the
rabbi to perform miracles. It is his
duty to be the peace-maker, to be
the friend, to bring contending for-
ces together and to at all times be
for the congregation and with the
egation, As a leader he must
not be led. And his leadership
l-.ould not be confined to the pres-
*:?*::*'

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An Invitation is extended every Jew to personally in-
rpect our itore to convince himself that every precau-
tion u Insure Kosher Products Is strictly adhered t<>.
ident of the congregation and the
board of trustees, but to the men
and women, boys and girls who
make up his congregation. He
should at all times be a shining ex-
ample to the youth within his con-
gregation. He should find time to
play, to be part of the life of his
congregation. He should stand with
the board of trustees in presenting
the needs of the congregation. He
should always be ready to instill in-
to the minds and the hearts of his
congregants that they should give
in proportion to their means for the
religious efforts conducted by the
congregation.
Thank God. there are many rab-
bis and many congregations in this
country who meet in the essentials
the requirements that make for a
wholesome, sane, sound, religious
congregation.
SOCIETY
The seventh regional conference
of Hadassah will be held in Savan-
nah. Ga.. on Sunday and Monday.
February 12-13, both the senior and
junior organizations meeting at the
same tune Business sessions will b;-
held separately of each organiza-
tion, though the social affairs in-
cluding the concluding banquet ai'd
dance Will be joint affairs. Special
rates have been arranged for tin
benefit of those wishing to attend
Delegates will be elected by the jun-
ior Miami organization at the next
meeting on January 30, at a place
which will be announced in oiu
next issue. Those desiring to attend
even though not delegates, are urged
to communicate with Miss Lena
W ilnkle. phone 2-7185.

At the joint Hadassah ball last
providing entertainment
were Milt Trager, Al Parker and
r Alexander. Leo Ackerman
was master of ceremonies. In chargi
ements for the Senior Ha-
dassah was a committee headed by
Mrs Alex Goldstein. Repress
he Junior Hadassah were Sylvia
Miles. Goldie Elman. Lillian Melch-
er, Bea Silver. Dora Rosenhouse and
Jennie Rotfort.
The local A.Z.A. chapter is spon-
soring a February frolic on Sunday
evening. February 12, for the bene-
fit of the organization. A popularitj
contest to choose Miami's mast pop-
ular Jewish girl will be cone
and votes will be sold at one cent
ai h The winner of the conte I
will choose a male companion and
Ck marriage will be performed
Tickets to admit a couple will be
only 50 cents. Entertainment will b
provided.
rempli Israel Sisterhood will cel-
ebrate Its annual birthday am
sary with a bridge luncheon at the
Blackstone hotel. Monday February
, 12:30 p. m In charge of ar-
I s a i ommil U i headi by Mrs. J. A Rlchter.
lood is spoi
nnual dance on Tuesday
tling, January 31, at the ballroom
beautiful Pier. Miami Beach.
ti t pre-
ffort to mak I
in evening ol outstanding enti -
will be made. Mrs. Sam
uimit-
i
Additional
Gloom Chaser
Leary: "Is ^at fellow McFa" a"
right to take on a fishing trip?"
Wyse: "Is he? Say. besides doing
the cooking he'll think up lies for
the whole bunch."
Boise: "Did you see that pedes-
trian who was struck by the auto
1 dare the driver to try it again?"
Noyes: "No: did the autoist take
up the challenge?"
Boise: "No. He said it nearly
broke his heart to pass up the
chance, but he had to meet a train."
Billswiggle: "I suppose in these
times you live in apprehensive trep-
idation, don't you?"
Dinklesproof: "No. I live in the
suburbs."
Bricklayer 'first day on job':
"Guess I can't work here there's
no place to park my auto."
Boss: "No. you won't do. We can
only use bricklayers who have their
own chauffeurs "
"How did the detectives discovei
thai the gangster was disguised iv
a woman?'"
"He passed a milliner's window
without looking in."
Lawyer: "Rotten! How would VOU
be able to pay me then'.'"
The use ol profanity at bull lights
will bring immediate arrest and im-
prisonment, according to an edict
issued by Mexico's chief of police.
But I understand that the bull, be-
fore dying, will be permitted to say
"O. pshaw!"
What's the News Today?
O. nothing extraordinary.
A hen at Rickey. Oregon, laid a
purple egg.
Delicatessen of All Kinds
Fancy Groceries Dairy Products
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
For Free Delivery
PHONE 5- 1512
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I". X. I.\t HKXTIIAI,
i HIROPOD1S I
HALCYON ARCADE
I'honr 14(8)
A man at Owensville, Indiana h
eaten 26,280 eggs in the last
years, six eggs a day. '2
A Washington dispatch on p,
Eastern affairs reveals that Jehn."
pronounced "Rey-Hoi," which w J
ly alters an earlier conception u!"
it might be "Chumley."
A $15,000 jeweled egg ts lncl
in a collection of Romanoff geT
now on show. The goose that 2
it, however, is no longer of a
world.
Pike's Peak's recent loss in stt.
ure is now attributed to the disap
pearance of an ice cap. It's a ma-
world, where even mountains gc
collegiate.
The dispatch further states thi:
the hog has been invited to atte*
a night club as the guest of hot
but will investigate the reputation
of the place before accepting.
There is probably no foundation
for the rumor that if the appear-
ances of this personality are sue-
cessful Patty Arbuckle may attempt
mother comeback.
It pays to advertise in The Jewish
Ploridian.
NEW 7th
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Only 1 ive Insurance ( ompanies .is Strong as the Maccabees
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Writes .ill of the usual forms of Certificates on Men and Women
on a Legal Reserve ISasis > 1,000 to $100,000
All Certificates have Special Accidental Clauses and
Iot.il and Permanent Disability Benefits
JUNIOR CERTIFICATES
Twenty Year Endowment
Educational Annuity
Ordinary Life
Twenty Payment 1 ifc
Single Premium All Policies Participating
All Junior Certificates Pay Full Benefits at Age Four
Special ["raining for Children in Music. Dancing wd
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PAGE 1

Pig Four THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Friday, January 20, 193 3. Slabin g'imannrt IitUrtm 1 •: %  A •:• &f + •: Vo) ,. MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 22, 1933. No. 6. t ^ &f&f &f&f&f 1 1 ft ^ tf 1 ft t tf tt f t ttt 1H11 t t :••:• < &f&f &f&f •> &f&f # Edited by RABBI S. M. MACHTEI Founder %  rid Director. Radio Synafoir of America % SUNDA Y MORNINGS WIOD, MIAMI, FLORIDA I MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 22, 1933. Good and Evil (Sermon delivered en Sunday. January is. 1933) Scripture Reading, Genesis Chapter II, Verses \S-\7 Incl. am very little concerned with theology. But, I am very much inter3 acted in religion. To a reasoning person — to a student of religion — many problems must present themselves when studying the scriptures. Certain parts must appear unreasonable. We shall endeavor, from time lo time, to clear the mists and to pierce the veil with a ray of light from Uie torch of Judaism. Judaism is compared to a torch from which other tapers have been kindled but whose own light has not been diminished, thereby, in the least. Other religions have had their origins in Judaism and have grown away from it —but the truth of the word of God, through the prophets in Israel has not been diminished in the least. Judaism is all-embracing and looks upon all true, moral religions as branches of the same tree — all reaching upward towards a common heaven and bearing beneficial fruit for all the children of men. ff>HIS thought has been beautifully expressed in a poem by Harry Ro1 maine: At the Muezzin's call for prayer The kneeling faithful thronged the square, And on Pushkara's lofty height The dark priest chanted Brahma's might. Amid a monastery's weeds An old Franciscan told his beads; While to the synagogue there came A Jew to praise Jehovah's name. The one great God looked down and smiled, And counted each his loving child; For Turk and Brahmin, monk and Jew Had reached Him through the gods they knew. L ET us try to understand our common Father. Chapter II, verse 17, of Genesis reads, "But of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it; for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shall surely die." Notice that God does not say "I shall kill you." but He says, 'thou shalt surely die." You wtjl become extinct. The word of God states a consequence, a result of the act. Death, extinction, follows mans eating of the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil. But. that does not seem reasonable. God must be mistaken. Or is He a Parent with a perverted sense? Just think of it. We spend money on the education oi our children with the object of training them to become good men and women. A parent who sends his child to college would be happy to learn from the dean that his child had learned to distinguish good from evil Why, that's almost perfection! Once you know the good from the evil, it is easy to do the good and to shun the evil. Most of the difficulty arises in being able to differentiate good from evil. The Bible tells us that because Adam and Eve ate of the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil they were banished from the Garden of Eden. Life.for them, ceased to be a paradise; that, as a result, death came to mankind. It is clear that, at the outset, the holy scripBures depict God in an unfavorable light. The God of the Hebrews must be cruel to have punished Adam and Eve for a disobedience that resulted in such good to them. Good? Why, just think of it! They learned to distinguish good from evil. Y ES. and that was the beginning ol the end. On that day the degeneration of mankind began. "Thou shalt surely die." Yes. moral and physical death is the result of our standard of good and evil. Our standard, not God's standard. Man was created in the image of God. Gods standard is the rule of right and wrong-Just and unjust. Man. created in the image and with the attributes of God, Is endowed With a sense, a heavenly sense, of right and wrong. This standard permits ful operation in Miami la the haul proof of ottr ability. Hundred! runHult Dr. Herkwltt. 36 N. E. FIRST AVENUE I EMPLOY FEDERATION ORCHESTRAS WHY? Reliable — Dependable Experienced — Organized Rehearsed And trying lo maintain a living wage scale. Miami Federation of Musicians LOUIS J. NETT. Secretary PHONE 2-3912 OPEN DAILY AND SUNDAY SEE THE PRIMITIVE EVERGLADES AT MUSA ISLE "" Seminole Indian Village DAILY AND SUNDAY LEADERSHIP CHIEF WILLIAM OSCBOLA NW. Twenty-flith Avanue and Sixteenth Street r. WW an Hauler Street o Twenty-seventh Avenue. 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Friday, January 20, 1933.
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page Five
"Sweet Water of Megiddo"
Lag Bo'omer Scenes in Palestine
By RABBI LAZARlS AMI KOI)
Rabbi Trustees
& Congregation
By DAVID A. BROWN
Continued from Last Week)
Remaining In second gear, the
bodge six roared and t01e its wav
Csdalnfully up the steep slopes that
led to Safed and Miron, the reced-
I. Kinereth gradually fading into
Insignificance behind the crags and
I Galilee. There was a tem-
torary Hill in the conversation. The
f ortly passenger had ceased brood-
inq over her young across the her-
[::iu; pond, the agronomist was over-
Dv the towering hills in the
I i. and even the voluble jour-
I had given the English prep-
tsinons a rest. Passing scenery leads
|o:;e lo meditation, and I fell to
|r,".usiiit! n the quaint custom of cel-
[bratiiii; the aniversary of Simeon
fear Jochai on Lag BoOmer. the
thirty-third day of Omer.
Hilluloh Dbar Jochai. it is called
[ and is an event of the year.
lever seven thousand Jews making
b.. pilgrimage to Miron every year.
|c:::!dren who have attained their
[third birthday are brought here to
have their locks shorn at the tomb
M the creator of the Zohar, who,
nth his son Eleazar, remained en-
mbed in a cave for 24 years, ex-
bting on carob beans and water
(from a neighboring spring. Seven
rid enthusiasts pay annual
k::bute and homage to this immor-
j, one of the greatest of Tan-
I m whose body lies interred in
f!::on, the final resting place of
undreds of Tannaim, including
the prince, and Shammai. his
[ pponent in Mishnaic debate,
ctli their train of devoted disciples.
Safed, a multitudinous gathering
\ Jem, jostling and chattering, ef-
rvetcing wfth childish impatience,
to dispense with the last 10
; : the pilgrimage. Safed. that
< historic city, where over a thous-
l:.d lives were lost in a disastrous
ike not more than a century
\:o. the fragile structures toppling
>h other, hurling their occu-
| ntt to ii terrible death.
Vnirtj minutes later, the Dodge
I i rest in Miron. Our first
I ol this remote and msig-
i village was one of two
(i buildings standing out
| a black background. As we
I i ar, the buildings assumed a
"ore distinct shape. A massive a
>oard greets the visitor -"Yeshiv-
th Simeon Bar Jochai" the rab-
o meal school of the learned sage
>nd Hie "Moshab Zekanim." home
or the aged. We pass on through
Ce winding path and find ourselves
n a small unassuming shtibel. a
" He ol former days when the syna-
xgue among Jews was the club-
ouse. the social center and the rec-
eatlon ground of its members. No
nlnister preached from Its pulpit;
io cantor filled its space with his
llstorted renderings of the most
autiful selections of our liturgy.
no petty rivalry existed as to the
pective offices of the synagog. A
miple. homely institution, a Shtibel.
where its members met three times
a day to pray, to discuss politics,
-heir troubles and the fate of their
hildren across the waters in the
and of the heathen.
The second building was a true
specimen of an ancient mausoleum.
Tall, stately, black with age and
with turrets running along its sides,
it could be easily distinguished from
ils neighbor. Inside this edifice
here the bodies ot Rabbi 8imeo l
lid his son Eleazar are interred, a
iephardic Shammas gre< led us
. ith numerous bows and oily ges-
ures, spreading out the palms 11
Is hands In gleeful expectancy of
: handsome remuneration from
ueh an opulent group. In this
Uildlng, there is another Yeslnva. a
'ephardic school ol learning. We
ntered this sanctum, and disco-.-
-i a group of Sephardim squatting
sn the ground, reclining leisure y
imldst luxurious carpet- and rugs,
.erasing huge volumes ol Maimon-
0 the tune Of eastern melodies.
i heir sing song reminded me
trongly of the muezzin call, as the
Arab Shainna.'- stands on the para-
. wall ol the minaret, and calls
his flock to prayer at eventide:
Ireary, creepy and monotonous We
wander further, and suddenly. With
that beat a little taster, we
ame upon the most important fea-
ture of this awesome mausoleum, a
ight at once Inspiring and sooth-
ing, the tomb ol the venerable
and master Kabbalist, Rabbi Simeon
Bar JOChal.
I To Be Continued)
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nas been said of me land with
ome truth) that I have a more in-
timate acquaintance with the rab-
Uinate than any other layman in
he. country. This, in a measure, is
due to those activities I have been
engaged in, during the past 20 years
which have impelled me to every
ectlon of the country east and
west, north and south crossing the
continent some 15 or 16 times in
hat period.
In this work the rabbi has played
.11 important part, and I have often
been compelled to lean upon him as
my mainstay in an emergency. Oth-
1 r work has brought me into con-
tact with the trustees. I have work-
ed with them, talked to them and
at them, have been rough with
'lain, and in turn, have been treat-
ed rather roughly by them. Congre-
gations I have come to know from
my intimate contacts with the in-
dividual members. I have had the
privilege of addressing congrega-
tions of all groups: Orthodox, Con-
servative, Reform, and have ad-
dressed^ them with a hat. without a
hat. and with a hat and tails. With
this background. I might well qual-
ify in any court ol the land as an
expert lay witness on the subject
matter ot this brief article.
Upon numerous occasions, and
particularly within the past lour or
five years. I have had dinned into
my ears complaints by the rabbi
about his board ol trustees and his
ongregatlon; by the board 01 trus-
ibOUl the rabbi and the 1011-
regation; by the members of the
congregation about the trustees and
the rabbi. These complaints are
i neral In character.
The Rabbi
By the rabbi: that the trustees
forget that the synagogue is a re-
!iglous institution and he. the rabbi.
.is spiritual leader. That there is
< o much cold blooded business
mixed up with the activities of the
board. That he is not tree to say
vhal hi' pleases when he pleases
That he is compelled to speak from
a censored pulpit. That his position
at times is a precarious one, being
lected from year to your and apt
.0 be thrown into the discard with-
iu! too much warning.
He complains about his congreca-
ion: He is only sure ot a lull con-
regatlon on the high holidays, the
ialance of the year, although he
may plead and scold, his congrega-
tion is limited to a mere handful of
he very religious or those who come
for special reasons or upon a spe-
cial occasion. Instead of being the
spiritual leader, he finds himself the
p] ritual "shamos." His sermons
rarely ever please all of the congre-
gation. His voice lacks coloring. His
subjects are too religious or too
spectacular. They have heard bet-
ter sermons, much better, by Rabbi
So-and-So, and So-and-So.
All of which comes to the rabbi
from confiding friends who tell him
the choiae morsels of gossip that
the congregation is indulging in on-
ly because they are his friends and
think he ought to know.
Trustees
The trustees have their stock of
complaints: The rabbi does not hold
the interest of the congregation. He
is only a fair preacher and not
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much of a teacher. As a business
man, he would starve to death. We
would get rid of him. if we could.
He has outlived his usefulness to'
this congregation, but has been with
us so long that we don't like to hurt
him.
As for the congregation, the trus- !
tees would like to know what they
want for their few dollars. Services
throughout the year. Sabbath and
Sunday schools for their children,
the use of the temple or the syna-
gogue for every conceivable func-
tion. But when it comes to reliev- j
ing the trustees of their financial I
burden, with an exception here and |
there, the congregants are just not
interested. It's a thankless task at
best, time consuming and costly.
Congregation
And now come the members of i
the congregation, and their com- ,
plaints are no less numerous: Proud \
of their place of worship, their Sab- I
bath school, their center building.
But they cost too much money. The
mortgage is eating us up. Support-
ing religious institutions is an ex-
pensive luxury what with member-
ship fees, costs of seats and other
incidental taxes and assessments
that are piled upon us from time
00 time. It would be much cheaper
to withdraw and just buy seats for j
the holy days. The board of trus-
tees must think we are made of
money. They operate as though we
were a closed corporation. To get
on the board you have to have a
blood test to trace your ancestry and
where you were born. If some of
them would only resign and give
the rest of us a chance we would
show them how to run a religious
institution. And as for the rabbi,
you can get as many opinions as
in re are members in the congrega-
tion:
Hi- sermons are too long. Why
doesn't he give us something ."nappy
once in a while'' The rabbi's duty
is to preach the Word of God. The
pulpit is no place for politics or
took reviews. What we want is re-
ligion, unadulterated. If the rabbi
would only stop preaching about
anti-Semitism. The rabbi is a Zion-
ist. The rabbi is not a Zionist, lVliy
should the rabbi get two months'
vacation? How come he goes to
Europe every year? The rabbi is too
old. The rabbi is too young. Why !
doe n't the rabbi get married? What i
right has a rabbi to live like a ;
priest? Have you heard about the |
rabbi? 'Then follows a whispered
conversation.) You don't say so! I
would never believe it. You would ;
think butter couldn't melt in his
mouth. If his wife would only stop
butting in. I wonder if she thinks
we can't run our women's organiza-
tion without her having to tell us
what we should do all the time?
The rabbi is just a darling. He plays
a fine game of golf, and as a story
teller none of the men has anything
on him. He's a good sport. He's a
man among men. That he tells his
-: : : : : > : : : : : : ? '
stories in the presence of ladies,
well, the rabbi is a human being,
too.
What Is tne Solution?
One would conclude from the
above recital that all is not well
with the forces that make up the
religious institutions in this coun-
try. But not to paint the other side
of the picture would be unfair, even
though the purpose of this article is
to present the disturbing factors
that enter into the congregational
life of our religious organizations
and possibly offer a solution.
Throughout the country there are
many congregations that enjoy, if
not a perfect relationship, at least
as fine a one as is possible, when
you consider that a congregation is
composed of many types and kinds
of people. And it is because I know
many of these congregations in a
rather intimate way that I dare to
venture "where Angels fear to
tread."
All of our religious organizations
have practically the same structure.
If I were to draw a chart. I would
place the president at the head, to
the left of him the board of trus-
tees, to the right the rabbi, and di-
rectly underneath, the congregation.
II this were to take form, it would
look like a pyramid, with the con-
gregation supporting the rabbi, the
trustees and the president.
Leadership is just as essential in
a religious institution as it Is In any
sue cessful enterprise, whether it be
commercial, political or social. Good
leadership makes for perfect coor-
dination and an harmonious whole.
Therefore it is essential in selecting
the president of a temple, that he
possess those qualities of leadership
as are befitting in the head of a re-
ligious institution. Being merely a
good business man, or being weal-
thy, or having plenty of time, none
of these in itself is sufficient. Pri-
marily, he must be a religious man
religious in the truest sense of
the word. In addition he must have
ability to organize. He must be wil-
ling to make the sacrifice of time
that an office of this nature de-
mands. Each member of the board
must have the potentialities of a
president. They should be the "pick"
of your congregation, men of char-
acter, men with a fine religious
background. They too must be
ready to make such sacrifice of time
as may be necessary in the interest
of the temple or synagogue.
The board of trustees should be
broad enough to permit the rabbi to
be an ex-officio member. He should
be invited at all times to participate
in the discussions of the board, for
1 Continued on Next Page)
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PAGE 1

Page Two THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Friday, January ?n .^ / II' Finally hitting their winning stride, the Hebrew Athletic club, with a large and enthusiastic crowd cheering them along, trounced the St. Pats in a cage tilt at Flamingo Park Monday night. The score was 39 to 15. With the Jewish boys hitting the hoop consistently and presenting a well played offensive, they had no trouble in piling up an early lead which was held without trouble throughout the game. Sam Bornstein, center, who comes from where basketball is played all the time, is a welcome addition to the team as is Joe Davis, rangy guard from orackerland. The local boys on the team are the Grossman brothers, Izzie Schwartz, and Al Reisman. Ralph Grossman led his teammates in scoring with 14 points followed by Bornstein with 11 and Al Grossman with eight points. Coach Art Webb is getting his squad into shape and more men will be added next week. The next contest will be held at Flamingo Park Monday evening at 8 p. m. sharp. • • • To Anna Appel, middle-aged star of the Yiddish Art theatre, fame is something more than electric lights and the trumpeting of her name. For 15 years she has appeared at the head of one of the most select group of stage artists in the world. With the Yiddish Art theatre she has seldom seen her name displayed in glaring electric bulbs. They do not do things like that in a serious theatre, and Anna Appel is serious. Miss Appel was born in Bucharest. Roumania. At 14 with her parents she emigrated from the old world to Canada. At 15 she was playing in a Montreal stock company in a series of classical plays. Her New York debut was with Jacob Adler in a series of plays by Tolstoi and later with Rudolph Schildkraut. Then, for 15 years she played steadily with the Yiddish Art theatre. "Symphony of Six Million" is her first motion picture venture in America, although she made a silent film in Vienna. Appearing with her is Ratoff, a Jewish actor of note, having performed for many years abroad and for a number of years with the Yiddish Art theatre where he established a unique reputation for characterization. Both of these artists had persistently refused to appear in films but were eventually induced to make their debut because of the human theme of the story which was writ; ten by Fannie Hurst. "Symphony of Six Million," which will appear at the Seventh Avenue j theatre this coming Sunday, is a human interest saga of New York's I Jewish East Side and tells the powerful dramatic story of a doctor torn between the sufferings of his people and the human urge for wealth. It is a thrilling story of Jewish life. • • Members of Beth David choir who assist at the late Friday night services are Mesdames Charles Markowitz. William Weintraub. Albert Dubbin. Edward Friedman, William Friedman and the Misses Rosalyn Daum and Rosalyn Bader. • • • The physical culture class under the direction of Mrs. Bertha Berkowitch Levy meets every morning from 9 to 10:30 in the tennis courts of Mrs. Joseph N. Morris. All are invited to Join this class, whose proceeds are devoted exclusively to the work of the Jewish Welfare bureau. A benefit bridge for the ladies' auxiliary of the Jewish Welfare bureau will be held at the Blackstone hotel. Miami Beach, Friday afternoon, February 3, beginning at 2 o'clock. Mrs. Isidor Cohen is chairman of the committee in charge. • • • With Norma Shearer as its star, and one of the most brilliant supporting casts yet assembled for the speaking screen, Metro-GoldwynMayer's lavish production of "Smilin' Through" will play Sunday. Monday and Tuesday at the Tivoli theatre. Miss Shearer in the feminine lead follows in the footsteps of Jane Cowl, who achieved one of her neatest successes in the recordjreaking New York stage run of the play from which the screen production was adapted. Opposite her is Fredric March, borrowed from Paramount to play the dual role of Jermy Wayne in the mid-Victorian APPEARING AT TIVOLI THEATRE THIS WEEK are well on their way to lose more couples before that point is reached. and Mr. Brown of Brooklyn nrr, inent members of Beth jfcJJJ gregation, and Sam Steiner of rZ cago, 111. '* Presidents of every Jewish wornen'i organization in Miami have been named on the Jewish Welfare j A large crowd attended the Bar Bail committee by Mrs. Bertha B. j Mitzvah of Robert Kurland of ft. York last Saturday morning at &., Jacob synagogue. Rabbi Axelrod d livered an earnest exhortation h English to the confirmant, deimn, the existing theory that th e Ba Mitzvah ceremony in this coota is nothing more than a theatrical act. • • Nearly 100 children now enrolled, at the Beth Jacob Sundav -h.i ,,„„.„ are arranging a reception at ,0 ,?*' which will be held in his honor shortly. I., \y. chairman of the annual Weliare ball, in addition to the members already serving. • • • Max Goebel. noted Jewish actor and playwright, is spending a vacaUon al Miami Beach to recuperate from las recent illness. Goebel is internationally known on the Yiddlsh stage and a number of his adNORMA SHEARERrram which la i> concert tour. At a well attended meeting of the ladies' auxiliary of the Jewish Weltare bureau held Monday afternoon aTToTa national Kaplan hall, Mrs. Meyer Schwartz, prominent communal worker of this city, was unanimousThe ladies' auxiliary of th. Mlwnl U<""" *""*• J 1 "Hert rt Jewish orthodox congregation held Kleinman was elected first v.ce one of its regular card parties a. Indent, and Mrs. Harry Isaacs, the synagog last Tuesday night with >*>nd vice president. These weie Mesdames A. Daum and Charles chosen to fill vacancies which reFeldman as the hostesses. Individsuited because of several recent resual prizes were awarded to the highi ignations. Mrs. Lena Simon was cquences of the story and Kenneth e st score at each table and Mrs. elected publicity chairman. Mrs. Wayne, his son, in the modern Rosenblum of Butler. Pa., was Sadye G. Rose, executive secretary cenes. Leslie Howard and O. P. Heggie, who left the screen to fulfill stage engagements on Broadway during he past season, were brought back .o Hollywood to add further lustre o Miss Shearer's cast. "Smilin' Through" is the story of an old man who seeks to shed the t lentless bitterness of his blighted .omance on a pair of young lovers. awarded the door prize. The annual Charity ball of the Jewish Welfare bureau to raise funds to carry on its work will be given this year at the beautiful Floridian hotel at Miami Beach The affair, which will take the form of a supper dance this year, has lor the ast .sevi ral years been one of the jutstanding events of the social seaIhe colorful background provides a ... ._,. „„ „„„.,„„ __ r I son, and will be held on Sunday •ontrast between the England of .'.68 and modern days. • • • Coining to Miami some years ago, vir. H. Samet and J. E. Samet. his en. first opened under the name of %  Samet's" at Miami Beach on November 26, 1929, and since that time Slave established an enviable repuation for fair dealing and clean •business. At all times insisting upon the handling of only strictly kosher ielicatessen. "Samet's" has jecome yr.onymous with "kashrus.'' Acveding to the request of a large lumber of their customers and paeons, "Samet's" will today open heir kosher meat and poultry department in their attractive and pacious store at 737 Washington ivenue. Miami Beach, where they trill be happy to welcome all who insist upon strict adherence to all •xuirements which insures kosher meats and poultry. The meat department will be closed on Saturdays and every Jewish holiday. Mr. Frost of Bradley Beach. N. J.. will .'r in charge of the meat department, and has had a long experi?nce in this line in a number of jrcminent tourist cities. • • Mr. and Mrs. I. Kwart are being congratulated upon the birth of a baby daughter at the Jackson Memorial hospital last week. Mother and fcaby are now at home and are doing nicely. The little girl was named Mashe Yocheved. • • • With Mrs. I. Buckstein. its president, as hostess, the ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish orthodox congregation will entertain its members and friends at a "social" next Tuesday evening, January 24. at the synagog. A program of entertainment will be presented and refreshments will be served. The oublic is 'nvited to attend. • • As we go to press the Women's club of the Workmen's circle is sponsoring a concert for the benefit of the tool campaign for the Jews of eastern Europe with the noted artists. Al Harris. Maxine Brodin and Zelda Zlatin appearing on the provening, March 12. All local Jewish organizations are cooperating to make this affair an outstanding success. Local friends and members of the Workmen's circle arc sponsoring ;i :eception in honor of Max Goebel, noted Jewish playwright and actor, this coming Sunday evening, January 22. at the Workmen's circle hall. roi N. w. Fifth avenue, beginning .it 8:30. A program will be presented and refreshments will be served. 1 lu public is invited of the Jewish Welfare bureau, told ol the cases arising daily and urged continued efforts to raise funds to cany on the work of relief. A social hour followed. • • • Officers recently elected by the local Bnai Brith lodge will be install* d at a public ceremony at Beth David Talmud Torah hall on Sundaj evening, January 29. beginning at 8 p. m. A splendid program will be presented in addition to the usual impressive Bnai Brith ritual. The public Is invited to attend. No charges ol any kind will be made and refreshments will be served. o'clock Services for the children are inclurj. ed in the weekly assembly, which is thoroughly enjoyed by all. It pays to advertise in The Jems,-. Floridian. Watch For "The Inside 93 Story" e s The Hebrew Athletic club held econd of a series of card parties tor the benefit of its community centre building fund last Sunday night. Quite a large number of guests attended and enjoyed a very delightful evening. Refreshments were served by the committee in charge, Prises were won by Mrs Henry Seltlln, Raymond Bain. M. Every night is a bin night at the Manowltl and L. Spiegelman. rValkathon contest and the Increasd attendance is due to the efforts .1 jack Negley, master ol ceremonRm,,lt vMUm : Mlami B,arh ies and the contestants, as well as toclude Brenner, of Cleveland, O.. Che floor shows from the various ***** ..,. : **.............j.......... night clubs. it, t _, „,, .. „ ;* ln*i*t -in >uur Grocw Kiwnir voii The Silver Slipper. Bagdad club. I + Moulin Rouge and Pier have pre| % NEW YOR K BREAD & ( AKI sented their star talent to packed f C OMPANY + houses and made it necessary for •:• BREAD AND ( AKES Revelations of Greater Miami Jewish Life ... Kashrus... Synagogs... Cemetery... Talmud Torahs ... AND? ... Coming Soon Always Fresh liToumnt Coffee I?* 1 **'** -.11 b-" the management to install 500 newbleacher seats. The McGreevys. Bilne and Mac; Jack Norton, the singing cowboy; Christine Christy, the flame of the Walkathon; Collapsible Neil Cappy. the loose-legged hoofer; Walter Morris. Jack Montgomery. Johnny McKay and Eric Weibe. songsters % supreme; Mickey Sinclair and Eve'* Whitmer. super strutters; Jack Kel* ley. the Stanley Laurel of the walk* ers; June Evans, queen of hula j; dancers: Bernard Shapoff and Fern •:Tracy, tap dancers, and the Smiths. Jerry and Frances, in their waltz + numbers, and Millie Rosen, the whistling sensation, are all among the contestants. The walkers, now thinned down to 16 couples and three solos, have passed the 400-hour mark and are nearing the 500, which means thev 471 S. W. lit Sl. |-honr 2-7SS2 Branch Store: l.V, \. w. ",th Si. •:• •:• •:• •:• -:• •:• T ....... ....... LA TOURAINE COFFEE AND FIFTH AVENUE COFFEE Roasted, packed and delivered daily from our Miami plant to insure "That Delicious Fresh Flavor" .. W. S. QUINBY CO.. INC. MIAMI JACKSONVILLE > &f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f &f &f&f &f &f &f &f&f&f ++++ &f&f &f&f &f &f &f •:• + + THE WILLIAM DENN H€TCL WASHINGTON AVENUE AT SIXTH STREET. MIAMI BEACH ••******************.;. ***•• PIERRE'S Beauty Shop Specializing in Haircuts and Finger Waving Hair Dyed 23 N. E. IM Art. Phone 2-S82" ******* *****•!••:•**********. True "Colonial" Hospitality Comfortable and Convenient I Iomelike and Pleasant 'A Delightful Spot for a Real Vacation" ONE OF THE FAMOUS "COLONIAL HOTELS" '********+****** %  >. • &f +****•: .** &f &f #*#++# &f # &f&f&f&f&f &f&f&f •;-'.•



PAGE 1

wJewisti Fiondfi'&in Vol. 6, No. 3. LORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 1933. Price Five Cents lAnnouncementsi CONGREGATION BETH JACOB {Orthodox) 111 Wa-hington Ave.. Miami Beach L. AXELBOD, Babbi Regular Friday evening services begin at 5:30 with the late services at 8:15 p rn., when the rabbi will preach a sermon on "Hebrew Slaves.' The congregational chanting and singing will be directed by Cantor Boris Schlachman. Saturday morning services begin at 9 a. m., with the rabbi preaching in Yiddish on the weekly portion of the law. MIAMI JEWISH OBTHODOX CONGBEGATION (Orthodox) |Mi S. W. Third Street JONAH E. CAPLAN. Babbi The usual early services begin at 530. and the late services at 8:30, when Rabbi Caplan will preach on By Their Deeds Shall Ye Know Them" The usual chanting and congregational singing will be enjoyed. Saturday morning services Mgin at 9 a. m. Beth David Sponsors Show Next Wednesday night, January 25. beginning at 8:15, the minstrel show sponsored by the junior committee of Beth David congregation will ring up the curtain for what promises to be one of the outstanding entertainments of the season, at the Riverside school auditorium, 221 S. W. Twelfth avenue. In charge of the show is Louis Hayman, veteran .showman. Professional dancers Dramatic Club Is Organized As a result of the enthusiastic reception of the recent Yiddish play given by local Jewish talent interested in the formation of a permanent Yiddish dramatic organization in Miami, the "Miami Jewish Dramatic Players" was organized last week Joseph Greenberg was elected president; Harry Rose, secretary and Mrs. M. Silverman. treasurer. Mr. Harry Greenberg will be direcappear during the evening's tor of the plays that will be produced by the organization. In announcing the plans of the organization, it was stressed that every efBETII DAVID CONGREGATION (Conservative) 139 N. W. Third Avenue MAX SHAPIBO. Rabbi will performance and will furnish additional entertainment. Mrs. Sam Weisel is chairman of the committee in charge of arrangements, and | fort will be made to interest local tickets are only 50 cents. Jews to take part in the presents The cast is composed of the fol, tions from time to time, so that Milowing: Interlocutor. Claire Cohen ami may be given the opportunity Weintraub: end men. Katie Markoto see Yiddish plays which otherwitz. Jeanette Falk. Juliette Stone wise could not be presented. The and Rose Bogen. Specialty acts will first play to be given by the new orbe a tap dance by Dorothy Kopploganization will be announced shortwitz and Claire Simon: Dance of I ly. the Soldiers by Ida Engler and Rosalyn Daum; adagio dance by Leonard Tobin and Rose Chintaling: song by Bobbie Resnick; tap dance by Theresa Rubenstein. The chorus s composed of Sadie Oliphant, Helene Friedman, Fae Weintraub, Sadye Resnick. Bert Friedman. Freda Markowitz. Reba Hayman. Ida Goldherg. Sadie Pepper. Iris Blumberg. Kashrus Work To Begin Soon Talmud Torah Ball Wednesday Final preparations for the annual Talmud Torah benefit ball to be held at the Mahi Shrine temple on Biscayne boulevard next Wednesday, January 25. beginning at 9 p. m„ include stars of night club shows now in the Greater Miami district. The beautiful hall will be specially decorated for the event and booths will be placed in and about the hall showing historical scenes. Dancing will begin at 9 o'clock and the vaudeville acts and floor show will be given during intermissions in the dancing. The affair is an annual event of the Ladles Auxiliary of the Miami Jewish orthodox congregation and the proceeds are devoted solely to the Talmud Torah fund which provides free tuition and school books to those otherwise unable to pay for their religious training. In charge of arrangements is a committee headed by Mrs. J. Louis Shochet, who is being assisted by a ticket committee in charge of Mrs. Charles Tannenbaum, Sam Futterfass and Milton Weiner; cake and food committee In charge of Mesdames William Mechlowltz, Morris Rappaport and Max Rappaport; flower committee in charge of Mesdames Sam Tannenbaum and Max Sophie Sapero, Clara Fine. Reva „ .T, Kupferstein; candies and cigarettes H H conferences have been held and i I .u.;. MI vacs begin at 5:30 p. m. nth the late services at 8:15 when Rabbi Shapiro will preach on "A New Jewish Nation in the Making." The congregational singing and chantinu will be led by Cantor Louis Hayman. who will be assisted by •he choir. Saturday morning services begin at 8:30 and Rabbi Shapiro will preach a sermon in Yiddish on the portion of the law. Silverman, Esther Lichtenstein and Ruth Dubbin. Beach Kennel Club To Open As a result of a stirring appeal made by Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan last Friday night at the Miami Jewish orthodox congregation, several | a :oc-al kosher committee is now being formed. Last Wednesday night Rabbi Caplan and Rabbi Max Shapiro of Beth David congregation met with Miami's butchers and plans for ; cents each and transportation to immediate functioning of a kosher I and Irom u e bal1 ma "f arran ed committee were discussed. All three \ ** callln 8 !" V !" mber of the com local butchers were invited to this in charge of Mrs. Nathan Abramson; sandwiches. Mrs. Nathan Adelman and Max Kupferstein. Tickets for this affair are only 50 mittee. TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI I Reform III N. K. Nineteenth Street DR. JACOB II. KAPLAN. Rabbi The Miami Beach Kennel club meeting but only two attended and will reopen its beautiful ocean-side ; offered to comply with all rules that plant on Tuesday evening. January may be adopted by the local rabbis SI, with a number of important and the kosher committee. The changes effected for the purpose of third refused to heed the call of the j.eaner and better dog racing. One two rabbis. A meeting of the kosher The President's Committee on Social Trends" will be discussed by Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan at Temple Israel, 137 N. E. Nineteenth street, at the services on Friday evening, '•'hich begin at 8:15. In the autumn of 1929 the President of the United States appointed a committee to examine the social trends in the United States. The •"port of this committee has Just bten issued, and is the outstanding contribution to an understanding of the problems of our civilization. The full title is: "A Review of the Finding! by the President's Research Committee on Social Trends." Comments on this Important document *i!l be the subject matter of the lecture by Dr. Kaplan at Temple Israel this Friday night. The public 'Bnai Brith S Elects Officers I At a meeting held on January 12. the Hebrew Athletic club, tiie Sholom lodge of Bnai Brith the following officers for the irear: President, W. L. Willir-st vice president. William Medman; second vice president, W. Cohen; secretary. Nat L. Williams; r Edward Friedman; monitor, Stanley Myers; assistant monitor, Leo Rosen; trustees, Lewis Brown, M. Rapaport, H. M. Dre"uch, j. Bernstein, H. Rayvis. Wil'iam Mechlowitz. Of the features tills year is the leal timing clock, which begins :o work simultaneously with the release of the dogs from the harness or box. This insures accurate timing o permit proper handicapping and record! of races. By use of the Keen starting harness and the electrical iming clock formful racing and ac' .urate records are assured. Both 1 l'.ese devices are protected by U. S. |and foreign patents. The Miami | 3each Kennel club is the only track now using these devices. A new pat1 nted track to carry the rabbit has ..placed the old wooden one. and because of its all-steel and concrete obstruction, prevents any lure trouble. A new marl and sand racng strip has been laid in place of the old turf track and insures firmer footing and speedier racing by the dogs. This Is the fifth season the track has operated and the same management of O'Hara and Anderson will again direct activities for the 52 ; vof racing. The public is invited to attend the nightly schooling races which begin at 7 o'clock ano arc ,.,,. (0 the public until the actual peaing night. A colorful season is predicted for the Beach oval. Noted Orator To Arrive committee will be held next week when the actual work of organization will begin. A Philosopher Looks At Yiddish By Prof. Morris Raphael Cohen Cemetery Report Is Adopted A large number of Miami's Jewish men and women attended a mass meeting of local Jewry at Odd Fellows hall last Tuesday night to discuss the local Jewish Cemetery asociation. Leaders of Greater Miami Jewry were present and heard the report of the cemetery adjustment committee given by Harry I. Lipton. prominent attorney of this city. After a brief discussion the recommendations of the committee were unanimously approved. A considerable saving in the principal sum. a reduction in Interest charges and title to a large part of the cemetery free and clear of debts, was effected by the committee. Messrs. Joint Distribution Campaigns Begin NEW YORK — Local campaigns for funds for relief activities among the Jews of eastern and central Europe start this week in a number of cities throughout the country. Rabbi Jonah E. Wise, chairman of the fund-raising committee of the joint distribution committee. The Jews of Denver. Colo., under the chairmanship of Noah A. Atler. initiate a drive this week for $5,000 for the purposes of the joint distribution committee. Another campaign in the western part of the country opens in Sacramento. Cal.. this week. Isador Brown is chairman, and the HcM. Albert Elkus. ol the Joint distribution committee's national council, is honorary chairman of the effort. The Allied Jewish campaign in Schenectady. N. Y., in which the Joint distribution committee is a chief participant, got under way last week under the chairmanship of Abraham Ferber. Other campaigns now going on are in Memphis. Harry I Lipton and Louis Heiman. attorneys, will represent the assocl| Tenn.. under the chairmanship of ation in making final arrangements David Stemberg, and in San Anwith the cemetery company. Rabbi M. Freed of New York, notPd Yiddish orator, is expected to arJewish Scout Troop Planned tonio. Tex. All Jewish girls between the ages of 10 and 15 who are interested in Girl Scout work are invited to atnve in Miami shortly on a lecture terd an organization meeting for a tour of the country in the interests Jewlsh tr00 p at Beth David Talmud physical training which Scout work Torah hall Tuesday afternoon. Jani provides. Mrs. Sadye Oliphant Is uary 24, at 4 o'clock. The Miami j Scout leader. branch of the Senior Council of Jewish Women is sponsoring this move in the interest of a wider training for local Jewish girls in Scout work in a distinct Jewish atmosphere. In beginning this work the senior council feels that local Jewish girls should receive the advantages of character building and of Jewish education, according to word received here this week. It is true that my work has been in the field of technical philosophy where Yiddish has been of no help to me. and I have lost active contact with the Jewish press or with the efforts to keep up high standards in Yiddish literature. I have not lost my love for my mother's -ongue. in which I was brought up and which can never be entirely replaced by any other tongue as the expression of Intimate affection. Though 40 years' inactivity has made me tongue-tied when it comes to speaking, I still can read Peretz and I deem it a great honor to testify to my high regard for his worth as a literary fixture, as well as a great, noble and beneficent personality. Perhaps the very fact that I have become an outsider to Yiddish literature may give some value to my testimony as to its great merit. Yiddish literature and the Yiddish press have had the great misfortune of being constantly assailed by two powerful parties, those who insist on the claims of the language of the country in which we live and those who espouse the claims of Hebrew, the language which has a unique sentimental value for all Jews. And I am glad to defend the value of Yiddish in substantial agreement with what Peretz himself once declared to be the relative necessities of the three languages for the Jews. First, as to the relative claims of Yiddish and Hebrew. I do not wish on an occasion of this sort to add to the acrimonious debate which has raged so long. I do not wish to deny that Hebrew will always have some passionate claim on Jewish sentiment. But as one who, at one time, at least, read and spoke both of these languages I may express my opinion that Hebrew has not the fluency and is not so redolent of the actual experience of the Jewish people for the last few centuries as is the Yiddish language. Let me testify from my own personal history. In the first period of my life I had an orthodox Hebrew education and I never read anything In Yiddish. My grandfather had charge of my education and he saw to it that no Yiddish reached me. When my mother wrote to him that I ought to learn to read and write Yiddish he replied: "I am giving your son the substance of life and education, the trimmings will come later." The society of which my grandfather was an Illustrious representative had its virtues, but It was barren and out of tune with the current of modern life. There were Maskilim, who read Hebrew books, wrote Hebrew letters to each other in stilted, figurative language and some were wen said to have kept their business books and records in Hebrew. But the whole thing was highly artificial and pedantic and the neoHebraic literature was completely divorced from the life of the great masses of the peP ,e : and having no roots, it bore no fruit. Perhaps the most significant incident in this connection is the fact that in the town of Nesviesh. where I was brought up. a town containing about six thousand Jews. I heard of only one who received a Hebrew newspaper, the Hazflroh. But his piety was rather suspected and fewshowed any interest, though there was a great deal of gossipy news (Contlnned on Pare Three) i I I .. • I



PAGE 1

Page Six THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Indav, January 13 The Source of Christian Ethics [i uniinued from Page One] repent so as not again to VIM. lie may also honor .. '.. %  / peace with thee. And meleea end persist in his • %  ].' %  even so forgive him the heart and leave to God : .ting." i en outdoes the (i credo of Jesus which sugthe turning Ol the other cheek n The entire concep• love, humility, and rabbinic one. Conniti t.s in Jewish writings against hatred, S pride Innunier•:., paaaagea extolling the love, truth, humility, and Hi ring. atlc and charitable US towards publicans enerally been %  ; out in contrast to the cold i If-rlghteous superl• ti.i Scribes and Pharisees. bbinic literature Is replete i love and kindilnners There was R. not only forgiving in robbers and tided them! Ji u and '.' %  i: dene can comtrangely moving R Ibbl Abbahu and 1'cnte: ilmud Jer Ime : a great ; %  : %  I man tin d him about I Pei Eekaka 'Five with harlot.-. I thl V68%  bath i amuse the bathers nd i play the flute.' tbbahu asked: evei doni a good % %  r ed: ul the thev. omaii Btanding an bitterly weeping. •.uned that prisoner. She frei dom only by tity. So I sold pillow and all my 1 ;avi the money hi % %  go ransom her %  d not sell her honor to saintly R. %  been on hi ascertain i eplj to Penteman lit to pray .: Ol trouble!' •' u .i..tin" la this 11 morality Idea that ind sinner was ; for Israel R. : the perbeautlful P"' aching %  thai Ji v Ish i readily in and hi %  n %  .•< all v and ntin ethbeen the Old literature, %  d that In been %  ftafiatMl and the Mank Directs Show On January 26, Burton Mi %  | well-known trouper and shov Will dlrecl the Beth David ml show at the Riverside school ti rium. Members of the Ittee Ol Beth David c: hood will be starred In thi performance, which is being given for the benefit of the Talmud Torah fund Sisterhood. A number of loClement, Eusebius, Jerome, and j Augustine, with miracles and a morI bid love of suffering, which is unJewish. This they probably borrowed from Mithraisni and other oriental mystic cults. An excellent example of this plaglarl in wi find in the earnest exhortation In the Book of Sirach: "Forgive thy neighbor the hurt that he hath done unto thee; "So shall thy sins also be forgiven when thou prayest." Now let us compare these lines with similar lines in the "Lord's Prayer": "Forgive us our sins as we forgive lose that trespass against u-." Philo, the greal Jewish philoso-. too. said till same tiling: "If you ask iorgiveness for your sins do you also forgive those that trespass against you. For remission s granted for remission." It become-, apparent, therefore, that the much-despised Pharisaism is the source from which not only -pels but all of Jesus" ethical : achings sprang. As if to corrobirate :1ns very point, we find that moving passage In Mldrash Le'Olam: : shall a man bestow lovin i kindness even on one who does evil i": Hi shall not be vengeful or bear a grudge. This is tile \MH lael ." For, Israel is uoort and forgiving i lClod. Since man is in His Image, there he must Ite Him. This is whal 'ho rabbls who preceded Jesus taught hical revolution which :.limed Jesus made in humanIon and robbing it of its rrnalism and inhuman ism, we oiler a 'characteristic exfrom the Talmud to refutt intention: told of Micah, the Jew. who offered sacriraphim, yet no divine pun: • was meted out to Juni. The %  came ijefore God and said: Lord, the smoke from Thy altars mingles with that of the offerings to Mlcah's idol." And God said: i eave him in peace. His bread is "tiered to poor travelers." Similarly "formalistic" is the beaut it ul story of Rabbi Ze-ira who Hi dieated his life to the poor, the ts and the sinners even as Jesus Is reputed to have done. When the rabbi died, the sinners wept ami lamented: "Hitherto the little rabbi with burnt leet prayed for us. but now who is going to pray for us?" They thi n lore repented Of penitents the Talmud sa; "The just the perfect, will not be worthy ol sitting with penitents In • I i world to come ." Do the gospels say as much? Xot onlj are the humaniti li nts of brotherly love and in-succinctly expressed in the Torah and all rabbinic li'' n :: bill their expression is tlv i %  e ot Judaism, They thus an M! to become both a euicli and an Inspiration to a higher and i of man on i This is nowhere better exemplified iban in the evening prayer recited by all pious Jews before retiring at night: "Master ol the world. I pardon ry sin and every wrong done to my person, to my property, to my honor and to all that I possess. la t no one be punished on my account; St, Petersburg Notes Services Friday night CongrettaItlon B'nai Israel, with A. S. Kleinfeld, rabbi, begin at K o'clock the rabbi will deliver a sermon on "Judaism in Action." Saturday -IT vici at 9 a. m.: Sunday school 10 a. m.: Hebrew school daily at 4 p. m Miss Sarah Gelman. of 1025 Fifteenth avenue, south, has just returned home after a six months' vacation in the North. Mrs. Lazaraus I.ehrer of Asheville. N. C, is a guest at the Horowitz hotel. At the meeting of the Judaic council, held January 9 at the Horowitz hotel. Mrs. M. Rosenberg, who was in charge ol the pn rai the evening, gave a very Interesting report on the life and work of Florence Nightingale, The next meeting of the Judaic council will be at the home of Miss Miriam Miller, i'7-ii Bayside drive, south. Monday eveJanuary M;. at 8:15 p. m. The Young Maccabeans met last Monday evening at the homi Fern Goldberg. Plans were made tor a vaudeville review to be at a later date. The hostess served is refreshments. The next meetinc will be at Hie home of Tiby Rothblatt, 4401 Filth avenue Monday evening, January 16 at 7:30 p. m. eal Jewish artistappear in tincast which is being n olghtly to insure a real professional performance. A number of specialty acts will be shown during the evening and an effort will be mai give the maximum of entertainment possible. Don't force your advice upon peoMany pie whose friendship you care for. | made hi ia man who can't write h, is dollar mark in the oJ IME MACCABEES MORI I 11 w Ml 1 iNst RAN< I A Human Institution Only I ivc Insurance Companies as Strong as the Maccabees Over One Million Dollars in the Relief Fund Homes tor Aged Without Cost to Members \\ rites .ill of the usual forms of Certificates on Men ,md Women on a I egal Reserve ISasis — $1,000 to $100,000 All ( crtificatcs have Special Accidental Clauses and Total and Permanent Disability Benefits JUNIOR CERTIFICATES Ordinary Life Twenty Payment lite Twenty Year Endowment Educational Annuity Single Premium — All Policies Participating All Junior ( ertificates Pay 1 nil Benefits at Age lour il Training lor ( hildren in Music, Dancing and I Ir.im.uic Art I rcc n \. M. COFFIN State Manager 226 Seybold Building : Phone 3-2618 MERCANTILE BANK ,-J TRUST COMPANY 7(il WASHINGTON AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA Condensed Statement. December 31. 1932 (Comptroller's Call) .! s sets: %  ash on I land and in Banks $197,975.67 I S. Government Securities 146\788.32 Mate Bonds 57 149.21 Municipal Bonds (-..4(10.00 Short Term Bonds, Due 1933 and ">4 38,809.25 Shon Term Bonds, Due 1935 and '56 J3.O9O.O0 I quipment Bonds j | 492.8 "> Railroad Bonds 56. "< Public Utility Bond. 30 435.00 lustrial Bonds 14*074.50 $612,549.71 • Guaranteed by I iquidator 44,0 1 hange and Seemed Loans I o.in.md Discounts 103,583 I urniture and I ixturcs 10,000.0 ( 'thev Assets 19,467-22 rOTAl ASSETS $817,763.04 Liabilities: apital Stock $100,000.00 surplus Fund 50,000.00 Reserve for Undivided Profits ........ 39,640.67 %  Mates Bond Account DEPOSITS 5,822.37 U I I Mill [Til S $817,763.04 PHILIP LIBERMAN, President


wJewish Fiondlian
Vol. No- '
(Announcements!
LORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY
MIAMI, ILORIDA, IRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 1933.
Price Five Cents
CONGREGATION BETH JACOB
(Orthodox)
HI Washington Av.. Miami Hcarh
I.. AXELROD, Rabbi
Regular Friday evening services
begin al 5:30 with the late services
at 8:15 P- m.. when the rabbi will
preach a sermon on "Hebrew
Slaves." The congregational chant-
ing and singing will be directed by
Cantor Boris Schlachman. Saturday
morning .services begin at 9 a. m
with the rabbi preaching in Yiddish
on the weekly portion of the law.
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION
(Orthodox)
IMS S. W. Third Strict
JONAH E. CAPLAN. Rabbi
The usual early services begin at
5:30. and the late services at 8:30,
when Rabbi Caplan will preach on
By Their Deeds Shall Ye Know
Them." The usual chanting and
congregational singing will be en-
joyed. Saturday morning services
Begin at 9 a. m.
BKTII DAVID CONGREGATION
(Conservative*
IU N. W. Third Avrniaa
MAX SHAPIRO. Rabbi
services begin at 5:30 p. m.
with the late services at 8:15 when
Rabbi Shapiro will preach on "A
Sew Jewish Nation in the Making."
The congregational singing and
chanting will be led by Cantor Louis
Hayman. who will be assisted by
nil. Saturday morning ser-
begln at 8:30 and Rabbi Sha-
piro will preach a sermon in Yid-
dish on the portion of the law.
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI
(Reform!
131 N. K. Nineteenth Street
l)K. JACOB II. KAPLAN. Rabbi
The President's Committee on
Social Trends" will be discussed by
Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan at Temple Is-
W N. E. Nineteenth street, at
vires on Friday evening,
in at 8:15.
In the autumn of 1929 the Presi-
dent hi the United States appoint-
tumittee to examine the so-
nds in the United States. The
report of this committee has just
ucd, and is the outstanding
contribution to an understanding of
Menu of our civilization. The
lull title is: "A Review of the Find-
by the President's Research
Committee on Social Trends." Coin-
on this important document
Kill be the subject matter of the
lecture by Dr. Kaplan at Temple Is-
rael this Friday night. The public
Mile.
Beth David
Sponsors Show
Next Wednesday night, January
25, beginning at 8:15, the minstrel
show sponsored by the Junior com-
mittee of Beth David congregation
will ring up the curtain for what
promises to be one of the outstand-
ing entertainments of the season, at
the Riverside school auditorium. 221
S. W. Twelfth avenue. In charge
of the show is Louis Hayman. vet-
eran showman. Professional dancers
will appear during the evenings
performance and will furnish addi-
tional entertainment. Mrs. Sam
Welsel Is chairman of the commit-
tee in charge ot arrangements, and
tickets are only 50 cents.
The cast is composed of the fol-
lowing: Interlocutor. Claire Cohen
Weintraub: end men. Katie Marko-
witz. Jeanette Falk, Juliette Stone
and Rose Bogen. Specialty acts will
be a tap dance by Dorothy Kopplo-
witz and Claire Simon: Dance of
the Soldiers by Ida Engler and Ros-
alyn Daum; adagio dance by Leon-
ard Tobin and Rose Chintaling;
song by Bobbie Resnick: tap dance
by Theresa Rubenstein. The chorus
s composed of Sadie Oliphant. Hel-
ene Friedman. Fae Weintraub. Sad-
ve Resnick. Bert Friedman. Freda
Maikowitz. Reba Hayman. Ida Gold-
Sadie Pepper Iris Blumberg.
Sophie Sapero, Clara Fine. Reva
Sllverman, Esther Llchtensteln and
Ruth Dubbin.
Dramatic Club
Is Organized
As a result of the enthusiastic re-
ception of the recent Yiddish play
I given by local Jewish talent inter-
| ested in the formation of a perman-
I ent Yiddish dramatic organization
j m Miami, the "Miami Jewish Dra-
matic Players" was organized last
I week. Joseph Greenberg was elect-
ed president; Harry Rose, secretary
and Mrs. M. Silverman. treasurer.
Mr. Harry Greenberg will be direc-
tor of the plays that will be pro-
duced by the organization. In an-
nouncing the plans of the organiza-
' tion, it was stressed that every ef-
fort will be made to interest local
Jews to take part in the presenta-
, tions from time to time, so that Mi-
1 ami may be given the opportunity
io see Yiddish plays which other-
I wise could not be presented. The
fust play to be given by the new or-
ganization will be announced! short-
ly.
tenai Brith
Elects Officers
meeting held on January 12.
the Hebrew Athletic club,
liolom lodge of Bnai Brith
the following officers for the
fear: President. W. L. Wil-
Nams; tii. t vice president, William
an; second vice president, W.
retary, Nat L. Wi! I
er, Edward Friedman; moni-
anley Myers; assistant moni-
'r. Leo Rosen; trustees. Lewis.
M. Rapaport. H. M. Dre-
"itch, j. Bernstein, H. Rayvis. Wil-
liam Mechlowltz.
Beach Kennel
Club To Open
The Miami Beach Kennel club
will reopen its beautiful ocean-side
plant on Tuesday evening. January
31, with a number of important
hanges effected for the purpose of
eaner and better dog racing. One
of the features thus year is the
rical timing clock, which bei'ins
;o work simultaneously with the re-
;ease of the dogs from the harness
or box. This insure.-, accurate timing
permit proper handicapping and
I i ords ol races. By use of the Keen
Starting harness and the electrical
.iming clock lormtul racing anil ac-
urate records are assured. Both
devices are protected by V. S.
and foreign patents. The Miami
Beach Kennel club is the only track
now using these devices. A new pai-
nted track to cany the rabbit has
eplaced the old wooden one. and
becau.se of its all-steel and concrete
traction, prevents any lure
trouble. A new marl and sand rac-
ng strip has been laid in place ol
the old turl track and insures firmer
footing and speedier racing by the
dogs.
This IS the fifth season the track
has operated and the same manage-
ment of OHara and Anderson will
again direct activities lor the 52
;. ... ol n.cmg. The public is invited
to attend the nightly schooling rac-
es which begin at 7 o'clock and are
free to the public until the actual
pening night, a colorful season Is
predicted lor the Beach oval.
Kashrus Work
To Begin Soon
As a result of a stirring appeal
made by Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan
j I Friday night at the Miami Jew-
ish orthodox congregation, several
conferences have been held and a
Oca! kosher committee is now being
formed. Last Wednesday night Rab-
bl Caplan and Rabbi Max Shapiro
of Beth David congregation met
with Miami's butchers and plans tor
immediate functioning of a kosher
committee were discussed. All three
' local butchers were invited to this
meeting but only two attended and
offered to comply with all rules that
may be adopted by the local rabbis
| and the kosher committee. The
third refused to heed the call ol the
two rabbis. A meeting of the kosher
committee will be held next week
when the actual work of organiza-
tion will begin
Talmud Torah
Ball Wednesday
Final preparations for the annual
Talmud Torah benefit ball to be
held at the Mahi Shrine temple on
Biscayne boulevard next Wednes-
day, January 25. beginning at 9 p.
m., include stars of night club shows
now in the Greater Miami district.
The beautiful hall will be specially
decorated for the event and booths
will be placed in and about the hall
showing historical scenes. Dancing
will begin at 9 o'clock and the vaud-
eville acts and floor show will be
given during intermissions in the
dancing. The affair is an annual
event of the Ladies Auxiliary of the
Miami Jewish orthodox congrega-
tion and the proceeds are devoted
solely to the Talmud Torah fund
which provides free tuition and
school books to those otherwise un-
able to pay for their religious train-
ing.
In charge of arrangements is a
committee headed by Mrs. J. Louis
Shochet. who is being assisted by
a ticket committee in charge of Mrs.
Charles Tannenbaum. Sam Futter-
taSS and Milton Weiner; cake and
food committee in charge of Mes-
dames William Mechlowltz, Morris
Rappaport and Max Rappaport;
flower committee in charge of Mes-
dames Sam Tannenbaum and Max
Kupferstein; candies and cigarettes
in charge of Mrs. Nathan Abrain-
son: sandwiches. Mrs. Nathan Ad-
elman and Max Kupferstein.
Tickets lor this affair are only 50
cents each, and transportation to
and from the ball may be arranged
by calling any member of the com-
mittee.
Noted Orator
To Arrive
: ed of New York, not-
ed Yiddish orator, is expected to ar-
... Miami shortly on a lecture
tour of the country in the interests
of Jewish education, according to
word received here this week.
Cemetery Report
Is Adopted
A large number of Miami's Jewish
in n and women attended a mass
meiting of local Jewry at Odd Fel-
lows hall last Tuesday night to dis-
cuss the local Jewish Cemetery as-
ociation. leaders of Greater Mi-
ami Jewry were present and heard
'lie report of the cemetery adjust-
ment committee given by Harry I.
Lipton. prominent attorney of this
city. Alter a brief discussion the
recommendations of the committee
were unanimously approved. A con-
siderable saving in the principal
sum. a reduction in interest charges
and title to a large part of the cem-
etery free and clear of debts, was
effected by the committee. Messrs.
Harry I Lipton and Louis Heiman.
attorneys, will represent the associ-
ation in making final arrangements
with the cemetery company.
Jewish Scout
Troop Planned
All Jewish girls between the ages
of 10 and 15 who are interested in
ciirl Scout work are invited to at-
tend an organization meeting for a
Jewish troop at Beth David Talmud
Torah hall Tuesday afternoon. Jan-
uary 24, at 4 o'clock. The Miami
Joint Distribution
Campaigns Begin
NEW YORK Local campaigns
for funds for relief activities among
the Jews of eastern and central Eur-
ope start this week in a number of
cities throughout the country. Rab-
bi Jonah E. Wise, chairman of the
fund-raising committee of the joint
distribution committee.
The Jews of Denver. Colo., under
the chairmanship of Noah A. Atler.
initiate a drive this week for S5 000
for the purposes of the joint disri-
bution committee. Another a m-
paign in the western part of the
country opens in Sacramento, Cal..
this week. Isador Brown is chair-
man, and the Hc\i. Albert Elkus ol
the joint distribution committee's
national council, is honorary chair-
man of the effort.
The Allied Jewish campaign in
Schenectady. N. Y., in which the
joint distribution committee is a
chief participant, got under way last
week under the chairmanship of
Abraham Ferber. Other campaigns
mow going on are in Memphis.
Tenn.. under the chairmanship of
David Steinberg, and in San An-
tonio, Tex.
branch of the Senior Council of
.Jewish Women is sponsoring this
move in the interest of a wider
training lor local Jewish girls in
Scout work in a distinct Jewish at-
mosphere. In beginning this work
the senior council feels that local
mild receive the ad-
vantages of character building and
physical training which Scout work
provides. Mts. Sadye Oliphant is
Scout leader.
A Philosopher
Looks At Yiddish
By Prof. Morris Raphael Cohen
It is true that my work has been
in the field of technical philosophy
where Yiddish has been of no help
to me, and I have lost active con-
tact with the Jewish press or with
the efforts to keep up high stand-
ards in Yiddish literature. I have
not lost my love for my mother's
-ongue, in which I was brought up
and which can never be entirely re-
placed by any other tongue as the
expression of intimate affection.
Though 40 years' inactivity has
made me tongue-tied when it comes
to speaking, I still can read Peretz
and I deem it a great honor to tes-
tify to my high regard for his worth
as a literary fixture, as well as a
great, noble and beneficent person-
ality.
Perhaps the very fact that I have
become an outsider to Yiddish lit-
erature may give some value to my
testimony as to its great merit. Yid-
dish literature and the Yiddish
press have had the great misfortune
of being constantly assailed by two
powerful parties, those who insist on
the claims of the language of the
country in which we live and those
who espouse the claims of Hebrew,
the language which has a unique
sentimental value for all Jews. And
I am glad to defend the value of
Yiddish in substantial agreement
with what Peretz himself once de-
clared to be the relative necessities
of the three languages for the Jews.
First, as to the relative claims of
Yiddish and Hebrew. I do not wish
on an occasion of this sort to add to
the acrimonious debate which has
raged so long. I do not wish to deny
that Hebrew will always have some
passionate claim on Jewish senti-
ment. But as one who, at one time,
at least, read and spoke both of
these languages I may express my
opinion that Hebrew has not t.he
fluency and is not so redolent of the
actual experience of the Jewish peo-
ple for the last few centuries as is
the Yiddish language. Let me testi-
fy from my own personal history.
In the first period of my life I had
an orthodox Hebrew education and
I never read anything in Yiddish.
My grandfather had charge of my
education and he saw to it that no
Yiddish reached me. When my
mother wrote to him that I ought
to learn to read and write Yiddish
he replied: "I am giving your son
the substance of life and education.
the trimmings will come later." The
society of which my grandfather
was an illustrious representative had
its virtues, but it was barren and
out of tune with the current of
modern life. There were Maskilim,
who read Hebrew books, wrote He-
brew letters to each other in stilted,
figurative language and some were
tven said to have kept their busi-
ness books and records in Hebrew.
Rut the whole thing was highly art-
ificial and pedantic and the neo-
Hebraic literature was completely
divorced from the life of the great
masses of the people; and, having
no roots, it bore no fruit. Perhaps
the most significant incident in this
connection is the fact that in the
town of Nesviesh. where I was
brought up. a town containing
about six thousand Jews. I heard of
only one who received a Hebrew
newspaper, the Hazfiroh. But his
piety was rather suspected and few
showed any Interest, though there
was a great deal of gossipy news
(Continued on Pe Three)
I