<%BANNER%>

The Jewish Floridian ( January 13, 1933 )

UFJUD

PAGE 1

# 'Jewish IFiaridlia in Vol. ... No. 2. (Announcements, i j MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CONGREGATION (Orthodox) 111.-. S. W. Third Street JONAH E. CAPLAN, Rabbi garly services begin at 5:30 with the late open forum services at 8:30, then Rabbi Caplan will preach on A Frank Disclosure of the Real Facts in Miami Jewry." In his sermon the rabbi will tell of the facts regarding the kosher meat problem m tln.s district as found by him in an exhaustive investigation concluded recently. Other problems U] also be told of as disclosed in his investigation, which affect the citizens of the Jewish community. The public is urged to attend. A so,-ial hour will follow. CONGREGATION BETH JACOB (Ortbadas) 111 WuhllVtOB Ave.. Miami Ilrarh L. AXELROD. Rabbi Regular Friday evening services at r>30 with the late services .it 8:30 when the rabbi will preach a sermon on "Jacob Lives On." Congregational chanting and singU be in charge of Cantor Bor* Schlaelimaii: Saturday morning Rabbi Axelrod will preach in Yiddish on the portion of the week, in addition to a brief talk in English en "Modern Confirmation." Robert Kurland of New York City will be Bar Mit/va during the morning service Saturday and will read the Maftir and Haftorah. LORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 7 ?}, 1933. Price Five Cents TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI I Reform) I :" V E. Nineteenth Sir., i DR. JACOB EL KAPLAN, Rabbi Regular Friday evening services will begin tonight at 8 o'clock when a sermon on "The Inner Conflict of the Jew" will be delivered by the labbi. The usual musical program ill be heard and a social hour will the services. BETH DAVID CONGREGATION iConNervmtivc) III N. W. Third Avenue MAX SHAPIRO, Rabbi The early services begin at 5:30 with the late services following at •:15 when Rabbi Shapiro will on "Is Life Worth Living?" The u-ual congregational singing •"id Chanting will be in charge of Cantor Louis Hayman, who will be assisted by the choir. A social hour *U1 follow. Saturday morning serrteea begin at 8:30 and at 10 a. m. *he rabbi will hold special services ; or pupilcf the Talmud Torah. Rabbi To Expose I ocal Conditions Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation In an announcement of his topic lonight at the late services in his synagog. promises to expose conditions affecting the well being of the Jewish community in the Greater Miami district. In his sermon the rabbi will give the results of an investigation which he has conducted during the past month regarding the "Kashrus" situation existing in Jewish butcher and delicatessen stores in the entire district. The attitude of the Jewish public, the "shochtim," the butchers and the tourists wili be discussed in frank and open fashion. The local cemetery situation, the alleged "undertaker and tombstone trust," and other similar matters will be covered. An invitation is extended to ;'ll who attend to discuss the questions involved, and the raBbi will answer all inquiries that may be asked. Services will start promptly at 8:30. HalpernMemorial Durant Speaks Meeting Held I On Russia Last Sunday evening a large number of friends of the late Dr. A. D. Halpern gathered at the memorial services held in his memory at the Workmen's Circle hall. Eulogies of his life were delivered by Leon Elkin. Harry I. Lipton, Harry Simonhoff and Henry Seitlin. Mr. A. L. Feinberg presided at the meeting. The work of the late Dr. Halpern in connection with the Zionist movement, his work in the establishing of the Yiddish Schule and his efforts for relief and general communal work were described by he different speakers. Flexner Succeeds Gov. Lehman Miller Is Named Associate Judge M. Victor Miller, of the law firm of Sampson *• Miller, was appointed associate judge of the Miami Beacli Municipal court Tuesday by John H. Levi, president of the city council, upon recommendation of Judge W. E. Walsh and Mayor A. Frank Katzentine. The associate Judge will serve whenever Judge Walsh is disqualified or is absent from the city. Mr. Miller came to Miami Beach eight years ago from Akron. O. He received his law degree from the University of Miami. He also attended Vanderbilt and Ohio State universities. He is a former treasurer and president of the University of Miami Alumni association. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Miller of the Mayfleld Court apartments. Miami Beach, and a brother of Mrs. S. H. Lutzky. president of Miami chapter of Senior Hadassah. Weintraub Is Named By Sheriff Sherirr Dan Hardle announced *• appointment this week of Sydney L Weintraub. local Jewish at*BMy, as counsel to the sheriff. Mr. Weintraub is the son-in-law of Mr. and Mrs Isidor Cohen, pioneer resets of this city, and is a member j the. administrative board of Beth avld congregation. Cemetery Report To Be Rendered Because of the intense interest be\ tag shown in the local cemetery siti uation a mass meeting will be held ; on Tuesday evening, January 18. at 8 p. m. at the Odd Fellow hall at N. W. Second avenue and Fourth street. At this meeting the final report of the adjustment committee will be given and action will be taken as to the future of the plot in the Woodlawn cemetery, owned by the Greater Miami Jewish Cemetery association. The citizens of Greater Miami are urged to attend this meeting, and Who have relatives or friends interred in the Jewish section of Woodlawn cemetery are urged to be present as the decision made at this meeting will affect them particularly. The local rabbis have been invitea [to attend and address the meeting NEW YORK — Eerr.artl Flexr.or of New York City has been elected vice president of the American Joint Reconstruction Foundation succeeding Gov. Herbert H. Lehman who has been compelled to resign because of the pressure of his official duties, according to information received here from London by Joseph C. Hyman, secretary of the Jewish Joint Distribution committee which, with the Jewish Coloni, ration association, organized the foundation to consolidate certain reconstruction activities in eastern I and central Europe. Governor Lehman, who held the vice presidency I of the foundation since its incep! tion in 1924, remains as a member | of the foundation's council. The foundation, it was learned, voted credit grants of $175,000 to Jewish institutions in Poland, Czecho Slovakia, Lithuania and Roumania. Mr. Flexner, who is chairman of the board of the Palestine Economic corporation, has long been associated with the relief and rehabilitation activities of the Joint Distribution committee, serving as chairman of its medical committee, vice chairman of its Committee on Reconstruction and as a member of its board of directors. Governor Lehman is vice chairman of the Joint Distribution committee and has been prominently identified with its activities since the inception of the committee in 1914. As chairman of the Committee on Reconstruction, he supervised the establishment of a network of Jewish cooperative loan societies throughout eastern and central Eu\ rope, designed to facilitate the reconstruction program of the Joint Distribution committee by making credit available to artisans, workmen and small merchants who otherwise enjoy no credit facilities. Dr. Will Durant, author of "The Story of Philosophy" and other works, contributor to various publications, and lecturer, will speak at Temple Israel of Miami. 137 N. E. Nineteenth street at 8 p. m. on January 15. It was learned last week that Dr. Durant would be In Florida this month, and Herbert U. Feibelman. chairman of the standing committee on intellectual culture of Temple Israel, arranged for the lecture. The subject of his address will be "The Tragedy of Russia." Dr. Durant last summer spent considerable time in a journey from Manchuria to Poland, and his observations on the Soviet experiment have been the subject of magazine contributions and lectures. It is considered that Dr. Durant's views will awaken widespread interest in the community. The Source of Christian Ethics Rahbinu Literature and Sentiments of Brnt/ierl) Lore, Forgiventts, and Broad llumanitatianhm. Benefit Ball to Hear Artists Artists who have made a hit on the vaudeville stage and who appear nightly in the different night clubs of the Greater Miami district will be seen and heard at the annual Talmud Torah ball of the Ladies' auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation. Mahi Shrine temple on the Biscayne boulevard will be the scene of this annual event on Wednesday evening, January 25. when it will be specially decorated with scenes famous in Jewish history and lore. Booths in which food and other articles will be sold will be erected and will be in charge of sub-committees of the organization. In charge of the general committee are Mesdames J. Louis Shochet and Louis Pallott. The proceeds are used for the Talmud Torah free tuition fund to provide daily religious training for those unable to pay for them. In direct charge of the daily Talmud Torah is Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan. a graduate of the "Isaac Elchanan Yeshiva" of New York. The public Is invited to attend this annual event. Beach Council Urges Agreement When the butchers' controversy now raging at Miami Beach was aired at a meeting of the city council, by an appeal for the granting of a permit to kill chickens on cityowned property, the council unanimously urged the parties involved Ive at a settlement. Arbeiter Ring Sponsors Concert Because of an error the date of the concert being sponsored by the Woman's club of the Workmen's circle was announced in our last issue as January 11. The concert for the benefit of a nation-.vide campaign for funds for the relief of Jews of eastern Europe will be held at Beth David Talmud Torah Thursday evening, January 19. beginning at 8 p. m. Among the artists appearing are Al Harris. Maxim Brody, former member of the Chicago Opera company, and the noted pianist, Zella Zaltin. The artists are making a nation-wide tour in behalf of the campaign and have been received with enthusiastic acclamation wherever they have appeared. Admission to the concert will be a nominal fee. "Ideas," said Rameau, the eighteenth century French philosopher, "are not self-creative. Like all life and all human experience, they flow on in cycles of endless continuity." It is this truth, so well-known to all intelligent students of history, which makes the claim advanced by so many Christian historians, that Jesus ushered an entirely new and epoch-making ethics into the world, sound so preposterous. Even so formidable a scholar and so fine a spirit as Ernest Renan, in his "scientific" Life of Jesus, becomes dithyrambic over this unprecedented "miracle of love" which had descended upon earth in the corporeal form of the carpenter of Nazareth. This assertion, if tenable, denies the very existence of the growth and progress of life both intellectually as well as physically. The ethics of Jesus, as expounded in the Synoptic Gospels, was an integral part of Jewish ethics prevalent in those days. To deny this fact is tantamount to declaring that the cart precedes the horse. Jewish ethics of Jesus' day was the result of the organic development of Judaism throughout the centuries of its existence. A particularly profound influence on Jewish ethics were the writings and labors of the pre-Exilic prophets, which were preserved for all posterity in the canonization of the Pentateuch, circa 450 B.C.E. It was the rabbinic teachings of the Tannaim and the Amoraim which, in the centuries immediately pre • ceding the advent of Jesus, elaborated and perfected the broad humanitarianism of the prophets. The apocryphal writings during the second and first centuries before the new era also concerned themselves with ethical thought and knowledge. Therefore it does seem incredible that even many supposedly intelligent Jews, not speaking ol Christians, are quite sincerely under the impression that such concepts as brotherly love, universal peace, forgiveness, non-resistance to evil, and humility had never been taught before Jesus. Where in the Christian gospels do we find any passage concerning love for one's fellowmen as moving as the Levitical injunction: "Thou shaH not hate thy brother in thine heart Thou shalt not take vengeance, nor bear any grudge against the children of thy people; but thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself." In the Testament of God written about 100 C.E. by one of the muchmaligned "scribes," we read: "Love ye therefore one another from the heart; and if a man sin against thee, cast forth the poison of hate and speak peaceably to him. and in thy soul hold not guile; and if he confess and repent, forgive him. But if he deny it, do not get into a passion with him. lest catching the poison from thee he take to swearing, and so thou sin doubly. And though he deny it and yet have a sense of shame when reproved, cease reproving him. For he who deil'ontinurd on Pe Six) % 



PAGE 1

Pa^c Two t Mr. :iiul Mis David Schwnlb Of Bl N B Seventieth street announce llie birth >>( :i Km, .limitary 2. al Vlotorta iio.-ipuj\i riic child hM been named i eonaurd. • • • The membership committee ol the National Council ol Jewish Juniors has announced thai the current month win be devoted to membership activities plans toward this end ire discussed si .1 meeting of the group held recently at the Beth David talmud Torah. As parl oi an Intensive drive, both the local and national committees sponsored %  kid party Tuesday at 8 i> m. at the Beth DavM Pslmud rorah Nee memban were honored. guests, in charge ol sxiangementi were Ifln Millie nulawi. chairman Mi v. Harriett Kantor. Miss Charlotte Kohn. Miss Mr.iam Schemberg. Miss Henrietta Hirsch. Miss Hobby IMlTT'ni BOBS Mary Rieliman end Idas Sylvia Poblai riie rsajular meeting January IT will be m charge of the numbership committee On January 31 a membership sooiai wr.i tv he'.. ; for the members and guest*. • • • rhe sisterhood of Bath DavM will sponsor • bridge luncheon at I M p in January ;s at the Qoldatotn .\::: 64? Colhr.s avenw M .anu Baaoh Hoatasaaa wU ba Mrs M Bchetnberg, Mrs B QoMsteln and Mm B Kandi? Rasaiialliaii may be made b] lalaiihraitiej anj of the hosteaaai • • • Dr and Mrs Qeoraje Jaj Qcjcaon ot 1 are in xr.anv. 1 '.stung 1 '.•.<-:•. %  pueats Mrs Genoa who fanv.e:.\ ami sfisi BUM ; ttas dauBfatai ol Mi and I Joseph Bi Dr. Oersoi parents are Ml an ..:-. Plrsl BaaettBej ol IT Bisters Ylsitansj nick was \> eek al : Mrs. Roaa .s w Twelfth s tr eet A Mm vNewark N J Mm (tea Tor* Mrs J s Mrs Ran ; H 1 A aarHM Mm I Hawark H J M:s A S okN Y Mrs anna Mint %  da Mn Ban QoHBat I Mn %  ten Ton Mn tf. B SBBBM ami a:-..Mrs. I Baaaaai • LN. 1 Mn Baraa founder of l .-pc Lrajur -** eitOtad CBSktfaaan I anal Mn Hanna v .:e\: seeaaeary *rstn enU be heUi the Bn rtesdar* of each month at Mrs Saanpscc's home • • • A ..r Ks^assah *** haU BtnaBfe] eAessaaaa : dee M-jial Acacxa chst ssBB Mrs rr*r.eaa WU^esson presadu* -. Bat *rsecw* of XI^s Pr*\i Lvtck? preaadent. T* xt D naaasaa *-as Jhe £*•*<£ speaker of :h# 1 and defiT*r*x Oaatetear. reported on the joint sensor and Jantor aarn dance head test Wednesday curhtD. XOcraetes sjx*. 1 of Uw MJ^.: CVrx MUK. Thrcxvh :he ccarteay at the YVjia gates son school of da=k-sag. Mast Jasm Ttanser vaa pnat'.A: an an ••?. dance mwrber %  • • As we p u -ofrss aveetang of E*-.ur*h BBaJBBBJ 0 I I I BfjBal aoM at take Scoosh Ifcv This is the Krai meeting of the winter season. Offlcen now serving aha wen recently elected an Mn Josephine LabaHne, worthy matron; George Orlfflth, worth! ron; Robert J VTallli associate patron: Lorn Waih.s. associate matron; Lena Simon, conductress; Fine, associate conductress; BUa Raiser, seen tarj I j.;.. Oi .'• %  Rth. treasurer; Lillian Fried marshal; Berthe HsJpem, chaplain; Mary Barber, Adah; Ida 1 Ruth; AnR< laman I Beesye Jacobye Mar:!. Schworta Blecta; Anna Albert warder Plans tot a garden part] ai adt t>j Senloi Hadasss oon Januarj M al the Blacks) Miami B each ... will begin al -' p no Full details aril! be announced In oui naxl me • • • Beth Jacob B Beach la plannli d the big aflain of I Poi Wadnaadaj II ,i: the WUllam Penn hotel arhex .: partiaa alii be si\c:fa benefit of Its v Prises aril] be a ai aided .u ill be a con Sam C and 18 rhf p •:;%  • • %  MD Uheri of A: Bbssl "T**! -' ; ••••'•'• 'n* B ".'.. and Mrs %  Adi •* %  ::. rasa • • a lemoon precedBg ..e worvtened to M.| a 1 udmous thanaa • • • %  M MV.-M on* c: an nsjadai .-A.-i • fyr^Ljrcy far tac ban 1 Ts:•.i ?r^ a %  %  :--• :" send r% I .;: K .'.'. January 3: In arrange::'. er.:s :s Mrs rTfwtah ?r-r ^ Asi\;r noted pianisl %  CVr.j : M '•. %  -%  ILKII : H I a a a • a % %  sses aill :ite part %  %  • S 6 I made and %  s %  • Max Marks i naif, K wnti :..-. • :: X f : :rv< rto: %  ta an alsc ;_kTi: • • • •a a IBJSSJSJ reaaaaa %  aaajaaj d -' %  %  %  ekcev A:;.'-.; .; ;;r^r-r.atae BksoUaa of officers -rsz rri: .: _r.--\.M A -i"t :~J!z ~: _i^:;..r^:> Hadassah at the Mahl Shrine tem1 pie last Wednesday night. Old fashioned barn dances were featured. • • • At a recent meeting of the A.Z.A. .junior Bnai Brith) the officers chosen to serve this coming year are Bam Silver, president; Bernard K.r. vice president; Milton Kaplan, secretary; Morris Raff, treasurer: Ellis Klein, reporter; Dave Hirsch, sereeaiit-at-arms. and Herman Mlntier, chaplain. Plans are now being made for a series of benefit affairs including a dance on February 5 to raise funds to send a •i„n to the Southern Conclave of the A.Z.A. which will be held in Atlanta. Oa.. during the month of March. • • • Mist Helen Yunes. who spent the summer In Boston, Mass.. returned ,mi Beach to spend the winter with her mother. Mrs. Rebecca prominent communal worker of this city. • • • Mr Philip Berkowitz returned to Ity this week from Savannah. Oa., where be spent a week on a combined business and pleasure trip. He brought back with him Mrs. Berkowitz. who had been visiting in nville. Fla. for the past month. • • • Aside from the fact the Walkathon has reached the 298th hour and only 15 couples remain, out of the original 29 starters, the entertainment has reached the stage where Jack Negley and company can offer hours and hours of real, -class fun and talent. The addition of the McGreeveys. Itau and Billy, seems to have inI new life into the couples, and Christine Christy, who puts and dances over in a big-time show all by herself. Johnny McKay, a ballad songster from Angeles; Eric Wiebe. crooner and ban joist, arc also registenne Friday, January M^ hits. Nell Cappy, one of th e ^ eccentric dancers running lo^ Jack Nortono. the singing and "J eling cowboy are popular withT patrons. l The Club Bagdad made their an. pearance Tuesday before a capaclt house and scored a hit. and th! Moulin Rouge floor show will ;!£ over the show for tonight. • • • Mr. A. Toleman of New York Cii is visiting his relatives Cantor J Mrs. Nathan Wroobel of this citv • • • Four one time members of the famous Ziegfeld Follies appear to. gether for the first time in "Blondie of the Follies." showing at the Tb. oil theatre next Sunday. Monte and Tuesday. The quartet comprises Marion Davies. Billie Dove, Ji m mie Durante and Clyde Cook. >u famous throughout the country t 0 day. Miss Davies and Miss Dove were members of the chorus while Durante and Cook were star cornedians in the Follies. Scenes from the Follies shows are portrayed In the picture in which the author relates the experiences of two girls from the New York tenements who ohtain luxuries through Broadway no1 torlety. It is a picture well worth 1 seeing and one bound to give res! enjoyment. • • • Cantor Nathan Wroobel Is now at his home after having spent several weeks at the University hospital. • • • At its meeting held last Wednesday. Beth David synagogue listened to an inspiring address delivered by Mrs. Gelbspan Mills, representing the Women's league of the United Synagogues of America Rabbi Max Shapiro of the congregation also spoke during the afternoon. A social hour followed. .-..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;. -;..;..-. &f lni*i on >our lirorrr ciinr >i>u &f NEW YORK BREAD d CAKE COMPANY BREAD AND CAKES : :i s. w. -ih si. Phn* ;-:*si ? • Brnch Store: I".', V W. :,ih Si. %  :• •:•:• %  :••:• v %  : %  •>•:-•> %  :• %  : %  < %  .•..:..;..•..•..;. WALK A THON CINDERELLA BALLROOM M.0# CASH PRIZES -'1 Hot RS DAILY PAST THE MSB! HOI R — GOING OS \o\r Always Fresh LA TOURAINE COFFEE AND FIFTH AVENUE COFFEE Roasted, packed and delivered daily from our Miami plant to insure "That Delicious Fresh Flavor" W. S. QL'IMBY CO., IN& MIAMI JACKSONVILLE ^ &f ^ &f&f ^f-IWWi^^HS^*****^^ .MI I I I M M H H PIERRE'S Beauty Shop ->X. ; %  v I. M M U e^ i— :-sts> af •:• •:•:• • V # + f + + + TliC HILIIAH tCNrS M)TEL %  iSmXGTON AMMt AT SIXTH STREET MIAMI BEACH True "Colonial" Hospitality Comfortable and Convenient Homelike and Pleasant "A Delightful Spot for a Real location" CHI OF THE FAMOUS COLONIAL HOTELS"' &f&f&f &f&f&f&f&f&f&f %  &f %  %  ++ %  )



PAGE 1

r-M.v. Fanuary 13, 1933. THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN THE JEWISH FLOR I D I A N ,,, HI.ISHED EVERY FRIDAY l>> the jKWISIl KIOKIDIAN PUBLISHING CO. 621 S. W. Fifteenth Avenue i l.Ol'IS SHOCHET, Editor p. O. Box 2973 Miami. Florida Phone 8-1183 I ,.r,.l ;'Meond <•! matter July 4. ,',,,,t il"Pol f !" %  Miami. Florid*. gk',,,.. A.-. ..I March 8. 1878. WKST PALM BEACH OFFICE 114 Kliihlh SIrMt Mr*. M. Srhrrbnick. Repr n l.lIre Miracle An Episode in Hebron Page Three S1BSCR1PTION Six Month J I.M (in, Vr W .00 FRIDAY. JANUARY 13, 1933. Vol. 6, No. 2. Around the Campus Bv MILTON A. FRIEDMAN Hello, folks! Is everybody happy? Well, liere we are again, back at dear old Florida alter a vacation that has left a burning .mprint In our minds. You cannot possibly realize how extremely difficult it Is !or the boys to get bacfc on the right track again. The word "study" is brand new and the students, if they can be called such, are attempting to put it into their dictionary. However you all know that it is always difficult to get people to adopt revolutionary ideas. With due persistence success will soon be in sight. Frankly. I never knew that so many activities could be packed into a short two weeks. Isn't it peculiar how one lives In the past? Miami has had an opportunity to calm down somewhat now that the collegians have left, but another hurricane is in sight. Beware! Prepare yourselves again. At the end oi this month, for those who are fortunate to have been able to complete all their exams early, there will be a few days open until the next semester begins. Not all the boys will be able to take advantage of this chance but a good many of us are certainly planning for it whether it materializes or not. I read in The Miami Herald the other day that the University of Miami upset the dope and defeated the highly touted Manhattan Jaspers. It made me feel great to know that my old alma mammy was coming into its own. It made me feel doubly proud because these are the same boys that I managed for two years am. whose individual accomplishments I watched develop. I visited the U. during my vacation and the place is the same as ever. The work, I was told, is harder than ever under the quarter-term system they are now using. There are less students and much less activity around the building, but It still has its friendly atmosphere. I sincerely hope it comes out o.' this financial collapse and rises to the heights which I am sure It will some day attain. It seems as though I have wandered from the Florida campus so I must return. This week the U. Proudly presented Richard Halliburton to its students. Mr. Halliburton gained fame as a writer, adventurer and raconteur. Some of his books are "The Royal Road to Romance," "The Flying Carpet" and others. He told many of his adventures to a highly interested audience. Last night Florida opened up its 1933 basketball season with a victory over Stetson. The game was cl se all the way as the score of 46M will verify. Florida has a good team this year and should go places. Everything has its end and this Uit. The sun hung low in the sky its last rays gilded the grey hills surrounding Hebron. As the day waned, a hush fell upon the land. One by one, the shops closed in the narrow street of the bazaar, overcast by heavy stone vaults which brought darkness sooner. Here and there gaps in the vaults allowed glimpses of the still clear sky, where the first stars had not yet appeared. But night was coming. Gathered together amid piles of blue cotton stuffs, a few traders hastily finish a game of dominoes, while they smoke a last narghileh before shutting their shops. Yonder, bright-colored glass trinkets surrender their glitter, I while the shade deepens. Here, in the strong fragrance of fruits, one sees many-colored pyramids built by the shopkeepers; near the red tomatoes hjaps of lemons stand near violet aubergiies. The heavy grapes gathered in tb; vines of Hebron lay among melons, sweet calabashes and I bright oranges. The traders remove their displays, leaving a strong and spicy smell that will rise in the night from the plenteous show hidden behind the leaf of the door. Red flames from the last rays of light arise in the copper pans and vanish away. The copper-beaters and the cobblers put their tools in order; a tawny leather scent floats in that corner. Wrapped up in white, sliding on the irregular pavement, polished and worn out, a few people loiter here and there, having a last chat, while their long, dark hands toss untiringly a string of amber beads, ended with a silken tassel. Young peop.e come back from the vines, where all day long they have gathered grapes ripening on the bountiful hilh. of Hebron. Time has come for everyone to return home. Among those who yet come and go. giving life to the darkening lanes, is a tired traveller. His garments are dark, his feet dusty. He leans heavily on his stick. Under his fur cap glisten his white hair; white, also, is the beard which covers his breast. His eyes are black and full of a strange spirit; whole centuries seem to have weighed on him. Unhesitatingly he proceeds toward a low. narrow little door that is old and worm-eaten and strengthened with coarse iron work. It has to be well-known, in order to be found, this obscure door which opens into the old ghetto I N the ghetto, gloom and anguish prevailed. It was Yom Kippur eve and a catastrophe had fallen the day before on Hebron; a notable of the little community had died suddenly. He was buried on the very morning, and now. of the men old enough to pray there remained but nine; the mlnyan was no more completethe hour of Kol Nidre was coming, and the Jews of Hebron would not be able to chant the solWatch For "The Inside Story". • • • Revelations of Greater Miami Jewish Life ... Kashrus... Synagogs... Cemetery... Talmud Torahs ... AND? ... Coming Soon emn and holy air. Had the Lord forgotten His people? Did He turn away His eyes from Hebron, which had gained His favor when Abraham lived there and welcomed His messengers under an oak, still venerated now? Alas! why did the Jews of Hebron dress in their most beautiful garmenu to ferfasten (to fortify themselves for the fast)? What bitter irony seemed to rise from the gorgeous schtreimels (fur caps) which covered their heads! Why did they comb and curl so carefully their Peoths (side-locks)? Why did they put on the many-hued caftans, lovingly prepared by their wives? Why did they turn several times round their waists the bright silken belts, kept for the great feasts only? Alas! why all that? Twould have been better to cover one's head with ashes and to tear up the garments: what sin did Hebron expiate on that day? Now it was time to go to the schul; Yom Kippur was approaching, and, for the first time the Jews of Hebron would not be able to pray together on the Day of Atonement. Yet everyone still hoped for the impossible, and as soon as the meal was over there were meetings everywhere, comings and goings between all the houses. Did not Yeshua's brother come from Jerusalem? No, this was a vain hope. But Yeshua who also sought information went to see Schmouel, who, perhaps could send word to the neighboring town to tell of the distress of Hebron. Maybe he had received a guest. But no, there was Schmouel himself on the road accompanied only by Jacob; all expectation was useless. It was growing late, nobody could come for the feast at the appointed hour Quite desperate, the tiny group decided to go to the schul; on their way they met those who had remained at home until the last minute, near their weeping wives and children, who were sad without quite well knowing why. Silently the door opened and a dumb and doleful ^shadow emerged; further on I two old friends Joined the group, steeped in their sorrow, and soon, the whole community was on the way to the synagogue, feeling a slight comfort to be thus gathered in their common distress. All to! gether they felt stronger to stand I their woe, but how bitter it all was. What unfelt calamity! Coi !d it be possible to Imagine Yom Klji >ur eve I and no Kol Nidre? S ADLY and slowly, shuffling along in their slippers, their bright garments covered with the Kittels iwhite robes), the nine men walked towards the synagogue. Behind the shut windows a woman's sob was sometimes to be heard; in front of the chasan's door, Yossele, his son, wept bitterly; he would be barmitzvah next week, too la'e to remove the calamity from Helsron Slowly, slowly, expecting perhaps, something from this very slowness, did the little group advance. No voice was to be heard; the weight of despair had stifled even the wailings; broken sighs only cadenced the walk on a sad rhythm. Now they were quite near the synagogue, their hearts full of sorrow Suddenly old Schmouel started; In front of the door he thought he had seen a white silhouette, looking like their own. ... He could not believe his eyes, thinking it was some vision, and he started to run. The others followed and heard an unknown voice, asking whether a pious Jew, away from his people for the feast, might pray together with the small community. This was no illusion; the traveller stood in front of them, the white kittel on his garments. Under his fur cap glistened his white hair; white also Is the beard which covers his breast. His eyes are black and full of a strange spirit. He looks so old. in spite of his lofty stature, that he seems to (Continued on Page Sis) Mr. Rubenstein was in Shule all i Ice has piled up in several of Calday Yom Kippur, and every time he ifornla's upland streams, though we stood up he rocked himself back and forth in a very energetic manner. Finally, Goldberg, sitting in the next seat, said to him: "Why are you so sad today, and why do you rock yourself so strongly?" "Well, I owe Ginsberg $100 and I promised to pay him sure tomorrow, and I haven't got the money," replied the troubled Jew. "Then why should you worry? Let Ginsberg rock himself." Life Is Worth Living Life is worth living after all. In spite of its fever of vague unrest, The hearts that break and the souls oppressed. The sneers that mock and the tears that fall. For God, Who watcheth. He knoweth best, And life is worth living after all. Like violets hidden under the snow. Hope still smiles after bitter pain, And under love's sorrowful, sweet refrain Are echoes of laughter soft and low. Seeds that are scattered shall blossom again And the sunshine comes when the shadows go. Life is worth living after all; Toil is lightened by noontide rest, And baby lips on the mother's breast Blot out the losses beyond recall. The robin sings as he builds his nest, And life is worth living after all. For sweet are the greetings when day is done. And tender the hands that cling to ours, And after this world with its sun and its showers. And its ties that are broken, one by one, Sound Is our sleep under drifting flowers. And life is worth living when life is done. A ChUd's Faith God sent his messenger to still the breath Of one we loved, and while with bitter tears We mourned the loss of him, so young for death. There came a little child, a babe In years, And wondering in her innocence to see The calm upon his face, the grief on ours, She raised her head and whispered smilingly, "See, brother is asleep beneath the flowers." Oh, perfect childish trust, which felt no dread Of this last sleep that hushed the pulseless breast, Seeing the blossoms heaped upon the dead. She knew that underneath was peaceful rest. Oh tender childish heart, our eyes grow dim, And from thy faith we learn to trust God's will, Content to know that all Is well with him, Who underneath the flowers slumbers still. "Oh. George, do you realize it's almost a year since our honeymoon, and that glorious day was spent on the sands? I wonder how we'll spend this one?" "On the rocks." Imagine it's so much warmer than eastern ice you hardly notice it. "Phrenology is coming back." says a trade organ of the amusement world. We had understood technocrats were taking over the job of explaining our bumps. Two of the debt-defaulting governments wished the White House a happy and prosperous New Year, the same not to be retroactive as of December 15. Arthur Gulterman, poet, petitioned Mayor McKee in verse to cleanse New York City's begrimed public statues, and the mayor replied In verse. The interchange was so pleasant a variation from the conventional type of official messages that we advise its adoption generally. Mr. Hoover could have addressed France with a couplet, demanding payment of the debt, and France could have replied with a quatrain. That preliminary stage is already past, but the discussion might continue as follows: Mr. Hoover to France: "He who in his pocket hath no money Should, in his mouth, be never without honey." France to Mr. Hoover: "Waste not your Hour, nor in the vain pursuit Of this and that endeavor and dispute; Better be Jocund with the fruitful Grape Than sadden after none, or bitter Fruit." Mr. Hoover to France: "Swans sing before they die — 'twere no bad thing Did certain persons die before they sing." Courage Black smoke athwart the paling evening sky, The last slow freighter passing down the bar. Brave courier of the deep, who breasts the waves And bears her treasured cargo near and far; Before the ice-clad prow her pennon gay Lifts head defiant to the grinding waves, Safe harbor to be won, she forges on And gallantly the lashing tempest braves; So let me keep my flag of courage high. To flutter bold in face of stress and gale, So let me steer brave course o'er Life's rough seas, No more than she to falter or to fall. Evelyn Newbride had two umbrellas given to her and as she needed only one she took the other, the gift of Sandy MacChinch, back to the store and asked if it could be exchanged for a gentleman's umbrella, for her husband. She was told it could not be done. "But why not?" asked Mrs. Newbride, "your firm's label is on the umbrella." "Yes. madam," replied the clerk, "but it was put on when the umbrella was recovered." If a man who is offered the chance of a lifetime for a mere song can't sing. I •



PAGE 1

Page Four THE IF WISH FLORIDIAN 1 &f&f&f&f &f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f &f &f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f &f&f&f &f&f &f&f&f &f j SaMo g>xjnagflg Sisllrtin Edited by RABBI S. M. MACHTEI Founder and Director, Radio Synagog of America WIOD, MIAMI, FLORIDA + SUNDAY MORNINGS % Vol. 1. MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 15, 1933. No. 5. # &f&f&f &f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f &f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f &f &f&f&f&f&f&f&f &f&f&f&f&f <">< %  &f &f&f&f&f&f&f Joseph's Revelation iScrmnn delivered on Sunday. January 8, 1933.) Scripture Reading, Genesis, Chapter XLV, Verses 1-9, bid. •wT appears, from the comforting words of Joseph to his brothers when j) he revealed himself to them as their long-sought brother, that Joseph, while he could never forget the suffering to which he had been subjected by his brothers, believed that they had been innocent tools in the hands of God — His messengers. The tribe had to be saved from starvation. The prophecy to Abraham that his seed would be in bondage in a strange land had to be fulfilled, and so, in accordance with the Divine Plan, Joseph was sent ahead to prepare the way for his people. Joseph's attitude towards the events reminds me of an incident in the life of a Jewish community in Russia under the old czarist regime. D AVID, the scribe of this village, had an only son who was brilliant and ambitious. The son, Joseph, eager for advanced learning in the university, found his career blocked by the "numerous clausus" which limited the percentage of Jews permitted to matriculate. After all other attempts had failed to gain hipi admission to the university, Joseph, without the knowledge of his father, a devout Jew, applied for baptism in the Russian Orthodox church and became an apostate. He left home and entered the university in the large state capital. When David learned of his son's act. he rent his garments and observed all the rites of mourning for one dead. He had no son. His son was dead to him. Nevermore must anyone at home mention the name of Joseph. David would rather have attended the luneral of his only son. A physical death would have been easier to bear. His son a "meshumed"! His son had deserted the fold! What had he done to deserve such punishment? Why had he, David, the scribe, who had observed as many of the 613 commands as it is humanly possible for one to obey, been singled out for such shame? But, one must not rebel. God's ways are Just. Y EARS passed and no word from Joseph reached any of the community. It was rumored that Joseph had graduated with honors and had been given an important government post. But. who pays attention to rumors? No one knew definitely. It did not matter. Jews may feel proud of a Jew — one of their own — in high office. That a "meshumed," a Goy, just another non-Jew. held high office was of no consequence to the people who were so oppressed and so down-trodden in the land which sought to imitate the old Spain in its persecutions of the Jew. Much of Israel's suffering had been traced directly to the zeal of "meshumodim," apostates, who vied With others in heaping indignities upon the "shzid," the Jew. These apostates had misquoted the Talmud to create false basis for adding to the misery of the long-suffering Jews. In this manner they thought to prove their loyalty to the faith of their adoption, and to demonstrate their contempt for the faith of their ancestors, the faith of the mothers at whose breasts they had nursed as infants. Little wonder that David, the scribe, had rent his garments and had considered his son, Joseph, dead. I N the village where David lived, there lived, also, Moses, the grain merchant, who had become wealthy in his dealings with the government. Moses employed many hundreds of men throughout the land. He made periodic rounds of his many branches to supervise the activities. All had gone well with Moses for many years. Then a blow fell upon his head. He was accused of cheating the government on a certain contract. He was tried and found guilty. He appealed the case, giving as his defense that an employee had been guilty of misconduct and had betrayed the trust Moses had placed in him, but to no avail. Moses lost the appeal and the sentence to hard labor in Siberia stood. That, to a man of Moses' years, meant certain death. Only one last appeal remained — the case records had been sent to St. Petersburg to the minister in whose department the contracts had originated. He alone could overrule the court's decision. Moses left his home to interview the minister and to plead his case in person. Arrived at St. Petersburg, Moses went directly to the hotel where the minister lived. He was announced and was received by the private secretary to the minister — a young bearded Russian, of refined and dignified bearing. Moses stated his case and produced affidavits to show his claims of a subordinate's conduct. He also produced, from an inner pocket, a long envelope containing ten thousand rubles. This he gave to the secretary, together with the other papers, stating that he did not request intervention and attention gratis. More would be forthcoming for the secretary's trouble. The private secretary advised that he would put the matter before the minister on the following day and suggested that Moses return the next evening. He would then tell him of the minister's decision. M OSES spent a miserable 24 hours. He presented himself to the minister's secretary the following night. The young man reached for a file and, giving the papers to Moses, he said, "Sir, the minister has studied your case and he has been convinced that the dereliction was no fault of your own. You are free." Tears flowed from the eyes of the old Jew as he thanked God and the young Russian for this news of his vindication. He reached into his pocket and withdrew a long envelope, bulging with ruble-notes of large denomination. He tendered it to the secretary. The young man placed it upon his desk, reached into a desk-drawer and took out the envelope he had been given the previous night. Both these he gave to Moses, and said, in Yiddish, "No, Reb Moishe, I don't want it. You contribute it to the poor of our village. You don't recognize me. I've grown older and have a beard. I am Joseph, the son of David, the scribe. Father has torn me, the •meshumed', out of his heart. I Suppose that I can't blame him. But. I followed my own course. I felt that I could render my people greater service as an apostate than had I remained within the fold." Friday, January n i ai "Ask and Ye Shall Learn" Q. — Rosh Hashanah is spoken of as the Day of Judgment. Is this idea in any way expressed in the prayers for the day? A. —The belief that God has chosen the New Year and the uays connected with it as a time for passing special Judgment upon his creatures is reflected in the liturgical pieces specially characteristic of the New Year. It is especially given expression in the section of the additional service (musaf) known as Zichronot t "remembrances"). According to Jewish tradition, the great books of judgment arc opened on the first day of Tishri and closed 10 days afterwards on the Day of Atonement. The scene in heaven described in the Book of Job (chapter 1, 6 f.) took place, according to the Targum, on New Year's day, Satan yearly playing the part of accuser before the Divine Judge. In the Talmud iRosh Hashanah 16 b.> it is said that the sounds of the shofar are intended to "confuse" Satan when so employed. In the same passage it is stated that three books are opened on this day, "one for the thoroughly wicked, another for the thoroughly pious, and the third for the large intermediate class. The fate of the thoroughly wicked and the thoroughly pious is determined on the spot, the destiny of the intermediate class is suspended until the Day ol Atonement, when the fate of every man is sealed." The following selection from the liturgy of the day brings out this aspect of the season: "We will celebrate the mighty holiness of this day. for it is one of awe and terror. Thereon Ls Thy dominion exalted and Thy throne is established in mercy, and Thou sittest thereon in truth. Verily it is Thou alone who are judge and arbiter, who knowest and art witness; Thou writest down and settest the seal. Thou recordest and tellest; yea, Thou rememberest the things forgotten. Thou unfoldest the records, and the deeds therein inscribed proclaim themselves; for lo, the seal of every man's hand is set thereto. The great trumpet is sounded, the still small voice is heard; the angels are dismayed; fear and trembling Beta hold of them as they proclaim, Behold the Day of Judgment! The host of heaven is to be arraigned in judgment. For in Thine eyes they are not pure; and all who enter the world dost Thou cause to pass beRecipes for the Jewish Family Orange Ginger Apples Six tart apples, 24 snaps crumbled, one-half cup orange marmalade, two tablespoons butter, onehalf cup hot water. Peel and core apples and place in a baking dish. Fill center with orange marmalade, cover with crumbled ginger snaps, dot with butter and pour water over all. Cover and bake in a hot oven '425 d< grees Fahrenheit! until apples are tt nder. Uncover and brown. Six portioi -. Apple Kings Four red apples, one cup :;ugar. one cup water, one-fourth teaspoon fore Thee as a flock of sheep. As a shepherd seeketh out his flock and causeth them to pass beneath his crook, so dost Thou cause to pass, and number, tell and visit eveiy living soul, appointing the measure of every creature's life and decreeing their destiny. "On the first day of the yea:' it is inscribed, and on the Day of Atonement the decree is sealed, how many shall pass away and how many shall die, who at the measure of man's days and who before it; who shall perish by fire and who by water, who by the sword, who by wild beasts, who by hunger and who by thirst, who by earthquake and who by plague, who by strangling and who by stoning; who shall have rest and who shall go wandering, who shall be tranquil and who shall be harassed, who shall be at ease and who shall be afflicted; who shall become poor and who shall wax rich; who shall be brought low and whe shall be upraised. But Penitence, Prayer and Charity avert the severe decree." It should be noted that the fate not only of individual creatur \s but of countries — "which of thorn is destined to the sword and which to peace, which to famine and which to plenty" —is also determined at the same time. One's fate is determined according as merit or demerit predominates in the final reckoning — hence the importance of multiplying i;ood deeds before the fatal day (of Atonement i. Those who emerge from the ordeal successfully are entered in the Book of Life. Tl is explains the petition, "Inscribe us in the Book of Life," and also the salutation of New Year's eve: "May you be inscribed (in the Book of Life i for a happy year." G OD S ways are wondeFful, past our finding out. Wh^r our neighbor's acts? Who are we to foresee the good that mav result from what we term "evil"? Joseph had borne his brothers an nner hatred. They had sought to vitiate Joseph's dreams by selling him to the SaZ TnJhad Z 6 XT' hlm %  to "-^S of hi dreams. They had been God's messengers. Jacob had mourned Joseph as his tibeT^ "f meanS f eX ndlng the lif f "• '* a"" o his tribe. Let us learn to reserve decision. Let us realize ot.r own limited understanding in judging our fellowmen. Gods ways are not ours transcend man's greatest imaginings. Trust in the Lord. They BECKWITTi OPTOMETRIST "22 Years in Miami' IS YOUR CHEAPEST SERVANT.. Useib! >fO M PAH^ To See I. To Helir*, Did you know... The m„-i ,,„,,„,,„,,, lh expert'" d / C r '" ""•' %  <"<"". 'Mn, ,,.,. nil reputation? '-ran WILL TKI.I." Miami"!.* .£:'"""•" %  '•'' operation In Hundred, ron.ult Dr. Herkwitt. 36 N. E. FIRST AVENUE cinnamon, two tablespoons i er n 0 Juice. n Core the apples and cut each into four slices, crossways. Mix rest ol ingredients and boil one minute Add apples. Cover with lid and boll slowly five minutes. Rem 0Ve lid and cook until apples are very tender when tested with fork. gerv warm or cold. Four Ways to Make Good Coffee Use one heaping tablespoonful of ground La Touraine coffee for each cup of water, then one for the pot In percolating, put two-thirds dry coffee in top of pot. Pour boiling water through coffee, then put i n balance of dry coffee. Let percolate until liquid shows blood red. In boiling, put dry coffee in bottom of pot. Pour on boiling water Boil two or three minutes. Stir in grounds. Add a little cold water to settle. In filtering, wet bag with cold water. Put dry coffee in bag in top of pot. Pour boiling water through coffee and repour until liquid shows blood red. For after-dinner coffee, use from 50 to 75 per cent more dry coffee Measure both coffee and water accurately. Do not guess. Use only boiling water. Have all utensils hot Serve immediately. Orange Bread Three-fourths cup orange marmalade, two tablespoons corn oil, one egg. one cup milk, three cups flour, six teaspoons baking powder, one-fourth teaspoon salt. Place marmalade in bowl, add oil and egg. Beat well, adding milk and sifted dry ingredients Bake in an oiled loaf pan — four inches by four inches by two inches, for one hour in hot oven. Radio Synagog Rabbi S. M. Machtei, founder and director of the Radio Synagof, tlD preach over WIOD at 1U o'clock Sunday morning on "God-Given Sons.' Leonard Tobin will deliver the sermonette on "False Pride." In addition to these there will be prayers, music and scripture reading. Delaney & Beers Kodak Kini.hing and Enlarging ( ommrrrial Work and Home Portrait. 50% Off on AH Amaltur Work 212 N. E. 4th SI. Phone 2-5WS EMPLOY FEDERATION ORCHESTRAS WHY? Reliable — Dependable Experientid — Organized | Rehearsed And tryingto Maintain a living wage arale. Miami Federation I of Musicians I.OIIIS J. NKTT. Secret PHONE 2-3912 :J The World's Most Indiiidual Playing Cards Your favorite photograph a •"**• %  heart a friend a child I 1 ""?!' ly reproduced on the back. %  card deck of PHOTO PLAYING CARDS. An ideal gift n v "..5h fore offered at thla low price Sr.nj' NO MONEY. Ju.t aend your "" photo, .nap.hot or negative I any lie>. It will be returned with you order. Pay mailman only II, ml limited time offer •* %  immediately. | THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN | i P. 0. Boi 27S Miami. Florid, j



PAGE 1

L.,. lanuary 13, 1933. THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN "Sweet Water of Megiddo" Lag Bo'omer Scenes in Palestine By RABBI LAZARUS AXELROD Continued from Last Week) I was attired immaculately, well Loomed, and I had brought with I a copy of 'he Manchester huardian to break the monotony, L within nve mniutes I gave up y business of continually flicking iecks of dust from off my spotless trousers, and left nature take care I its own course. I gazed mystified Ind enviously at the two ChalutL. who seemed to take to the flyL dust as a fish to water. At one jpriod, we could barely see each flier, and I thought seriously of lomposine a poem to begin with The Assyrians came down like the | us t on the fold." I sighed deeply then I recalled the open top of a I r.don 'bits, and even the stifling jtmosphere of the "underground" Labway) seemed at that moment a lentable Utopia. ] Through this hazy cloud of dust perceived a gigantic signboard irranged skillfully over an arched Gateway, which Indicated that we tere passing by Nesher. the famous j'mpnt factory. The dust lessened [onsiderably. as the Dodge slowed (own to 30 miles per hour and we night a fleeting glimpse of olivefctnned and bright-eyed maidens lad in workaday garments, loung|r.? idly in front of small but very tractive wooden bungalows, the Icaes of the employees of that colt al factory. They waved to us, |ughingly and cheerfully, these ardy Jewish girls, the personiflcaLon of extreme self satisfaction and lontentment. a product of the Holy Land, suffused with that indomit}ole courage and inflexible will inwited from ancestral martyrs. Their laughter raised our droopn? spirits, and I perceived that Ken our friend from Massachusetts Lowed that determined looking pouth to relax into a grimaced mile. In the background, not more |!tan a thousand feet away from model village with its neat lirubberies and well-ordered flower lardens, loomed the grimy outline p the factory, four towering chimbelching forth volumes of Irayish black smoke. The huge boilPage Five POPULAR BEACH HOSTELRY are £2"! iS* imm6nSe bulldi davs n th 0mK h UrS 3 day 365 days ln the year, holidays included It requires 24 hours to restore normal heat to the extinguished furaces, and keen competition in foreign cement prohibits this wanton waste of one day per week. Nesher constitutes one of the four leading industrial concerns of the Holy Land, the remaining honors being shared between Shemen, the home of soaps and oils, the Pinchas Ruttenberg Electrical Company, and the Rothchild flour mills and electrically operated Matzoh factory. Sixty, seventy and eighty kilometers appeared in rapid succession on the speedometer, and once again we were plunged into the swirling eddies of dust. Finally, after three hours of powdered earth, a lecture on the value of a good home in Massachusetts, listening dully to a German's idea of English as she is spoken, we reached Tiberias, the half-way stop between Haifa and Safed. With relief we alighted for the well-earned recess, and we gazed with unconcealed admiration at the peerless view spread out before us. The much-eulogized Lake of Kinereth lay serenely, like an immense heet of silvered glass, a thousand feet below sea-level. Over a hundred square miles of warm, medicinal waters, which, viewed from the hills, appears no greater than an oversized basin of water. Skiffs, canoes and other hand-propelled sea craft traversed its unruffled surface, gliding along innocently, but with death-dealing nets trailing in their wage, the flsh of Kincreth bringing compensating prices in the busy markets of Jaffa and Jerusalem. Six pocket Kodaks clicked simultaneously, as, Inspired by the scenic beauty of the place, we transferred it to six rolls of film. The incessant tooting of a horn jerked us back reluctantly to our automobile, where the driver lay sprawled in his seat, the only attraction in Kinereth to his corporeal mind being a substantial meal of Gefllte flsh. (To be Continued) Many Prominent Jews are Guests at the William Penn Hotel, Miami Beach Miracle Meditations Snobbishness takes many unex%  cted forms; so does the inferiority fmplex. How often has the writer rumpled up in humiliation because p did not know Yiddish, especially the presence of English speaking wple who did. Somebody will be f : -ing a story and suddenly introT-ee some full-blooded incompressible Yiddish phrase on which fie whole point and atmosphere of |he story seem to depend. Those in fc company who know Yiddish not Jnly enjoy the Joke but obviously p discomfiture of the one member Nie party, the ignoramus, the |M1. the barbarian, the goy who lesnt know enough to enjoy it. Or ?roup of initiates, themselves well l er *ed in the history of English and fdeed of other literatures, will aspe one that H one doesn't know pdish poetry, one doesn't know pthing. Chaucer and Milton and fWs may be all right but you realF ought to be able to read —even | name escapes me. hat is even worse, one can gain FiJgh Yiddish from a knowledge {German to see that the Ylddishpfc granted a certain forgivable f deration of love, are probably There is a raciness, picturP Uen ess, and half-cynical tragedy L* comps ut even in the translap of Jewish Jokes or in the half;ay. half-melancholy gestures that accompany their telling. The stories of Sholem Aleichem in English — even in English —have a quality so much their own that one wishes one could learn Yiddish to get that quality undiluted and pure. It 'teems sometimes as if one could hardly get the spirit of one's own race except in that language in which much of its suffering and joy has been in all countries and for centuries told and indeed lived. Yet what to do. One can embark on the study of Hebrew, though enthusiastic young men from the universities who have to come to Judaism via the English prose of Ludwig Lewisohn or the Nordic scholarship of George Foote Moore, have found it discouragingly harder than they could have believed. But Yiddish! It seems not a language to learn so much as a gift to inherit. It is intertwined with years of childhood and of family association. It is in the blood and of the cradle. As well teach the stone-deaf music or the color-blind to paint as teach an adult American the special verbal magic of a language that seems secret, open only to very private sesame, a psychology that one is born with rather than a logic that one may acquire. The sensitive ear begins to catch the cadences and even the profane goyim know what goyim means. But when one humbly asks the initiate whether Yiddish It'ontinurd from Page Three) have come through all the centuries. How is it possible to describe the joy which spreads among the little group, so desperate a few minutes ago? Yossele, having seen and understood, went running to tell the good news to the women and children who had remained at home, while the minyan (quorum for prayer i, miraculously completed, sang Kol Nidre with a thankful piety. A ND in spite of the tears shed on their sins, in spite of the supplications and implorations offered up to the Lord, the Jews of Hebron felt a strange joy in their hearts, for they knew now that the Master did not turn away from them. When the hour of Neila "final Yom Kippur prayer) came, they acted as though the fast had just begun, so easily had they gone through with it. And when It was time to go, when three stars appeared in the sky, they waited for their providential guest, disputing who would have the honor to invite him to break can be learned, his look scornfully replies: "Impossible' —or at least: "Not by you." You protest in vain that you've mastered even Dutch and he smiles pityingly, Dutch! So we in the outer darkness will be doomed through the whole of our lives to the hearing of Jokes of which we understand everything but the point. We shall have to hear about poetry most of which, unlike Dante, we cannot even read in a bad translation. We shall have to catch rumors of prose that, even were it translated, we are assured we should not be able "to get" in English at all. We shall have to infer from a Yiddish shrug of the shoulders which is intelligible even to an Illiterate what the accompanying words mean if we could understand them. We shall have to hear mildly amusing anecdotes that, in Yiddish, we are assured, would convulse the hearer with laughter. We shall go to the Yiddish Art theatre to take it on faith and with the libretto, so to speak, in our hands. It is all very discouraging. One is almost tempted to go and live in Warsaw and Minsk for a while, though this is hardly the moment nor is it certain that one could live there in peace. But surely if one did live there for a while, one could pick up the language. Then how pleasant it would be to come back and show those machers —it is impossible to explain to you who do not know Yiddish what machers means — where they get off. Impossible to learn Yiddish? Oser!—The Wondering Jew in Opinion. the fast. But they looked in vain for him; he had disappeared and none had seen him going, not even the women and children who had waited for the end of the fast in front of the sole door of the little synagogue. As mysteriously as he had come, he had vanished away. And the Jews of Hebron understood then who was the miraculous guest who had prayed with them. They knew that Abraham, the patriarch had compassion on them, who lived and toiled where he had lived, near the place where he had wanted to be buried, near Sarah his wife. Abraham had had God's leave to come back on earth for one day, as a weary traveller covered with the dust of the road; unhesitatingly had he passed the threshold of the ghetto, and there he was to complete the minyan when the hour of Kol Nidre had come. • And this is why, nowadays, the Jews of Hebron still pray in the plain little schul of the Ashkenazim, which is called, in remembrance of this miracle, Avrom Ovinou's Scliule, the synagogue of Abraham our father. died as the result of burns received when her dress ignited as she was lighting a gas stove. She was 81 years old, and was interred in the Jewish cemetery at Atlanta. When a man has a reputation for wisdom he can say foolish things and his friends applaud them as sarcasm. + + + I NATIONAL FRUIT | t SHIPPERS, INC. 211 5th St. Miami Beach f + + Shippers of Highest Quality + Tree Ripened + Indian River Fruit J Pecans, Jellies, etc. ?, + t DELIVERY GUARANTEED Z RELIABLE AND BONDED % Mr. Philip Augustine returned to the city this week from Atlanta, Ga., where he attended the funeral of his mother. Mrs. Ethel Augustine, his mother, was a resident of this country for the past 40 years and made her home in Atlanta. Ga. She •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• Splendid Opportunity To study Hebrew with nationally-known Hebrew educator and writer. Private lessons, also group instruction can be arranged by calling evenings: EVERGREEN 775-J, APT. 12. TIVOLI W. Flatter at Sth Phone 2-3352 Miniiii-.-'iii2 to 11 Evening 25r SUNDAY. MONDAY and TUESDAY January IS, 16. 1? Marion Davies Robert Montgomery ...in... "BLONDIE of the FOLLIES" j "Radio Service" WM. SIELER Parts and Accessories 430 NORTH MIAMI AVE. No Charge for Examination Now you OBI buy BILTMORE LAUNDRY SERVICE at a price that fits your pockctbook! PHONE 3-3687 21 N. W. 9TH ST. OPEN DAILY AND SUNDAY SEE THE PRIMITIVE EVERGLADES AT MUSA ISLE Seminole Indian Village OPENDAILY AND SUNDAY LEADERSHIP CHIEF WILLIAM OSCEOLA N. W. Twenty-fifth Avenue and Sixteenth Street Co Went on Flatter Street to Twenty-aeventh Avenue, Turn North LARGEST COLLECTION OF CAPTIVE ALLIGATORS AND CROCODILES COMPLETE FLORIDA SWAMP ZOO AND MUSEUM Sea Cowboy Bill, a Real 8eminole Indian. Wreatle the Alligator TO GET THERE — Take any for hire car or drive weet en Flacler and north on Twenty-aeventh Avenue, or yacht "Macushla" — leavea Pier 6. City Yacht Baain — 2 p. m. dally — alao on apeedhoat "Speedee" from Floridian Dock, Miami Beach. 1'



PAGE 1

%  ssa m Page Six THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Friday, January n I The Source of Christian Ethics [Continued from Pace One] nieth may repent so as not again to wrong thee; yea, he may also honor thee a.*1 be at peace with thee. And if he be shameless and persist in his wrongdoing, even so forgive him from the heart and leave to God the avenging." This sentiment even outdoes the celebrated credo of Jesus which suggests the turning of the other cheek when smitten. The entire conception of brotherly love, humility, and forgiveness Is a rabbinic one. Constantly one meets in Jewish writings earnest exhortations against hatred, greed, and false pride. Innumerable are the passages extolling the virtues of love, truth, humility, and patient suffering. The democratic and charitable conduct of Jesus towards publicans and sinners has generally been pointed out in contrast to the cold legalism and self-righteous superiority of the Scribes and Pharisees. Yet rabbinic literature is replete with the most tender love and kindness towards sinners. There was R. Ze'ira, who was not only forgiving but. in order to reclaim robbers and cut-throats, befriended them! Not even the story of Jesus and the repentant Magdalene can compare with the strangely moving story of Rabbi Abbahu and Pentekaka as narrated in Talmud Jer.. Ta'anith 1:2: "During the time of a great drought, people spoke of a man whose prayer for rain was answered. R. Abbahu asked him about himself and this man. Pentekaka (Five Pinsi. said: "I am occupied with harlots, I clean the theatre, I carry the vessels to the bath. I amuse the bathers with my jokes, and I play the flute.' •Thereupon R. Abbahu asked: 'Have you ever done a good thing in your life? "To which Pentekaka answered: Once I was sweeping out the theatre and I saw a woman standing between the pillars bitterly weeping. I spoke to her and ascertained that her husband was a prisoner. She could purchase his freedom only by sacrificing her chastity. So I sold my bed and my pillow and all my possessions, and I gave the money to her. bidding her go ransom her husband and not sell her honor to strangers ..." "How overwhelmed the saintly R. Abbahu must have been on hearing this explanation, we can ascertain only by reading his reply to Pentekaka: 'Thou art the man fit to for us in our hour of trouble!' How utterly astounding is this pronouncement of a higher morality and a deeper religiosity than is generally current! The very idea that a coarse voluptuary and sinner was more fit to pray to God for Israel than the saintly and spotless R. Abbahu. merely because of the performance of an ineffably beautiful act of mercy, cannot anywheres find a parallel in Jesus' teaching and practice. It is apparent that Christian as well as many Jewish scholars have inveighed too readily against Jewish legalism and heartless formalism while at the same time extolling the humanitarianism of Christian ethics. In fact, to all honest students of Bible history and comparative religion, it becomes easily apparent that the entire ethical fabric of Christianity has been bodily transferred from the Old Testament and rabbinic literature. with only one difference — that in the process of transferring its enlightened simplicity and realistic character. Jewish ethics have been adulterated by the gospel and the early Christian writers like Orlgen, pray Clement, Eusebius, Jerome, and Augustine, with miracles and a morbid love of suffering, which is unJewish. This they probably borrowed from Mithraism and other oriental mystic cults. An excellent example of this plagiarism we find in the earnest exhortation in the Book of Sirach: "Forgive thy neighbor the hurt thai he hath done unto thee; "So shall thy sins also be forgiven when thou prayest." Now let us compare these lines with similar lines in the "Lord's Prayer": "Forgive us our sins as we forgive those that trespass against us." Philo. the great Jewish philosopher, too. said the same thing: "If you ask forgiveness for your sins do you also forgive those that trespass against you. For remission .s granted for remission." It becomes apparent, therefore, that the much-despised Pharisaism is the source Irom which not only the gospels but all of Jesus' ethical teachings sprang. As if to corroborate this very point, we find that moving passage in Midrash Le'Olam: "Ever shall a man bestow lovlim kindness even on one who does evil unto him. He shall not be vengeful lor bear a grudge. This is the way jf Israel For, Israel is good and forgiving because so is God. Since man is made in His image, there he mast 'Ululate Him. This is what the rabbis who preceded Jesus taught As to the ethical revolution which it is claimed Jesus made in humanizing religion and robbing it of its :o!d formalism and inhuman legalism. we oiier a "characteristic example" from the Talmud to refute his contention: The story is told of Micah, the idolatrous Jew. who offered sacrifices to teraphim. yet no divine pun\shment was meted out to him. The ingels therefore came before God and said: "See. Lord, the smoke from Thy altars mingles with that of the offerings to Micah's idol." And God said: "Leave him in peace. His bread i.s offered to poor travelers." Similarly "formalistic" is the beautiful story of Rabbi Ze-ira who dedicated his life to the poor, the outcasts and the sinners even as Jesus is reputed to have done. When the rabbi died, the sinners wept and lamented: "Hitherto the little rabbi witli burnt feet prayed for us, but now who is going to pray for us?" They therefore repented Of penitents the Talmud says: "The Just, the perfect, will not be worthy of sitting with penitents in the world to come ." Do the gospels say as much? Not only are the humanitarian sentiments of brotherly love and forgiveness .succinctly expressed in the Torah and all rabbinic literature, but their expression is the very essence of Judaism. They thus are '!• siuned to become both a guide and an inspiration to a higher and nobler existence of man on earth. This is nowhere better exemplified than in the evening prayer recite by all pious Jews before retiring a' night: "Master of the world. I pardon every sin and every wrong done to my person, to my property, to my honor and to all that I possess. Let no one be punished on my account." St. Petersburg Notes Don't force your advice upon people wliose friendship you care for. Many a man who can't writTS made his dollar mark i n the Mank Directs Showon January 25. Burton Mank. well-known trouper and showman will direct the Beth David minstrel show at the Riverside school auditorium. Members of the Junior committee of Beth David Sisterhood will be starred in the performance, which is being given for the benefit of the Talmud Torah fund of the Sisterhood. A number of loServioM Friday night Congregation B'nai Israel, with A. S. Klein! feld. rabbi, begin at 8 o'clock, when the rabbi will deliver a sermon on 1 "Judaism in Action." Saturday i vices at 9 a. in.: Sunday BChOOl 10 I a. m.: Hebrew school daily at 4 p. m Miss Sarah Gelman. of 1025 Fifteenth avenue, south, has Just returned home after a BUI months' vacation in the North. Mrs. Lazaraus Lehrer of AsheVille, N. C, is a guest at the Horowitz hotel. At the me tini of the Judaic council, held January 9 at the Horowitz hotel. Mis. M. Rosenberg, who was in charge ol the program foi the evening, gave a very mte: report on the life and work of Florence Nightingale. The next meeting of the Judaic council will be at the home of Miss Miriam Miller. 2741 Bayside drive, south. Monday evi Ding, .January 16. at 8:15 p. m. The Young Maerabeans met las: Monday .•veiling at the home ol Fern Goldberg, Plans were made for a vaudeville review to be given at a later date. The hostess served delicious refreshments, The next meeting will be at the home of Tiby Rothblatt, 4401 Fifth avenue, south. Monday evening, January 16 at 7::i<; p. m. cai Jewish artists appear in the cast which is being rehearsed nightly to insure a real professional performance. A number of specialty acts will be shown during the evening and an effort will be made to give the maximum of entertainment possible. MOM THAN Mil INSURANCE A Human Institution Only 1 ive Insurance Companies as Strong as the Maccabw> Over One Million Dollars in the Relief Fund Homes for Aged Without Cost to Members Writes .ill of the usual forms of Certificates on Men and Women on a Legal Reserve Basis— $1,000 to $100,000 All Certificates have Special Accidental Clauses and Total and Permanent Disability Benefits JUNIOR CERTIFICATES Ordinary Life Twenty Year Endowmci Twenty Payment I ite Educational Annuity •single Premium — All Policies Participating All Junior Certificates Pay 1 nil Benefits at Age Four Special Training for Children in Music, Dancing and Dramatic Art Free A. M. COFFIN State Manager 226 Seybold Building : Phone 3-2618 MERCANTILE BAMK .„J TRUST COMPANY Tin WASHINGTONAVENUE, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA Condensed Statement. December 31, 1932 i Comptroller's Call I Assets: %  i-li on Hand and in Banks $197,975.67 U. S. Government Securities 146,788.32 Mate Bonds 57 149.21 Municipal Bonds 6,400.00 Shon Term Bonds, Due 1933 and '34 38,809.2 5 short Term Bonds, Due 1 9 J 5 an d '36 .. 33.090.00 I quipment Bonds 31,492.83 Railroad Bonds 56J3 5.00 Public Utility lioinis 3o!435.O0 Industrial Bonds 14^074.50 — $612,549.78 Loans Guaranteed by Liquidator 44,092.11 stock I nchange and Secured I oaiu Z.Z......... 28,070.00 Loans and Discounts 103,583.93 Furniture and Fixtures io.000.oe Other Assets 19,467.2' 11 1 M ASS1 Ts $817,763.0' Liabilities: apital Stock $100,000.00 Surplus I und 50,000.00 Reserve lor Undivided Profits 39,640.67 inited States Bond Account 2,300.00 DEPOSITS Z'Z'.".'Z "5,822.37 rA] LIABILITIES $817,763.04 PHILIP LIHHRMAN, President


MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
January 13, 1933

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00203

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
January 13, 1933

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00203

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text
#'Jewish IFiaridlia in
Vol. ... No. 2.
(Announcements,
i ___________j
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION
(Orthodox)
111.-. S. W. Third Street
JONAH E. CAPLAN, Rabbi
garly services begin at 5:30 with
the late open forum services at 8:30,
then Rabbi Caplan will preach on
A Frank Disclosure of the Real
Facts in Miami Jewry." In his ser-
mon the rabbi will tell of the facts
regarding the kosher meat problem
m tln.s district as found by him in
an exhaustive investigation con-
cluded recently. Other problems
U] also be told of as disclosed in
his investigation, which affect the
citizens of the Jewish community.
The public is urged to attend. A so-
,-ial hour will follow.
CONGREGATION BETH JACOB
(Ortbadas)
111 WuhllVtOB Ave.. Miami Ilrarh
L. AXELROD. Rabbi
Regular Friday evening services
at r>30 with the late services
.it 8:30 when the rabbi will preach
a sermon on "Jacob Lives On."
Congregational chanting and sing-
U be in charge of Cantor Bor-
* Schlaelimaii: Saturday morning
Rabbi Axelrod will preach in Yid-
dish on the portion of the week, in
addition to a brief talk in English
en "Modern Confirmation." Robert
Kurland of New York City will be
Bar Mit/va during the morning ser-
vice Saturday and will read the
Maftir and Haftorah.
LORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY
MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JANUARY7?}, 1933.
Price Five Cents
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI
I Reform)
I :" V E. Nineteenth Sir., i
DR. JACOB EL KAPLAN, Rabbi
Regular Friday evening services
will begin tonight at 8 o'clock when
a sermon on "The Inner Conflict of
the Jew" will be delivered by the
labbi. The usual musical program
ill be heard and a social hour will
the services.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
iConNervmtivc)
III N. W. Third Avenue
MAX SHAPIRO, Rabbi
The early services begin at 5:30
with the late services following at
:15 when Rabbi Shapiro will
on "Is Life Worth Living?"
The u-ual congregational singing
"id Chanting will be in charge of
Cantor Louis Hayman, who will be
assisted by the choir. A social hour
*U1 follow. Saturday morning ser-
rteea begin at 8:30 and at 10 a. m.
*he rabbi will hold special services
;or pupil- cf the Talmud Torah.
Rabbi To Expose
I ocal Conditions
Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan of the Mi-
ami Jewish Orthodox congregation
In an announcement of his topic
lonight at the late services in his
synagog. promises to expose condi-
tions affecting the well being of the
Jewish community in the Greater
Miami district. In his sermon the
rabbi will give the results of an in-
vestigation which he has conducted
during the past month regarding
the "Kashrus" situation existing in
Jewish butcher and delicatessen
stores in the entire district. The at-
titude of the Jewish public, the
"shochtim," the butchers and the
tourists wili be discussed in frank
and open fashion. The local ceme-
tery situation, the alleged "under-
taker and tombstone trust," and
other similar matters will be cov-
ered. An invitation is extended to
;'ll who attend to discuss the ques-
tions involved, and the raBbi will
answer all inquiries that may be
asked. Services will start promptly
at 8:30.
HalpernMemorial Durant Speaks
Meeting Held I On Russia
Last Sunday evening a large num-
ber of friends of the late Dr. A. D.
Halpern gathered at the memorial
services held in his memory at the
Workmen's Circle hall. Eulogies of
his life were delivered by Leon El-
kin. Harry I. Lipton, Harry Simon-
hoff and Henry Seitlin. Mr. A. L.
Feinberg presided at the meeting.
The work of the late Dr. Halpern
in connection with the Zionist
movement, his work in the estab-
lishing of the Yiddish Schule and
his efforts for relief and general
communal work were described by
he different speakers.
Flexner Succeeds
Gov. Lehman
Miller Is Named
Associate Judge
M. Victor Miller, of the law firm
of Sampson Miller, was appoint-
ed associate judge of the Miami
Beacli Municipal court Tuesday by
John H. Levi, president of the city
council, upon recommendation of
Judge W. E. Walsh and Mayor A.
Frank Katzentine.
The associate Judge will serve
whenever Judge Walsh is disquali-
fied or is absent from the city. Mr.
Miller came to Miami Beach eight
years ago from Akron. O.
He received his law degree from
the University of Miami. He also
attended Vanderbilt and Ohio State
universities. He is a former treas-
urer and president of the University
of Miami Alumni association. He is
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Miller
of the Mayfleld Court apartments.
Miami Beach, and a brother of Mrs.
S. H. Lutzky. president of Miami
chapter of Senior Hadassah.
Weintraub Is
Named By Sheriff
Sherirr Dan Hardle announced
* appointment this week of Syd-
ney L Weintraub. local Jewish at-
*BMy, as counsel to the sheriff. Mr.
Weintraub is the son-in-law of Mr.
and Mrs- Isidor Cohen, pioneer res-
ets of this city, and is a member
j the. administrative board of Beth
avld congregation.
Cemetery Report
To Be Rendered
Because of the intense interest be-
\ tag shown in the local cemetery sit-
i uation a mass meeting will be held
; on Tuesday evening, January 18. at
8 p. m. at the Odd Fellow hall at
N. W. Second avenue and Fourth
street. At this meeting the final re-
port of the adjustment committee
will be given and action will be tak-
en as to the future of the plot in
the Woodlawn cemetery, owned by
the Greater Miami Jewish Ceme-
tery association.
The citizens of Greater Miami are
urged to attend this meeting, and
Who have relatives or friends
interred in the Jewish section of
Woodlawn cemetery are urged to be
present as the decision made at this
meeting will affect them particul-
arly.
The local rabbis have been invitea
[to attend and address the meeting
NEW YORK Eerr.artl Flexr.or
of New York City has been elected
vice president of the American
Joint Reconstruction Foundation
succeeding Gov. Herbert H. Lehman
who has been compelled to resign
because of the pressure of his offi-
cial duties, according to information
received here from London by Jos-
eph C. Hyman, secretary of the
' Jewish Joint Distribution commit-
tee which, with the Jewish Coloni-
, ration association, organized the
foundation to consolidate certain
' reconstruction activities in eastern
I and central Europe. Governor Leh-
man, who held the vice presidency
I of the foundation since its incep-
! tion in 1924, remains as a member
| of the foundation's council.
The foundation, it was learned,
voted credit grants of $175,000 to
Jewish institutions in Poland,
Czecho Slovakia, Lithuania and
Roumania.
Mr. Flexner, who is chairman of
the board of the Palestine Economic
corporation, has long been associat-
ed with the relief and rehabilitation
activities of the Joint Distribution
committee, serving as chairman of
its medical committee, vice chair-
man of its Committee on Recon-
struction and as a member of its
board of directors.
Governor Lehman is vice chair-
man of the Joint Distribution com-
mittee and has been prominently
identified with its activities since
the inception of the committee in
1914. As chairman of the Commit-
tee on Reconstruction, he supervised
the establishment of a network of
Jewish cooperative loan societies
throughout eastern and central Eu-
\ rope, designed to facilitate the re-
construction program of the Joint
Distribution committee by making
credit available to artisans, work-
men and small merchants who oth-
erwise enjoy no credit facilities.
Dr. Will Durant, author of "The
Story of Philosophy" and other
works, contributor to various publi-
cations, and lecturer, will speak at
Temple Israel of Miami. 137 N. E.
Nineteenth street at 8 p. m. on Jan-
uary 15.
It was learned last week that Dr.
Durant would be In Florida this
month, and Herbert U. Feibelman.
chairman of the standing committee
on intellectual culture of Temple
Israel, arranged for the lecture. The
subject of his address will be "The
Tragedy of Russia." Dr. Durant
last summer spent considerable time
in a journey from Manchuria to
Poland, and his observations on the
Soviet experiment have been the
subject of magazine contributions
and lectures.
It is considered that Dr. Durant's
views will awaken widespread inter-
est in the community.
The Source of
Christian Ethics
Rahbinu Literature and Sentiments
of Brnt/ierl) Lore, Forgiventts,
and Broad llumanitatianhm.
Benefit Ball
to Hear Artists
Artists who have made a hit on
the vaudeville stage and who appear
nightly in the different night clubs
of the Greater Miami district will
be seen and heard at the annual
Talmud Torah ball of the Ladies'
auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Or-
thodox congregation. Mahi Shrine
temple on the Biscayne boulevard
will be the scene of this annual
event on Wednesday evening, Jan-
uary 25. when it will be specially
decorated with scenes famous in
Jewish history and lore. Booths in
which food and other articles will
be sold will be erected and will be
in charge of sub-committees of the
organization. In charge of the gen-
eral committee are Mesdames J.
Louis Shochet and Louis Pallott.
The proceeds are used for the Tal-
mud Torah free tuition fund to pro-
vide daily religious training for
those unable to pay for them. In
direct charge of the daily Talmud
Torah is Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan. a
graduate of the "Isaac Elchanan
Yeshiva" of New York. The public
Is invited to attend this annual
event.
Beach Council
Urges Agreement
When the butchers' controversy
now raging at Miami Beach was
aired at a meeting of the city coun-
cil, by an appeal for the granting
of a permit to kill chickens on city-
owned property, the council unani-
mously urged the parties involved
Ive at a settlement.
Arbeiter Ring
Sponsors Concert
Because of an error the date of
the concert being sponsored by the
Woman's club of the Workmen's
circle was announced in our last is-
sue as January 11. The concert for
the benefit of a nation-.vide cam-
paign for funds for the relief of
Jews of eastern Europe will be held
at Beth David Talmud Torah
Thursday evening, January 19. be-
ginning at 8 p. m. Among the art-
ists appearing are Al Harris. Maxim
Brody, former member of the Chi-
cago Opera company, and the noted
pianist, Zella Zaltin. The artists
are making a nation-wide tour in
behalf of the campaign and have
been received with enthusiastic ac-
clamation wherever they have ap-
peared. Admission to the concert
will be a nominal fee.
"Ideas," said Rameau, the eight-
eenth century French philosopher,
"are not self-creative. Like all life
and all human experience, they flow
on in cycles of endless continuity."
It is this truth, so well-known to all
intelligent students of history, which
makes the claim advanced by so
many Christian historians, that
Jesus ushered an entirely new and
epoch-making ethics into the world,
sound so preposterous. Even so for-
midable a scholar and so fine a spir-
it as Ernest Renan, in his "scien-
tific" Life of Jesus, becomes dithy-
rambic over this unprecedented
"miracle of love" which had de-
scended upon earth in the corporeal
form of the carpenter of Nazareth.
This assertion, if tenable, denies the
very existence of the growth and
progress of life both intellectually
as well as physically.
The ethics of Jesus, as expounded
in the Synoptic Gospels, was an in-
tegral part of Jewish ethics preva-
lent in those days. To deny this fact
is tantamount to declaring that the
cart precedes the horse. Jewish eth-
ics of Jesus' day was the result of
the organic development of Judaism
throughout the centuries of its ex-
istence. A particularly profound in-
fluence on Jewish ethics were the
writings and labors of the pre-Exilic
prophets, which were preserved for
all posterity in the canonization of
the Pentateuch, circa 450 B.C.E. It
was the rabbinic teachings of the
Tannaim and the Amoraim which,
in the centuries immediately pre
ceding the advent of Jesus, elabor-
ated and perfected the broad hu-
manitarianism of the prophets. The
apocryphal writings during the sec-
ond and first centuries before the
new era also concerned themselves
with ethical thought and knowledge.
Therefore it does seem incredible
that even many supposedly intelli-
gent Jews, not speaking ol Chris-
tians, are quite sincerely under the
impression that such concepts as
brotherly love, universal peace, for-
giveness, non-resistance to evil, and
humility had never been taught be-
fore Jesus.
Where in the Christian gospels
do we find any passage concerning
love for one's fellowmen as moving
as the Levitical injunction: "Thou
shaH not hate thy brother in thine
heart Thou shalt not take ven-
geance, nor bear any grudge against
the children of thy people; but thou
shalt love thy neighbor as thyself."
In the Testament of God written
about 100 C.E. by one of the much-
maligned "scribes," we read:
"Love ye therefore one another
from the heart; and if a man sin
against thee, cast forth the poison
of hate and speak peaceably to him.
and in thy soul hold not guile; and
if he confess and repent, forgive
him. But if he deny it, do not get
into a passion with him. lest catch-
ing the poison from thee he take to
swearing, and so thou sin doubly.
And though he deny it and yet have
a sense of shame when reproved,
cease reproving him. For he who de-
il'ontinurd on Pe Six)




Pa^c Two
t
Mr. :iiul Mis David Schwnlb Of
Bl N B Seventieth street announce
llie birth >>( :i Km, .limitary 2. al
Vlotorta iio.-ipuj\i riic child hM
been named i eonaurd.

The membership committee ol the
National Council ol Jewish Juniors
has announced thai the current
month win be devoted to member-
ship activities plans toward this
end ire discussed si .1 meeting of
the group held recently at the Beth
David talmud Torah.
As parl oi an Intensive drive, both
the local and national committees
sponsored kid party Tuesday at 8
i> m. at the Beth DavM Pslmud
rorah Nee memban were honored.
guests, in charge ol sxiangementi
were Ifln Millie nulawi. chairman
Mi v. Harriett Kantor. Miss Char-
lotte Kohn. Miss Mr.iam Schem-
berg. Miss Henrietta Hirsch. Miss
Hobby IMlTT'ni BOBS Mary Rieli-
man end Idas Sylvia Poblai
riie rsajular meeting January it
will be m charge of the number-
ship committee On January 31 a
membership sooiai wr.i tv he'..;. for
the members and guest*.

rhe sisterhood of Bath DavM will
sponsor bridge luncheon at I M
p in January ;s at the Qoldatotn
. .\::: 64? Colhr.s avenw M-.-
anu Baaoh Hoatasaaa wU ba Mrs
m Bchetnberg, Mrs B QoMsteln
and Mm B Kandi? Rasaiialliaii
may be made b] lalaiihraitiej anj of
the hosteaaai

Dr and Mrs Qeoraje Jaj Qcjcaon
ot 1 are in xr.anv. 1 '.stung
1 '..<-:. pueats Mrs Genoa who
fanv.e:.\ ami sfisi BUM -;
- ttas dauBfatai ol Mi and I
Joseph Bi Dr. Oersoi
parents are Ml an
..:-.
Plrsl BaaettBej
ol It Bisters Ylsitansj nick was
\> eek al : Mrs.
Roaa .- s w Twelfth
street a Mm v-
Newark n J Mm
(tea Tor* Mrs J
s Mrs Ran ";
H 1 a aar-
hm Mm I Haw-
ark H J M:s A S ok-
n y Mrs anna Mint
da Mn Ban QoHBat
I Mn !
ten Ton Mn tf. B
sbBbm ami
a:-..- Mrs. I Baaaaai
lN. 1 Mn Baraa founder
of l .-pc Lrajur -**
eitOtad CBSktfaaan I
anal Mn Hanna v .:e\:
seeaaeary *rs- tn
enU be heUi the Bn
rtesdar* of each month at Mrs
Saanpscc's home

A ..r Ks^assah
*** haU BtnaBfe] eAessaaaa : dee
M-jial Acacxa chst ssBB Mrs rr*r.-
eaa WU^esson presadu* -. Bat *r-
secw* of XI^s Pr*\i Lvtck?
preaadent. T* xt D naaasaa *-as
Jhe **< speaker of :h# 1
and defiT*r* Cnddren. Mn A>x Oaatetear. re-
ported on the joint sensor and Jan-
tor aarn dance head test Wednesday
curht- D. X- Ocraetes sjx*.
1 of Uw Mj^.: CVrx Muk.
Thrcxvh :he ccarteay
at the YVjia gates son school of da=k--
sag. Mast Jasm Ttanser vaa pnat'.A:
an an ?. dance mwrber.

As we p u -ofrss aveetang of
E*-.ur*h BBaJBBBJ 0 I I I BfjBal
aoM at take Scoosh Ifcv
This is the Krai meeting of the win-
ter season. Offlcen now serving
aha wen recently elected an Mn
Josephine LabaHne, worthy ma-
tron; George Orlfflth, worth!
ron; Robert J VTallli associate pa-
tron: Lorn Waih.s. associate ma-
tron; Lena Simon, conductress;
Fine, associate conductress;
BUa Raiser, seen tarj I j.;.. Oi .'
Rth. treasurer; Lillian Fried
marshal; Berthe HsJpem, chap-
lain; Mary Barber, Adah; Ida 1
Ruth; An- R< laman I
Beesye Jacobye Mar:!.
Schworta Blecta; Anna Albert
warder
Plans tot a garden part] ai
adt t>j Senloi Hadasss
oon Januarj M al
the Blacks) Miami Beach
... will begin al -' p no Full de-
tails aril! be announced In oui naxl
me

Beth Jacob B
Beach la plannli d the big
aflain of I Poi Wadnaadaj
II ,i: the WUllam
Penn hotel arhex
. .: partiaa alii be si\c:- fa
benefit of Its v
Prises aril] be a ai aided
.- u ill be
- a con
Sam C and
18 rhf p :;-


MD Uheri of
a: Bbssl "T**! -'; '' 'n* B
".'.. and Mrs Ad-
i *::. rasa
a
lemoon preced-
Bg ..e wor-
vtened to
M.-
|
a 1 ud-
mous thanaa


M MV-
.-M on* c: an nsjadai .-A.-i

fyr^Ljrcy far tac ban 1 Ts:-
.i ?r^ a

-
:-- : -.-..'. i-r.:ifrs*r
:,-:. 5-s-tr-
fB hf i rj; x

da paaaa meotsae; of
:~-i: Pr.-^i .rear
C
I aaanBar at pronanont
aaaaftan *c;r *^te meetaag
WTIfi
-' sjao sctaed-
ItaaiBBj dascaaaaaai groap of
DajpaM aeeu ^err Taaaday
twiaua- st Ba Ts-=afi Torah bafid-
ac beg?j.iTat iilktB nBBi
Ftaaat Mas &^xre aa charge

TJar woddjr caass fea fas'n -
BgaBM : ?.(::. rr .a.-jg B Kir-
-^ -' Ttoji* Isr<-; aeeti = -^
rabbi's study every Thursday morn-
Ing at 9 30 Those Interested are
united to attend.

Mrs a Rahman of New York
City arrived here last Friday to vis-
it her daughter and son-in-law, Mr.
and Mi* Al Hirsch of this city. She
will spend the Winter season here

rhe Ladies' auxiliary of the Jew-
. \\\'.'..ire bureau will hold its
,: meeting for January on
r. .,:.. rnoon, January 16. at
3 p. m In Kaplan hall. Important
K will be transacted and elec-
tion ol will be held. Only
who have paid their dues will
vote All members
are urged to attend aa the election
,1 ,.; mportant for the sue-
Plam tor
arity ball will be dis-
i and 1 report given by Mrs
H\nMn N Levj chairman
A ::
be held at its Tal-
JJ Wednesday. Janu-
d Important
a.'.I be transacted. A so-
cial houi and procram will follow
the business meeting. All members
- attend.

More than I of bridge
aren ba play s; e: a series
by the He-
brea dttuetk ehib b ralat funds
- Oommunlt] Oentn majnten-
.r.e. ":
to Mrs Sam Blank
Miami Death nee Feuer.
. thC !' '
menu aren served


Ing mm
Bonceri to t>"
send r% I
.;: K .'.'. January 3: In
arrange::'. er.:s :s Mrs
rTfwtah ?r--r^ Asi\;r noted pianisl

CVr.j : M -
'.--
ILK- II : H I
a a a
-

a
sses aill :ite part

-
S
6
I
made and

s
Max Marks i naif, K
wnti :..-. :: X
f
-
: :rv< rto-
: -
ta an alsc
;_kTi:

a a ibjssjsJ re-
aaaaa aaajaaj d
-'
ekcev A:;.'-.; .; ;;r^r-r.-
atae BksoUaa of officers -rsz
rr- i: .: _- r.--\- .m
A -i"t :~J!z ~: _i^- :;..r^:>
Hadassah at the Mahl Shrine tem-
1 pie last Wednesday night. Old fash-
ioned barn dances were featured.

At a recent meeting of the A.Z.A.
.junior Bnai Brith) the officers
chosen to serve this coming year
are Bam Silver, president; Bernard
K.r. vice president; Milton Kap-
lan, secretary; Morris Raff, treas-
urer: Ellis Klein, reporter; Dave
Hirsch, sereeaiit-at-arms. and Her-
man Mlntier, chaplain. Plans are
now being made for a series of ben-
efit affairs including a dance on
February 5 to raise funds to send a
in to the Southern Conclave
of the A.Z.A. which will be held in
Atlanta. Oa.. during the month of
March.

Mist Helen Yunes. who spent the
summer In Boston, Mass.. returned
,mi Beach to spend the winter
with her mother. Mrs. Rebecca
- prominent communal work-
er of this city.

Mr Philip Berkowitz returned to
Ity this week from Savannah.
Oa., where be spent a week on a
combined business and pleasure trip.
He brought back with him Mrs.
Berkowitz. who had been visiting in
nville. Fla. for the past
month.

Aside from the fact the Walka-
thon has reached the 298th hour
and only 15 couples remain, out of
the original 29 starters, the enter-
tainment has reached the stage
where Jack Negley and company
can offer hours and hours of real,
-class fun and talent.
The addition of the McGreeveys.
Itau and Billy, seems to have in-
I new life into the couples, and
Christine Christy, who puts
and dances over in a big-time
show all by herself. John-
ny McKay, a ballad songster from
Angeles; Eric Wiebe. crooner
and ban joist, arc also registenne
Friday, January M^
hits. Nell Cappy, one of the ^
eccentric dancers running lo^
Jack Nortono. the singing and "J
eling cowboy are popular withT
patrons. l*
The Club Bagdad made their an.
pearance Tuesday before a capaclt
house and scored a hit. and th!
Moulin Rouge floor show will ;!
over the show for tonight.

Mr. A. Toleman of New York Cii
is visiting his relatives Cantor J
Mrs. Nathan Wroobel of this citv

Four one time members of the
famous Ziegfeld Follies appear to.
gether for the first time in "Blondie
of the Follies." showing at the Tb.
oil theatre next Sunday. Monte
and Tuesday. The quartet compris-
es Marion Davies. Billie Dove, Jim.
mie Durante and Clyde Cook. >u
famous throughout the country t0.
day. Miss Davies and Miss Dove
were members of the chorus while
Durante and Cook were star corned-
ians in the Follies. Scenes from the
Follies shows are portrayed In the
picture in which the author relates
the experiences of two girls from
the New York tenements who oh-
tain luxuries through Broadway no-
1 torlety. It is a picture well worth
1 seeing and one bound to give res!
enjoyment.

Cantor Nathan Wroobel Is now at
his home after having spent several
weeks at the University hospital.

At its meeting held last Wednes-
day. Beth David synagogue listened
to an inspiring address delivered by
Mrs. Gelbspan Mills, representing
the Women's league of the United
Synagogues of America Rabbi Max
Shapiro of the congregation also
spoke during the afternoon. A so-
cial hour followed.
.-..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;. -;..;..-. -
? lni*i on >our lirorrr ciinr >i>u ?
* NEW YORK BREAD d CAKE *
COMPANY
BREAD AND CAKES *
.:. :i s. w. -ih si. Phn* ;-:*si ?
Brnch Store: I".', V W. :,ih Si.
: :- ::: v :>:-> : : < ...:..;......;.
WALK A THON
CINDERELLA
BALLROOM
M.0# CASH PRIZES
-'1 Hot rs DAILY
PAST THE MSB! HOI R
GOING OS \o\r _
Always Fresh
LA TOURAINE COFFEE
AND
FIFTH AVENUE COFFEE
Roasted, packed and delivered
daily from our Miami plant
to insure
"That Delicious
Fresh Flavor"
W. S. QL'IMBY CO., In&
MIAMI JACKSONVILLE
^?^??^f-IWWi^^HS^*****^^
'.MIIIIMMHH
*
*
*
PIERRE'S
Beauty Shop
->X. ;
v I.
'.....MMU
e^i :-sts>
.....a-f
:
:-
:

*
V
#
+
f
+
*
+
*
+
TliC
HILIIAH tCNrS M)TEL
iSmXGTON AMMt AT SIXTH STREET MIAMI BEACH
True "Colonial" Hospitality
Comfortable and Convenient
Homelike and Pleasant
"A Delightful Spot for a Real location"
CHI OF THE FAMOUS COLONIAL HOTELS"'
??? ????????++)


r-M.v. Fanuary 13, 1933.
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
,,, HI.ISHED EVERY FRIDAY
l>> the
jKWISIl KIOKIDIAN PUBLISHING CO.
621 S. W. Fifteenth Avenue
i l.Ol'IS SHOCHET, Editor
p. O. Box 2973
Miami. Florida Phone 8-1183
I ,.r,.l ;'- Meond ,',,,,t il"- Pol f Miami. Florid*.
gk',,,.. A.-. ..I March 8. 1878.
WKST PALM BEACH OFFICE
114 Kliihlh SIrMt
Mr*. M. Srhrrbnick. Repr.....nl.lIre
Miracle
An Episode in Hebron
Page Three
S1BSCR1PTION
Six Month........JI.M
(in, Vr.......W.00
FRIDAY. JANUARY 13, 1933.
Vol. 6, No. 2.
Around the
Campus
Bv MILTON A. FRIEDMAN
Hello, folks! Is everybody happy?
Well, liere we are again, back at
dear old Florida alter a vacation
that has left a burning .mprint In
our minds. You cannot possibly
realize how extremely difficult it Is
!or the boys to get bacfc on the right
track again. The word "study" is
brand new and the students, if they
can be called such, are attempting
to put it into their dictionary. How-
ever you all know that it is always
difficult to get people to adopt rev-
olutionary ideas. With due persist-
ence success will soon be in sight.
Frankly. I never knew that so
many activities could be packed in-
to a short two weeks. Isn't it pe-
culiar how one lives In the past?
Miami has had an opportunity to
calm down somewhat now that the
collegians have left, but another
hurricane is in sight. Beware! Pre-
pare yourselves again. At the end
oi this month, for those who are
fortunate to have been able to com-
plete all their exams early, there
will be a few days open until the
next semester begins. Not all the
boys will be able to take advantage
of this chance but a good many of
us are certainly planning for it
whether it materializes or not.
I read in The Miami Herald the
other day that the University of
Miami upset the dope and defeated
the highly touted Manhattan Jas-
pers. It made me feel great to know
that my old alma mammy was com-
ing into its own. It made me feel
doubly proud because these are the
same boys that I managed for two
years am. whose individual accomp-
lishments I watched develop. I vis-
ited the U. during my vacation and
the place is the same as ever. The
work, I was told, is harder than ever
under the quarter-term system they
are now using. There are less stu-
dents and much less activity around
the building, but It still has its
friendly atmosphere. I sincerely
hope it comes out o.' this financial
collapse and rises to the heights
which I am sure It will some day
attain.
It seems as though I have wan-
dered from the Florida campus so I
must return. This week the U.
Proudly presented Richard Halli-
burton to its students. Mr. Hallibur-
ton gained fame as a writer, adven-
turer and raconteur. Some of his
books are "The Royal Road to Ro-
mance," "The Flying Carpet" and
others. He told many of his adven-
tures to a highly interested audi-
ence.
Last night Florida opened up its
1933 basketball season with a vic-
tory over Stetson. The game was
clse all the way as the score of 46-
M will verify. Florida has a good
team this year and should go places.
Everything has its end and this
Uit.
The sun hung low in the sky its
last rays gilded the grey hills sur-
rounding Hebron. As the day wan-
ed, a hush fell upon the land. One
by one, the shops closed in the nar-
row street of the bazaar, overcast
by heavy stone vaults which brought
darkness sooner. Here and there
gaps in the vaults allowed glimpses
of the still clear sky, where the first
stars had not yet appeared.
But night was coming. Gathered
together amid piles of blue cotton
stuffs, a few traders hastily finish a
game of dominoes, while they smoke
a last narghileh before shutting
their shops. Yonder, bright-colored
glass trinkets surrender their glitter, I
while the shade deepens. Here, in
the strong fragrance of fruits, one
sees many-colored pyramids built by
the shopkeepers; near the red to-
matoes hjaps of lemons stand near
violet aubergiies. The heavy grapes
gathered in tb; vines of Hebron lay
among melons, sweet calabashes and I
bright oranges. The traders remove
their displays, leaving a strong and
spicy smell that will rise in the
night from the plenteous show hid-
den behind the leaf of the door. Red
flames from the last rays of light
arise in the copper pans and vanish
away. The copper-beaters and the
cobblers put their tools in order; a
tawny leather scent floats in that
corner. Wrapped up in white, slid-
ing on the irregular pavement, pol-
ished and worn out, a few people
loiter here and there, having a last
chat, while their long, dark hands
toss untiringly a string of amber
beads, ended with a silken tassel.
Young peop.e come back from the
vines, where all day long they have
gathered grapes ripening on the
bountiful hilh. of Hebron. Time has
come for everyone to return home.
Among those who yet come and go.
giving life to the darkening lanes,
is a tired traveller. His garments
are dark, his feet dusty. He leans
heavily on his stick. Under his fur
cap glisten his white hair; white,
also, is the beard which covers his
breast. His eyes are black and full
of a strange spirit; whole centuries
seem to have weighed on him. Un-
hesitatingly he proceeds toward a
low. narrow little door that is old
and worm-eaten and strengthened
with coarse iron work. It has to be
well-known, in order to be found,
this obscure door which opens into
the old ghetto .
IN the ghetto, gloom and anguish
prevailed. It was Yom Kippur eve
and a catastrophe had fallen the
day before on Hebron; a notable of
the little community had died sud-
denly. He was buried on the very
morning, and now. of the men old
enough to pray there remained but
nine; the mlnyan was no more com-
plete- the hour of Kol Nidre was
coming, and the Jews of Hebron
would not be able to chant the sol-
Watch For
"The Inside
Story".
Revelations of
Greater Miami
Jewish Life ...
Kashrus...
Synagogs...
Cemetery...
Talmud Torahs ...
AND? ...
Coming Soon
emn and holy air. Had the Lord
forgotten His people? Did He turn
away His eyes from Hebron, which
had gained His favor when Abra-
ham lived there and welcomed His
messengers under an oak, still ven-
erated now?
Alas! why did the Jews of Hebron
dress in their most beautiful gar-
menu to ferfasten (to fortify them-
selves for the fast)? What bitter
irony seemed to rise from the gor-
geous schtreimels (fur caps) which
covered their heads! Why did they
comb and curl so carefully their
Peoths (side-locks)? Why did they
put on the many-hued caftans, lov-
ingly prepared by their wives? Why
did they turn several times round
their waists the bright silken belts,
kept for the great feasts only? Alas!
why all that? Twould have been
better to cover one's head with ash-
es and to tear up the garments:
what sin did Hebron expiate on that
day? Now it was time to go to the
schul; Yom Kippur was approach-
ing, and, for the first time the Jews
of Hebron would not be able to pray
together on the Day of Atonement.
Yet everyone still hoped for the
impossible, and as soon as the meal
was over there were meetings every-
where, comings and goings between
all the houses. Did not Yeshua's
brother come from Jerusalem? No,
this was a vain hope. But Yeshua
who also sought information went
to see Schmouel, who, perhaps could
send word to the neighboring town
to tell of the distress of Hebron.
Maybe he had received a guest. But
no, there was Schmouel himself on
the road accompanied only by Jac-
ob; all expectation was useless. It
was growing late, nobody could
come for the feast at the appointed
hour Quite desperate, the tiny
group decided to go to the schul; on
their way they met those who had
remained at home until the last
minute, near their weeping wives
and children, who were sad without
quite well knowing why. Silently
the door opened and a dumb and
doleful ^shadow emerged; further on
I two old friends Joined the group,
steeped in their sorrow, and soon,
the whole community was on the
way to the synagogue, feeling a
slight comfort to be thus gathered
in their common distress. All to-
! gether they felt stronger to stand
I their woe, but how bitter it all was.
What unfelt calamity! Coi !d it be
possible to Imagine Yom Klji >ur eve
I and no Kol Nidre?
SADLY and slowly, shuffling along
in their slippers, their bright
garments covered with the Kittels
iwhite robes), the nine men walked
towards the synagogue. Behind the
shut windows a woman's sob was
sometimes to be heard; in front of
the chasan's door, Yossele, his son,
wept bitterly; he would be bar-
mitzvah next week, too la'e to re-
move the calamity from Helsron .
Slowly, slowly, expecting perhaps,
something from this very slowness,
did the little group advance. No
voice was to be heard; the weight of
despair had stifled even the wail-
ings; broken sighs only cadenced
the walk on a sad rhythm. Now
they were quite near the synagogue,
their hearts full of sorrow Sud-
denly old Schmouel started; In
front of the door he thought he had
seen a white silhouette, looking like
their own. ... He could not believe
his eyes, thinking it was some vis-
ion, and he started to run.
The others followed and heard an
unknown voice, asking whether a
pious Jew, away from his people for
the feast, might pray together with
the small community. This was no
illusion; the traveller stood in front
of them, the white kittel on his gar-
ments. Under his fur cap glistened
his white hair; white also Is the
beard which covers his breast. His
eyes are black and full of a strange
spirit. He looks so old. in spite of
his lofty stature, that he seems to
(Continued on Page Sis)
Mr. Rubenstein was in Shule all i Ice has piled up in several of Cal-
day Yom Kippur, and every time he ifornla's upland streams, though we
stood up he rocked himself back and
forth in a very energetic manner.
Finally, Goldberg, sitting in the
next seat, said to him: "Why are you
so sad today, and why do you rock
yourself so strongly?"
"Well, I owe Ginsberg $100 and I
promised to pay him sure tomor-
row, and I haven't got the money,"
replied the troubled Jew.
"Then why should you worry? Let
Ginsberg rock himself."
Life Is Worth Living
Life is worth living after all.
In spite of its fever of vague unrest,
The hearts that break and the souls
oppressed.
The sneers that mock and the tears
that fall.
For God, Who watcheth. He know-
eth best,
And life is worth living after all.
Like violets hidden under the snow.
Hope still smiles after bitter pain,
And under love's sorrowful, sweet
refrain
Are echoes of laughter soft and low.
Seeds that are scattered shall blos-
som again
And the sunshine comes when the
shadows go.
Life is worth living after all;
Toil is lightened by noontide rest,
And baby lips on the mother's
breast
Blot out the losses beyond recall.
The robin sings as he builds his
nest,
And life is worth living after all.
For sweet are the greetings when
day is done.
And tender the hands that cling to
ours,
And after this world with its sun
and its showers.
And its ties that are broken, one by
one,
Sound Is our sleep under drifting
flowers.
And life is worth living when life is
done.
A ChUd's Faith
God sent his messenger to still the
breath
Of one we loved, and while with
bitter tears
We mourned the loss of him, so
young for death.
There came a little child, a babe
In years,
And wondering in her innocence to
see
The calm upon his face, the grief
on ours,
She raised her head and whispered
smilingly,
"See, brother is asleep beneath
the flowers."
Oh, perfect childish trust, which
felt no dread
Of this last sleep that hushed the
pulseless breast,
Seeing the blossoms heaped upon
the dead.
She knew that underneath was
peaceful rest.
Oh tender childish heart, our eyes
grow dim,
And from thy faith we learn to
trust God's will,
Content to know that all Is well
with him,
Who underneath the flowers slum-
bers still.
"Oh. George, do you realize it's
almost a year since our honeymoon,
and that glorious day was spent on
the sands? I wonder how we'll
spend this one?"
"On the rocks."
Imagine it's so much warmer than
eastern ice you hardly notice it.
"Phrenology is coming back." says
a trade organ of the amusement
world. We had understood techno-
crats were taking over the job of
explaining our bumps.
Two of the debt-defaulting gov-
ernments wished the White House a
happy and prosperous New Year,
the same not to be retroactive as of
December 15.
Arthur Gulterman, poet, petition-
ed Mayor McKee in verse to cleanse
New York City's begrimed public
statues, and the mayor replied In
verse. The interchange was so plea-
sant a variation from the conven-
tional type of official messages that
we advise its adoption generally.
Mr. Hoover could have addressed
France with a couplet, demanding
payment of the debt, and France
could have replied with a quatrain.
That preliminary stage is already
past, but the discussion might con-
tinue as follows:
Mr. Hoover to France:
"He who in his pocket hath no
money
Should, in his mouth, be never
without honey."
France to Mr. Hoover:
"Waste not your Hour, nor in the
vain pursuit
Of this and that endeavor and dis-
pute;
Better be Jocund with the fruitful
Grape
Than sadden after none, or bitter
Fruit."
Mr. Hoover to France:
"Swans sing before they die 'twere
no bad thing
Did certain persons die before they
sing."
Courage
Black smoke athwart the paling
evening sky,
The last slow freighter passing
down the bar.
Brave courier of the deep, who
breasts the waves
And bears her treasured cargo
near and far;
Before the ice-clad prow her pen-
non gay
Lifts head defiant to the grinding
waves,
Safe harbor to be won, she forges
on
And gallantly the lashing tempest
braves;
So let me keep my flag of courage
high.
To flutter bold in face of stress
and gale,
So let me steer brave course o'er
Life's rough seas,
No more than she to falter or to
fall.
Evelyn Newbride had two umbrel-
las given to her and as she needed
only one she took the other, the gift
of Sandy MacChinch, back to the
store and asked if it could be ex-
changed for a gentleman's umbrel-
la, for her husband. She was told it
could not be done.
"But why not?" asked Mrs. New-
bride, "your firm's label is on the
umbrella."
"Yes. madam," replied the clerk,
"but it was put on when the um-
brella was recovered."
If a man who is offered the
chance of a lifetime for a mere
song can't sing.
I


Page Four
THE if WISH FLORIDIAN
1
'
*???????????????????????????????????**??*???*?
j SaMo g>xjnagflg Sisllrtin
Edited by RABBI S. M. MACHTEI
Founder and Director, Radio Synagog of America
WIOD, Miami, Florida
+ Sunday Mornings
% Vol. 1. MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 15, 1933. No. 5.
#?????????????????????????????*?????<"> Joseph's Revelation
iScrmnn delivered on Sunday. January 8, 1933.)
Scripture Reading, Genesis, Chapter XLV, Verses 1-9, bid.
wT appears, from the comforting words of Joseph to his brothers when
j) he revealed himself to them as their long-sought brother, that Joseph,
while he could never forget the suffering to which he had been subjected
by his brothers, believed that they had been innocent tools in the hands
of God His messengers. The tribe had to be saved from starvation. The
prophecy to Abraham that his seed would be in bondage in a strange land
had to be fulfilled, and so, in accordance with the Divine Plan, Joseph
was sent ahead to prepare the way for his people. Joseph's attitude to-
wards the events reminds me of an incident in the life of a Jewish com-
munity in Russia under the old czarist regime.
DAVID, the scribe of this village, had an only son who was brilliant
and ambitious. The son, Joseph, eager for advanced learning in the
university, found his career blocked by the "numerous clausus" which
limited the percentage of Jews permitted to matriculate. After all other
attempts had failed to gain hipi admission to the university, Joseph,
without the knowledge of his father, a devout Jew, applied for baptism in
the Russian Orthodox church and became an apostate. He left home and
entered the university in the large state capital. When David learned of
his son's act. he rent his garments and observed all the rites of mourning
for one dead. He had no son. His son was dead to him. Nevermore must
anyone at home mention the name of Joseph. David would rather have
attended the luneral of his only son. A physical death would have been
easier to bear. His son a "meshumed"! His son had deserted the fold!
What had he done to deserve such punishment? Why had he, David, the
scribe, who had observed as many of the 613 commands as it is humanly
possible for one to obey, been singled out for such shame? But, one must
not rebel. God's ways are Just.
YEARS passed and no word from Joseph reached any of the commun-
ity. It was rumored that Joseph had graduated with honors and had
been given an important government post. But. who pays attention to
rumors? No one knew definitely. It did not matter. Jews may feel proud
of a Jew one of their own in high office. That a "meshumed," a Goy,
just another non-Jew. held high office was of no consequence to the peo-
ple who were so oppressed and so down-trodden in the land which sought
to imitate the old Spain in its persecutions of the Jew. Much of Israel's
suffering had been traced directly to the zeal of "meshumodim," apos-
tates, who vied With others in heaping indignities upon the "shzid," the
Jew. These apostates had misquoted the Talmud to create false basis for
adding to the misery of the long-suffering Jews. In this manner they
thought to prove their loyalty to the faith of their adoption, and to dem-
onstrate their contempt for the faith of their ancestors, the faith of the
mothers at whose breasts they had nursed as infants. Little wonder that
David, the scribe, had rent his garments and had considered his son, Jos-
eph, dead.
IN the village where David lived, there lived, also, Moses, the grain mer-
chant, who had become wealthy in his dealings with the government.
Moses employed many hundreds of men throughout the land. He made
periodic rounds of his many branches to supervise the activities. All had
gone well with Moses for many years. Then a blow fell upon his head. He
was accused of cheating the government on a certain contract. He was
tried and found guilty. He appealed the case, giving as his defense that
an employee had been guilty of misconduct and had betrayed the trust
Moses had placed in him, but to no avail. Moses lost the appeal and the
sentence to hard labor in Siberia stood. That, to a man of Moses' years,
meant certain death. Only one last appeal remained the case records
had been sent to St. Petersburg to the minister in whose department the
contracts had originated. He alone could overrule the court's decision.
Moses left his home to interview the minister and to plead his case in
person. Arrived at St. Petersburg, Moses went directly to the hotel where
the minister lived. He was announced and was received by the private
secretary to the minister a young bearded Russian, of refined and dig-
nified bearing. Moses stated his case and produced affidavits to show his
claims of a subordinate's conduct. He also produced, from an inner pock-
et, a long envelope containing ten thousand rubles. This he gave to the
secretary, together with the other papers, stating that he did not request
intervention and attention gratis. More would be forthcoming for the
secretary's trouble. The private secretary advised that he would put the
matter before the minister on the following day and suggested that Moses
return the next evening. He would then tell him of the minister's decision.
MOSES spent a miserable 24 hours. He presented himself to the min-
ister's secretary the following night. The young man reached for a
file and, giving the papers to Moses, he said, "Sir, the minister has studied
your case and he has been convinced that the dereliction was no fault of
your own. You are free." Tears flowed from the eyes of the old Jew as
he thanked God and the young Russian for this news of his vindication.
He reached into his pocket and withdrew a long envelope, bulging with
ruble-notes of large denomination. He tendered it to the secretary. The
young man placed it upon his desk, reached into a desk-drawer and took
out the envelope he had been given the previous night. Both these he
gave to Moses, and said, in Yiddish, "No, Reb Moishe, I don't want it.
You contribute it to the poor of our village. You don't recognize me. I've
grown older and have a beard. I am Joseph, the son of David, the scribe.
Father has torn me, the meshumed', out of his heart. I Suppose that I
can't blame him. But. I followed my own course. I felt that I could render
my people greater service as an apostate than had I remained within the
fold."
Friday, January n iai,
"Ask and Ye Shall
Learn"
Q. Rosh Hashanah is spoken of
as the Day of Judgment. Is this idea
in any way expressed in the prayers
for the day?
A. The belief that God has
chosen the New Year and the uays
connected with it as a time for
passing special Judgment upon his
creatures is reflected in the liturg-
ical pieces specially characteristic of
the New Year. It is especially given
expression in the section of the ad-
ditional service (musaf) known as
Zichronot t "remembrances"). Ac-
cording to Jewish tradition, the
great books of judgment arc opened
on the first day of Tishri and closed
10 days afterwards on the Day of
Atonement. The scene in heaven
described in the Book of Job (chap-
ter 1, 6 f.) took place, according to
the Targum, on New Year's day,
Satan yearly playing the part of ac-
cuser before the Divine Judge. In
the Talmud iRosh Hashanah 16 b.>
it is said that the sounds of the
shofar are intended to "confuse"
Satan when so employed. In the
same passage it is stated that three
books are opened on this day, "one
for the thoroughly wicked, another
for the thoroughly pious, and the
third for the large intermediate
class. The fate of the thoroughly
wicked and the thoroughly pious is
determined on the spot, the destiny
of the intermediate class is su-
spended until the Day ol Atone-
ment, when the fate of every man
is sealed." The following selection
from the liturgy of the day brings
out this aspect of the season:
"We will celebrate the mighty
holiness of this day. for it is one of
awe and terror. Thereon Ls Thy do-
minion exalted and Thy throne is
established in mercy, and Thou sit-
test thereon in truth. Verily it is
Thou alone who are judge and ar-
biter, who knowest and art witness;
Thou writest down and settest the
seal. Thou recordest and tellest;
yea, Thou rememberest the things
forgotten. Thou unfoldest the rec-
ords, and the deeds therein inscribed
proclaim themselves; for lo, the seal
of every man's hand is set thereto.
The great trumpet is sounded, the
still small voice is heard; the angels
are dismayed; fear and trembling
Beta hold of them as they proclaim,
Behold the Day of Judgment! The
host of heaven is to be arraigned
in judgment. For in Thine eyes they
are not pure; and all who enter the
world dost Thou cause to pass be-
Recipes for the
Jewish Family
Orange Ginger Apples
Six tart apples, 24 snaps crum-
bled, one-half cup orange marma-
lade, two tablespoons butter, one-
half cup hot water.
Peel and core apples and place in
a baking dish. Fill center with or-
ange marmalade, cover with crum-
bled ginger snaps, dot with butter
and pour water over all. Cover and
bake in a hot oven '425 d< grees
Fahrenheit! until apples are tt nder.
Uncover and brown. Six portioi -.
Apple Kings
Four red apples, one cup :;ugar.
one cup water, one-fourth teaspoon
fore Thee as a flock of sheep. As a
shepherd seeketh out his flock and
causeth them to pass beneath his
crook, so dost Thou cause to pass,
and number, tell and visit eveiy liv-
ing soul, appointing the measure of
every creature's life and decreeing
their destiny.
"On the first day of the yea:' it is
inscribed, and on the Day of Atone-
ment the decree is sealed, how many
shall pass away and how many shall
die, who at the measure of man's
days and who before it; who shall
perish by fire and who by water,
who by the sword, who by wild
beasts, who by hunger and who by
thirst, who by earthquake and who
by plague, who by strangling and
who by stoning; who shall have rest
and who shall go wandering, who
shall be tranquil and who shall be
harassed, who shall be at ease and
who shall be afflicted; who shall be-
come poor and who shall wax rich;
who shall be brought low and whe
shall be upraised. But Penitence,
Prayer and Charity avert the severe
decree."
It should be noted that the fate
not only of individual creatur \s but
of countries "which of thorn is
destined to the sword and which to
peace, which to famine and which
to plenty" is also determined at
the same time.
One's fate is determined accord-
ing as merit or demerit predomin-
ates in the final reckoning hence
the importance of multiplying i;ood
deeds before the fatal day (of
Atonement i. Those who emerge
from the ordeal successfully are en-
tered in the Book of Life. Tl is ex-
plains the petition, "Inscribe us in
the Book of Life," and also the sal-
utation of New Year's eve: "May
you be inscribed (in the Book of
Life i for a happy year."
GOD S ways are wondeFful, past our finding out. Wh^r
our neighbor's acts? Who are we to foresee the good that mav re-
sult from what we term "evil"? Joseph had borne his brothers an nner
hatred. They had sought to vitiate Joseph's dreams by selling him to the
SaZ TnJhad Z6 XT' hlm to "-^S of hi
dreams. They had been God's messengers. Jacob had mourned Joseph as
his tibeT^ "f ,meanS f eX*ndlng the lif" f '* a"" o
his tribe. Let us learn to reserve decision. Let us realize ot.r own limited
understanding in judging our fellowmen. Gods ways are not ours
transcend man's greatest imaginings. Trust in the Lord.
They
BECKWITTi
OPTOMETRIST
"22 Years in Miami'
IS YOUR
CHEAPEST
SERVANT..
Useib!
>fOMPAH^
To See I. To Helir*,
Did you know...
The m-i ,,,,,,,,, lh, .
expert'" d/C'r '" ""'<"<"".
'Mn, ,,.,. ,nil reputation?
'-ran will tki.i."
Miami"!.* .:'""""''' operation In
Hundred, ron.ult Dr. Herkwitt.
36 N. E. FIRST AVENUE
cinnamon, two tablespoons iern0
Juice. n
Core the apples and cut each into
four slices, crossways. Mix rest ol
ingredients and boil one minute
Add apples. Cover with lid and
boll slowly five minutes. Rem0Ve
lid and cook until apples are very
tender when tested with fork. gerv
warm or cold.
Four Ways to Make Good Coffee
Use one heaping tablespoonful of
ground La Touraine coffee for each
cup of water, then one for the pot
In percolating, put two-thirds dry
coffee in top of pot. Pour boiling
water through coffee, then put in
balance of dry coffee. Let percolate
until liquid shows blood red.
In boiling, put dry coffee in bot-
tom of pot. Pour on boiling water
Boil two or three minutes. Stir in
grounds. Add a little cold water to
settle.
In filtering, wet bag with cold
water. Put dry coffee in bag in top
of pot. Pour boiling water through
coffee and repour until liquid shows
blood red.
For after-dinner coffee, use from
50 to 75 per cent more dry coffee
Measure both coffee and water ac-
curately. Do not guess. Use only
boiling water. Have all utensils hot
Serve immediately.
Orange Bread
Three-fourths cup orange mar-
malade, two tablespoons corn oil,
one egg. one cup milk, three cups
flour, six teaspoons baking powder,
one-fourth teaspoon salt.
Place marmalade in bowl, add oil
and egg. Beat well, adding milk
and sifted dry ingredients Bake in
an oiled loaf pan four inches by
four inches by two inches, for one
hour in hot oven.
Radio Synagog
Rabbi S. M. Machtei, founder and
director of the Radio Synagof, tlD
preach over WIOD at 1U o'clock
Sunday morning on "God-Given
Sons.' Leonard Tobin will deliver
the sermonette on "False Pride." In
addition to these there will be pray-
ers, music and scripture reading.
Delaney & Beers
Kodak Kini.hing and Enlarging
( ommrrrial Work and Home Portrait.
50% Off on AH Amaltur Work
212 N. E. 4th SI. Phone 2-5WS
EMPLOY
FEDERATION
ORCHESTRAS
WHY?
Reliable Dependable
Experientid Organized |

Rehearsed
And trying- to Maintain a
living wage arale.
Miami Federation I
of Musicians
I.OIIIS J. NKTT. Secret
PHONE 2-3912
:j
The World's Most Indiiidual
Playing Cards .
Your favorite photograph a "**
heart a friend a child I1""?!'
ly reproduced on the back. "
card deck of PHOTO PLAYING
CARDS. An ideal gift nv"..5h
fore offered at thla low price Sr.nj'
NO MONEY. Ju.t aend your ,""
photo, .nap.hot or negative I any
lie>. It will be returned with you
order. Pay mailman only II- ,
ml limited time offer *
immediately.
| THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN |
i P. 0. Boi 27S Miami. Florid, j
*-----------------------------------*


L.,. lanuary 13, 1933.
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
"Sweet Water of Megiddo"
Lag Bo'omer Scenes in Palestine
By RABBI LAZARUS AXELROD
Continued from Last Week)
I was attired immaculately, well
Loomed, and I had brought with
I a copy of 'he Manchester
huardian to break the monotony,
L within nve mniutes I gave up
y business of continually flicking
iecks of dust from off my spotless
trousers, and left nature take care
I its own course. I gazed mystified
Ind enviously at the two Chalut-
L. who seemed to take to the fly-
L dust as a fish to water. At one
jpriod, we could barely see each
flier, and I thought seriously of
lomposine a poem to begin with
The Assyrians came down like the
|ust on the fold." I sighed deeply
then I recalled the open top of a
I r.don 'bits, and even the stifling
jtmosphere of the "underground"
Labway) seemed at that moment a
lentable Utopia.
] Through this hazy cloud of dust
perceived a gigantic signboard
irranged skillfully over an arched
Gateway, which Indicated that we
tere passing by Nesher. the famous
j'mpnt factory. The dust lessened
[onsiderably. as the Dodge slowed
(own to 30 miles per hour and we
night a fleeting glimpse of olive-
fctnned and bright-eyed maidens
lad in workaday garments, loung-
|r.? idly in front of small but very
tractive wooden bungalows, the
Icaes of the employees of that co-
lt al factory. They waved to us,
|ughingly and cheerfully, these
ardy Jewish girls, the personiflca-
Lon of extreme self satisfaction and
lontentment. a product of the Holy
Land, suffused with that indomit-
}ole courage and inflexible will in-
wited from ancestral martyrs.
Their laughter raised our droop-
n? spirits, and I perceived that
Ken our friend from Massachusetts
Lowed that determined looking
pouth to relax into a grimaced
mile. In the background, not more
|!tan a thousand feet away from
model village with its neat
lirubberies and well-ordered flower
lardens, loomed the grimy outline
p the factory, four towering chim-
belching forth volumes of
Irayish black smoke. The huge boil-
Page Five
POPULAR BEACH HOSTELRY
are 2"! iS* imm6nSe bulldi*
davs n th0mK hUrS 3 day' 365
days ln the year, holidays included
It requires 24 hours to restore nor-
mal heat to the extinguished fur-
aces, and keen competition in for-
eign cement prohibits this wanton
waste of one day per week.
Nesher constitutes one of the four
leading industrial concerns of the
Holy Land, the remaining honors
being shared between Shemen, the
home of soaps and oils, the Pinchas
Ruttenberg Electrical Company, and
the Rothchild flour mills and elec-
trically operated Matzoh factory.
Sixty, seventy and eighty kilo-
meters appeared in rapid succession
on the speedometer, and once again
we were plunged into the swirling
eddies of dust. Finally, after three
hours of powdered earth, a lecture
on the value of a good home in
Massachusetts, listening dully to a
German's idea of English as she is
spoken, we reached Tiberias, the
half-way stop between Haifa and
Safed.
With relief we alighted for the
well-earned recess, and we gazed
with unconcealed admiration at the
peerless view spread out before us.
The much-eulogized Lake of Kiner-
eth lay serenely, like an immense
heet of silvered glass, a thousand
feet below sea-level. Over a hun-
dred square miles of warm, me-
dicinal waters, which, viewed from
the hills, appears no greater than
an oversized basin of water. Skiffs,
canoes and other hand-propelled
sea craft traversed its unruffled sur-
face, gliding along innocently, but
with death-dealing nets trailing in
their wage, the flsh of Kincreth
bringing compensating prices in the
busy markets of Jaffa and Jerusa-
lem. Six pocket Kodaks clicked sim-
ultaneously, as, Inspired by the
scenic beauty of the place, we trans-
ferred it to six rolls of film. The in-
cessant tooting of a horn jerked us
back reluctantly to our automobile,
where the driver lay sprawled in
his seat, the only attraction in Kin-
ereth to his corporeal mind being a
substantial meal of Gefllte flsh.
(To be Continued)
Many Prominent Jews are Guests at the William Penn Hotel, Miami Beach
Miracle
Meditations
Snobbishness takes many unex-
cted forms; so does the inferiority
fmplex. How often has the writer
rumpled up in humiliation because
p did not know Yiddish, especially
' the presence of English speaking
wple who did. Somebody will be
f:-ing a story and suddenly intro-
T-ee some full-blooded incompre-
ssible Yiddish phrase on which
fie whole point and atmosphere of
|he story seem to depend. Those in
fc company who know Yiddish not
Jnly enjoy the Joke but obviously
p discomfiture of the one member
Nie party, the ignoramus, the
|M1. the barbarian, the goy who
lesnt know enough to enjoy it. Or
* ?roup of initiates, themselves well
ler*ed in the history of English and
fdeed of other literatures, will as-
pe one that H one doesn't know
pdish poetry, one doesn't know
pthing. Chaucer and Milton and
fWs may be all right but you real-
F ought to be able to read even
| name escapes me.
hat is even worse, one can gain
FiJgh Yiddish from a knowledge
{German to see that the Ylddish-
pfc granted a certain forgivable
f deration of love, are probably
There is a raciness, pictur-
PUeness, and half-cynical tragedy
L* comps ut even in the transla-
p of Jewish Jokes or in the half-
;ay. half-melancholy gestures that
accompany their telling. The stor-
ies of Sholem Aleichem in English
even in English have a quality
so much their own that one wishes
one could learn Yiddish to get that
quality undiluted and pure. It
'teems sometimes as if one could
hardly get the spirit of one's own
race except in that language in
which much of its suffering and joy
has been in all countries and for
centuries told and indeed lived.
Yet what to do. One can embark
on the study of Hebrew, though en-
thusiastic young men from the uni-
versities who have to come to Juda-
ism via the English prose of Ludwig
Lewisohn or the Nordic scholarship
of George Foote Moore, have found
it discouragingly harder than they
could have believed. But Yiddish!
It seems not a language to learn so
much as a gift to inherit. It is inter-
twined with years of childhood and
of family association. It is in the
blood and of the cradle. As well
teach the stone-deaf music or the
color-blind to paint as teach an
adult American the special verbal
magic of a language that seems se-
cret, open only to very private se-
same, a psychology that one is born
with rather than a logic that one
may acquire. The sensitive ear be-
gins to catch the cadences and even
the profane goyim know what goy-
im means. But when one humbly
asks the initiate whether Yiddish
It'ontinurd from Page Three)
have come through all the centuries.
How is it possible to describe the
joy which spreads among the little
group, so desperate a few minutes
ago? Yossele, having seen and un-
derstood, went running to tell the
good news to the women and chil-
dren who had remained at home,
while the minyan (quorum for
prayer i, miraculously completed,
sang Kol Nidre with a thankful
piety.
AND in spite of the tears shed on
their sins, in spite of the sup-
plications and implorations offered
up to the Lord, the Jews of Hebron
felt a strange joy in their hearts,
for they knew now that the Master
did not turn away from them. When
the hour of Neila "final Yom Kip-
pur prayer) came, they acted as
though the fast had just begun, so
easily had they gone through with
it. And when It was time to go,
when three stars appeared in the
sky, they waited for their providen-
tial guest, disputing who would have
the honor to invite him to break
can be learned, his look scornfully
replies: "Impossible' or at least:
"Not by you." You protest in vain
that you've mastered even Dutch
and he smiles pityingly, Dutch!
So we in the outer darkness will
be doomed through the whole of our
lives to the hearing of Jokes of
which we understand everything but
the point. We shall have to hear
about poetry most of which, unlike
Dante, we cannot even read in a bad
translation. We shall have to catch
rumors of prose that, even were it
translated, we are assured we should
not be able "to get" in English at
all. We shall have to infer from a
Yiddish shrug of the shoulders
which is intelligible even to an Illit-
erate what the accompanying words
mean if we could understand them.
We shall have to hear mildly amus-
ing anecdotes that, in Yiddish, we
are assured, would convulse the
hearer with laughter. We shall go
to the Yiddish Art theatre to take
it on faith and with the libretto, so
to speak, in our hands.
It is all very discouraging. One is
almost tempted to go and live in
Warsaw and Minsk for a while,
though this is hardly the moment
nor is it certain that one could live
there in peace. But surely if one did
live there for a while, one could pick
up the language. Then how pleasant
it would be to come back and show
those machers it is impossible to
explain to you who do not know
Yiddish what machers means
where they get off. Impossible to
learn Yiddish? Oser!The Won-
dering Jew in Opinion.
the fast. But they looked in vain
for him; he had disappeared and
none had seen him going, not even
the women and children who had
waited for the end of the fast in
front of the sole door of the little
synagogue. As mysteriously as he
had come, he had vanished away.
And the Jews of Hebron under-
stood then who was the miraculous
guest who had prayed with them.
They knew that Abraham, the pa-
triarch had compassion on them,
who lived and toiled where he had
lived, near the place where he had
wanted to be buried, near Sarah his
wife. Abraham had had God's leave
to come back on earth for one day,
as a weary traveller covered with
the dust of the road; unhesitating-
ly had he passed the threshold of
the ghetto, and there he was to
complete the minyan when the hour
of Kol Nidre had come.

. And this is why, nowadays, the
Jews of Hebron still pray in the
plain little schul of the Ashkenazim,
which is called, in remembrance of
this miracle, Avrom Ovinou's
Scliule, the synagogue of Abraham
our father.
died as the result of burns received
when her dress ignited as she was
lighting a gas stove. She was 81
years old, and was interred in the
Jewish cemetery at Atlanta.
When a man has a reputation for
wisdom he can say foolish things
and his friends applaud them as
sarcasm.
* +
+ +
* *
I NATIONAL FRUIT |
t SHIPPERS, INC.
* *
211 5th St. Miami Beach
f
+
+ Shippers of Highest Quality
+ Tree Ripened
+ Indian River Fruit
J Pecans, Jellies, etc. ?,
+
t DELIVERY GUARANTEED Z
*
*
*
RELIABLE AND BONDED %
*
Mr. Philip Augustine returned to
the city this week from Atlanta, Ga.,
where he attended the funeral of
his mother. Mrs. Ethel Augustine,
his mother, was a resident of this
country for the past 40 years and
made her home in Atlanta. Ga. She
:
:
:
*
:
:
:
*
Splendid
Opportunity
To study Hebrew with nation-
ally-known Hebrew educator
and writer. Private lessons, al-
so group instruction can be ar-
ranged by calling evenings:
Evergreen 775-J, Apt. 12.
TIVOLI
W. Flatter at Sth Phone 2-3352
Miniiii-.- -'iii- 2 to 11 Evening 25r
SUNDAY. MONDAY and TUESDAY
January IS, 16. 1?
Marion Davies
Robert Montgomery
...in...
"BLONDIE of the FOLLIES" j
"Radio Service"
WM. SIELER
Parts and Accessories
430 NORTH MIAMI AVE.
No Charge for Examination
Now you obi buy
BILTMORE LAUNDRY SERVICE
at a price that fits your pockctbook!
PHONE 3-3687 21 N. W. 9TH ST.
OPEN
DAILY
AND
SUNDAY
SEE THE PRIMITIVE EVERGLADES AT
MUSA ISLE
Seminole Indian Village
OPEN-
DAILY
AND
SUNDAY
LEADERSHIP CHIEF WILLIAM OSCEOLA
N. W. Twenty-fifth Avenue and Sixteenth Street
Co Went on Flatter Street to Twenty-aeventh Avenue, Turn North
LARGEST COLLECTION OF CAPTIVE ALLIGATORS
AND CROCODILES
COMPLETE FLORIDA SWAMP ZOO AND MUSEUM
Sea Cowboy Bill, a Real 8eminole Indian. Wreatle the Alligator
TO GET THERE Take any for hire car or drive weet en Flacler and north
on Twenty-aeventh Avenue, or yacht "Macushla" leavea Pier 6. City Yacht
Baain 2 p. m. dally alao on apeedhoat "Speedee" from Floridian Dock,
Miami Beach.
'


1'


ssa m
Page Six
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Friday, January n
I
The Source of
Christian Ethics
[Continued from Pace One]
nieth may repent so as not again to
wrong thee; yea, he may also honor
thee a.*1 be at peace with thee. And
if he be shameless and persist in his
wrongdoing, even so forgive him
from the heart and leave to God
the avenging."
This sentiment even outdoes the
celebrated credo of Jesus which sug-
gests the turning of the other cheek
when smitten. The entire concep-
tion of brotherly love, humility, and
forgiveness Is a rabbinic one. Con-
stantly one meets in Jewish writings
earnest exhortations against hatred,
greed, and false pride. Innumer-
able are the passages extolling the
virtues of love, truth, humility, and
patient suffering.
The democratic and charitable
conduct of Jesus towards publicans
and sinners has generally been
pointed out in contrast to the cold
legalism and self-righteous superi-
ority of the Scribes and Pharisees.
Yet rabbinic literature is replete
with the most tender love and kind-
ness towards sinners. There was R.
Ze'ira, who was not only forgiving
but. in order to reclaim robbers and
cut-throats, befriended them!
Not even the story of Jesus and
the repentant Magdalene can com-
pare with the strangely moving
story of Rabbi Abbahu and Pente-
kaka as narrated in Talmud Jer..
Ta'anith 1:2:
"During the time of a great
drought, people spoke of a man
whose prayer for rain was answered.
R. Abbahu asked him about himself
and this man. Pentekaka (Five
Pinsi. said:
"I am occupied with harlots, I
clean the theatre, I carry the ves-
sels to the bath. I amuse the bathers
with my jokes, and I play the flute.'
Thereupon R. Abbahu asked:
" 'Have you ever done a good
thing in your life?-
"To which Pentekaka answered:
" Once I was sweeping out the the-
atre and I saw a woman standing
between the pillars bitterly weeping.
I spoke to her and ascertained that
her husband was a prisoner. She
could purchase his freedom only by
sacrificing her chastity. So I sold
my bed and my pillow and all my
possessions, and I gave the money
to her. bidding her go ransom her
husband and not sell her honor to
strangers ..."
"How overwhelmed the saintly R.
Abbahu must have been on hearing
this explanation, we can ascertain
only by reading his reply to Pente-
kaka:
" 'Thou art the man fit to
for us in our hour of trouble!'
How utterly astounding is this
pronouncement of a higher morality
and a deeper religiosity than is gen-
erally current! The very idea that
a coarse voluptuary and sinner was
more fit to pray to God for Israel
than the saintly and spotless R.
Abbahu. merely because of the per-
formance of an ineffably beautiful
act of mercy, cannot anywheres
find a parallel in Jesus' teaching
and practice. It is apparent that
Christian as well as many Jewish
scholars have inveighed too readily
against Jewish legalism and heart-
less formalism while at the same
time extolling the humanitarianism
of Christian ethics. In fact, to all
honest students of Bible history and
comparative religion, it becomes
easily apparent that the entire eth-
ical fabric of Christianity has been
bodily transferred from the Old
Testament and rabbinic literature.
with only one difference that in
the process of transferring its en-
lightened simplicity and realistic
character. Jewish ethics have been
adulterated by the gospel and the
early Christian writers like Orlgen,
pray
Clement, Eusebius, Jerome, and
Augustine, with miracles and a mor-
bid love of suffering, which is un-
Jewish. This they probably bor-
rowed from Mithraism and other
oriental mystic cults.
An excellent example of this plag-
iarism we find in the earnest exhor-
tation in the Book of Sirach:
"Forgive thy neighbor the hurt
thai he hath done unto thee;
"So shall thy sins also be forgiven
when thou prayest."
Now let us compare these lines
with similar lines in the "Lord's
Prayer":
"Forgive us our sins as we forgive
those that trespass against us."
Philo. the great Jewish philoso-
pher, too. said the same thing:
"If you ask forgiveness for your
sins do you also forgive those that
trespass against you. For remission
.s granted for remission."
It becomes apparent, therefore,
that the much-despised Pharisaism
is the source Irom which not only
the gospels but all of Jesus' ethical
teachings sprang. As if to corrob-
orate this very point, we find that
moving passage in Midrash Le'-
Olam:
"Ever shall a man bestow lovlim
kindness even on one who does evil
unto him. He shall not be vengeful
lor bear a grudge. This is the way
jf Israel
For, Israel is good and forgiving
because so is God. Since man is
made in His image, there he mast
'Ululate Him. This is what the rab-
bis who preceded Jesus taught .
As to the ethical revolution which
it is claimed Jesus made in human-
izing religion and robbing it of its
:o!d formalism and inhuman legal-
ism. we oiier a "characteristic ex-
ample" from the Talmud to refute
his contention:
The story is told of Micah, the
idolatrous Jew. who offered sacri-
fices to teraphim. yet no divine pun-
\shment was meted out to him. The
ingels therefore came before God
and said:
"See. Lord, the smoke from Thy
altars mingles with that of the of-
ferings to Micah's idol."
And God said:
"Leave him in peace. His bread i.s
offered to poor travelers."
Similarly "formalistic" is the
beautiful story of Rabbi Ze-ira who
dedicated his life to the poor, the
outcasts and the sinners even as
Jesus is reputed to have done. When
the rabbi died, the sinners wept and
lamented:
"Hitherto the little rabbi witli
burnt feet prayed for us, but now
who is going to pray for us?" They
therefore repented .
Of penitents the Talmud says:
"The Just, the perfect, will not be
worthy of sitting with penitents in
the world to come ."
Do the gospels say as much?
Not only are the humanitarian
sentiments of brotherly love and
forgiveness .succinctly expressed in
the Torah and all rabbinic litera-
ture, but their expression is the very
essence of Judaism. They thus are
'! siuned to become both a guide
and an inspiration to a higher and
nobler existence of man on earth.
This is nowhere better exemplified
than in the evening prayer recite
by all pious Jews before retiring a'
night:
"Master of the world. I pardon
every sin and every wrong done to
my person, to my property, to my
honor and to all that I possess. Let
no one be punished on my account."
St. Petersburg
Notes
Don't force your advice upon peo-
ple wliose friendship you care for.
Many a man who can't writTS
made his dollar mark in the *
Mank Directs Show-
on January 25. Burton Mank.
well-known trouper and showman
will direct the Beth David minstrel
show at the Riverside school audi-
torium. Members of the Junior
committee of Beth David Sister-
hood will be starred in the perform-
ance, which is being given for the
benefit of the Talmud Torah fund
of the Sisterhood. A number of lo-
ServioM Friday night Congrega-
tion B'nai Israel, with A. S. Klein-
! feld. rabbi, begin at 8 o'clock, when
the rabbi will deliver a sermon on
1 "Judaism in Action." Saturday i
! vices at 9 a. in.: Sunday BChOOl 10
I a. m.: Hebrew school daily at 4 p. m
Miss Sarah Gelman. of 1025 Fif-
teenth avenue, south, has Just re-
turned home after a BUI months' va-
cation in the North.
Mrs. Lazaraus Lehrer of Ashe-
Ville, N. C, is a guest at the Horo-
witz hotel.
At the me tini of the Judaic
council, held January 9 at the Horo-
witz hotel. Mis. M. Rosenberg, who
was in charge ol the program foi
the evening, gave a very mte:
report on the life and work of Flor-
ence Nightingale. The next meeting
of the Judaic council will be at the
home of Miss Miriam Miller. 2741
Bayside drive, south. Monday evi
Ding, .January 16. at 8:15 p. m.
The Young Maerabeans met las:
Monday .veiling at the home ol
Fern Goldberg, Plans were made
for a vaudeville review to be given
at a later date. The hostess served
delicious refreshments, The next
meeting will be at the home of Tiby
Rothblatt, 4401 Fifth avenue, south.
Monday evening, January 16 at 7::i<;
p. m.
cai Jewish artists appear in the
cast which is being rehearsed night-
ly to insure a real professional per-
formance. A number of specialty
acts will be shown during the eve-
ning and an effort will be made to
give the maximum of entertainment
possible.
MOM THAN Mil INSURANCE
A Human Institution
Only 1 ive Insurance Companies as Strong as the Maccabw>
Over One Million Dollars in the Relief Fund
Homes for Aged Without Cost to Members
Writes .ill of the usual forms of Certificates on Men and Women
on a Legal Reserve Basis $1,000 to $100,000
All Certificates have Special Accidental Clauses and
Total and Permanent Disability Benefits
JUNIOR CERTIFICATES
Ordinary Life Twenty Year Endowmci
Twenty Payment I ite Educational Annuity
single Premium All Policies Participating
All Junior Certificates Pay 1 nil Benefits at Age Four
Special Training for Children in Music, Dancing and
Dramatic Art Free
A. M. COFFIN
State Manager
226 Seybold Building : Phone 3-2618
MERCANTILE BAMK
.J TRUST COMPANY
Tin WASHINGTON- AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
Condensed Statement. December 31, 1932
i Comptroller's Call I
Assets:
' i-li on Hand and in Banks........$197,975.67
U. S. Government Securities 146,788.32
Mate Bonds 57 149.21
Municipal Bonds ......... 6,400.00
Shon Term Bonds, Due 1933 and '34 38,809.2 5
short Term Bonds, Due 1 9 J 5 and '36 .. 33.090.00
I quipment Bonds 31,492.83
Railroad Bonds 56J3 5.00
Public Utility lioinis 3o!435.O0
Industrial Bonds 14^074.50
-------!------ $612,549.78
Loans Guaranteed by Liquidator .............................. 44,092.11
stock I nchange and Secured I oaiu Z.Z.............. 28,070.00
Loans and Discounts .............. ........ 103,583.93
Furniture and Fixtures io.000.oe
Other Assets ................ 19,467.2'
11 1 M ASS1 Ts ...............................................$817,763.0'
Liabilities:
' apital Stock .......................... $100,000.00
Surplus I und 50,000.00
Reserve lor Undivided Profits......................... 39,640.67
i- nited States Bond Account 2,300.00
DEPOSITS Z'Z'.".'Z "5,822.37
rA] LIABILITIES ..... .....................$817,763.04
PHILIP LIHHRMAN, President