The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00202

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewisti Meridian
Vol. 6. No. 1.
FLORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY
_______MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 6, 1933.
j Announcements!
CONGREGATION BETH JACOB
(Orthodox)
311 Waxhinston Avr., Miami It..,, h
L. AXELBOD, Rabbi
Regular Friday evening services
will begin at 5:30 with the late ser-
vices at 8:30, when Rabbi Axelrod
will preach on "The Challenge of
the Jew." Congregational chanting
and singing will be directed by Can-
tor Boris Schlachman. Saturday
morning the services begin at 8:30
and the rabbi will preach in Yid-
dish on "Vaylgash."
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI
, Reform
117 N. K. Ninrtrrnth Strrrl
DR. JACOB II. KAPLAN, Rabbi
Regular Friday evening services
begin at 8 o'clock tonight with the
rabbi preaching on "Together We
Stand." The usual musical program
by the choir will be heard and a so-
cial hour will follow the services.
The public is invited to attend.
Forum Speaker
Begins Series
DAVID SHOLTZ
Florida's New Governor
Joint Hadassah
Dance Wednesday lh:
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
(Conservative)
1.19 N. W. Third Avrnur
MAX SHAPIRO. Rabbi
Services will begin tonight at 5:30.
followed by the late services at 8:15
when Rabbi Shapiro will preach on
"The World's Fools." The usual
congregational singing and chanting
will be led by Cintor Louis Hay-
man, who will be assisted by the
choir. A social hour will follow.
MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION
lOrthorloa I
IMI S. W. Third Slrwl
JONAH E. CAPLAN. Rabbi
Regular Friday evening services
begin at 5:30 with the late services
at 8:30. when Rabbi Caplan will
preach on "Human Responsibility."
The regular chanting and congre-
gational singing will be enjoyed.
Following the services a social hour
will be held in the vestry rooms of
the synagogue with Mr. Joseph
Greenberg, well known Jewish art-
Joining forces for the success of
Its efforts, Junior and Senior Ha-
dassah are making certain that the
barn dance being held on January
11 at the Mahi Shrine temple will
be one of the most novel as well as
entertaining events of the season.
For those familiar with farm life, it
will brin? back memories dear to
them, and to the uninitiated it will
bring scenes that they have only
Financial slumps, panics and de-
pressions were outlined by Dr. Arth-
ur Frederick Sheldon, president em-
eritus of the Sheldon school, Chi-
cago, discussing "The Basic Enemies
of Human Progress, and Their Com-
ing Conquest," 'n Bayfront park
Wednesday. It was the first of a ser-
ies of 11 open forurn lectures sched-
uled for Wednesday nights under
the auspices of Temple Israel.
"A slump is temporary sleeping
sickness; a panic in an -economic
St. Vitus dance; but a depression is
creeping paralysis," Dr. Sheldon de-
clared.
"Physical science has located and
isolated many of the germs which
were the cause of physical diseases
practically eradicating such disas-
trous diseases as leprosy, yellow fev-
er and smallpox. Science must now
turn attention to the location of the
'bugs' or its psychological germs
hat cause economic diseases.
Among the greatest of these eco-
nomic diseases is ignorance of the
perfectly natural laws of human re-
lationships. The basic economic law
is service in sense of usefulness. The
opposite of this is selfishness which
is undue regard for the rights of
self and corresponding disregard of
the rights of others.
DOYLE CARLTON
Florida's Retiring Governor
Jewish Lawyer
Is Re-appointed
1st. presenting a number of popular bp seen and hean| during tne eve.
readings. |)jn? LeQ Ackerman wm be master
n! ceremonies, and Burton Mank
will direct the square dances.
Benjamin Axelroad, prominent
lewlob attorney of this city, whose
term as a member of the board of
trustees of the Jackson Memorial
hospital expired this week, was re-
Selfishness appointed by the city commission
takes many forms. For example, the for a full four-year term to succeed
World war which cost the world himself. With him was also reap-
more than two hundred billions of pol.ited G. A. Tiice, president of the
dollars and the end is not yet. It is Jersey Ice Cream company, and
!Vad f b"tn0t See"\ Farm _yar<". destined to tend to break the backs popular communal worker of this
of generations to be. Its motive was city
purely selfishness and greed, not Mr. Axelrod has been an active
service. worker in local Jewish affairs since
"Unethical competition is another his anival in Miami some years ago.
form of selfishness. Competition is |
the life of trade up to a certain
rangements for the senior group are pojnt beyond which it becomes the
Mrs. Alex Goldstein, chairman, as- death of profits to both employer
sisted by Mesdames J. Katz and B. and employe. Possibly the Brandeis
Kandle. Representing the junior suggestion of a certificate of neces-
group are Miss Sylvia Miles as sity- whereby one seeking to enter
chairman with Miss Lilian Melcher business must get a certincate show- --------
and Mrs. Goldie Elman assisting. ig that tne business is needed is one I A mass meeting of all Jews of the
The public is urged to attend as the of the answers. | 0reater Miami district interest*d in
proceeds will be devoted to Hadas- "Technology functioning in the Bnai Brith will be held at the Com-
sah work in Palestine. A number of creation of miracle making ma-
outstanding vaudeville artists will cmnes is one of the causes of the
barn, rural scenes will be the theme
of all decorations which will en-
hance the natural beauty of the
ballroom. Square dances and other
dances reminiscent of days gone by
will be featured. In charge of ar-
Bnai Brith Calls
Jews To Meeting
Standard Oil To
Tax Lamps
Benefit Dance To
Be Novel Event CemeteryMeeting
Final preparations have been AQOpt IVeSOlUtlOn
made for what promises to be one --------
of the most outstanding affairs of An important meeting regarding
the current season on Wednesday.' the cemetery situation was held last
January 25 at the Mahi Shrine tern- Tuesday night at Beth David Tal-
ple when the annual ball of the mud Torah. Mr. I. L. Mintzer. pres-
Ladies Auxiliary of the Miami Jew- I ident of the Greater Miami Jewish
ish Orthodox congregation will be : Cemetery association presided. A
held. Booths specially erected for full discussion regarding present
the affair will be filled with goodies j conditions took place. A resolution
of all kinds. Special decorations was unanimously adopted directing
will be placed throughout the beau- j a meeting of the adjustment com-
tlful ballroom of the temple. Noted mittee within one week; that no ac-
artists will be heard in a program \ tion be taken towards an adjust -
featuring both classical and vaude- ment without the approval of the
ville numbers. Dancing will begin I full committee; that a mass meet-
at 9 p." m. and last until the early ing of the community be held on
morning hours. The proceeds will January 17, at which time the com-
be used towards the Talmud Torah mittee shall have concluded finai
funds of the congregation, which is negotiations regarding the cemetery
taking care of a number of pupils or be discharged at this meeting. A and ethical. The trouble of the lamps, and tJlP tax on candles, such
unable to pay for their Hebrew re- general discussion of the problems world all down through the ages as those used on pHday ^
ligious instruction. Mrs. J. Louis affecting the cemetery was led by has been the leaving out of the
Shochet and Mrs. Louis Pallott are Stanley C. Myers and was partici- third element which is essential for Chanukah. will r> from one cent
in charge of the committee which is pated in by Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan permanent power. Temporary pow- to 10 cents, according to the size of
making arrangements for the affair, and Rabbi Max Shapiro. (Continued on Page Six) the box.
widespread unemployment. Some
say man has created a juggernaut,
a Frankenstein, a boomerang which
threatens to turn on society and
upon the civilization with destruc-
tion. One thing is certain. The ma-
chine must be made the slave of
man or man will become its slave.
Some way, somehow the problem of
mass consumption as well as mass
production must be solved; other-
wise, we are in for an explosion
which will rend civilization.
"Super credit is another form of
selfishness. In the words of Meyers,
credit is like morphine. In the
hands of an expert and in the pres-
ence of dire emergency morphine is
useful, but carried to excess both
credit and morphine are sure roads
to the gutter.
munity Centre of the Hebrew Ath-
letic club at S. W. Fifth street and
Sixteenth avenue, next Thursday
evening. January 12. At this meet-
ing a number of prominent speak-
ers will be heard and an attempt
will be made to reorganize Che local
branch. Nomination and election of
officers will be made and plans for
the work of this important body
will be discussed. The general pub-
lic even though not now affiliated
with Bnai Brith is urged to attend.
NEW YORK. N. Y. The Stand-
ard Oil Company of New York has
"Many causes have entered into decided to affix a special stamp tax
the world depression, but they could
all be bundled together and labeled
ignorance of natural laws and sel-
fishness.'
"There are three kinds of poten-
tial human energy: physical, mental
to all Jahrzeit lamps and wax can-
dles sold for religious purposes, the
proceeds to go to New York Yesh-
ivoth and Talmud Torahs. A two-
cent tax will be applied to Jahrzeit
Price Five Cents
After Six O'Clock
Lifting the Nocturnal Sable Cur-
tain that Separates Christian
from Jew.
By Rabbi Edgar F. Magnin
: : ? : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : ; > -,
In a consideration of better un-
derstanding between Jews and
Christians, it is well to point out
that the words anti-Semitism or
prejudice are too general to be ap-
plied to all forms of anti-Jewish
feeling or discrimination. It is also
essential to emphasize that the so-
cial question differs in many feat-
ures from the racial, economic and
religious aspects of the subject.
Let us analyze the social question
a little closer. The problem is one
of the paradoxes of American life.
Has it ever occurred to you that in
this country that emphasizes de-
mocracy and which is composed of
all racial and religious stocks or
their descendants why the social
problem should be more serious than
it is in Europe with all its tradi-
tional hatreds and prejudices? We
have been informed that in Russia
before the Revolution where Jews
were slaughtered like animals in a
stockyard or even in Germany
where scientific anti-Semitism ger-
minated in theory and was carried
out in practice, that the feeling
against the Jew socially speaking
was often less intense than it is in
this country. Here Jews mingle with
Christians frequently; they do bus-
iness together both in the relation-
ship of customer and merchant and
vice versa; they form partnerships;
they work together on campaigns
for civic, philanthropic and intellec-
tual betterment; their greetings in
the street are friendly and exceed-
ingly human, and yet they do not
mingle together socially. We are
not, of course, discussing exceptions
to the rule.
It is doubtful whether the Chris-
tian himself realizes in a corucious
and analytical way the implications
of his attitude toward the Jew; and
we are certain that the average Jew
has devoted very little thought to
the question at all.
The charge has often been made
that Jews are clannish. Jews are
clannish, but this statement requires
some explanation and further eluci-
dation. The truth is that all groups
are clannish. People feel more at
home among their own kind than
they do among the representatives
of other groups. That is why Jews.
Italians. French, Germans and oth-
er ethnic groups build up their own
neighborhoods, form their own
clubs and carry on their own social
affairs. Since the destruction of the
Ghetto. Jews have continued to
form new "Ghettos" of their own
volition in every large city of the
world.
Looking at the question from the
religious angle, it is necessary that
we be clannish and that applies to
all other religious groups as well. If
we mingle too intimately with oth-
ers, our young people will be tempt-
ed to intermarry and this will mean
the suicide of our people and the
destruction of our faith. Let us.
however, be.candid and admit that
we do choose to remain apart after
6 o'clock. There are many gentiles
who would be happy to welcome
Jewish people to their homes, but
snobbishness is a trait of human
nature and Jews are no exception
to the rule. The trouble is that, if
(Continued on Page Three)


Page Two
THE iFWISH FLORID'AN
Friday, January 6. 193'-
f
m I
The Chanukah program of Beth
Jacob congregation last Sunday
morning was witnessed by a large
crowd of tourists and residents, who
thoroughly enjoyed the efforts of
the children. The miniature service
was enthusiastically received, as was
the playlet, "The New Hope." The
entire affair was produced by the
teachers of the Sunday school, un-
der the direction of Rabbi Axelrod.
Miss Belle Siegel coached the angels
and the toy orchestra. Miss Marion
Levy coached the dances, and was
in charge of the costuming and
make-up. Miss Sylvia Levy took
charge of the boys in the playlet,
and Mrs. L. Axelrod directed the
girls' scenes in the sketch. Miss
Marion Blank acted as mistress of
ceremonies. The affair ended with
the singing of the Hatikvah, after
which Mrs. 3arney Weinkle, presi-
dent of the sisterhood, spoke to the
audience on the importance of the
Sunday school, and urged the par-
ents to assist the school in every
way possible.
The children taking part in the
play were: Sidney Besvinick. Shir-
ley Klein. June Rose Toursh. Esther
Levy, Jean Weinberg. Martha Ne-
ham. Gladys Marcus, Stanley Wein-
kle, Rose Blank. Seymon Rheim, Ir-
ving Goldstein, Jean Miller. Beat-
rice Dansky and Lillian Marcus.

Last Saturday Bernard Serkin.
the son of Mr. and Mrs. B. Serkin
of this city, was Bar Mitzva at the
Miami Jewish Orthodox congrega-
tion in the presence of a large num-
ber of friends. Bernard recited the
Haftorah and then made a brief ad-
dress in English, following which
Rabbi Caplan spoke on the duties
of a Bar Mitzva. Following the cer-
emonies the parents were hosts to
the worshippers at a Kiddush in the
vestry rooms of the synagog. Sun-
day night a Bar Mitzva dinner was
served at the home of the Serkins
to a large number of their relatives
and friends, a number of whom
came from Nashville, Tenn.

Cantor Nathan Wroobel is still a
patient at the University hospital at
Coral Gables following an auto ac-
cident last week.
*
Mr. and Mrs. Moe Harris of New
York and Miami entertained at a
New Year's eve party last Saturday
night at their hdmc. As the guests
entered the beautifully decorated
living room of the home they were
given party caps, noisemakers and
favors. Music was furnished during
the evening ajjd dancing was en-
joyed. Promptly at midnight a buf-
fet supper was served. Festivities
lasted until 4 a. m. Sunday morn-
ing. Among those present were
Rabbi and Mrs. Jonah E. Caplan.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Tannenbaum.
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Tannenbaum.
Mr. and Mrs. Max Kupferstein. Mr.
and Mrs. Charles Feldman. Mr. and
Mrs. Nathan Adelman. Mr. and Mrs.
J. Louis Shochet, Mr. and Mrs. Cal-
vin of Monticello, N. Y.. Mrs. S.
Grossman, Miss Alberta Tannen-
baum, Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weiner.
Miss Anna Myers and Mr. Brigadier
of New York City, Mrs. I. Buckstein,
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Futaerfass, and
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Seitlin.

The marriage of Miss Edythe R.
Mink and Norman S. Fregger took
place Sunday, December 25, at the
home of Rabbi Jacob H. Kaplan, in
the presence of the immediate fam-
ily.
The bride wore an attractive gown
of gray and powder blue, with ac-
cessories to match. She carried a
bouquet of bridal roses.
Mr. Fregger is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. J. Fregger of Omaha, and has
been attending school in Washing-
ton and at present is connected with
the prohibition unit of the govern-
ment. The bride is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. A. Mink.
Following the wedding dinner, the
The Woman's club of the Work-
resenting the Miami Jewish Ortho- The Wo ned a large
dox Talmud Torah played a team of mens "" New years
Beth David Talmud Torah last Fri- number
day morning at Ada Merritt field.
The Miami Jewish Orthodox Warn
won by a score of 18 to 5. On the
victorious team were Roy Mechlo-
witz. Jerry Rieger, Bernard Serkin,
Stanley Jamison. Gerald Shulan,
Harvey Levien. Oscar Rappaport.
Martin Greenberg, Mortimer Lasky
and Manuel Seitlin. Utility men
were Stanley Rieger. Manuel Ser-
kin, Jack Seitlin. Stanley Slier and
Seymour Silver.
An important meeting of the lad-
;, auxiliary of the Miami Jewish
ruiiuwuig mot h-m*b ....... .----- -------- -
ccuple left for Washington, where Orthodox congregation will be hem
the bridegroom will resume his
studies and the bride will enter
George Washington university.

Mr. and Mrs. Sol Schneider enter-
tained at a dinner party recently at
their home to honor Leonard Ban-
on the occasion of his birthday.
Bouganvillea and fern centered the
next Tuesday evening. January 10.
at the synagog when important bus-
iness will be transacted. All mem-
bers are urged to attend.

Plans are being made by Temple
Israel Sisterhood for a stepping out
party in charge of a committee
headed by Mrs. Herbert Seppler. full
table. In the receiving line with the details of which will be announced
hosts and Mr. Barr were Miss Belle shortly.
Schwartz and Miss Nettie Ornstein.
Special entertainment was given by
Miss Helen Rubel. Dancing was also
enjoyed.
Wr last "Sunday evening at its
hall 701 N. W. Fifth avenue. Du.
to, the evening Yiddish folk songs
, n enjoyed as were a number of
well-rendered songs given by Louis
Riegel. In charge of arrangements
was a committee headed by Mrs.
Henry Seitlin.

Mis Bertha Levy, owner and di-
rector of Camp Wohelo. entertained
Recipes for the
Jewish Family
TaygJech
eggs, four and
Mrs. Julius Damenstein and
daughter. Harriet, are in Charles-
ton. S. C. to attend the unveiling
of a monument to Mrs. Damen-
stein's father, the late Sol Bowman.

Dr. H. Lipkin of the Jewish Mem-
orial hospital. New York, with Mrs.
Lipkin and their daughter and son.
ire at the Park apartments for their
eighth w'.nter in Miami Beach.

Word of the death of Mrs. Re-
becca Barnett at Cleveland, O., on
December 24. has been received
here. Mrs. Barnett is survived by
Mrs. Ben Watts, formerly of Miami,
and Mrs. I. L. Seligman of Miami,
both, prominent communal workers
well known in Miami, her daughters.

The January meeting of the Tem-
ple Irael Sisterhood was held Tues-
day afternoon at Kaplan hall with
Mrs. I. Levin presiding. After the
business session was concluded a
program in charge of Mrs. Ted Si-
mon was presented. Mrs. Jessie Ad-
'.er, formerly assistant district attor-
. (if Cincinnati. O. spoke on the
work of her office. Mrs. Larry Fay
was heard in a number of vocal se-
Vctions which received much ap-
plause. She was accompanied at the
-.iano by Mrs. Frances Tarbeaux.
Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan, rabbi of Tem-
ple Israel, delivered a five-minute
iiional talk. Mrs. A. I. Magid
showed the beautiful Italian ban-
quet cloth and napkins presented to
*hc sisterhood by Major Kaufman
Mandel which will be awarded in a
most arranged by the sisterhood.
\ social hour followed the program
in charge of Mrs. Jack Bernstein,
chairman of the social hour. Mes-
dames Jack Bernstein, Harry Nev-
ins and Bert Relsner assisted.

One of the regular series of card
parties was held last Tuesday night
it the vestry rooms of the Miami
Jewish Orthodox congregation by its
ladies auxiliary. More than 10 tab-
les of bridge were in play with Mrs.
Jonah E. Caplan and Mrs. William
Clein as the hostesses. The door
prize was won by Mrs. R. Beck. In-
dividual prizes were awarded at
each table. During the evening de-
licious refreshments were served.

Instead of its regular meeting
Temple Israel Sisterhood will cele-
brate the ninth anniversary of its
organization on February 6, with a
bridge luncheon at Kaplan hall.
Full details of this affair will appear
in an early issue.

Playing the first of a series of
inter-school contests, the team rep-
Mrs. Louis Pallott is now conval-
escing at her home after having un-
dergone an operation at the Victor-
ia hospital.
The regular board meeting ol
Beth David Sisterhood was held last
Wednesday noon when a delicious
luncheon was served.
Charles Markowitz and Louis Hay-
man were the hostesses. The regu-
lar business meeting followed the
luncheon. Mrs. Sydney L. Wcin-
traub reported that a tidy sum had
been realized from the food sale
held recently. A series of card par-
ties will be sponsored by the sister-
hood, the beginning of which will
be announced in an early issue.

Beth David Sisterhood will hold
its regular meeting on Wcdi <
January 18. at its Talmud Torah
nail beginning at 2 p. m., when im-
portant business will be transacted.
A special meeting of the executive
board of the ladies auxiliary of the
Jewish Welfare bureau was held last
Wednesday at the call of its presi-
dent, Mrs. I. Levin. In presenting
her resignation as president of the
organization Mrs. Levin stressed the
i fact that the office was one that re-
quired and deserved the undivided
attention of its president. That be-
cause of her office as president ol
Trlnple Israel Sisterhood and Other
duties she was unable to devote the
time necessary, and therefore sub-
mitted her resignation which will
be acted on at the next meeting of
the auxiliary on January Hi at Kap-
lan hall. Representatives of the or-
ganization to the Jewish Welfare
bureau consisting of Mesdames Her-
bert E. Kleiman. Harry Kevins,
Bertha B. Levy. A. I. Magid and J.
Simpson were chosen as a commit-
tee to recommend officers to till the
vacancies.

The Bible class and Hebrew study
moup of Beth David meets regularly
every Tuesday evening beginning at
7:30. All interested in this are urg-
ed to attend.

The boys of the Talmud Torah of
the Miami Jewish Orthodox congre-
gation were given a talk on "Sports-
manship" by Max Rosenfeld, out-
fielder of the Brooklyn Nationals,
last Wednesday morning. Following
the address he answered questions
regarding baseball.
Eight eggs, four and one half
cups flour, two teaspoor.fuls baking
powder, one pound honey, three-
fourths cup sugar, one teaspoonful
ginger, one-half cup walnut meats,
rector oi uamp M[N (., ,_ llim,. an(j baking pow-
a number of her counsellors and ^ Ulorougnly and knead well. The
campers of Atlanta. Ga^,and_";" dougn should be soft, but just stiff
enough to roll Roll by bits into
long rope formation, each rope to
be betwe-n three-eights and one-
hall inch in diameter. Use very lit-
tle flour in rolling. Then slice ropes
to make one-half inch cubes.
Light oven. While oven is heating,
bring to a boil one pound of honey,
one teaspoon ginger, and one cup of
sugar in a shallow, broad-bottomed
bowl. Put into this mixture the par-
ticles of dough. Then place in med-
ium oven. Do not open oven for
first 15 or 20 minutes. By this time
the honey will have coated each bit
of dough. Now stir every 10 minutes
to separate the particles, which
must not cling to each other. Allow
one hour in all for baking. Particles
should bv brown and when one Is
put into cold water it should remain
firm and crisp.
Wet a board with cold water and
pour contents of pan onto it. With
wet hands, mold in form of a cake
(two inches high' Sprinkle with
one-half cup of walnut meats and
let cool. Then cut in two-inch
strips. Cut each strip diagonally at
two-inch intervals.
Recipe makes 40 diamond-shaped
pieces that will keep indefinitely.
.1 1|'H------ -" -
,. Fla.. at the Roney Plaza pools
last Friday. Present were the Miss-
es Evelyn, Rita and Betty Abelman
of Atlanta, Ga and Kitty and Dor-
othy Morris. Shirley and Isable Levy
of Miami, Mesdames Sadye Sachs.
Lill Morris and Abraham.

To honor the memory of the late
Dr. A. D. Halpern. the Workmen's
circle is sponsoring a memorial
meeting at the Workmen's circle
hall. 701 N. W. Fifth avenue this
coming Sunday evening. January 8.
when a number of prominent speak-
ers will address the meeting. The
public is urged to attend.
Sponsoring a Jewish concert at
Beth David auditorium, the Wom-
an's club of the Workmen's circle
will hold a benefit concert, the pro-
ceeds to be devoted to the tool cam-
1 UCI11IUUO _
Mesdames Paign ot tne Jews of eastern Eur"
ope, on Wednesday evening. Janu-
ary 11. Among the artists who will
appear are Al Harris. Maxim Bro-
ciyn. artist formerly with the Chi-
cago Opera company, and the noted
pianist. Zella Zaltin. These artists
are on a tour of the country in the
Interests of the tool campaign.
The Ami Well club, a group of
-uis ranging in age from 12 to 15.
will hold a kiddie patty at the home
of Miss Kitty Morris. Saturday.
January 7. when plans call for var-
ious names to be played and re-
in shments to be served. Girls with-
in the ages prescribed may become
members upon applying to any
member of the club. Meetings are
held every Thursday evening at the
homes ol the different members.
Mrs. Sam Tannenbaum is sponsor
[or tin group.

A regular meeting oi the Books in
Brief club will be held Monday eve-
ning, January 9, at the home of
Mrs. I. L. Reisman. 2001 S. W. Sixth
Street, when Mis. George Goldberg
Will review "Contessions ol St Allg-
ustlne." A social hour will lollow
the discussion.
*
Mi. and Mrs. Albert Mendelsohn
ol New York announce the engage-
ment of their daughter. Florence, to
Morton Roth, son of Mrs. O. Roth
of Cincinnati. Miss Mendelsohn,
who has been in Cincinnati for the
last three weeks, is expect eel to join
her parents at their winter home.
227 Thirteenth strict. Miami Beach,
shortly.
Fish Ramekins
Two cups cold, cooked, flaked fish:
one-fourth cup chopped nut meats,
one-fourth cup grated cheese, one-
half cup buttered crumbs, two table-
spoons flour, one-fourth teaspoon
salt, one cup milk.
Melt butter, blend in flour and
salt and add milk gradually. Cook
until thick in a double boiler. Add
cooked fish and reheat. Place layers
of fish. salt, pepper, nut meats,
cheese and crumbs in greased rame-
kin dishes and bake 20 minutes in a
moderate oven. 325 degrees Fahren-
heit. Garnish with slices of pimento
(illM'S.
Bunt Km hen
Two eggs, two cups sugar, two
and one-half tablespoons melted
butter, one teaspoon vanilla, one
cup milk, three cups flour, two tea-
spoons baking powder, one-fourth
cup small raisins.
Beat eggs, sugar and butter for
10 minutes. Add milk, flour, baking
powder, vanilla and raisins. Bake
one hour.
in-
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\ry 6, 1933.
TF WISH' *************+*"-.....
T D T A N After Six o'clock
Contlnul f,0^pw 0m]
Jews caonot go with gentiles they
Prefer to go with, they remain
among their own. As a matter of
fact. Jews make lines of social dem-
arcation among their own. which is
also natural.
The only objection to this system
of making social distinctions is
when people are snobbish in their
attitude, unkind, intolerant and per-
i------THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
gO EVERY FR.UAY
by the
TI I PUBLISHING CO.
Fifteenth Avenue
[SIIOCHET, Editor
[O. Hip. 297S
Phone 2-1183
biiil fluHH matter July 4,
Office At Mi;.mi. Florida
March S. 1S79.
BEACH OFFICE
Eighth Street
ebnirk. Representative
ItSI KlITKlS
Sl.M
1141
1AMMil 6, 1933
6, No. 1.
nd the
fmpus
L>N A. FRIEDMAN
I is everybody happy?
| Is the day after the
Such things do come,
^ression certainly did
enty. The proverbial
fin sight. It's off with
Dn with the new for a
iltter 1933.
brld in general no re-
felt on the departure
that dismal year. And
ode can bring nothing
Substantiating this
bn.niend you all to see
J'The Conquerors." This
Jias been in crises be-
ach time come out of
achievement and suc-
| repeats itself. It is
that open up new
ly and striving. Ne-
[mother of invention.
j of old would have
"given an opportunity
Gild an empire greater
fefore known to mankind,
years with a smile on
song in your heaETA
song on your lips, and
' heart. Life Ls sweet and
still before you. Make
krour opportunities. Re-
jmay be down, but nev-
Je there is life there is
there is hope there is
fhere there is ambition
fgy and pep. One can-
fail with all these as-
Ito school for us all now
elude, hoping that pros-
kto you and yours. But
^ matter how and when
tier it is hard or easy.
chin and come back
a great life if you
[mi if at first you don't
again.
er day, I am your fond
St.
ation with them or noon-day lunch-
eon clubs is partially an expression
of one's desire for superiority.
After 6 o'clock Mrs. Jones is the
ruler. As Count Keyserling in his
recent book. America Set Free."
puts it, Mr. Jones is little better
than a harem slave. He works all
day long cooped up in an office or
factory while his wife wears spec-
tacles and reads books on how to
rear children even though she has
none, or if she is blessed with these
permits somebody else to nurse
them while she reads the books. Mr.
Jones during this period is striving
Page Three
THE
B cuiom
CHAiE!
The devil is fear. I've been happy
and fortunate in not being afraid.
I've always done what I wanted to
do when I wanted to do it.
A vast majority of people are re-
strained in their attempts to achieve
content and happiness by the fear
mit their sense of""wrjeriorttv^to toZZTw^JZZ? is strlvin* that somebody will express disap-
arriSt-Sr j^~ "2 sirtheir and their
the ::;r ht:i:z: zz s, 22 -r rar- ** ^ say is *--
tude that the gentile maintains t' Zl n T ^" WhM* H **"*"* L* W I 'earned
ward the Jew after b^sinels h!,,r," j! &j 'ar8e'y f gUZZl'ng that dldn,t matter ln the least.
. down food and playing bridge until And I have that to remember
He would force the Jew to be clan-
nish even if he did not choose to be.
He believes that he is better social-
ly. Just exactly what merit consists
one's eyes are as heavy as lead. Mrs.
Jones' friends are his friends.
An eastern educator, anticipating
Levy may be a good fellow and the return of liquor, urges general
of from the social m J?e,S, m'ght P0SSibly t0lerate educa"on in the art of drinking. I
something thaT cannot IT'Z < Ton "T^. ^ "l "* *" don't taow about "** but i-
denned in definite tenS; u I <" m'X' that'S ^ 'S a pened in at a cockta" P"** the oth-
chological an^ extr mSy sub e K5 h V T*' 2" "* "^ Where We a" did what
The average g^wTadmit' iT^J^T^ZX _^our home work.
brats and'charLL'r TiJV t "T.k'" *" ^ "* him aga'n "Ast~V Cognizes Women."
belief .hi. I t thC "eXt mrning' In tnis wa* -headline. I, too. always tell them
ntlwitn him no? "2 1 tUSi" ,the JeW 'S CmPe"ed l "Ve a SOrt that their W a-e like sta s
ness witn him, nor would he form of dual life
partnerships with him. But he be- No self-respecting Jew can object
Ueves that there is a certain indefin- to this too strongly. It is true one
able something that elevates him does not like to be snubbed, regard-
above the tribes of Israel. This may ed as an inferior; but, since he finds
of course have been occasioned or- ; more pleasure among his own peo-
rinally by religious prejudices, i pie and is more at home with them,
Don't neglect to keep your shoes
polished. You can shine at one end
if you can't at the other.
Had Diogenes visited this country
while on his famous still hunt some
get-rich-quick promoter would have
wiped his lantern.
There is not much new on smash-
ing the atom, except that a bandit
chieftain, wanted by Tokio' troops
in Manchukuo, is described as four
feet, 10 inches tall.
If French pastry ever shows up
on the card as "liberty cream puffs"
we'll know the situation is beyond
repair.
There can be little doubt about that.
At one time the Crucifixion Story
meant far more than it does today.
what difference does it make after
ail? As long as they allow us to
earn an honest occupation, to vote.
but even though we are not living I to worship our God as we choose
in a theological age and the average | and to live in accordance with our
American is not a particularly good I conscience, the Jew need not corn-
church member, these feelings of
hostility persist. They have become
part of the subconscious fabric of
the Christian mind.
plain too loudly about social dis
criminations. We read recently that
a distinguished pastor in New York
did complain about it and we heart-
There is still another reason, far ily approve the stand he took. He
more important, that makes for this exemplified the courage and truly
distinction between Jews and Chris- j beautiful religious spirit that is very
fatch For
ie Inside
.93
ns of
iatni
*
if
Torahs...
ting Soon
tions after six chimes. In America
there is no aristocracy; or what w
call aristocracy is something new.
In Europe aristocracy Ls an estab-
lished thing resulting from many
years of wealth, culture, or by rea-
son of noble lineage. The aristocrat
is always sure of himself. He may
mingle with anyone he chooses and
still remain an aristocrat. He is
quick to sense cultural attainments
and is always eager for delightful
society.
American aristocracy is based
chiefly on the almighty dollar and
is new. Every American who start-
ed in a factory as a laborer and rose
from one position to the other until
he became owner of another factory
envies in his heart of hearts the
kings and queens of Europe. Dem-
ocratic in a sense that he would af-
ford the right to success to anybody
who deserves it. he is still very un-
democratic in his entire outlook and
subconsciously he possesses an in-
feriority complex. That Ls the rea-
son why most Americans join lodges
and fraternities. They carry around
a pocketbook full of receipts. They
love such titles as potentate, grand
exalted ruler, grand master. Be-
witched by regalia, dim lights and
"mysteries." they are like school
boys. They also feel that by joining
an organization they are better
than the man that does not happen
to belong. They forget that the req-
uisite for affiliation is chiefly the
ability to pay dues and that under
the gorgeous robes and trappings of
the officers of these various frater-
nities one often discovers a plumber
or a barber.
This is no indictment against fra-
ternities. We believe in them; they
fill a definite need in community
life and have achieved a great deal
of good and perhaps it is to their
credit that one of humble occupa-
tion may receive honors within the
fraternity that he could not receive
anywhere else. But this still does
not contiovert the point that affill-
rare even in this day and age. But
the plea for the abolition of social
discrimination on the basis of mor-
ality and idealism should always
come from the Christian and not
from the Jew.
Women
(After the Mid rash)
By P. M. RASKIN
When Jehovah first created
Mount and vale and field and
wood.
He looked around with satisfaction,
And pronounced it "Good."
Every prey-beast in the forest.
Every songbird in the air,
Fish and reptile, tree and flower
"Good" did He declare.
When at last He made the woman,
Bright as sunshine, fair as day,
He regarded her in silence
"Good" he did not say.
Just in silent admiration
He looked on for one short while.
And all the seven heavens kindled
With the Artist's smile.
"I have finished all creation
Bird and beast, and man and elf.
All are good; but this woman
I surpassed Myself.
"Tree and flower, vale and moun-
tain.
Nothing, nothing that I made
Is endowed with grace and beauty
That can never fade.
"But thus woman's grace surpasses
Earth below or skies above.
She will animate creation.
Fill the worlds with love.
"She. the source of life and b- '.
Will her grace to life impart,*'?//^
And with pride looked down thi
Master
On His work of art. .
As to holiday presents, blest isn't
the tie that binds.
An ex-Follies girl entering this
country from Canada the other day
was detained at the border for ques-
tioning by the immigration author-
ities. You remember how Prof- Ein-
stein was asked whether he held
any ideas regarding pacifism, an-
archy, etc., and was put to a good
deal of annoyance. Well, this girl's
examination was much briefer than
the professor's.
"Do you hold any ideas .?" the
examiner began.
"No," he said at once, and with
transparent honesty.
So she was promptly admitted, as
not being un-American or danger-
ous to our form of government.
New London coast guards found a
cargo of whisky under a load of fish,
which may explain an aroma that
some had ascribed to inferior creo-
sote.
Japan is to be confronted again
shortly with the task of balancing
a budget, which is becoming more
and more unlike a paper umbrella.
No one will have any money in
heaven, a California evangelist de-
clares. "Certainly not," comments
Cicero. "I will nave no money in
heaven, because others will have
taken and kept it. And those who
have taken and kept it will not be
in heaven. I hope."
I can't feel sorry for a man who's
sorry for himself!
A war was never won by tears, but
faith and bravery
Made every soldier swing along to
martial music and to song.
And every heart was lifted with
the thought of victory.
I can't feel sorry for a man who's
sorry for himself!
The odds may be against him, but
he'll never win with griev-
ing.
There ls an end to every road, a
lightening of trouble's load.
And better times are coming to
the man who keeps believ-
ing.
I can't feel sorry for a man who's
sorry'for himself!
With music and gay laughter we
will fight the deadly foe;
For Poverty's an enemy that can be
slain by you and me.
If Courage. Faith and Fortitude
march with us as we go.
By refusing a further hearing to
organized drys the senate judiciary
committee has paved the way to
another count of elbows, shortly, on
beer.
A POEM TO AN EMPTY Pl'RSF.
Oh, thou, my one time friend.
Thou art so flat.
With sides that inward bend.
Which once were fat!
Oh, thou, my empty one,
I need a hat.
And all I get's a dun
Now think on that!
Oh. center of my hope.
Give me some cash.
I need a cake of soap;
I need some hash.
Oh. thou, my poor, thin purse,
Don't be so flat.
Go find thyself a nurse.
And get thee fat!
Love is one of the diseases for
which the onion is a sure cure.
Don't save a!l your smiles for the
parlor. Use a few in the kitchen.
Some candidates get there with
both feet and others put both feet
in it.
Some people put their best foot
forward so far that the other one
never catches up.
A young curate was a great suc-
cess, and all the spinsters worship-
ped him. ThLs was pleasant at first,
but as time went on he found the
position trying and left the parish.
When asked why he gave up the
curacy he said because so many
girls were on his track. "You need
not have feared that; there is safety
in numbers, you know." "Perhaps,"
said the curate, learned in the books
of the Old Testament, "but I do
know there is safety in Exodus, and
that is why I made mine from the
parish."
Marian: "I maintain that love-
making is Just the same as it always
was."
Her sweetheart: "How do you
know?"
Marian: "I Just read about a
Greek maiden who sat and listened
to a lyre all the evening."
There was a burst of applause, as
the pianist finished his last solo. He
bowed and, after thanking his audi-
ence, was about to leave when a
man approached and presented a
check. This the pianist refused,
saying he would prefer it to be used
for some charitable purpose.
"In that case." said the donor. "I
suppose you wouldn't mind if we
added it to our special fund?"
"Not at all," said the pianist.
"What is the special fund for?"
"To enable us to have better en-
tertainments next year."
A
. I



/
Page Four
THE iPWISH FLORID'AN
*??? ?????????????????? ???????#?*)??+?????#'?????$
EaiMn ^yttagng lBitlUtut |
a
Edited by RABBI S. M. MACHTEI
Founder ind Dlr*otor, Radio Bynagog of America
Sunday Mornings WIOD, Miami, Florida
Vol. 1 MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 8, 1933. No. 4
itttttttt Pharaoh's Dream
Sermon Delivered January 1. 1933
Scripture Heading, Genesis, Chapter XII, Verses 1-7, inch
A Jew about 60 years old, sitting alongside of me in the synagogue one
day last week, began a discussion on the age of Joseph when Jacob
again saw him alter the absence during which Joseph had attained to
great fame and glory. This old Jew. in computing the Intervening years,
from memory, did not know how long Joseph had been in prison, nor did
he know how long the famine lasted in Egypt. He reckoned seven years
of plenty and seven years of famine. When I told him that Joseph had
spent 12 years in prison he was minded to believe me, but. when I said
that there were but two yean ol famine, alter the seven years of plenty
God having ended the famine ft>r the sake of Jacob when he settled in
the province of Goshen in the land of Egypt this elderly Jew looked
askance at me, and, but for the fact that he knew me to be a rabbi, he
might have branded me an ignoramus. The lack of an adequately trained
Jewish manhood is fell by those of us who are familiar with the needs "I
our people. Among the Ooylm, the other nations, ignorance of such mat-
ters that are Intimately bound up with Torah. is pardonable. As I have
said on previous occasions, they have only the translated scriptures and
some editions used by non-Jews are poorly translated. The scripture
reading for today is an example of a misleading and false translation in
the copy of the Christian Bible which I have at home. This volume con-
tains both the Old Testament and the New Testament. Verse 7 of chapter
41 in Genesis, in this Christian Bible reads. "And the seven thin ears de-
voured the seven rank and full ears. And Pharaoh awoke, and, behold, it
was a dream." In the original Hebrew no reference is made to any num-
eral 7 preceding the words "thin ears," nor is there any such translation
erroneously using the number seven In the Jewish Publication Society
translated Bible which I use at the studio and from which I read the
scriptures this morning. The Christian translators have furnished the
word seven believing that they enlighten the student or reader. In-
stead it is confusing, misleading and false. When the cows and the ears
of corn appeared in Pharaoh's dream, their number is given as seven in
each case, but. when the devouring takes place, when the lean consume
the fat. the number seven is used only in connection with the fat ones.
The lean cows and the empty ears of corn are referred to only by the
plurals of the Hebrew words for cow and ear. The minimum plural is
two two cows and two ears of corn. Scriptures did not record an error
and an oversight by failing to mention the exact number of lean ones that
consumed the fat ones. The Holy Torah revealed the true prophecy and
its interpretation.
AS interpreted by Joseph, the seven fat cows and the seven full ears
raoh that may be applied to our life today. We have been visited by
seven empty ears were symbolic of seven years of famine. As originally
intended there were to have been seven years of each, but, with the ar-
rival of Jacob, the sages tell us, the famine came to an end after the sec-
ond year. Thus, to have said that the seven lean swallowed the seven fat
would have been untrue. Therefore the plural forms are used in both
cases to denote the smallest possible plural two. Because the full meas-
ure of the prophecied plenty was visited on Egypt their number is given
as seven. A more profound discussion of this subject, must preclude a
knowledge of Hebrew by the listeners. It is out of place here.
HOWEVER, there Is much else that we learn from the dream of Pha-
roah that may be applied to our life today. We have been visited by
years of plenty. These have been followed by years of famine. Unfortun-
ately, we had no national Joseph. No one foresaw the years of need for
the entire nation. If any did foresee it no provision for common protec-
tion was made. No reserve was gathered. The people have suffered. A
minority, during these years of famine, may have been living on goods
stored during the years of plenty. The question now is, "How much
longer? When will this end?" We have had some calamity-Josephs insist
that our generation will not see the end. According to them, the years of
famine must equal, in number, the years of plenty. Scripture disproves
any such theory. God has been known to shorten evil decrees. It may be
for the sake of a Joseph or a Jacob; it may be for the sake of some hith-
erto unknown person who has found favor in the eyes of God. It may
come through someone inspired to lead us out of o*ur doubts and fears
into a state of faith and a sense of security. One thing is certain there
is some divine plan in all this. When it shall have been, realized, when
the purpose behind all this will have been accomplished, then, and then
only, will we return to a state of progress, within the meaning of that
word to us mortals. Joseph's opportunity came after years of slavery and
imprisonment. He rose from bondage to the premiership of Egypt and
brought salvation to the people. We, in this land, and in the other lands
where suffering is the common lot, may be, even now, training some lead-
er who will bring us the salvation we so greatly need. That leader will
not be one who relies on himself, on his wisdom and his integrity. That
leader will realize what Joseph did whin lie said to Pharaoh, "It is not
in me; God shall give Pharaoh an answer of peace."
Ask and Ye Shall
Learn"
Q. Is it true that the expression
-Father in Heaven" as a synonym
for God, as used in the Lords Pray-
er, originated with Jesus of Nazar-
eth? Is it possible that the phrase
and tlH' meaning usually attributed
to it were unknown to the Jews be-
fore?
Heaven," the opening sentence oi
the Lord's Prayer, is distinctly Jew-
ish and has Its parallels in Jewish
liturgy. In the Mislmah (Sotah,
chapter IX end) Rabbi Elic/cr ben
Horkenos, a Tanna of the first cen-
tury, exclaims "Who is there on
whom to lean, except our PMhei
who is in Heaven?" The lei in Fath-
er in Heaven as applied to God
semis to be much older than Jesus.
While one cannot point with any
amount ol certainty as to when and
how it came into use. it was without
a doubt part ol the common stock
phrases expressive of Jewish relig-
ious ideas. The God idea which the
phrase conveys is contained In the
Hebrew Bible.
"Look down from heaven, and see ...
For Thou art our Father .
Thou, O Lord, art our Father,
Our Redeemer, from everlasting is
Thy name."
(Isaiah, chapter 63. verses 15-16i
And the Prophet Malachi '2. 10)
emphasizes the idea ol the Father-
hood of God when he exclaims:
"Have we not all one father?
Has not one God created us?
Why do we deal treacherously every
man against his brother?
ate, that "fifty thousand French-
men awoke this morning slaves. I
is for you. gentlemen, to decree that
tonight they shall go to bed free
men This appeal carried the Na-
tional assembly, and the yoke ol
serfdom was removed from the Jews
of France.
Throughout the wild hurly-burly
days of the French Revolution
which often offered hostile manifes-
tations to the Catholic Church, Ab-
be Gregoire maintained his sense of
individual judgment. He belonged
to those clerics known as "Galil-
eans" who, While In no way wishing
to alter Catholicism theologically,
were determined that the catholic
Church ol France should be Inde-
pendent ol the Interference ol the
Vatican. His beliel In the meat
principles ol the French Revolution
he likewise maintained unshakable.
Honesty and courage marked his
Character and made him the cham-
pion ot the oppressed, the friend of
the weak and thus also the brave
protagonist ol the Jews. When be
died in 1831. despite opposition ol
church and civil authorities, his fu-
neral was honored by a magnificent
display Ol public esteem and respect.
Friday, January 6. i93,
unto others as you would have oth
ers do unto you" Is an admirable
plank on which all men ought to 1
able to unite. A fine discussion ot
the Golden Rule is contained h
Gerald Friedlanders "The Jewish
Sources of the Sermon on Z
Mount," London, 1911.
Radio Synagog
Rabbi S. M. Machtci, founder and
director of the Radio Synagog, m
preach over WIOD at 10 o'clock on
Sunday morning on "Josephs Revp.
lation." In addition to the unaa
there will be players, hymns, Ob,
tine reading and a question box.
TIVOLli
. 11.., i..
Matinee 20,
it nth -
2 l II
'hone 2-JJS! j
Evening J>
q. Would not you please tell in
brief of the life of Abbe Gregoire
and of his services to the Jewish
people?
A. Abbe Henri Gregoire. Jesuit.
Revolutionary and friend of the
Jews, was of humble origin, the son
of peasant parents. He was bom
near Luneville in 1750. and although
he was educated in Jesuit schools.
he fell under the influence of the
great humanitarian movement of
his day. In 1788 he wrote an essay
on the Physical and Moral Regen
eration of the Jews, and from that
onward his name became identified
with those who rank as the most
doughty champions of J e w i s h
emancipation in Europe. In Octo-
ber, 1789. Abbe Gregoire introduced
before the National assembly m
France his famous law for the
emancipation of the Jews. In de-
fense of his motion he declared, in
the course of the parliamentary de-
Q, What is the so-r.iiled Golden
Rule?
A. The t,olden Rule is the des-
ignation ot a fundamental moral
teaching "I Jesus of Nazareth re-
ported m the New Testament Mat-
thew 7. 12): "All things therefore
whatsoever ye would that men
should do unto you, even so do ye
also unto them." Elsewhere in the
New Testament 'Jan-.-:. 2.8) this
precept is described as "the royal
law." The Golden Rule as quoted
lure Is a definite assertion of the
essentially Jewish view as expressed
in rabbinical writings, that "meas-
ure for measure" should be norm
regulating any one man's expecta-
tion from others i rightsi, while
more than measure should be the
rule indicating one's services to oth-
ers (duties). Hlllel Is credited with
the authorship of the Golden Rule
in its negative form. The Talmud
i Sabbath 31> narrates that a
heathen once came to Hillel and
asked for admission into the Jewish
fold on condition that he be taught
the principles ol Judaism while
standing on one foot. Hillel said to
him. "What is hateful to yourself,
do to no other: that is the whole
law. and the nst Is commentary.
Go and learn." It has been sug-
gested, by the Rev. Dr. G. George
Fox 'in Jus very line study ol Juda-
ism. Christianity and the Modern
Social Ideas. Fort Worth, 1919), that
the Golden Rule of Hillel and that
(il Jesus really supplement one an-
other. Neither is really complete
without the other. "What is hateful
to yourself, do to no other, but do
Sunday and Men lay. Jan. n and _!
David Manners Ann Dvorak I
J "CROONER" j
! "Kittle Hungary"!
Home Cooking
Business Men's Lunches 25c
?
Steak and Chiikeu Dinners 54c?
i Dallti i';i a
KEVA SCHWARTZ, Prop. +
v : : : > *** : : -: < : : : : ** -hii
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rE stand, today, on the threshold of a new calendar year. What
Father Time may bring to each ol us and to all of us during this
coming twelvemonth Is not known to us. We do not believe that he will
scatter his wares promiscuously. We must believe that all his bundles are
addressed to certain individuals. They will receive these parcels. Let each
one of us accept his gilt with the faith that it is for the best. Should it
contain something distasteful, let us realize that we are not qualified to
judge true values. The bitter pill coats a healing drug. Our taste of it is
no fair appraisal of its value. Just as the laws of Egypt, enacted by Jos-
eph as emergency measures, brought relief to many and saved the land,
so, also, will the effect of the emergency changes in our personal conduct
and in the affairs ol the government result in lasting good. Be not fright-
ened by Pharaoh's dream. The dream foretold seven years of famine.
Actually there were but two. Genesis, chapter XLVII, verse 18, speaks of
only a first and second year of famine. No reference is made to a com-
pletion of the seven years. So, also, will our present emergency draw to
an unexpected and surprisingly early close during this year, which begins
today. Welcome to 1933. May it offer the interpretation and solution to
our dream.
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Friday. January 6, 193 3.
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Page Five
"Sweet Waters of Megiddo"
Lag Bo'omer Scenes in Palestine
By RABBI LAZARUS AXELROD
Not here the glamor and mystic-
llsm of the East. Not here the zeal.
I the ardor, the burning desire for a
divine revelation. The rose of ro-
Imance has ceased to wield Its sway
lover the prosaic West. Science has
I no use for sentimental reminiscences
I of our past, for petty observances of
Ln era which is gone, and which
lean be but on obstacle ln tne Patn
|of advancement. The mind domi-
| nates our destiny. The heart plays
| second fiddle, while the soul slum-
|bers peacefully in blissful ignorance
|o( its whereabouts. The scientific
I West has triumphed over the ro-
Imantic East. In the still waters of
| blue lagoons shimmering in the sun-
| shine, sombre shadows of gigantic
| seaplanes cast a blot over the rip-
Ipling reflections of swaying palms
I and verdant cypresses. Birds of par-
ladise. languidly preening their iri-
Idescent plumage, are startled by the
I roar of high-powered engines cut-
ting through psace at the rate of
hour miles per minute. Probably the
| high priest, ministering in the tem-
I pje of Buddha, is mildly surprised
| to hear the snappy strains of Eddie
| Cantor's appealing love songs, or
the dreamy stanzas of Moonlight
I on the Colorado, through the court-
I psy of a mischievous Chinaman who
I has placed his radiola in a secluded
I corner of the temple.
East is East, and West s West.
I but there will always be a demand
I in the West for a breath, a waft of
I that easterntsm which tends to ex-
I alt the spirit, to accelerate the lm-
I agination, and to lift us ever so
I slightly above ourselves. As I sit at
LECTURER WHO OPENED
FORUM SERIES HERE
my typewriter in a room overlook-
ing the seething waters of the At-
lantic. I close my eyes, and be-
hold, a continuous and recurring ar-
ray of scenes, enacted In the spring
of 1929, sends my memory back to
Palestine, to Mt. Carmel, Miron, to
! the sweet waters of Megiddo .
We left Mt. Carmel on the thirty-
second day of Omer, that period of
Sephira between Passover and Pent-
ecost, en route for Miron, a remote
spot lying 10 miles to the west of
Safed. A motley group, we set out
in high spirits, ln a Dodge six. What
; a peculiar gathering of people we
, represented. There was the German
i agronomist, who, throughout the
1 six-hour journey, held forth osten-
1 tatiously on "how to make orange
I groves pay" a lady of ample pro-
portions, wife of a prominent Zion-
ist leader who thoroughly regretted
ever leaving her home in Massa-
chussets, and didn't care a pin who
knew it. Two Chalutzim, clad ln
brown shirts and knickers, who rad-
iated with a spirit of camaraderie,
intended to lighten the bumps and
Jolts on the uneven highway a
German journalist taking corre-
spondence courses in the English
language, who immediately pounced
upon me and ultimately left me in
j Miron talking Deutsch to myself.
And lastly, a young American tour-
ist fresh from Connecticut, who ap-
peared embarrassed at finding him-
self in European society, and turned
appealingly to me, apparently as
the nearest approach to a civilized
specimen of humanity.
To be Continued
The Meeting Place of
All Faiths
An important meeting of the He-
wt: Athletic club was held at its
I mmunity Centre last Wed-
eventng. Reports of team
Icaptains in the drive to raise funds
I tor the centre were received, and
! work will begin under the direction
: the 10 team captains immediate-
I Mr. Max Orovitz, president of
the Young Men's club, advised that
[he would aid the organization in its
I efforts to obtain the residue of the
[funds the now inactive Young Men's
club still has. Athletic reports of
I the committee in charge were re-
ceived. A basketball contest will be
[plavod by the Hebrew Athletic club
the strong Turner's Sport
I Shop team next Monday night at
IFlamingo park, beginning at 8 p. m.
I Art Webb, former University of Mi-
ami basketball coach, is in charge
|of the team.

The first of a series of card par-
ities for the benefit of the Commun-
being sponsored by the
Hebrew Athletic club will be held
'he coming Sunday. January 8. at
the centre located at the corner of
s W. Sixteenth avenue and Fifth
Bttat. Prizes will be awarded for
nigh scores and refreshments will
* served. A nominal charge of only
25 cents will be made. The public
purged to itieod.
*
Orson's, at 1301 Collins avenue.
|Mlami Beach, is again open for the
*-son and will make its formal
p* next Sunday. In addition to
providing hotel accommodations in
lne most pleasant of surroundings,
regular dinners and suppers will be
Mrved at reasonable prices. In its
history it has established an envi-
able reputation for good will be-
use of its catering directly to the
"dividual wants of its patrons. For
those requiring it, special diet is
prepared in accordance with the
special needs of the individual. "Pa"
and "Ma" Gerson have been long-
time residents of thus district and
have a large number of friends here.

Out of the original 28 couples who
started New Year's eve in the Walk-
Uhon at the Cinderella ballroom,
as this goes to press, only 16 remain,
although six boys are soloing.
Folks who have witnessed Mara-
thons here in the past are almost
unanimous in declaring the teams
"ntered in this competition for the
si.000 prize money are the most tai-
nted the Magic City has seen. Al-
most every one of them can do
something in the way of entertain-
ing and what a collection of eccen-
tric, tap and various other dancers
are among them.
And vocalists of all denomina-
tions, blues singers, jazz and what
would you. are keeping the patrons
calling for encores as fast as they
go on. Jack Negley. master of cer-
emonies, is highly elated over the
talent he has to call on and thinks
this bunch of kids are the cham-
pions.
A motley assortment of teams are
ntered. some veterans of the Walk-
athon and Marathon game, others
making their first start in this kind
of competition, but they are all
sticking gamely to their work and
the on^s now in will possibly stick
for some time.

Gay parties and thrilling action
in city night clubs will be seen next
Sunday and Monday in "Crooner."
at the Tivoli theatre.
David Manners and Ann Dvorak,
who made such an excellent team as
the lovers ln "Stranger in Town."
will again be seen as the leading
players in this picture. Manners,
who plays the title role, is said to
give an excellent performance as
the crooner who leaps to fame over-
night and becomes so Impressed
Founders of All Religions Envis-
ioned World of Inner and Outer
Peace.
Dr. Arthur Frederick Sheldon,
scientist, writer, philosopher and
lecturer, who opened the program
series of the IVIiami unit of the
Florida Forum and Assembly
Wednesday night in Bayfront
park. The series, for the benefit
of the public, will include 11 lec-
tures by famous personages.
with his accidental success that he
imagines he is a genius. Miss Dvor-
ak gives a fascinating performance
1 as his college sweetheart.
Ken Murray, famous as a radio
entertainer, proves to be Just as en-
tertaining on the screen as a high
pressure publicity manager, while
Claire Dodd. a Broadway favorite.
' sets the heart aflutter as a society
vamp. Guy Kibbee contributes bar-
rels of fun as a jovial drunk in a
night club.
The theme is said to be a compos-
ite story of the lives of famous
; crooners and takes a satirical jab
' at the vanities of professional en-
tertainers. It Is gay and jazzy, a
revelation of the wild hysteria of
night club life, although it carries a
=erious vein of delightful romance.
It abounds with humorous sequenc-
es and exciting action, interspersed
with sparkling dialogue from the
pen of the well known author and
columnist. Rian James.

Interest is being centered on the
big minstrel show sponsored by the
Junior committee of the Beth David
Sisterhood to be held Wednesday
night. January 25. in the auditorium
of the Riverside school. The show-
is being directed by Burton Blank,
professional showman. The presen-
tation will be in grand minstrel
style and will have a professional
air.
The four end men are noted for
their black-face comedy. The chor-
us is composed of some of the best
singers in the city. The specialty
acts will be original and entertain-
ing. This minstrel will be unique in
that it has a bevy of beautiful
young women, good singers and
music brimming over with rhythm
and dancers.

Plans for a benefit concert for
Temple Israel Sisterhood to be held
at Kaplan hall on January 31. are
now being completed. In charge of
arrangements is a committee head-
ed by Mrs. Hannah Spiro Asher.
who is being assisted by Mesdames
I. L. Rosendorf, Morris Cowen. H. I.
Magid and Henry Williams.

Mr. and Mrs. H. Wolofsky of
Montreal. Can., arrived here this
week to spend their winter vacation
I in Miami. Mr. Wolofsky is the edi-
tor and publisher of The Canadian
! Jewish Eagle, one oi the largest
Jewish dailies in the country and is
one of the leading Yiddish journal-
ists of the world.
By 11.1 As I II 111 KM W
."..*.;....;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;. .;. f .;...,..;,., ....... ...-.
Out of man's wonder at the infi-
nite developed his religion. He
needed to explain to himself how he.
a mere speck of dust in an endless
universe, came into being. He
sought to find out why he continued
to evolve and exist. He made at-
tempts to probe into the future and
to discover what happens after that
phenomenon we know as Death.
One can imagine a primitive man
gazing wonderingly at the stars, on
a night so far back that even his-
tory has no record of it, and vague-
ly trying to read in the brilliant
constellations the secret of the far
greater power he felt everywhere
about him.
And thus should have come hap-
piness upon earth. For what can be
more conducive to a sane, sweet ex-
istence than the humble realization
that we are privileged to be here for
only the flicker of an eyelash in the
great totality of time. Such a
thought, such a feeling, should have
made men mutually helpful to one
another, disdaining wealth, position,
power as the great illusions. Cer-
tainly it should have prevented
much of the carnage and the bru-
tality associated with human differ-
ences and human wars. For even
today, although we have abandoned
the rack and the thumbscrew, we
have specialised in the subtler forms
of torture, physical and spiritual.
"Man's inhumanity to man" still
"makes countless thousands mourn."
Much of our confusion results
from the fact that in the multiplic-
ity of religions we have forgotten
the meaning of religion. The old
religions which have lasted. Christ-
ianity. Judaism, Buddhism. Confu-
cianism and Mohammedanism,
among others, have an ethical foun-
dation which comparatively few of
their adherents take the trouble to
understand and to follow in prac-
tice. Getting down very close to
home, how many who call them-
selves Jews today make an effort to
understand the ethics of Judaism
as enunciated by such sages" as Hil-
lel? How many who think of them-
selves as Christians try sincerely to
live in accordance with the precepts
laid down by Christ, even allowing
for them a liberal margin of error
because of human frailty? Most
people care little for inward and
spiritual religion, but stress merely
a certain outward conformity to
doctrine and theology that usually
misses the very essence not only of
their own religion but of all relig-
ions.
And so. church attendance is not
in itself conducive to the religious
life, nor are visits to mosques, holy
caves, synagogues, sacred rivers.
Such observance must be preceded
and followed by deeds; religion
must be the mother of ethics and
morality. Go back with me, as an
example, to the middle of the six-
teenth century, B. C. E., in Hindus-
tan, where the cult of Buddha, the
wise, the enlightened, originated.
Today Buddhism numbers more
than 400,000,000 adherents. From
the royal sermons of King Piyadasi,
a zealous Buddhist, we gather some-
thing of the ethical sub-structure
of this faith which has so many de-
votees: "A man ought to honor his
own faiin." he expounds, "but he
should never abuse the faith of oth-
ers." What a modern touch! What
a precept for the busybodies of to-
day who wish to pour all mankind
into one religious mold. "There are
even circumstances." continues the
great Buddhist, "when the religion
of others ought to be honored, and
in acting thus a man fortifies his
own faith and assists the faith of
others."
All of the important religions ln
one form or another stress spiritual
evolution. In Buddhism there is the
Karma, which includes both the
merit and demerit of a man's ac-
tions and determines the future
condition of all sentient beings.
Virtue, austerity and science, it is
claimed, lead to the highest states,
and suppression of desire leads to
peace. On the way to Nirvana or
the perfect state one must utilize
right faith, right judgment, right
language, right purpose, right prac-
tice, right effort, right thinking and
right meditation. And since Buddha
is supposed to be only the ideal of
what any man can become, the true
Buddhist is enjoined not to kill, not
to steal, not to lie and to practice
various virtues, among which are
charity, purity, patience, courage,
contemplation and knowledge. And
as part of his code of behavior the
follower after Buddha is warned
against saying or repeating any-
thing which can set others at en-
mity among themselves. It is also
pointed out to him that at all times
he must function as a peacemaker.
He must be patient under injury,
resigned under misfortune and must
possess real humility.
II I had not linked all these moral
precepts and practices to Buddha,
any right thinking man could have
accepted them as sound ethics for
whatever creed the listener may
represent. And yet in far off India.
Ceylon. Burmah and parts of the
earth the very mention of which
takes us off on the magic carpet of
fancy these are the commandments
which the devout hold before them
as ideals of conduct.
Judaism, too, has always stressed
conduct rather than ritual or belief.
The ten commandments handed
down by Moses were intended to be
and were a torch of civilization in a
surrounding darkness of barbarism.
The Jewish concept of holiness
embraced not only right believing
and right thinking, but right doing.
It is in that sense that Zangwill's
famous epigram is true: "The
Greeks worshipped the holiness of
beauty, the Jews the beauty of holi-
ness."
Our prophets were impatient of
ceremonial that was not on expres-
sion of the principles of Judaism.
Many of them condemned it as in-
adequate. Amos cries, "I hate, I de-
spise your feasts But let justice
well up as the waters, and right-
eousness as a mighty stream." How
truly contemptuous he would have
(Continued on Page Six)
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Page Six
THE JEWISH FLORID'AN.
Friday, January <
.1
St. Petersburg
Notes
Congregation B'nai Israel with A.
S. Kleinfeld. rabbi, will hold regular
Friday night services at 8 p. m.,
when he will preach a sermon "A
Father's Blessing." Saturday morn-
ing the services begins at 9 o'clock.
Sunday school at 10 o'clock. He-
brew school daily at 4 p. m.
Judge Max Pinansky was the
guest of the congregation. On Fri-
day night, after the services, he ad-
dressed the members of the congre-
gation at the Horowitz hotel, giving
useful suggestions as to the future
activities of the congregation, and
how to raise the standard of Juda-
ism in our city. Upon invitation of
Rabbi Kleinfeld. he occupied the
pulpit Saturday morning and spoke
upon the Problems of Jewish Life.
While in town he was a guest .at
the Soreno hotel. Among his guests
for the New Year's eve celebration
was Rabbi A. S. Kleinfeld, who gave
the New Year's greeting in the pres-
ence of 500 guests at the Soreno.
Congregation B'nai Israel is giv-
ing a card party for the benefit of
the Building fund at the Temple,
Sunday evening, January 8. They
are also planning a concert on Jan-
uary 22.
The building committee is con-
templating to start building the
new synagogue before the summer.
The Judaic council met at the
Horowitz hotel. December 29. After
a short business session, the mem-
bers enjoyed bridge and dancing.
The next meeting of the council
will be held at the Horowitz hotel,
Monday evening. January 9, at 8:15
p. m.
The Judaic council entertained
with a charity dance on Tuesday
evening. December 27, at the Shrine
club. Members of the council acting
as hostesses included the Misses
Rose Horowitz. Celia Ruibn. Sylvia
Schwartz and Mrs. William Salzer.
Little Corinne Silverman offered
one of the highlights of the eve-
ning by presenting a very entertain-
ing dance number.
Guests and members included
Messrs. and Mesdames B. Reyner,
W. V. Salzer. S. Fyvolent. M. Miller,
M. Rosenberg, H. Cohen, J. L. Mille,
G. Rippa. A. Esrick. H. Goldbery.
S. Trager. L. Feinberg. L. Donsky.
A. Silverman. S. Rosenberg, A. Ru-
bin. H. Mogel. M. Weinstein, L. Sol-
omon. F. Sherman, G. H. Clark. J.
P. Clark. K. D. Huff. E. Marcott. H.
Herman. Captain and MM. Terves;
Mesdames F. Keller. A. Gallop, B.
Carroll, F. Robbins, Landorff, Reiss-
ler; Misses Ethel Horowitz, Lee Ra-
binovich, Ruth Feldman, Sylvia
Schwartz. Rose Horowitz, Miriam
Miller. Mildred Carroll, Margaret
Bryant. Elizabeth Coates, A. Fein-
berg. Ida Keller. Annabel Jacobs,
M. Laivett, S. Laivett, M. Hamilton,
Belle Goldman, Celia Rubin; Messrs.
Jay Schwartz, F. Hoffman, Harold
Jacoby. Louis Magid. Paul Fehder,
Ben Schwartz. Harry Keller, Ben
Wolfson. H. Boswier, R. H. James.
M. Robbins, Sol Green, Carl Mor-
gan, Drs. L. M. Gable and H. R.
Gable and Rabbi A. S. Kleinfeld.
Potato Latkes
Four potatoes, two eggs, one tea-
spoonful salt, one-half cup flour,
one teaspoon baking powder.
Grate the potatoes. Drain off the
water. Add the other ingredients,
stirring well. The batter should pour
easily. Grease a griddle and drop
batter by spoonfuls on the hot grid-
dle. Fry as any pancake.
Other shortening may be used in-
stead of butter.
The Meeting Place of
All Faiths
(Continued from Page Five)
been in our present day of those
who go to churches and to syna-
gogues, but have not God in their
hearts! Hosea speaks in a similar
. vein: "I desire mercy and not sacri-
fice." And the eloquent Isaiah de-
clares in the name of God. "To
' what purpose is the multitude of
your sacrifices unto me? Bring
no more vain oblations; it is an of-
fering of abomination unto me .
Yea, when ye make many prayers. I
will not hear; yours hands are full
of blood Cease to do evil; learn
to do well."
The passion for social justice.
; then, vivifies Judaism, as it does
other creeds, and turns the observ-
| ing Jew who understands and prac-
tices the tenets of his own faith in-
to 3 practical idealist who makes
the world safe for the weak, the
poor and the oppressed of the earth.
The ethical basis of Christianity
is too well known to need much ex-
planation here. The Christian and
the non-Christian world is familiar
with the Golden Rule, "Whatever
ye would that me should do to you.
do ye even so to them." But how
many men and women of our ac-
quaintance actually practice this?
Christ emphasized humility, relief
of the poor, the duty of love of one's
neighbor. For the prevailing ha-
treds and bloodsheds of his day and
of all time the teacher who is
known by the epithet of the Prince
of Peace advocated not a brutal
might that would crush all non-
believers into conformity, but an ov-
erwhelming pity that sought to em-
brace even the enemy. The psalm-
ist, it will be recalled, asks. "What |
is man that Thou art mindful of
him and the son of man that Thou
visiteth him? For Thou hast made
him a little lower than the angels
nnd hast crowned him with glory
and honor." The ideal suggested j
here is one that cannot be even
faintly realized by any other way
than in terms of conduct. And cer- i
tainly. Christianity attaches no
more value to mere lip profession
than does either Buddhism or Juda-
ism. When I reflect on the sorrows
of the world and especially on the j
false reasoning which justifies bru- '
tality of man towards man. I can-
not help thinking of the immortal
words, "Though I speak with the |
tongues of men and angels and have
not charity, I am become as sound-
'ng brass or a tinkling cymbal."
Certainly the effect of Christian j
-thics upon those who take the i
trouble to understand it is to make
'cm better men among men. The
n .it French mathematician and
icious philosopher of the seven-
Bentb century. Pascal, testifies to
"he effect of Christ upon his life as
ollows: "I keep my faith with ev-
eryone. I render not evil to those
who wrong me ... I try to be just
true, sincere and faithful to all
men, and I have a tender affection
for those with whom God has mo:v
intimately connected me, and whe-
ther I am alone or in the presence
of men, all my actions are perform-
ed in the sight of God, who must
judge them and to whom I have
consecrated them all." This might
have been uttered by a devout Bud-
dhist or a devout Jew or by a good,
righteous man of any religion.
If space permitted, the doctrines
of the wise Confucius might be
quoted, urging men to exercise
charity, forgiveness, repentance, and
pointing out that example is to be
preferred to teaching. The Moham-
medan faith, too, while stressing the
devotional exercises of a Moslem,
emphasizes also hospitality and
charity. But enough has already
been cited to show that the found-
ers of all the recognized religions
envisioned a world in which the re-
lations between men and men would
be helpful toward the achievement
After Six O'Clock
This article um by mitttke
concluded on page J. This />
the conclusion.
Jews must learn not to go where
they are not wanted. The kind of a
Jew that turns up his nose at his
own people, that changes his name
from Rosenfeld to Roosevelt just for
the sake of sliding through a crevice
into Christian society, or who at-
tends the Christian Science church
for the same reason, is to be blamed
of course; but he is more to be pit-
ied. He must be a most uncomfort-
able creature. It he is so privileged
as to be part of the elite group for
an occasional evening he must feel
of an outer and inner peace.
All religions have a meeting place
in the ideals of our common hu-
manity. And these seem to be the
same, irrespective of color or race.
Formulas vary. All kinds of decrees
insisting upon "Thou shalt" or
"Thou shalt not" are promulgated,
but. in the last analysis, each faith
goes far beyond taboos, formulas,
ritual and theological belief into the
sphere of human conduct. And the
truly godless man. in my humble
opinion, is not he who denies the ex-
istence of God. but he who accepts
the letter and rejects the spirit, who
prays with his lips and curses with.
his heart, who glibly quotes the Bi-
ble and follows in his actions the
dictates of lust, avarice and cruelty.
In conclusion I wish to Rrophasizc
an essential agreement among all of
us God's children as to how we
must live to draw nearer toward
God. Be it Christianity, Judaism.
Buddhism. Confucianism, Moham-
medanism, be it a creed older than
history or a cult young as the day's
newspaper, only one thing interests
us: How does that faith affect the
daily life of its adherents? Does it
make them more kindly, more tol-
erant, more just? For, when all i^
said and done, all religions meet
somewhere in the great, compassion-
ate heart of God.
like an ugly duckling amidst a bevy
of swans. Though he may not real-
ize it. he stands out like a sore
thumb and is an object of sympa-
thetic ridicule.
What the future will demonstrate
we cannot predict; nor do we care
very much personally. We do think
thai both Jews and Christians
might exercise a little more desire
to mingle together, at the same
time maintaining their own self re-
spect and fealty to their group. If
this is to come, the Christian will
have to become a lot more Christian
than he is and many Jews will have
to improve their manners.
After all. is it not possible that a
partial basis for this discrimination
rest.- upon our own crudities? Some
of us do not know how funny we
are. It is commendable for a man
to rise from the ghetto to a boule-
vard in one generation, but living
on the boulevard does not necessar-
ily mean the abolition of his ghetto
characteristics Many of us may re-
tain all 'he peculiarities of the im-
migrant and not realize it lang-
uage, manners and modes of think-
ing.
I know that I shall be severely
criticised for making this statement,
but truth and candor dictate I hat
the attention of our people be called i
to this weakness in ourselves. Some
Jews might well cultivate a little
more reserve, polish and poise. I
have no doubt that this will be
achieved in time as many Jews have
already acquired these characteris-
tics, but let us not deceive ourselves
that most Jews possess them. They
do not. So this adds another point !
to the aggravation that exists be- j
tween Jews and Christians and !
some of our gentile students made
no bones about it.
And so for a long time at least,
Jew and gentile will get along from
daybreak to dusk. When night
(haws his sable curtain over the
earth there will be a parting of the
Forum Speaker
Begins Series
..,,, ,| frm !, 0n()
had through physical fitness
mental energy, but permanent *
er of government, economic Syste '
institutions or Individuals can i
realized only by adding ethical I
er. including economic gain, can fc
ness to mental and physical fitness
"Three elements are required u
make the compound known as.,
ar: carbon, hydrogen and oxy2
Add one or subtract one and >*
compound is not sugar. Just so d>
ture requires the three kinds ol ^.
man energy to make the compound
permanent power.
"We have passed through the boy.
hood of the race and have entered
manhood and must become w
enough to add ethical fitness if civ-
ilization is to endure.
"Selfishness is not the law of sur-
vival in the lower animal kingdom.
This is because animals cannot pro
duce food. If man and nature failed
to produce food for the animal, u*
animal dies. When we come to the
kingdom of man this law changes.
He can produce food or its equiva-
lent the money to purchase food
money earned by service render-
ed. Since he can. !" must or tend to
perish. This carries with it a cor-
responding duty of society to fur-
nish the citizen a chance to sent.
If this is denied, man must rever.
to his animal characteristics, and
will. We are in for one of two
things, either ethical evolution o:
ultimate bloody revolution.
"The same degree of scientific
thought that has been directed to-
ward mass production, once cen-
tered on ways and means of mass
consumption, could solve the prob-
lem and will, let us hope, before I,
is too late."
Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan
Temple Israel presided. The Form
is under the auspices of a commit-
tee of Temple Israel.
Directors
MARVIN D. ADAMS
Vice President, Btsmbltr-Adsms-
Frasier Ins. Agency, Inc.
Miami, Kin.
GEORGE J. AVENT
VIm President, Florida National
Hank. Jacksonville, Kla.
EDWARD BALL
Vice President, Almoun Securities,
Inc.. Jacksonville, Pla.
ALFRED I. DuPONT
I'rt-si,lent. Almtmrs Seruritirs. In.- .
Jacksonville, Kla.
WM. C. HILL
President. Third National Bank,
Miami. Kla.
W. O. KENNEDY
Florida Manager, Thomson &
McKmni.il. Miami. Kla.
JOHN F. LANIGAN
Vice President and Assistant Trust
Officer of ili.- Bank, Miami Kla
J. WALTER MUHLBACH
W. A. REDDING
Vice President, Florida National
Bank, Jacksonville, Kla.
WM. H. ROGERS
Rogers Towers, Jacksonville Ha
F C SCHWALBE
Vice Presl.....it, Florida National
Hank. .lack-...11 ill,.. Kla
A. A. UNGAR
I 11.111 Hunk Co.. Miami, Kla
B. S. WEATHERS
President "f the Hunk, Miami. Pis
Officers
ALFRED I. DuPONT
Chairman ..r the Board
B. S. WEATHERS
Pi-1-.i |nt
L. A. USINA
Vice President and Cashier
J. WALTER MUHLBACH
Vies President ami Triijt Officer
JOHN F. LANIGAN
Vies 1'rn.iil.rnt nnd A*istnnt
Trust, Officer
C. F. SHEWMAKE
Assistant <'ahi>r
E. A. GARDNER
('nmiitrnllp
Statement of Condition
From Report to Comptroller
DHCEMBER 31, 1932
RESOURCES
Loans and Discounts .... ...............................$ 432,460.47
Overdrafts ........................................................... 34.6O
Furniture and Fixtures ......................... 10,351.42
U. S. Bonds to Secure Circulation............................ 400,000.00
Accrued Interest Receivable ........... $ 11,908.81
U. S. Bonds and Treasury
. ( "Jjetta ............ 594,385.96
listed New York Stuck Exchange
Bonds and Other Securities .'..... 164,375.00
( ash on Hand and Due from Banks 811,997.5 1 1,5 82.667.28
$2,425,513.77
LIABILITIES
Capital Stuck ........................................................$ 400,000.00
Surplus ........................................................ 100,000.00
Undivided Profits .......................... 3 1,821.39
( irculation ..................... 400,000.00
DEPOSITS...........................Z:ZIZZZ 1,493,692.31
$2,425,513.77
AFFILIATED BANKS
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK FLORIDA BANK
Of Jarkhonvillc
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
At St. I', 1, ,.>,,,.
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
__ __ At l.skrlsnd
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
At ll.,rl.,
At Orlsndo
FLORIDA BANK AND TRUST
COMPANY
At Dsytons lira, li
FLORIDA SOUTHSIDE BANK
South Jacksonville
rLCLQIDA Ml 14 \ VI BANK
AND TRUST CCHPANY
iT ]H W / Ui Hast Flagler Street


Full Text

PAGE 1

Friday. January 6, 193 3. THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page Five "Sweet Waters of Megiddo" Lag Bo'omer Scenes in Palestine By RABBI LAZARUS AXELROD Not here the glamor and mysticllsm of the East. Not here the zeal. I the ardor, the burning desire for a divine revelation. The rose of roImance has ceased to wield Its sway lover the prosaic West. Science has I no use for sentimental reminiscences I of our past, for petty observances of L n era which is gone, and which lean be but on obstacle ln tne P atn |of advancement. The mind domi| nates our destiny. The heart plays | second fiddle, while the soul slum|bers peacefully in blissful ignorance |o( its whereabouts. The scientific I West has triumphed over the roImantic East. In the still waters of | blue lagoons shimmering in the sun| shine, sombre shadows of gigantic | seaplanes cast a blot over the ripIpling reflections of swaying palms I and verdant cypresses. Birds of parladise. languidly preening their iriIdescent plumage, are startled by the I roar of high-powered engines cutting through psace at the rate of hour miles per minute. Probably the | high priest, ministering in the temI pje of Buddha, is mildly surprised | to hear the snappy strains of Eddie | Cantor's appealing love songs, or the dreamy stanzas of Moonlight I on the Colorado, through the courtI psy of a mischievous Chinaman who I has placed his radiola in a secluded I corner of the temple. East is East, and West s West. I but there will always be a demand I in the West for a breath, a waft of I that easterntsm which tends to exI alt the spirit, to accelerate the lmI agination, and to lift us ever so I slightly above ourselves. As I sit at LECTURER WHO OPENED FORUM SERIES HERE my typewriter in a room overlooking the seething waters of the Atlantic. I close my eyes, and —behold, a continuous and recurring array of scenes, enacted In the spring of 1929, sends my memory back to Palestine, to Mt. Carmel, Miron, to the sweet waters of Megiddo We left Mt. Carmel on the thirtysecond day of Omer, that period of Sephira between Passover and Pentecost, en route for Miron, a remote spot lying 10 miles to the west of Safed. A motley group, we set out in high spirits, ln a Dodge six. What ; a peculiar gathering of people we represented. There was the German i agronomist, who, throughout the 1 six-hour journey, held forth osten1 tatiously on "how to make orange I groves pay" — a lady of ample proportions, wife of a prominent Zionist leader who thoroughly regretted ever leaving her home in Massachussets, and didn't care a pin who knew it. Two Chalutzim, clad ln brown shirts and knickers, who radiated with a spirit of camaraderie, intended to lighten the bumps and Jolts on the uneven highway —a German journalist taking correspondence courses in the English language, who immediately pounced upon me and ultimately left me in j Miron talking Deutsch to myself. And lastly, a young American tourist fresh from Connecticut, who appeared embarrassed at finding himself in European society, and turned appealingly to me, apparently as the nearest approach to a civilized specimen of humanity. To be Continued The Meeting Place of All Faiths An important meeting of the Hewt: Athletic club was held at its I mmunity Centre last Wedeventng. Reports of team Icaptains in the drive to raise funds I tor the centre were received, and work will begin under the direction : the 10 team captains immediateI Mr. Max Orovitz, president of the Young Men's club, advised that [he would aid the organization in its I efforts to obtain the residue of the [funds the now inactive Young Men's club still has. Athletic reports of I the committee in charge were received. A basketball contest will be [plavod by the Hebrew Athletic club the strong Turner's Sport I Shop team next Monday night at IFlamingo park, beginning at 8 p. m. I Art Webb, former University of Miami basketball coach, is in charge |of the team. • • • The first of a series of card parities for the benefit of the Communbeing sponsored by the Hebrew Athletic club will be held 'he coming Sunday. January 8. at the centre located at the corner of s W. Sixteenth avenue and Fifth Bttat. Prizes will be awarded for nigh scores and refreshments will %  served. A nominal charge of only 25 ce nts will be made. The public purged to itieod. • • Orson's, at 1301 Collins avenue. | Mlami Beach, is again open for the *-son and will make its formal p* next Sunday. In addition to providing hotel accommodations in ln e most pleasant of surroundings, regular dinners and suppers will be Mrved at reasonable prices. In its history it has established an enviable reputation for good will beuse of its catering directly to the "dividual wants of its patrons. For those requiring it, special diet is prepared in accordance with the special needs of the individual. "Pa" and "Ma" Gerson have been longtime residents of thus district and have a large number of friends here. • • • Out of the original 28 couples who started New Year's eve in the WalkUhon at the Cinderella ballroom, as this goes to press, only 16 remain, although six boys are soloing. Folks who have witnessed Marathons here in the past are almost unanimous in declaring the teams "ntered in this competition for the si.000 prize money are the most tainted the Magic City has seen. Almost every one of them can do something in the way of entertaining and what a collection of eccentric, tap and various other dancers are among them. And vocalists of all denominations, blues singers, jazz and what would you. are keeping the patrons calling for encores as fast as they go on. Jack Negley. master of ceremonies, is highly elated over the talent he has to call on and thinks this bunch of kids are the champions. A motley assortment of teams are ntered. some veterans of the Walkathon and Marathon game, others making their first start in this kind of competition, but they are all sticking gamely to their work and the on^s now in will possibly stick for some time. • • • Gay parties and thrilling action in city night clubs will be seen next Sunday and Monday in "Crooner." at the Tivoli theatre. David Manners and Ann Dvorak, who made such an excellent team as the lovers ln "Stranger in Town." will again be seen as the leading players in this picture. Manners, who plays the title role, is said to give an excellent performance as the crooner who leaps to fame overnight and becomes so Impressed Founders of All Religions Envisioned World of Inner and Outer Peace. Dr. Arthur Frederick Sheldon, scientist, writer, philosopher and lecturer, who opened the program series of the IVIiami unit of the Florida Forum and Assembly Wednesday night in Bayfront park. The series, for the benefit of the public, will include 11 lectures by famous personages. with his accidental success that he imagines he is a genius. Miss Dvorak gives a fascinating performance 1 as his college sweetheart. Ken Murray, famous as a radio entertainer, proves to be Just as entertaining on the screen as a high pressure publicity manager, while Claire Dodd. a Broadway favorite. sets the heart aflutter as a society vamp. Guy Kibbee contributes barrels of fun as a jovial drunk in a night club. The theme is said to be a composite story of the lives of famous ; crooners and takes a satirical jab at the vanities of professional entertainers. It Is gay and jazzy, a revelation of the wild hysteria of night club life, although it carries a =erious vein of delightful romance. It abounds with humorous sequences and exciting action, interspersed with sparkling dialogue from the pen of the well known author and columnist. Rian James. • • • Interest is being centered on the big minstrel show sponsored by the Junior committee of the Beth David Sisterhood to be held Wednesday night. January 25. in the auditorium of the Riverside school. The showis being directed by Burton Blank, professional showman. The presentation will be in grand minstrel style and will have a professional air. The four end men are noted for their black-face comedy. The chorus is composed of some of the best singers in the city. The specialty acts will be original and entertaining. This minstrel will be unique in that it has a bevy of beautiful young women, good singers and music brimming over with rhythm and dancers. • • • Plans for a benefit concert for Temple Israel Sisterhood to be held at Kaplan hall on January 31. are now being completed. In charge of arrangements is a committee headed by Mrs. Hannah Spiro Asher. who is being assisted by Mesdames I. L. Rosendorf, Morris Cowen. H. I. Magid and Henry Williams. • • • Mr. and Mrs. H. Wolofsky of Montreal. Can., arrived here this week to spend their winter vacation I in Miami. Mr. Wolofsky is the editor and publisher of The Canadian Jewish Eagle, one oi the largest Jewish dailies in the country and is one of the leading Yiddish journalists of the world. By 11.1 As I II 111 KM W ."..•*.;....;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;. .;. f .;...,..;,., „•....... .•..-. Out of man's wonder at the infinite developed his religion. He needed to explain to himself how he. a mere speck of dust in an endless universe, came into being. He sought to find out why he continued to evolve and exist. He made attempts to probe into the future and to discover what happens after that phenomenon we know as Death. One can imagine a primitive man gazing wonderingly at the stars, on a night so far back that even history has no record of it, and vaguely trying to read in the brilliant constellations the secret of the far greater power he felt everywhere about him. And thus should have come happiness upon earth. For what can be more conducive to a sane, sweet existence than the humble realization that we are privileged to be here for only the flicker of an eyelash in the great totality of time. Such a thought, such a feeling, should have made men mutually helpful to one another, disdaining wealth, position, power as the great illusions. Certainly it should have prevented much of the carnage and the brutality associated with human differences and human wars. For even today, although we have abandoned the rack and the thumbscrew, we have specialised in the subtler forms of torture, physical and spiritual. "Man's inhumanity to man" still "makes countless thousands mourn." Much of our confusion results from the fact that in the multiplicity of religions we have forgotten the meaning of religion. The old religions which have lasted. Christianity. Judaism, Buddhism. Confucianism and Mohammedanism, among others, have an ethical foundation which comparatively few of their adherents take the trouble to understand and to follow in practice. Getting down very close to home, how many who call themselves Jews today make an effort to understand the ethics of Judaism as enunciated by such sages" as Hillel? How many who think of themselves as Christians try sincerely to live in accordance with the precepts laid down by Christ, even allowing for them a liberal margin of error because of human frailty? Most people care little for inward and spiritual religion, but stress merely a certain outward conformity to doctrine and theology that usually misses the very essence not only of their own religion but of all religions. And so. church attendance is not in itself conducive to the religious life, nor are visits to mosques, holy caves, synagogues, sacred rivers. Such observance must be preceded and followed by deeds; religion must be the mother of ethics and morality. Go back with me, as an example, to the middle of the sixteenth century, B. C. E., in Hindustan, where the cult of Buddha, the wise, the enlightened, originated. Today Buddhism numbers more than 400,000,000 adherents. From the royal sermons of King Piyadasi, a zealous Buddhist, we gather something of the ethical sub-structure of this faith which has so many devotees: "A man ought to honor his own faiin." he expounds, "but he should never abuse the faith of others." What a modern touch! What a precept for the busybodies of today who wish to pour all mankind into one religious mold. "There are even circumstances." continues the great Buddhist, "when the religion of others ought to be honored, and in acting thus a man fortifies his own faith and assists the faith of others." All of the important religions ln one form or another stress spiritual evolution. In Buddhism there is the Karma, which includes both the merit and demerit of a man's actions and determines the future condition of all sentient beings. Virtue, austerity and science, it is claimed, lead to the highest states, and suppression of desire leads to peace. On the way to Nirvana or the perfect state one must utilize right faith, right judgment, right language, right purpose, right practice, right effort, right thinking and right meditation. And since Buddha is supposed to be only the ideal of what any man can become, the true Buddhist is enjoined not to kill, not to steal, not to lie and to practice various virtues, among which are charity, purity, patience, courage, contemplation and knowledge. And as part of his code of behavior the follower after Buddha is warned against saying or repeating anything which can set others at enmity among themselves. It is also pointed out to him that at all times he must function as a peacemaker. He must be patient under injury, resigned under misfortune and must possess real humility. II I had not linked all these moral precepts and practices to Buddha, any right thinking man could have accepted them as sound ethics for whatever creed the listener may represent. And yet in far off India. Ceylon. Burmah and parts of the earth the very mention of which takes us off on the magic carpet of fancy these are the commandments which the devout hold before them as ideals of conduct. Judaism, too, has always stressed conduct rather than ritual or belief. The ten commandments handed down by Moses were intended to be and were a torch of civilization in a surrounding darkness of barbarism. The Jewish concept of holiness embraced not only right believing and right thinking, but right doing. It is in that sense that Zangwill's famous epigram is true: "The Greeks worshipped the holiness of beauty, the Jews the beauty of holiness." Our prophets were impatient of ceremonial that was not on expression of the principles of Judaism. Many of them condemned it as inadequate. Amos cries, "I hate, I despise your feasts But let justice well up as the waters, and righteousness as a mighty stream." How truly contemptuous he would have (Continued on Page Six) GLOBE EXTERMINATING GO. PHONE 2-3034 1798 N. W. 20TH ST. ~. % J Sperinlizinc in destroying nil forma of Vermin. RaU. Mice, Roachea. AnU. etc. &f _-. f.et our monthly rate* for apartment holmes and dwellinca. &f ^ Free inspection for Termites. 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PAGE 1

/ Page Four THE iPWISH FLORID'AN &f&f&f &f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f&f &f &f&f &f &f&f&f &f &f&f &f&f&f&f # &f *) &f &f + &f&f &f&f&f #' &f&f &f &f&f $ EaiMn ^yttagng lBitlUtut | a Edited by RABBI S. M. MACHTEI Founder ind Dlr*otor, Radio Bynagog of America SUNDAY MORNINGS WIOD, MIAMI, FLORIDA Vol. 1 MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 8, 1933. No. 4 i ttttttttr the sake of Jacob when he settled in the province of Goshen in the land of Egypt this elderly Jew looked askance at me, and, but for the fact that he knew me to be a rabbi, he might have branded me an ignoramus. The lack of an adequately trained Jewish manhood is fell by those of us who are familiar with the needs "I our people. Among the Ooylm, the other nations, ignorance of such matters that are Intimately bound up with Torah. is pardonable. As I have said on previous occasions, they have only the translated scriptures — and some editions used by non-Jews are poorly translated. The scripture reading for today is an example of a misleading and false translation in the copy of the Christian Bible which I have at home. This volume contains both the Old Testament and the New Testament. Verse 7 of chapter 41 in Genesis, in this Christian Bible reads. "And the seven thin ears devoured the seven rank and full ears. And Pharaoh awoke, and, behold, it was a dream." In the original Hebrew no reference is made to any numeral 7 preceding the words "thin ears," nor is there any such translation erroneously using the number seven In the Jewish Publication Society translated Bible which I use at the studio and from which I read the scriptures this morning. The Christian translators have furnished the word seven believing that they enlighten the student or reader. Instead it is confusing, misleading and false. When the cows and the ears of corn appeared in Pharaoh's dream, their number is given as seven in each case, but. when the devouring takes place, when the lean consume the fat. the number seven is used only in connection with the fat ones. The lean cows and the empty ears of corn are referred to only by the plurals of the Hebrew words for cow and ear. The minimum plural is two — two cows and two ears of corn. Scriptures did not record an error and an oversight by failing to mention the exact number of lean ones that consumed the fat ones. The Holy Torah revealed the true prophecy and its interpretation. A S interpreted by Joseph, the seven fat cows and the seven full ears raoh that may be applied to our life today. We have been visited by seven empty ears were symbolic of seven years of famine. As originally intended there were to have been seven years of each, but, with the arrival of Jacob, the sages tell us, the famine came to an end after the second year. Thus, to have said that the seven lean swallowed the seven fat would have been untrue. Therefore the plural forms are used in both cases to denote the smallest possible plural —two. Because the full measure of the prophecied plenty was visited on Egypt their number is given as seven. A more profound discussion of this subject, must preclude a knowledge of Hebrew by the listeners. It is out of place here. H OWEVER, there Is much else that we learn from the dream of Pharoah that may be applied to our life today. We have been visited by years of plenty. These have been followed by years of famine. Unfortunately, we had no national Joseph. No one foresaw the years of need for the entire nation. If any did foresee it no provision for common protection was made. No reserve was gathered. The people have suffered. A minority, during these years of famine, may have been living on goods stored during the years of plenty. The question now is, "How much longer? When will this end?" We have had some calamity-Josephs insist that our generation will not see the end. According to them, the years of famine must equal, in number, the years of plenty. Scripture disproves any such theory. God has been known to shorten evil decrees. It may be for the sake of a Joseph or a Jacob; it may be for the sake of some hitherto unknown person who has found favor in the eyes of God. It may come through someone inspired to lead us out of o*ur doubts and fears into a state of faith and a sense of security. One thing is certain — there is some divine plan in all this. When it shall have been, realized, when the purpose behind all this will have been accomplished, then, and then only, will we return to a state of progress, within the meaning of that word to us mortals. Joseph's opportunity came after years of slavery and imprisonment. He rose from bondage to the premiership of Egypt and brought salvation to the people. We, in this land, and in the other lands where suffering is the common lot, may be, even now, training some leader who will bring us the salvation we so greatly need. That leader will not be one who relies on himself, on his wisdom and his integrity. That leader will realize what Joseph did whin lie said to Pharaoh, "It is not in me; God shall give Pharaoh an answer of peace." Ask and Ye Shall Learn" Q. — Is it true that the expression -Father in Heaven" as a synonym for God, as used in the Lords Prayer, originated with Jesus of Nazareth? Is it possible that the phrase and tlH' meaning usually attributed to it were unknown to the Jews before? Heaven," the opening sentence oi the Lord's Prayer, is distinctly Jewish and has Its parallels in Jewish liturgy. In the Mislmah (Sotah, chapter IX end) Rabbi Elic/cr ben Horkenos, a Tanna of the first century, exclaims "Who is there on whom to lean, except our PMhei who is in Heaven?" The lei in Father in Heaven as applied to God semis to be much older than Jesus. While one cannot point with any amount ol certainty as to when and how it came into use. it was without a doubt part ol the common stock phrases expressive of Jewish religious ideas. The God idea which the phrase conveys is contained In the Hebrew Bible. "Look down from heaven, and see ... For Thou art our Father Thou, O Lord, art our Father, Our Redeemer, from everlasting is Thy name." (Isaiah, chapter 63. verses 15-16i And the Prophet Malachi '2. 10) emphasizes the idea ol the Fatherhood of God when he exclaims: "Have we not all one father? Has not one God created us? Why do we deal treacherously every man against his brother? ate, that "fifty thousand Frenchmen awoke this morning slaves. I is for you. gentlemen, to decree that tonight they shall go to bed free men This appeal carried the National assembly, and the yoke ol serfdom was removed from the Jews of France. Throughout the wild hurly-burly days of the French Revolution which often offered hostile manifestations to the Catholic Church, Abbe Gregoire maintained his sense of individual judgment. He belonged to those clerics known as "Galileans" who, While In no way wishing to alter Catholicism theologically, were determined that the catholic Church ol France should be Independent ol the Interference ol the Vatican. His beliel In the meat principles ol the French Revolution he likewise maintained unshakable. Honesty and courage marked his Character and made him the champion ot the oppressed, the friend of the weak and thus also the brave protagonist ol the Jews. When be died in 1831. despite opposition ol church and civil authorities, his funeral was honored by a magnificent display Ol public esteem and respect. Friday, January 6 i 93 unto others as you would have oth ers do unto you" Is an admirable plank on which all men ought to 1 able to unite. A fine discussion ot the Golden Rule is contained h Gerald Friedlanders "The Jewish Sources of the Sermon on Z Mount," London, 1911. Radio Synagog Rabbi S. M. Machtci, founder and director of the Radio Synagog, M preach over WIOD at 10 o'clock on Sunday morning on "Josephs Revp. lation." In addition to the unaa there will be players, hymns, Ob, tine reading and a question box. TIVOLli 11.., i.. Matinee 20, it nth 2 l„ II 'hone 2-JJS! j Evening J> Q. — Would not you please tell in brief of the life of Abbe Gregoire and of his services to the Jewish people? A. — Abbe Henri Gregoire. Jesuit. Revolutionary and friend of the Jews, was of humble origin, the son of peasant parents. He was bom near Luneville in 1750. and although he was educated in Jesuit schools. he fell under the influence of the great humanitarian movement of his day. In 1788 he wrote an essay on the Physical and Moral Regen eration of the Jews, and from that onward his name became identified with those who rank as the most doughty champions of J e w i s h emancipation in Europe. In October, 1789. Abbe Gregoire introduced before the National assembly m France his famous law for the emancipation of the Jews. In defense of his motion he declared, in the course of the parliamentary deQ, What is the so-r.iiled Golden Rule? A. —The t,olden Rule is the designation ot a fundamental moral teaching "I Jesus of Nazareth reported m the New Testament Matthew 7. 12): "All things therefore whatsoever ye would that men should do unto you, even so do ye also unto them." Elsewhere in the New Testament 'Jan-.-:. 2.8) this precept is described as "the royal law." The Golden Rule as quoted lure Is a definite assertion of the essentially Jewish view as expressed in rabbinical writings, that "measure for measure" should be norm regulating any one man's expectation from others i rightsi, while more than measure should be the rule indicating one's services to others (duties). Hlllel Is credited with the authorship of the Golden Rule in its negative form. The Talmud i Sabbath 31> narrates that a heathen once came to Hillel and asked for admission into the Jewish fold on condition that he be taught the principles ol Judaism while standing on one foot. Hillel said to him. "What is hateful to yourself, do to no other: that is the whole law. and the nst Is commentary. Go and learn." It has been suggested, by the Rev. Dr. G. George Fox 'in Jus very line study ol Judaism. Christianity and the Modern Social Ideas. Fort Worth, 1919), that the Golden Rule of Hillel and that (il Jesus really supplement one another. Neither is really complete without the other. "What is hateful to yourself, do to no other, but do — Sunday and Men lay. Jan. n and _! David Manners Ann Dvorak I J "CROONER" j "Kittle Hungary"! Home Cooking Business Men's Lunches 25c &f Steak and Chiikeu Dinners 54c &f i Dallti i';i a KEVA SCHWARTZ, Prop. + v •:• •:• •:• •> *** •:• •:• -:• <• •:• •:• •:• •:• ** -HII 304 S. E. FIRST AVENUE "Radio Service" WM. SIEI.EK Parts and Accessories 430 NORTH MIAMI AVE. No Charge for Examination Delaney & Beers kodak I in.-thins: %  >". Knlariiiig 1 urn ial Work and Home Purl nil* .50% OfT on All AmaU-ur Wort 212 N. K. 4th St. Phone 233ii W! r E stand, today, on the threshold of a new calendar year. What Father Time may bring to each ol us and to all of us during this coming twelvemonth Is not known to us. We do not believe that he will scatter his wares promiscuously. We must believe that all his bundles are addressed to certain individuals. They will receive these parcels. Let each one of us accept his gilt with the faith that it is for the best. Should it contain something distasteful, let us realize that we are not qualified to judge true values. The bitter pill coats a healing drug. Our taste of it is no fair appraisal of its value. Just as the laws of Egypt, enacted by Joseph as emergency measures, brought relief to many and saved the land, so, also, will the effect of the emergency changes in our personal conduct and in the affairs ol the government result in lasting good. Be not frightened by Pharaoh's dream. The dream foretold seven years of famine. Actually there were but two. Genesis, chapter XLVII, verse 18, speaks of only a first and second year of famine. No reference is made to a completion of the seven years. So, also, will our present emergency draw to an unexpected and surprisingly early close during this year, which begins today. Welcome to 1933. May it offer the interpretation and solution to our dream. •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• *+++++ &f&f&f&f Splendid Opportunity To study Hebrew with ftltklBally-known I lebrew educator and writer. Private lessons, also gltMlp instruction un bearranged by calling evening* EVERGREEN 775-J, APT. 12. .;..;..;..;.. : ..;..;..;. .; % %  ; % %  ; %  .: %  .:. %  : % % % % % % % %  : % %  •• %  %  %  • % %  '" il DR. CHAS. BECKWITT! OPTOMETRIST "22 Years in Win mi" ] Did you know ... f Th.,rlanl thin* in Mint. •"< %  rjM .•>,• facto, i. ,„nidrrlnK hi. axpantnea and rrpulalion? "TlaU WILL TEI.I." m of HKCWlal operation in Miami ihe l„.l „r„„f „f „ ur ability. M..,„lr. ,1, ,,„,-„l| II,. |l,.,ki||. •'I" V K. FIRST AVKNI i: EMPLOY FEDERATION ORCHESTRAS WHY? Reliable — Dependdb | Experienced — OrgtHbti Rehearsed And Irylnr to maintain • Hvlnc %  *' %  •• i — I Miami Federation of Musicians I.IMIIS J. NKTT. ataUtHfl PHONE 2-3912 Tbt World's Musi hidiiiJ"' Pitying Cards ... Your favorite pMaW* heart u friend child cki Irt-rfe, of I, re„r.Hl,.,.,l 0B ^p?Uf^\ rani deck i'f ('Altl)S. An ideal a-ift "•;"<>, fort offered at thia !•• i ,r "' ,'„ r i" j Nt) MONEY. Ju.t end your | i phof aaaatan* or netta iboto, i>iwh,.t Of '" v "'' itl) your llM), It will be returned irder. I'ay mailman OMFfJJ ^ a 1..1 ,i..,i,. u l lime oliei order. Pay -'. ial limit, -.1 imtm-dialely. I THE JEWISH 1 a p 11 Boa 27S M %  I.ORIDIAN ri. ri*



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Page Six THE JEWISH FLORID' A N Friday, January < .1 St. Petersburg Notes Congregation B'nai Israel with A. S. Kleinfeld. rabbi, will hold regular Friday night services at 8 p. m., when he will preach a sermon "A Father's Blessing." Saturday morning the services begins at 9 o'clock. Sunday school at 10 o'clock. Hebrew school daily at 4 p. m. Judge Max Pinansky was the guest of the congregation. On Friday night, after the services, he addressed the members of the congregation at the Horowitz hotel, giving useful suggestions as to the future activities of the congregation, and how to raise the standard of Judaism in our city. Upon invitation of Rabbi Kleinfeld. he occupied the pulpit Saturday morning and spoke upon the Problems of Jewish Life. While in town he was a guest .at the Soreno hotel. Among his guests for the New Year's eve celebration was Rabbi A. S. Kleinfeld, who gave the New Year's greeting in the presence of 500 guests at the Soreno. Congregation B'nai Israel is giving a card party for the benefit of the Building fund at the Temple, Sunday evening, January 8. They are also planning a concert on January 22. The building committee is contemplating to start building the new synagogue before the summer. The Judaic council met at the Horowitz hotel. December 29. After a short business session, the members enjoyed bridge and dancing. The next meeting of the council will be held at the Horowitz hotel, Monday evening. January 9, at 8:15 p. m. The Judaic council entertained with a charity dance on Tuesday evening. December 27, at the Shrine club. Members of the council acting as hostesses included the Misses Rose Horowitz. Celia Ruibn. Sylvia Schwartz and Mrs. William Salzer. Little Corinne Silverman offered one of the highlights of the evening by presenting a very entertaining dance number. Guests and members included Messrs. and Mesdames B. Reyner, W. V. Salzer. S. Fyvolent. M. Miller, M. Rosenberg, H. Cohen, J. L. Mille, G. Rippa. A. Esrick. H. Goldbery. S. Trager. L. Feinberg. L. Donsky. A. Silverman. S. Rosenberg, A. Rubin. H. Mogel. M. Weinstein, L. Solomon. F. Sherman, G. H. Clark. J. P. Clark. K. D. Huff. E. Marcott. H. Herman. Captain and MM. Terves; Mesdames F. Keller. A. Gallop, B. Carroll, F. Robbins, Landorff, Reissler; Misses Ethel Horowitz, Lee Rabinovich, Ruth Feldman, Sylvia Schwartz. Rose Horowitz, Miriam Miller. Mildred Carroll, Margaret Bryant. Elizabeth Coates, A. Feinberg. Ida Keller. Annabel Jacobs, M. Laivett, S. Laivett, M. Hamilton, Belle Goldman, Celia Rubin; Messrs. Jay Schwartz, F. Hoffman, Harold Jacoby. Louis Magid. Paul Fehder, Ben Schwartz. Harry Keller, Ben Wolfson. H. Boswier, R. H. James. M. Robbins, Sol Green, Carl Morgan, Drs. L. M. Gable and H. R. Gable and Rabbi A. S. Kleinfeld. Potato Latkes Four potatoes, two eggs, one teaspoonful salt, one-half cup flour, one teaspoon baking powder. Grate the potatoes. Drain off the water. Add the other ingredients, stirring well. The batter should pour easily. Grease a griddle and drop batter by spoonfuls on the hot griddle. Fry as any pancake. Other shortening may be used instead of butter. The Meeting Place of All Faiths (Continued from Page Five) been in our present day of those who go to churches and to synagogues, but have not God in their hearts! Hosea speaks in a similar vein: "I desire mercy and not sacrifice." And the eloquent Isaiah declares in the name of God. "To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? Bring no more vain oblations; it is an offering of abomination unto me Yea, when ye make many prayers. I will not hear; yours hands are full of blood Cease to do evil; learn to do well." The passion for social justice. ; then, vivifies Judaism, as it does other creeds, and turns the observ| ing Jew who understands and practices the tenets of his own faith into 3 practical idealist who makes the world safe for the weak, the poor and the oppressed of the earth. The ethical basis of Christianity is too well known to need much explanation here. The Christian and the non-Christian world is familiar with the Golden Rule, "Whatever ye would that me should do to you. do ye even so to them." But how many men and women of our acquaintance actually practice this? Christ emphasized humility, relief of the poor, the duty of love of one's neighbor. For the prevailing hatreds and bloodsheds of his day and of all time the teacher who is known by the epithet of the Prince of Peace advocated not a brutal might that would crush all nonbelievers into conformity, but an overwhelming pity that sought to embrace even the enemy. The psalmist, it will be recalled, asks. "What | is man that Thou art mindful of him and the son of man that Thou visiteth him? For Thou hast made him a little lower than the angels nnd hast crowned him with glory and honor." The ideal suggested j here is one that cannot be even faintly realized by any other way than in terms of conduct. And ceri tainly. Christianity attaches no more value to mere lip profession than does either Buddhism or Judaism. When I reflect on the sorrows of the world and especially on the j false reasoning which justifies bru' tality of man towards man. I cannot help thinking of the immortal words, "Though I speak with the | tongues of men and angels and have not charity, I am become as sound'ng brass or a tinkling cymbal." Certainly the effect of Christian j -thics upon those who take the i trouble to understand it is to make 'cm better men among men. The n .it French mathematician and icious philosopher of the sevenBentb century. Pascal, testifies to "he effect of Christ upon his life as ollows: "I keep my faith with everyone. I render not evil to those who wrong me ... I try to be just true, sincere and faithful to all men, and I have a tender affection for those with whom God has mo:v intimately connected me, and whether I am alone or in the presence of men, all my actions are performed in the sight of God, who must judge them and to whom I have consecrated them all." This might have been uttered by a devout Buddhist or a devout Jew or by a good, righteous man of any religion. If space permitted, the doctrines of the wise Confucius might be quoted, urging men to exercise charity, forgiveness, repentance, and pointing out that example is to be preferred to teaching. The Mohammedan faith, too, while stressing the devotional exercises of a Moslem, emphasizes also hospitality and charity. But enough has already been cited to show that the founders of all the recognized religions envisioned a world in which the relations between men and men would be helpful toward the achievement After Six O'Clock This article um by mitttke concluded on page J. This /> the conclusion. Jews must learn not to go where they are not wanted. The kind of a Jew that turns up his nose at his own people, that changes his name from Rosenfeld to Roosevelt just for the sake of sliding through a crevice into Christian society, or who attends the Christian Science church for the same reason, is to be blamed of course; but he is more to be pitied. He must be a most uncomfortable creature. It he is so privileged as to be part of the elite group for an occasional evening he must feel of an outer and inner peace. All religions have a meeting place in the ideals of our common humanity. And these seem to be the same, irrespective of color or race. Formulas vary. All kinds of decrees insisting upon "Thou shalt" or "Thou shalt not" are promulgated, but. in the last analysis, each faith goes far beyond taboos, formulas, ritual and theological belief into the sphere of human conduct. And the truly godless man. in my humble opinion, is not he who denies the existence of God. but he who accepts the letter and rejects the spirit, who prays with his lips and curses with. his heart, who glibly quotes the Bible and follows in his actions the dictates of lust, avarice and cruelty. In conclusion I wish to Rrophasizc an essential agreement among all of us God's children as to how we must live to draw nearer toward God. Be it Christianity, Judaism. Buddhism. Confucianism, Mohammedanism, be it a creed older than history or a cult young as the day's newspaper, only one thing interests us: How does that faith affect the daily life of its adherents? Does it make them more kindly, more tolerant, more just? For, when all i^ said and done, all religions meet somewhere in the great, compassionate heart of God. like an ugly duckling amidst a bevy of swans. Though he may not realize it. he stands out like a sore thumb and is an object of sympathetic ridicule. What the future will demonstrate we cannot predict; nor do we care very much personally. We do think thai both Jews and Christians might exercise a little more desire to mingle together, at the same time maintaining their own self respect and fealty to their group. If this is to come, the Christian will have to become a lot more Christian than he is and many Jews will have to improve their manners. After all. is it not possible that a partial basis for this discrimination rest.upon our own crudities? Some of us do not know how funny we are. It is commendable for a man to rise from the ghetto to a boulevard in one generation, but living on the boulevard does not necessarily mean the abolition of his ghetto characteristics Many of us may retain all 'he peculiarities of the immigrant and not realize it —language, manners and modes of thinking. I know that I shall be severely criticised for making this statement, but truth and candor dictate I hat the attention of our people be called i to this weakness in ourselves. Some Jews might well cultivate a little more reserve, polish and poise. I have no doubt that this will be achieved in time as many Jews have already acquired these characteristics, but let us not deceive ourselves that most Jews possess them. They do not. So this adds another point to the aggravation that exists bej tween Jews and Christians and some of our gentile students made no bones about it. And so for a long time at least, Jew and gentile will get along from daybreak to dusk. When night (haws his sable curtain over the earth there will be a parting of the Forum Speaker Begins Series % % %  ..„,,„„, ,| fr„ m !•„, 0n() had through physical fitness mental energy, but permanent er of government, economic S y ste institutions or Individuals can i realized only by adding ethical I er. including economic gain, can fc ness to mental and physical fitness "Three elements are required u make the compound known as., ar: carbon, hydrogen and oxy2 Add one or subtract one and •>* compound is not sugar. Just so D> ture requires the three kinds ol ^. man energy to make the compound permanent power. "We have passed through the boy. hood of the race and have entered manhood and must become w enough to add ethical fitness if civilization is to endure. "Selfishness is not the law of survival in the lower animal kingdom. This is because animals cannot pro duce food. If man and nature failed to produce food for the animal, u* animal dies. When we come to the kingdom of man this law changes. He can produce food or its equivalent — the money to purchase food — money earned by service rendered. Since he can. !"£• must or tend to perish. This carries with it a corresponding duty of society to furnish the citizen a chance to sent. If this is denied, man must rever. to his animal characteristics, and will. We are in for one of two things, either ethical evolution o: ultimate bloody revolution. "The same degree of scientific thought that has been directed toward mass production, once centered on ways and means of mass consumption, could solve the problem and will, let us hope, before I, is too late." Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan Temple Israel presided. The Form is under the auspices of a committee of Temple Israel. Directors MARVIN D. ADAMS Vice President, Btsmbltr-AdsmsFrasier Ins. Agency, Inc. Miami, Kin. GEORGE J. AVENT VIM President, Florida National Hank. Jacksonville, Kla. EDWARD BALL Vice President, Almoun Securities, Inc.. Jacksonville, Pla. ALFRED I. DuPONT I'rt-si,lent. Almtmrs Seruritirs. In.. Jacksonville, Kla. WM. C. HILL President. Third National Bank, Miami. Kla. W. O. KENNEDY Florida Manager, Thomson & McKmni.il. Miami. Kla. JOHN F. LANIGAN Vice President and Assistant Trust Officer of ili.Bank, Miami Kla J. WALTER MUHLBACH W. A. REDDING Vice President, Florida National Bank Jacksonville, Kla. WM. H. ROGERS Rogers • Towers, Jacksonville Ha F C SCHWALBE Vice Presl it, Florida National Hank. .lack-...11 ill,.. Kla A. A. UNGAR I 11.111 Hunk Co.. Miami, Kla B. S. WEATHERS President "f the Hunk, Miami. Pis Officers ALFRED I. DuPONT Chairman ..r the Board B. S. WEATHERS Pi-1-.i |nt L. A. USINA Vice President and Cashier J. WALTER MUHLBACH Vies President ami Triijt Officer JOHN F. LANIGAN Vies 1'rn.iil.rnt nnd A*istnnt Trust, Officer C. F. SHEWMAKE Assistant <'ahi>r E. A. GARDNER ('nmiitrnllp Statement of Condition From Report to Comptroller DHCEMBER 31, 1932 RESOURCES Loans and Discounts .... $ 432,460.47 Overdrafts 34.6O Furniture and Fixtures 10,351.42 U. S. Bonds to Secure Circulation 400,000.00 Accrued Interest Receivable $ 11,908.81 U. S. Bonds and Treasury ( "Jjetta 594,385.96 listed New York Stuck Exchange Bonds and Other Securities .' 164,375.00 ( ash on Hand and Due from Banks 811,997.5 1 1,5 82.667.28 $2,425,513.77 LIABILITIES Capital Stuck $ 400,000.00 Surplus 100,000.00 Undivided Profits 3 1,821.39 ( irculation 400,000.00 DEPOSITS Z:ZIZZZ 1,493,692.31 $2,425,513.77 AFFILIATED BANKS FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK FLORIDA BANK Of Jarkhonvillc FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK At St. I', 1, ,.>,„,,. FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK __ __ At l.skrlsnd FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK At ll.,rl.,„ At Orlsndo FLORIDA BANK AND TRUST COMPANY At Dsytons lira, li FLORIDA SOUTHSIDE BANK South Jacksonville rLCLQIDA Ml 14 \ VI BANK AND TRUST CCHPANY iT ] H %  W / Ui Hast Flagler Street


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wJewisti Meridian Vol. 6. No. 1. FLORIDA'S ONLY JEWISH WEEKLY MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 6, 1933. j Announcements! CONGREGATION BETH JACOB (Orthodox) 311 Waxhinston Avr., Miami It..,, h L. AXELBOD, Rabbi Regular Friday evening services will begin at 5:30 with the late services at 8:30, when Rabbi Axelrod will preach on "The Challenge of the Jew." Congregational chanting and singing will be directed by Cantor Boris Schlachman. Saturday morning the services begin at 8:30 and the rabbi will preach in Yiddish on "Vaylgash." TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIAMI Reform • 117 N. K. Ninrtrrnth Strrrl DR. JACOB II. KAPLAN, Rabbi Regular Friday evening services begin at 8 o'clock tonight with the rabbi preaching on "Together We Stand." The usual musical program by the choir will be heard and a social hour will follow the services. The public is invited to attend. Forum Speaker Begins Series DAVID SHOLTZ Florida's New Governor Joint Hadassah Dance Wednesday lh : BETH DAVID CONGREGATION (Conservative) 1.19 N. W. Third Avrnur MAX SHAPIRO. Rabbi Services will begin tonight at 5:30. followed by the late services at 8:15 when Rabbi Shapiro will preach on "The World's Fools." The usual congregational singing and chanting will be led by Cintor Louis Hayman, who will be assisted by the choir. A social hour will follow. MIAMI JEWISH ORTHODOX CONGREGATION lOrthorloa I IMI S. W. Third Slrwl JONAH E. CAPLAN. Rabbi Regular Friday evening services begin at 5:30 with the late services at 8:30. when Rabbi Caplan will preach on "Human Responsibility." The regular chanting and congregational singing will be enjoyed. Following the services a social hour will be held in the vestry rooms of the synagogue with Mr. Joseph Greenberg, well known Jewish artJoining forces for the success of Its efforts, Junior and Senior Hadassah are making certain that the barn dance being held on January 11 at the Mahi Shrine temple will be one of the most novel as well as entertaining events of the season. For those familiar with farm life, it will brin? back memories dear to them, and to the uninitiated it will bring scenes that they have only Financial slumps, panics and depressions were outlined by Dr. Arthur Frederick Sheldon, president emeritus of the Sheldon school, Chicago, discussing "The Basic Enemies of Human Progress, and Their Coming Conquest," 'n Bayfront park Wednesday. It was the first of a series of 11 open forurn lectures scheduled for Wednesday nights under the auspices of Temple Israel. "A slump is temporary sleeping sickness; a panic in an -economic St. Vitus dance; but a depression is creeping paralysis," Dr. Sheldon declared. "Physical science has located and isolated many of the germs which were the cause of physical diseases practically eradicating such disastrous diseases as leprosy, yellow fever and smallpox. Science must now turn attention to the location of the 'bugs' or its psychological germs hat cause economic diseases. Among the greatest of these economic diseases is ignorance of the perfectly natural laws of human relationships. The basic economic law is service in sense of usefulness. The opposite of this is selfishness which is undue regard for the rights of self and corresponding disregard of the rights of others. DOYLE CARLTON Florida's Retiring Governor Jewish Lawyer Is Re-appointed 1st. presenting a number of popular bp seen and hean| during tne eve readings. |)jn? LeQ Ackerman W M be master n! ceremonies, and Burton Mank will direct the square dances. Benjamin Axelroad, prominent lewlob attorney of this city, whose term as a member of the board of trustees of the Jackson Memorial hospital expired this week, was reSelfishness appointed by the city commission takes many forms. For example, the for a full four-year term to succeed World war which cost the world himself. With him was also reapmore than two hundred billions of pol.ited G. A. Tiice, president of the dollars and the end is not yet. It is Jersey Ice Cream company, and Vad f b tn0t See "\ Farm _ya r <". destined to tend to break the backs popular communal worker of this of generations to be. Its motive was city purely selfishness and greed, not Mr. Axelrod has been an active service. worker in local Jewish affairs since "Unethical competition is another his anival in Miami some years ago. form of selfishness. Competition is | the life of trade up to a certain rangements for the senior group are pojnt beyond which it becomes the Mrs. Alex Goldstein, chairman, asdeath of pro fits to both employer sisted by Mesdames J. Katz and B. and employe. Possibly the Brandeis Kandle. Representing the junior suggestion of a certificate of necesgroup are Miss Sylvia Miles as sity whe reby one seeking to enter chairman with Miss Lilian Melcher business must get a certincate showand Mrs. Goldie Elman assisting. ig that tne business is needed is one I A mass meeting of all Jews of the The public is urged to attend as the of the answers | 0reater Miami district inter est*d in proceeds will be devoted to Hadas"Technology functioning in the Bnai Brith will be held at the Comsah work in Palestine. A number of crea tion of miracle making maoutstanding vaudeville artists will cmnes i s one of the causes of the barn, rural scenes will be the theme of all decorations which will enhance the natural beauty of the ballroom. Square dances and other dances reminiscent of days gone by will be featured. In charge of arBnai Brith Calls Jews To Meeting Standard Oil To Tax Lamps Benefit Dance To Be Novel Event CemeteryMeeting Final preparations have been AQOpt IVeSOlUtlOn made for what promises to be one of the most outstanding affairs of An important meeting regarding the current season on Wednesday.' the cemetery situation was held last January 25 at the Mahi Shrine ternTuesday night at Beth David Talple when the annual ball of the mud Torah. Mr. I. L. Mintzer. presLadies Auxiliary of the Miami JewI ident of the Greater Miami Jewish ish Orthodox congregation will be : Cemetery association presided. A held. Booths specially erected for full discussion regarding present the affair will be filled with goodies j conditions took place. A resolution of all kinds. Special decorations was unanimously adopted directing will be placed throughout the beauj a meeting of the adjustment comtlful ballroom of the temple. Noted mittee within one week; that no acartists will be heard in a program \ tion be taken towards an adjust featuring both classical and vaude, ment without the approval of the ville numbers. Dancing will begin I full committee; that a mass meetat 9 p." m. and last until the early ing of the community be held on morning hours. The proceeds will January 17, at which time the combe used towards the Talmud Torah mittee shall have concluded finai funds of the congregation, which is negotiations regarding the cemetery taking care of a number of pupils or be discharged at this meeting. A and ethical. The trouble of the lamps and tJlP tax on candles, such unable to pay for their Hebrew regeneral discussion of the problems world all down through the ages as those used on pHday ^ ligious instruction. Mrs. J. Louis affecting the cemetery was led by has been the leaving out of the „ Shochet and Mrs. Louis Pallott are Stanley C. Myers and was particithird element which is essential for Chanukah. will r> from one cent in charge of the committee which is pated in by Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan permanent power. Temporary powto 10 cents, according to the size of making arrangements for the affair, and Rabbi Max Shapiro. (Continued on Page Six) the box. widespread unemployment. Some say man has created a juggernaut, a Frankenstein, a boomerang which threatens to turn on society and upon the civilization with destruction. One thing is certain. The machine must be made the slave of man or man will become its slave. Some way, somehow the problem of mass consumption as well as mass production must be solved; otherwise, we are in for an explosion which will rend civilization. "Super credit is another form of selfishness. In the words of Meyers, credit is like morphine. In the hands of an expert and in the presence of dire emergency morphine is useful, but carried to excess both credit and morphine are sure roads to the gutter. munity Centre of the Hebrew Athletic club at S. W. Fifth street and Sixteenth avenue, next Thursday evening. January 12. At this meeting a number of prominent speakers will be heard and an attempt will be made to reorganize Che local branch. Nomination and election of officers will be made and plans for the work of this important body will be discussed. The general public even though not now affiliated with Bnai Brith is urged to attend. NEW YORK. N. Y. — The Standard Oil Company of New York has "Many causes have entered into decided to affix a special stamp tax the world depression, but they could all be bundled together and labeled ignorance of natural laws and selfishness.' "There are three kinds of potential human energy: physical, mental to all Jahrzeit lamps and wax candles sold for religious purposes, the proceeds to go to New York Yeshivoth and Talmud Torahs. A twocent tax will be applied to Jahrzeit Price Five Cents After Six O'Clock Lifting the Nocturnal Sable Curtain that Separates Christian from Jew. By Rabbi Edgar F. Magnin •:• •:• &f •:• •:• •:• •: %  •:• •: %  •:• •: %  •:• •:• ••• •:• •: %  •:• •:• •:• •:• •; •> %  -, In a consideration of better understanding between Jews and Christians, it is well to point out that the words anti-Semitism or prejudice are too general to be applied to all forms of anti-Jewish feeling or discrimination. It is also essential to emphasize that the social question differs in many features from the racial, economic and religious aspects of the subject. Let us analyze the social question a little closer. The problem is one of the paradoxes of American life. Has it ever occurred to you that in this country that emphasizes democracy and which is composed of all racial and religious stocks or their descendants why the social problem should be more serious than it is in Europe with all its traditional hatreds and prejudices? We have been informed that in Russia before the Revolution where Jews were slaughtered like animals in a stockyard or even in Germany where scientific anti-Semitism germinated in theory and was carried out in practice, that the feeling against the Jew socially speaking was often less intense than it is in this country. Here Jews mingle with Christians frequently; they do business together both in the relationship of customer and merchant and vice versa; they form partnerships; they work together on campaigns for civic, philanthropic and intellectual betterment; their greetings in the street are friendly and exceedingly human, and yet they do not mingle together socially. We are not, of course, discussing exceptions to the rule. It is doubtful whether the Christian himself realizes in a corucious and analytical way the implications of his attitude toward the Jew; and we are certain that the average Jew has devoted very little thought to the question at all. The charge has often been made that Jews are clannish. Jews are clannish, but this statement requires some explanation and further elucidation. The truth is that all groups are clannish. People feel more at home among their own kind than they do among the representatives of other groups. That is why Jews. Italians. French, Germans and other ethnic groups build up their own neighborhoods, form their own clubs and carry on their own social affairs. Since the destruction of the Ghetto. Jews have continued to form new "Ghettos" of their own volition in every large city of the world. Looking at the question from the religious angle, it is necessary that we be clannish and that applies to all other religious groups as well. If we mingle too intimately with others, our young people will be tempted to intermarry and this will mean the suicide of our people and the destruction of our faith. Let us. however, be.candid and admit that we do choose to remain apart after 6 o'clock. There are many gentiles who would be happy to welcome Jewish people to their homes, but snobbishness is a trait of human nature and Jews are no exception to the rule. The trouble is that, if (Continued on Page Three)



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Page Two THE iFWISH FLORID' A N Friday, January 6. 193'f m I The Chanukah program of Beth Jacob congregation last Sunday morning was witnessed by a large crowd of tourists and residents, who thoroughly enjoyed the efforts of the children. The miniature service was enthusiastically received, as was the playlet, "The New Hope." The entire affair was produced by the teachers of the Sunday school, under the direction of Rabbi Axelrod. Miss Belle Siegel coached the angels and the toy orchestra. Miss Marion Levy coached the dances, and was in charge of the costuming and make-up. Miss Sylvia Levy took charge of the boys in the playlet, and Mrs. L. Axelrod directed the girls' scenes in the sketch. Miss Marion Blank acted as mistress of ceremonies. The affair ended with the singing of the Hatikvah, after which Mrs. 3arney Weinkle, president of the sisterhood, spoke to the audience on the importance of the Sunday school, and urged the parents to assist the school in every way possible. The children taking part in the play were: Sidney Besvinick. Shirley Klein. June Rose Toursh. Esther Levy, Jean Weinberg. Martha Neham. Gladys Marcus, Stanley Weinkle, Rose Blank. Seymon Rheim, Irving Goldstein, Jean Miller. Beatrice Dansky and Lillian Marcus. • • • Last Saturday Bernard Serkin. the son of Mr. and Mrs. B. Serkin of this city, was Bar Mitzva at the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation in the presence of a large number of friends. Bernard recited the Haftorah and then made a brief address in English, following which Rabbi Caplan spoke on the duties of a Bar Mitzva. Following the ceremonies the parents were hosts to the worshippers at a Kiddush in the vestry rooms of the synagog. Sunday night a Bar Mitzva dinner was served at the home of the Serkins to a large number of their relatives and friends, a number of whom came from Nashville, Tenn. • • • Cantor Nathan Wroobel is still a patient at the University hospital at Coral Gables following an auto accident last week. • Mr. and Mrs. Moe Harris of New York and Miami entertained at a New Year's eve party last Saturday night at their hdmc. As the guests entered the beautifully decorated living room of the home they were given party caps, noisemakers and favors. Music was furnished during the evening ajjd dancing was enjoyed. Promptly at midnight a buffet supper was served. Festivities lasted until 4 a. m. Sunday morning. Among those present were Rabbi and Mrs. Jonah E. Caplan. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Tannenbaum. Mr. and Mrs. Sam Tannenbaum. Mr. and Mrs. Max Kupferstein. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Feldman. Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Adelman. Mr. and Mrs. J. Louis Shochet, Mr. and Mrs. Calvin of Monticello, N. Y.. Mrs. S. Grossman, Miss Alberta Tannenbaum, Mr. and Mrs. Milton Weiner. Miss Anna Myers and Mr. Brigadier of New York City, Mrs. I. Buckstein, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Futaerfass, and Mr. and Mrs. Harry Seitlin. • • • The marriage of Miss Edythe R. Mink and Norman S. Fregger took place Sunday, December 25, at the home of Rabbi Jacob H. Kaplan, in the presence of the immediate family. The bride wore an attractive gown of gray and powder blue, with accessories to match. She carried a bouquet of bridal roses. Mr. Fregger is the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Fregger of Omaha, and has been attending school in Washington and at present is connected with the prohibition unit of the government. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. Mink. Following the wedding dinner, the The Woman's club of the Workresenting the Miami Jewish OrthoThe Wo ned a large dox Talmud Torah played a team of mens "" New years Beth David Talmud Torah last Frinumber day morning at Ada Merritt field. The Miami Jewish Orthodox Warn won by a score of 18 to 5. On the victorious team were Roy Mechlowitz. Jerry Rieger, Bernard Serkin, Stanley Jamison. Gerald Shulan, Harvey Levien. Oscar Rappaport. Martin Greenberg, Mortimer Lasky and Manuel Seitlin. Utility men were Stanley Rieger. Manuel Serkin, Jack Seitlin. Stanley Slier and Seymour Silver. An important meeting of the lad;, auxiliary of the Miami Jewish ruiiuwuig MOT H-M*B „....... — ccuple left for Washington, where Orthodox congregation will be hem the bridegroom will resume his studies and the bride will enter George Washington university. • • • Mr. and Mrs. Sol Schneider entertained at a dinner party recently at their home to honor Leonard Banon the occasion of his birthday. Bouganvillea and fern centered the next Tuesday evening. January 10. at the synagog when important business will be transacted. All members are urged to attend. • • • Plans are being made by Temple Israel Sisterhood for a stepping out party in charge of a committee headed by Mrs. Herbert Seppler. full table. In the receiving line with the details of which will be announced hosts and Mr. Barr were Miss Belle shortly. Schwartz and Miss Nettie Ornstein. Special entertainment was given by Miss Helen Rubel. Dancing was also enjoyed. Wr last "Sunday evening at its hall 701 N. W. Fifth avenue. Du. to, the evening Yiddish folk songs „, n enjoyed as were a number of well-rendered songs given by Louis Riegel. In charge of arrangements was a committee headed by Mrs. Henry Seitlin. • • Mis Bertha Levy, owner and director of Camp Wohelo. entertained Recipes for the Jewish Family TaygJech eggs, four and Mrs. Julius Damenstein and daughter. Harriet, are in Charleston. S. C. to attend the unveiling of a monument to Mrs. Damenstein's father, the late Sol Bowman. • • • Dr. H. Lipkin of the Jewish Memorial hospital. New York, with Mrs. Lipkin and their daughter and son. ire at the Park apartments for their eighth w'.nter in Miami Beach. • • • Word of the death of Mrs. Rebecca Barnett at Cleveland, O., on December 24. has been received here. Mrs. Barnett is survived by Mrs. Ben Watts, formerly of Miami, and Mrs. I. L. Seligman of Miami, both, prominent communal workers well known in Miami, her daughters. • • • The January meeting of the Temple Irael Sisterhood was held Tuesday afternoon at Kaplan hall with Mrs. I. Levin presiding. After the business session was concluded a program in charge of Mrs. Ted Simon was presented. Mrs. Jessie Ad'.er, formerly assistant district attor. (if Cincinnati. O. spoke on the work of her office. Mrs. Larry Fay was heard in a number of vocal seVctions which received much applause. She was accompanied at the •-.iano by Mrs. Frances Tarbeaux. Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan, rabbi of Temple Israel, delivered a five-minute iiional talk. Mrs. A. I. Magid showed the beautiful Italian banquet cloth and napkins presented to *hc sisterhood by Major Kaufman Mandel which will be awarded in a •most arranged by the sisterhood. \ social hour followed the program in charge of Mrs. Jack Bernstein, chairman of the social hour. Mesdames Jack Bernstein, Harry Nevins and Bert Relsner assisted. • • • One of the regular series of card parties was held last Tuesday night it the vestry rooms of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation by its ladies auxiliary. More than 10 tables of bridge were in play with Mrs. Jonah E. Caplan and Mrs. William Clein as the hostesses. The door prize was won by Mrs. R. Beck. Individual prizes were awarded at each table. During the evening delicious refreshments were served. • • • Instead of its regular meeting Temple Israel Sisterhood will celebrate the ninth anniversary of its organization on February 6, with a bridge luncheon at Kaplan hall. Full details of this affair will appear in an early issue. • • • Playing the first of a series of inter-school contests, the team repMrs. Louis Pallott is now convalescing at her home after having undergone an operation at the Victoria hospital. The regular board meeting ol Beth David Sisterhood was held last Wednesday noon when a delicious luncheon was served. Charles Markowitz and Louis Hayman were the hostesses. The regular business meeting followed the luncheon. Mrs. Sydney L. Wcintraub reported that a tidy sum had been realized from the food sale held recently. A series of card parties will be sponsored by the sisterhood, the beginning of which will be announced in an early issue. • • • Beth David Sisterhood will hold its regular meeting on Wcdi < January 18. at its Talmud Torah nail beginning at 2 p. m., when important business will be transacted. A special meeting of the executive board of the ladies auxiliary of the Jewish Welfare bureau was held last Wednesday at the call of its president, Mrs. I. Levin. In presenting her resignation as president of the organization Mrs. Levin stressed the i fact that the office was one that required and deserved the undivided attention of its president. That because of her office as president ol Trlnple Israel Sisterhood and Other duties she was unable to devote the time necessary, and therefore submitted her resignation which will be acted on at the next meeting of the auxiliary on January Hi at Kaplan hall. Representatives of the organization to the Jewish Welfare bureau consisting of Mesdames Herbert E. Kleiman. Harry Kevins, Bertha B. Levy. A. I. Magid and J. Simpson were chosen as a committee to recommend officers to till the vacancies. • • • The Bible class and Hebrew study moup of Beth David meets regularly every Tuesday evening beginning at 7:30. All interested in this are urged to attend. • • • The boys of the Talmud Torah of the Miami Jewish Orthodox congregation were given a talk on "Sportsmanship" by Max Rosenfeld, outfielder of the Brooklyn Nationals, last Wednesday morning. Following the address he answered questions regarding baseball. Eight eggs, four and one half cups flour, two teaspoor.fuls baking powder, one pound honey, threefourths cup sugar, one teaspoonful ginger, one-half cup walnut meats, rector oi uamp ••-• M[N ( ., ,_ llim ,. an( j baking powa number of her counsellors and ^ Ulorougnly and knea d well. The campers of Atlanta. Ga ^, a nd _";" dougn should be soft, but just stiff enough to roll Roll by bits into long rope formation, each rope to be betwe-n three-eights and onehall inch in diameter. Use very little flour in rolling. Then slice ropes to make one-half inch cubes. Light oven. While oven is heating, bring to a boil one pound of honey, one teaspoon ginger, and one cup of sugar in a shallow, broad-bottomed bowl. Put into this mixture the particles of dough. Then place in medium oven. Do not open oven for first 15 or 20 minutes. By this time the honey will have coated each bit of dough. Now stir every 10 minutes to separate the particles, which must not cling to each other. Allow one hour in all for baking. Particles should bv brown and when one Is put into cold water it should remain firm and crisp. Wet a board with cold water and pour contents of pan onto it. With wet hands, mold in form of a cake (two inches high' Sprinkle with one-half cup of walnut meats and let cool. Then cut in two-inch strips. Cut each strip diagonally at two-inch intervals. Recipe makes 40 diamond-shaped pieces that will keep indefinitely. .1 1|'H -" %  „„,. Fla.. at the Roney Plaza pools last Friday. Present were the Misses Evelyn, Rita and Betty Abelman of Atlanta, Ga„ and Kitty and Dorothy Morris. Shirley and Isable Levy of Miami, Mesdames Sadye Sachs. Lill Morris and Abraham. • • • To honor the memory of the late Dr. A. D. Halpern. the Workmen's circle is sponsoring a memorial meeting at the Workmen's circle hall. 701 N. W. Fifth avenue this coming Sunday evening. January 8. when a number of prominent speakers will address the meeting. The public is urged to attend. Sponsoring a Jewish concert at Beth David auditorium, the Woman's club of the Workmen's circle will hold a benefit concert, the proceeds to be devoted to the tool cam1 UCI11IUUO Mesdames Paign ot tne Jews of eastern Eur ope, on Wednesday evening. January 11. Among the artists who will appear are Al Harris. Maxim Brociyn. artist formerly with the Chicago Opera company, and the noted pianist. Zella Zaltin. These artists are on a tour of the country in the Interests of the tool campaign. The Ami Well club, a group of -uis ranging in age from 12 to 15. will hold a kiddie patty at the home of Miss Kitty Morris. Saturday. January 7. when plans call for various names to be played and rein shments to be served. Girls within the ages prescribed may become members upon applying to any member of the club. Meetings are held every Thursday evening at the homes ol the different members. Mrs. Sam Tannenbaum is sponsor [or tin group. • • • A regular meeting oi the Books in Brief club will be held Monday evening, January 9, at the home of Mrs. I. L. Reisman. 2001 S. W. Sixth Street, when Mis. George Goldberg Will review "Contessions ol St Allgustlne." A social hour will lollow the discussion. • • Mi. and Mrs. Albert Mendelsohn ol New York announce the engagement of their daughter. Florence, to Morton Roth, son of Mrs. O. Roth of Cincinnati. Miss Mendelsohn, who has been in Cincinnati for the last three weeks, is expect eel to join her parents at their winter home. 227 Thirteenth strict. Miami Beach, shortly. Fish Ramekins Two cups cold, cooked, flaked fish: one-fourth cup chopped nut meats, one-fourth cup grated cheese, onehalf cup buttered crumbs, two tablespoons flour, one-fourth teaspoon salt, one cup milk. Melt butter, blend in flour and salt and add milk gradually. Cook until thick in a double boiler. Add cooked fish and reheat. Place layers of fish. salt, pepper, nut meats, cheese and crumbs in greased ramekin dishes and bake 20 minutes in a moderate oven. 325 degrees Fahrenheit. Garnish with slices of pimento (illM'S. Bunt Km hen Two eggs, two cups sugar, two and one-half tablespoons melted butter, one teaspoon vanilla, one cup milk, three cups flour, two teaspoons baking powder, one-fourth cup small raisins. Beat eggs, sugar and butter for 10 minutes. Add milk, flour, baking powder, vanilla and raisins. Bake one hour. in+ WALK A THON CINDERELLA BALLROOM S1.000 CASH PRIZES 21 inii us nun — GOING ON .YOU" — %  •••••— -.•..•. I PIERRE'S Beauty Shop Specializing in Haircuts and X Finger Waving Hair Dyed ,* 2J N. E. lit Are. Phone 2-J828 f >******* +++++++4444 +++ ++< '.•••.••:• %  •.• %  :••>•:• %  : % % %  % % %  % %  : % %  : %  :• %  :•••. % %  : %  ; •t on nur GnCCf L'i>m.; you NEW YORK BREAD A CAKE COMPANY i'.i:i \i. AM) CAKES 471 S. W. -ill St. Phutif I-7IS1 Hr.nih Slorr: Ml N. W. :,ih si. *•:••:••:••:••:••:••:••:••:•.: %  • ;..;. *******^*<.*.:.*.><.^.<.^^.>. : ..J. > : .. : +< .. : < .... < .. >+ > .J. > : .. ..J. ; .. : .. : .. : < .. :4+<-I GECSCNS 1301 COLLINS AVENUE. MIAMI BEACH Announce their Formal Opening SUNDAY JANUARY 8TU The Finest of Food, under strict dular^ rmpmititon PHONE 5-WH &f&f + + •• %  %  >in %  i n ii mumming?



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\ry 6, 1933. TF WISH' *********•****+* %  "T D T A N After Six o'c lock £Contlnu l f, 0 ^ p w 0M] Jews caonot go with gentiles they Prefer to go with, they remain among their own. As a matter of fact. Jews make lines of social demarcation among their own. which is also natural. The only objection to this system of making social distinctions is when people are snobbish in their attitude, unkind, intolerant and per%  i THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN gO EVERY FR.UAY by the TI %  I %  • PUBLISHING CO. Fifteenth Avenue [SIIOCHET, Editor [O. HIP. 297S Phone 2-1183 biiil fluHH matter July 4, Office At Mi;.mi. Florida March S. 1S79. BEACH OFFICE Eighth Street •ebnirk. Representative ItSI KlITKlS Sl.M 1141 1AMMil 6, 1933 6, No. 1. nd the fmpus L>N A. FRIEDMAN I is everybody happy? | Is the day after the Such things do come, ^ression certainly did enty. The proverbial fin sight. It's off with Dn with the new for a iltter 1933. brld in general no refelt on the departure that dismal year. And ode can bring nothing Substantiating this bn.niend you all to see J'The Conquerors." This Jias been in crises beach time come out of achievement and suc| repeats itself. It is that open up new ly and striving. Ne[mother of invention. j of old would have "given an opportunity Gild an empire greater fefore known to mankind, years with a smile on song in your heaETA song on your lips, and heart. Life Ls sweet and still before you. Make krour opportunities. Rejmay be down, but nevJe there is life there is there is hope there is fhere there is ambition fgy and pep. One canfail with all these asIto school for us all now elude, hoping that proskto you and yours. But ^ matter how and when tier it is hard or easy. chin and come back a great life if you [MI if at first you don't again. er day, I am your fond St. ation with them or noon-day luncheon clubs is partially an expression of one's desire for superiority. After 6 o'clock Mrs. Jones is the ruler. As Count Keyserling in his recent book. • %  America Set Free." puts it, Mr. Jones is little better than a harem slave. He works all day long cooped up in an office or factory while his wife wears spectacles and reads books on how to rear children even though she has none, or if she is blessed with these permits somebody else to nurse them while she reads the books. Mr. Jones during this period is striving Page Three THE B CUIOM CHAiE! The devil is fear. I've been happy and fortunate in not being afraid. I've always done what I wanted to do when I wanted to do it. A vast majority of people are restrained in their attempts to achieve content and happiness by the fear mit their sense of""wrjeriorttv^to toZZTw^JZZ? is strlvin that somebody will express disap%  arriSt-Sr j^~ "2 sir t heir — a nd their the ::„;r h T:I:Z: ZZ S, 22 -r %  r a r ** ^ %  s ay is %  *-tude that the gentile maintains t Zl n T ^" WhM H **"*"* %  L !" W I 'earned ward the Jew after b^sinels h!,,r," j! & j ar8e y f gUZZl ng that dldn,t matter ln the least. down food and playing bridge until And I have that to remember He would force the Jew to be clannish even if he did not choose to be. He believes that he is better socially. Just exactly what merit consists one's eyes are as heavy as lead. Mrs. Jones' friends are his friends. An eastern educator, anticipating Levy may be a good fellow and the return of liquor, urges general of from the social M J ? e S m ght P0SSibly t0lerate educa "on in the art of drinking. I something thaT cannot IT'Z < Ton "T^. ^ "l "* *" %  don t taow about "*•* but idenned in definite tenS; u I < m X that S ^ S a pened in at a cockta P"** the othchological an^ extr mSy sub e K5 H V T*' 2" "* "^ Where We a did what !" The average g^wTadmit' iT^J^T^ZX —_^our home work. brats and'charLL'r TiJV t "T.K'" *" ^ "* him aga n Ast ~V Cognizes Women." belief .hi. I t thC eXt m rning In tnis wa -headline. I, too. always tell them ntlwitn him no? "2 1 t USi t he JeW S C mPe ed l Ve a SOrt that their W a -e like sta s ness witn him, nor would he form of dual life partnerships with him. But he beNo self-respecting Jew can object Ueves that there is a certain indefinto this too strongly. It is true one able something that elevates him does not like to be snubbed, regardabove the tribes of Israel. This may ed as an inferior; but, since he finds of course have been occasioned or; more pleasure among his own peorinally by religious prejudices, i pie and is more at home with them, Don't neglect to keep your shoes polished. You can shine at one end if you can't at the other. Had Diogenes visited this country while on his famous still hunt some get-rich-quick promoter would have wiped his lantern. There is not much new on smashing the atom, except that a bandit chieftain, wanted by Tokio' troops in Manchukuo, is described as four feet, 10 inches tall. If French pastry ever shows up on the card as "liberty cream puffs" we'll know the situation is beyond repair. There can be little doubt about that. At one time the Crucifixion Story meant far more than it does today. what difference does it make after ail? As long as they allow us to earn an honest occupation, to vote. but even though we are not living I to worship our God as we choose in a theological age and the average | and to live in accordance with our American is not a particularly good I conscience, the Jew need not cornchurch member, these feelings of hostility persist. They have become part of the subconscious fabric of the Christian mind. plain too loudly about social dis criminations. We read recently that a distinguished pastor in New York did complain about it and we heartThere is still another reason, far ily approve the stand he took. He more important, that makes for this exemplified the courage and truly distinction between Jews and Chrisj beautiful religious spirit that is very fatch For ie Inside .93 ns of iatni • • %  if Torahs... ting Soon tions after six chimes. In America there is no aristocracy; or what w call aristocracy is something new. In Europe aristocracy Ls an established thing resulting from many years of wealth, culture, or by reason of noble lineage. The aristocrat is always sure of himself. He may mingle with anyone he chooses and still remain an aristocrat. He is quick to sense cultural attainments and is always eager for delightful society. American aristocracy is based chiefly on the almighty dollar and is new. Every American who started in a factory as a laborer and rose from one position to the other until he became owner of another factory envies in his heart of hearts the kings and queens of Europe. Democratic in a sense that he would afford the right to success to anybody who deserves it. he is still very undemocratic in his entire outlook and subconsciously he possesses an inferiority complex. That Ls the reason why most Americans join lodges and fraternities. They carry around a pocketbook full of receipts. They love such titles as potentate, grand exalted ruler, grand master. Bewitched by regalia, dim lights and "mysteries." they are like school boys. They also feel that by joining an organization they are better than the man that does not happen to belong. They forget that the requisite for affiliation is chiefly the ability to pay dues and that under the gorgeous robes and trappings of the officers of these various fraternities one often discovers a plumber or a barber. This is no indictment against fraternities. We believe in them; they fill a definite need in community life and have achieved a great deal of good and perhaps it is to their credit that one of humble occupation may receive honors within the fraternity that he could not receive anywhere else. But this still does not contiovert the point that affillrare even in this day and age. But the plea for the abolition of social discrimination on the basis of morality and idealism should always come from the Christian and not from the Jew. Women (After the Mid rash) By P. M. RASKIN When Jehovah first created Mount and vale and field and wood. He looked around with satisfaction, And pronounced it "Good." Every prey-beast in the forest. Every songbird in the air, Fish and reptile, tree and flower — "Good" did He declare. When at last He made the woman, Bright as sunshine, fair as day, He regarded her in silence — "Good" he did not say. Just in silent admiration He looked on for one short while. And all the seven heavens kindled With the Artist's smile. "I have finished all creation — Bird and beast, and man and elf. All are good; but this woman I surpassed Myself. "Tree and flower, vale and mountain. Nothing, nothing that I made Is endowed with grace and beauty That can never fade. "But thus woman's grace surpasses Earth below or skies above. She will animate creation. Fill the worlds with love. "She. the source of life and b'. Will her grace to life impart,*'?//^ And with pride looked down thi Master On His work of art. As to holiday presents, blest isn't the tie that binds. An ex-Follies girl entering this country from Canada the other day was detained at the border for questioning by the immigration authorities. You remember how ProfEinstein was asked whether he held any ideas regarding pacifism, anarchy, etc., and was put to a good deal of annoyance. Well, this girl's examination was much briefer than the professor's. "Do you hold any ideas .?" the examiner began. "No," he said at once, and with transparent honesty. So she was promptly admitted, as not being un-American or dangerous to our form of government. New London coast guards found a cargo of whisky under a load of fish, which may explain an aroma that some had ascribed to inferior creosote. Japan is to be confronted again shortly with the task of balancing a budget, which is becoming more and more unlike a paper umbrella. No one will have any money in heaven, a California evangelist declares. "Certainly not," comments Cicero. "I will nave no money in heaven, because others will have taken and kept it. And those who have taken and kept it will not be in heaven. I hope." I can't feel sorry for a man who's sorry for himself! A war was never won by tears, but faith and bravery Made every soldier swing along to martial music and to song. And every heart was lifted with the thought of victory. I can't feel sorry for a man who's sorry for himself! The odds may be against him, but he'll never win with grieving. There ls an end to every road, a lightening of trouble's load. And better times are coming to the man who keeps believing. I can't feel sorry for a man who's sorry'for himself! With music and gay laughter we will fight the deadly foe; For Poverty's an enemy that can be slain by you and me. If Courage. Faith and Fortitude march with us as we go. By refusing a further hearing to organized drys the senate judiciary committee has paved the way to another count of elbows, shortly, on beer. A POEM TO AN EMPTY Pl'RSF. Oh, thou, my one time friend. Thou art so flat. With sides that inward bend. Which once were fat! Oh, thou, my empty one, I need a hat. And all I get's a dun — Now think on that! Oh. center of my hope. Give me some cash. I need a cake of soap; I need some hash. Oh. thou, my poor, thin purse, Don't be so flat. Go find thyself a nurse. And get thee fat! Love is one of the diseases for which the onion is a sure cure. Don't save a!l your smiles for the parlor. Use a few in the kitchen. Some candidates get there with both feet and others put both feet in it. Some people put their best foot forward so far that the other one never catches up. A young curate was a great success, and all the spinsters worshipped him. ThLs was pleasant at first, but as time went on he found the position trying and left the parish. When asked why he gave up the curacy he said because so many girls were on his track. "You need not have feared that; there is safety in numbers, you know." "Perhaps," said the curate, learned in the books of the Old Testament, "but I do know there is safety in Exodus, and that is why I made mine from the parish." Marian: "I maintain that lovemaking is Just the same as it always was." Her sweetheart: "How do you know?" Marian: "I Just read about a Greek maiden who sat and listened to a lyre all the evening." There was a burst of applause, as the pianist finished his last solo. He bowed and, after thanking his audience, was about to leave when a man approached and presented a check. This the pianist refused, saying he would prefer it to be used for some charitable purpose. "In that case." said the donor. "I suppose you wouldn't mind if we added it to our special fund?" "Not at all," said the pianist. "What is the special fund for?" "To enable us to have better entertainments next year." A I