The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
January 16, 1931
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00099

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Vol. IV.--No. III. Miami, Florida, Friday, January 16, 1931 Price 5 Cents
T i YI. e u ,.


Announcements

MIAMI
JEWISH ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION
(Orthodox)
1545 S. W. 3rd Street
ISAAC M.-WAPNER
Rabbi
The usual early Friday
evening services will begin at
5:15 p. m. with the late ser-
vices at 8:15 p. m. with Rabbi
Isaac M. Wapner preaching a
sermon in English and Yid-
dish on "Courtesy begets
Heroism." Rev. Nathan Wroo-
bel will conduct the congre-
gational singing and chant
the services. Saturday morn-
ing services will begin at 8:30
a. m. The Dailv Minvnn will


begin at 8 a. m. every day Jewish mu
and 5:15 p. m. for evening
services. A social hour follows Watch this pal
the late Friday evening ser-
vices. If you want to
in touch with us at
TEMPLE ISRAEL of MIAMI
(Reform)
137 N. E. 19th Street
DR. JACOB H. KAPLAN
Rabbi
Services at Teknple Israel Beach Bank
will begin at 8:15 p. m. with Is Again Open
Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan preach-
ing a sermon on "What a The City Ba of Miami
hired martin Politics Could Beachclosed jus t e weeks
J0 -rr.-Tmi" sare colrdfallyrec qed justnees
invited to attend And .enjoy reopened for business last
the services. Sunday school Tuesday morning with new
begins as usual at 10 a. m. financial interests in control.
A social hour will follow Mr. Philip Liberman well
Sunday morning. This week known nationally for his com-
the Rabbi spoke over W. I. 0. munal work, and Mr. Julian
D. in the Radio program pres- Livingston of Chicago, Ill.
ented by the University of Instrumental in carrying
Miami and his subject was out and effecting the reopen-
"The Unity of the Race." ing of the bank was the well
known attorney, Mr. Harry
I. Lipton president of the lo-
CONG. BETH DAVID cal Zionist district, a director
(Conservative) in the Orthodox Beach Syna-
189 N. W. Third Avenue gogue, and a law partner of
S. M. MACHTEI Baron de Hirsch Meyer,
Rabbi Beach councilman.
Mr. Julian M. Livingston
The usual late Friday night was the president of the Liv-
services will begin at 8 p. m. ingston Bakeries of Chicago
with Rabbi S. M. Machtei which recently sold out to the
preaching the sermon on "Na- Continental Bakeries for sev-
than Straus." Mr. Louis Hay- eral million dollars. He is
man will conduct the congre- married and has one son.
national singing and chanting. Mr. Liberman who is a re-
A social hour at which the tired manufacturer is well
Sisterhood will be hosts will and favorably known for his
follow the services. intensive work for Jewish in-
The Rabbi will preach in stitutions in New York city.
Yiddish on the portion of the He was a member of the
week at the Saturday morn- building committee which
ing services which begin at erected the $5,000,000 struc-
9 a. m. ture of the Isaac Elchanan
Yeshiva. For twenty-one
,' years he was president of the
CONG, BETH JACOB Orthodox Congregation, Beth
(Orthodox) Israel of 284 West 84th street
11l Washington Avenue which is headed by Rabbi
Miami Beach Schick. He was recently chos-
Saen president for life of this
SThe usual 'early Friday Synagogue which maintains
Night services will begin at a large Talmud Torah. He is
5:15.. m., with the late ser- a director of the Uptown
vices following at 8 p. m. Talmud Torah. of New York
;IThe .co.npepational singing city, the largest Talmud Torah I
:an4 dtfih g -of the-ser- in New York. He is also a
Si ,'bhe, conducted by director of the Central Jew-
.obw- 5 of.
Sftu 4t Mtrth#
Ih.


We Qo On cThe JAir

A JEWISH hour, for the JEWISH people, sponsored by the
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.

Beginning Sunday, February 1st, tune in on Miami's oldest
Radio Station WQAM from 5 to 6 p. m. and listen to THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN WEEKLY HOUR every Sunday.


The important Jewish news of the week ....
An address by an outstanding Jewish speaker
THE SOCIAL CALENDAR OF THE WEEK
A PROGRAM PRESENTED BY A LOCAL
JEWISH ORGANIZATION


Lsic ....


per for further announcements.


have your organization go on the Radio get
once.


Flagler Track
Meets Approval


Continuing the policy es-
tablished. by its officials the
opening week, .the West Flag-
ler Kennel Club is staging
races every night but Sunday,
of such calibre that even
those not previously interest-
ed must necessarily become
racing enthusiasts. Dogs are
entered in the races of the
finest racing abilities known
to the sport and with the ad-
ded hurdle race every night
has been giving the specta-
tors the thrill of their lives.
Situated but three miles from
the heart of Miami's shopping
district and the center of the
city, visitors 'and residents
can reach the track within a
few minutes after boarding
the street cars, busses that
run direct to the track or by
driving out by auto.
Added features are given
each night to insure a full
evening's enetrtainment for
the patrons.
Five hundred dollar Sweep-
stake race over the Futurity
course will be the feature of
Saturday night's program at
the West Flagler Kennel club.
Six of the fastest dogs from
different parts of the coun-
try are to be entered, among
them Meadow's Aristocrat,
winner of Wednesday night's
feature race Kitty Dunn; win-
ner of Tuesday night's fea-
ture, and Cardinal, known to
the greyhound racing fans all
over the country as one of the
greatest speedsters running
today.
city, which he founded on
his visit to Palestine three
years ago..
Associated with thenew
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Racing Season
Is Begun Here


The long awaited 1931 race
meeting of the Miami Racing
assocatioa-opened- at beauti-
ful Hialeah Park track Thurs-
day afternoon. At 2:30 p. m.
a band of thoroughbreds
paraded to the post for the
first -event that threw back
the curtain on the greatest
season of sports the city has
ever enjoyed.
-The feature race, named
the Hialeah Inaugural handi-
cap, topped a program of six
events. The field was one of
tthe most notable ever raced
in fte south. The Inaugural,
at six furlongs, carried added
money value of $2,000.
Although the weather had
a frigid tinge early in the day
a clear sky was evident and
the track, fast drying out af-
ter the recent rains, was fast
at post time.
There never has been a
more representative group of
horsemen gathered at any
race course than. the crowd
at Hialeah. Increased purses,
favorable climatic conditions
and confidence in the officials
of the track have made many
come to Miami to race instead
of putting up in winter quar-
ters after the northern sea-
son closed.
Praise of Frank J. Bruen,
Joseph E. Widener and Maj.
Barclay H. Warburton is un-
animous for the way they
have gone about making the
track on a par with any in the
country. They have' done no
end of work and spared no
expense to beautify the plant
and make conditions perfect
for the horsemen and patrons.
Whereas, a few yea ago the
track wa tp1rely a raig
tiptoda e fidit'
t r of4


Noted Jew Dies
In New York
Nathan Straus, noted Jew-
ish philanthropist, a c t i v e
Zionist, and termed the "heart
of the Jewish people," died
at his home in New York city
last Sunday night at the age
of 83. Born in Bavaria, Jan-
uary 31, 1848, he came to
this country in 1854 and set-
tled in Talbotton, Ga. Later
he came to New York where
he married and subsequently
engaged in business, at one
time a member of the firm
of I. L. Straus and Sons, R.
H. Macy, famous department
store and Abraham and
Straus. In 1914 he retire from
business to devote his entire
time to philanthropy and to
carry out his wish to "give
charity during life, and die
a poor man."
His first public appearance
as a philanthropist was dur-
ing the panic of 1893 when
he provided coal for the poor,
as well as meals and lodg-
ing. His next step was in the
establishment of depots for
the distribution of pasteu-
rized milk for infants, which
in later years was termed by
the Rockefeller Research In-
stitute as the first construc-
tive step for the conservation
of infant life taken in this
country. The next- -etep--
in his constructive work was
the establishment of a tuber-
culosis preventorium in Lake-
wood in the Cleveland Cot-
tage. His last and most im- -
portant work was his active
,participation in the rebuild-
ing of a Jewish homeland in
Palestine. When he first vie-
ited Palestine he established
free kitchens to afford or
nourishing and healthy food
for the needy. This was prior
to the world war. When Jus-
tice Brandeis became the
head of the Zionist provis-
ional committee, Straus be-
came actively identified with
the Zionist movement. -
He also aided the Ameri- .
can Jewish Congress. When
the Keren Hayesod was es-
tablished he became an ac-
tive supporter of this jund,
and later became an cflicer
under the Lipsky regime of
the American Zionist organi-
zation. In 1928 during the
earthquakes in Palestine he
cabled $25,000 to the commit-
tee helping the Arabians in u>
addition to his aid for fellow :
Jews. The massacres in 1929 ,-,
in Palestine were partly the
cause of the failure of Straus'
health, particularly the newks
that the Medical head of his ..
Health Institute in Jenraltem
had been murdered. ,
He left instructioma that he
was to bq buried im a
pine casket, .adon~ l
Dr. PQvidJ DSe a
ducted tle ,
hbme at thae e' H H
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Page 2


EDUCATION
The National Education Associ-
ation, composed of school-teachers
of the entire country, has started
a vigorous campaign for the im-
provement of country schools. The
first and most important step to
be taken in this direction is to
find some way of paying better
salaries to country school teachers.
On the question whether coun-
try schools, especially rural high
schools ought to give more atten-
tion to so-called "vocational" ed-
ucation, there is room for a sharp
difference of opinion. Most of the
teachers think that farming, carp-
entering, sewing, cooking and the
like should be taught in the
schools. A few maintain that the
place to learn any trade is "on
the job," that the elements of
education do not consist in ac-
quiring skill, but in acquiring
knowledge and understanding.
It must be admitted that the
old-fashioned country schools which
were limited, almost, to the Three
R's laid a pretty sound foundation
of culture among those pupils who
were able to absorb it.
PROHIBITION
Stanley High, the editor of the
Christian Herald, says it is time
that the leadership of those who
wish to retain Prohibition in the
Constitution and the law of the
land was taken over by somebody
besides the church people and min-
isters.
Mr. High is right. One of the
reasons why so many people who
regard themselves as moral Chris-
tians are opposed to Prohibition is
that they do not believe that it
is a question of morals or religion.
They resent the effort to make
it appear that drinking is sinful.
So far as our Government and
the law are concerned, the ques-
tion of whether it is sinful to drink
does not enter into the question
at all. Prohibition is an economic
movement, not a moral one. If
it is to have anything like whole-
hearted support from the people
of the United States, that support
must be sought on economic and
social grounds and not on grounds
with which probably the majority
of truly religious people cannot
agree.


ORGANIZATION
Newcomb Carlton, president of
the Western Union Telegraph
Company, thinks that our whole
system of government needs re-
organizing. The country has be-
come too big, its problems too
complex, to admit of efficient ad-
ministration by a single President
and a Congress as now organized.
Mr. Carlton is himself probably
the nation's greatest organizer.
There is less lost motion in the
management of the Western Union
than in any other concern of which
I have any knowledge. Whatever
Mr. Carlton has to say about or-
ganization, therefore, mut be lis-
tened to respectfully.
There is certainly food for
thought in what he says about the
inadequacy of our present Consti-
tutional set-up of government.
The difficulty would be in chang-
ing it effectively. Authority must
be centered somewhere, and most
people would rather have one in-
dividual in the White House on
whom to lay the blame whenever
anything goes wrong, than to have
to divide their ammunition among
several heads of government.


CREATION
Professor Robert Millikan, one
of the three or four greatest sci-
entists of our time, declares that
the deeper he delves into the se-
crets of nature, the more convin-
cing is the evidence of "a Creator
continually on the job."
Creation is not finished, Dr.
Millikan believes. The universe is
constantly being rebuilt. Evolu-
tion is going on as it has gone
on for tens of millions of years.
Both in animal life and in the case
of the inert elements, growth and
development continue.
Dogmatic religionists, who be-
lieve that everything was finished
when, as the Book of Genesis tells
us, God rested on the Seventh Day,
will disagree with Dr. Millikan.
He believes in a God who works
through methods of which science
has gained a few glimpses and is
steadily learning more.
In a time and place where men
were burned at the stake for hold-
ing beliefs not taught by the
priests of religion, Millikan would
have risked his life by such ut-
terances. That cannot happen in
America today, but if the Bolshe-
vists of Russia had their way he
would be condemned for believing
in any sort of a God or religion
at all.
MOVIES
Two hundred million dollars, or
very close to it, was spent in the
manufacture of motion pictures
last year, according to the Census
Bureau.
There were 2,534 different mo-
tion pictures produced, of which
1,510 were "silent" films, and 689
were "talkies," the others being
silent pictures with sound accom-
paniments.


JUST OUT JUST OUT


PETER WIERNIK'S



HISTORY OF THE JEWS



IN AMERICA

REVISED, ENLARGED AND
BROUGHT UP TO DATE

Nearly 500 pages
(Iumtrated)
Price, postpaid $2.50

MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO


Jewish History Publishing Company
77 BOWERY, NEW YORK, N. Y.

Trade supplied by THE BLOCH PUBLISHING CO.
81 West 81st St., New York, N. Y.


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


BY ERNET CAMP JA
New YorkVisitors who "do"
New York under the guidance of
their metropolitan friends find the
experience most informing for
the friends.
Twice I have skipped out to
pilot a pop-eyed delegation through
the marvels of Manhattan, only to
catch them yawning. They had
seen everything I knew of-and a
lot besides. Before the evening
was over they were leading me
around.
A party of rubber-neckers ex-
ploring the Big burg have not only
boundless vitality, but consuming
curiosity. They will see more
"sights" in a week than the local
tax-payers do in ten years.
THE WOOLWORTH
BUILDING
The Woolworth building, oddly
enough, continues almost invaria-
bly the first thing that a visitor
demands to see. This despite the
fact that its 60 stories are now
overshadowed by the 77-story
Chrysler building. Also by the
Empire State, now under construc-
tion, whose 88 stories go sheering
up for a quarter of a mile above
the sidewalks.
It is the force of habit and
tradition. The Woolworth build-.
ing was for so long the tallest
in the world that it has become
fixed in national consciousness as
such. For many minds it holds a
certain glamor that will probably
remain for many years.


THE SIGHTSEEING BUSINESS
A charge of fifty cents is made
for the elevator ride to the famous
Woolworth observation tower, 751
feet up. For a like sum one may
One great advantage of living
in a small town is that it is still
possible to go to the movies with-
out having to listen. In the big
cities no theater is regarded as
any good unless it is equipped to
produce "talkies," which instead of
being an improvement on the sil-
ent drama are mostly rather in-
ferior stage productions.


THE FASHION
CLEANERS
QUALITY
WORKMANSHIP
ONE DAY SERVICE
14 Branches in Greater Miami
MIAMI OFFICE & PLANT:
936 WEST FLAGLER STREET
Phone 2-7T38


--
I -


WE
PAY


5%


On Savings I
The Morris Plan Co. invites
you to place your savings ac-
count here, large or small.
NO ONE ever lost a dollar
of savings or interest in a
Morris Plan Bank.

The MORRIS

PLAN CO.
OF MIAMI
105 N. E. First Ave.
VINCENT B. 1BRIC, Msr.
IIIIIIIIIIIUI UuMilUnHiHInIIU IIII ii lHnIIHilliInmhIIIIMniUIIfll


First Race At 8:15
Last Race At 10:50


ADMISSION 50c


Friday, January 16, 1931,1


view New York from the spectac-
ular Chrysler tower. Yet it is said
that the current popularity of the
latter stimulated, rather than
checked, the flow of visitors to the
Woolworth building.
Other sights that every visitor
wants to see are the Aquarium in
Battery Park, the Statue of Liber-
ty, the Stock Exchange, the Metro-
politan Museum of Art, and the
American Museum of National
History.
ON WITH THE STORY
George Benchler, staff announ.-
er at radio station WABC, left the
studios on a recent rainy evening
and stepped into a taxi in front of
the Columbia building. His driver
was one of those talkative boso,.
"D'ya work in the studios Bud-
dy?" he inquired as he skidded
expertly around a corner.
"Yes," said Benchler.
"Well," said the cabby, "I was
over in the Coffee Pot listening' to
the Detective Story Magazine
broadcast tonight. I go in for that
crook stuff, see, so every Thoisday
I parks the boiler and listens in
at this here oeanery. But bein' it's
rainin', y'know, everybody's look-
in' for cabs tonight and so just as
I was getting' steamed up about
this here story, in walks a guy
that wants a cab and I gotta leave
right in the middle of the story.
So I was just wondering' if you
happened to know how it come
out ?"
Benchler did know, fortunately,
and put an end to the driver's,
suspense as well as his own-for
the chauffeur, listening to his re-I
cital of the thriller, kept his eyes
on the road instead of turning to

It shows wonderful self-
control when a man never
mistakes his good luck for
ability.
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feel safe, for you know you
have the best.
YOU also feel free to ask
for information or assistance
With your poliieis.
Insurance Investments
The one safe investment.
Ask for information.

W.A. ASHLEY
108 So. Oliver Ave.,
W. Palm Beach, Fla.
Representing only the best
old line Companies.
NaN uw --------- NN


Ten Races Nightly
--Except Sunday


THINKING JEWS ALL SUB.CPIBE TO i I..*. -.


Ox,,
k~~ .- ,.- ... :.. ..-.;


THE RACE FAN KNOWS WHERE THE DOGS RUN TRUEST

America's Finest Racing Greyhounds

Are Entertaining Miami Residents and Visitors Every Night
Playing To Capacity Houses.


At The


Biscayne Kennel Club


From Downtown--Go North on N. E. Second Avenue, or N. W. Seventh Avenue to 114th tr
From Mimi DBeaeh-Crous on 7tb Street Causeway and Turn North on N. L. Ieems Adem to lik4th Uftev
From Wsut Palm Deah, Lake Worth, Fort Lauderdale Hollywood-4-D.iriy ojt oae Did to 114tb fsmt
Miami Transit Co. Busses Leave South Entrance of Venetian Arcade for Trac
Every 10 Minutes, Starting at 7 o'Clok
MIAMI'S HOMETOWN GREYHOUND RACE TRACK


Jai.Alai Players
Enthuse Patrons

Jai-Alai, the fastest game
in the world, is being demon-
strated in a manner that only
the greatest players in the
world can, at the Biscayne
Fronton. Crowded to capacity
every night the plying
arouses the enthusiasm of
patrons to an unbounded de-
gree.
With champion plays staged
every week, and a match for
the world singles title in pros-
pect to be played shortly,
Jai Alai enthusiasts are
boundto travel to this popu-
lar amusement resort for an
amusement and exhibition of
skill that no other game can
produce.

Lantern-jawed men are not
always light-headed.


family

finish
A completely finish.
ed service at rea-
sonable rates.
phone 3-2661
NATIONAL
LAUNDRIES, IN C.
Miami


KING
FUNERAL HOME
29 N. THIRD AVENUE
Phones 2353531624


-- --- -I ---- .,.... 1- -'----~-r7TI


.-,- ---~


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Friday, January 16, 1931 THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN Page 8


THE JEWISH
FLORIDIA N
A Wauihl Newsppor
PUBLEBD EVERT FRIDAY
br tb
JEWISH FLORIDIAN PUBLISHING CO

107 SOUTH MIAMI AVE.
4W06
J. LOUIS SHOCHET, Editor
P Box 2 u
Miami, Florida Phone 2-1188
WEST PALM BEACH OFFICE:
414 Ihh Btnreet
MI. I. Schrbmiek Repaoontadv
Entered as second class matter,
July 4th, 1980, at the Post Office
at Miami, Florida, under the act
of March 8, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION
Six Monute ...................... $1.0
One Tear ........................ $.
VOL IV.-NO. III.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 1931.

A PLAIN WHITE CASKET

Shocking as has been the
news of the death of that
great Jew in Israel, Nathan
Straus, yet may Israel and
the Jewish people of the
United States be comforted.
Comforted, that by leading a
life so exemplary as did the
late Nathan Straus, glory and
honor w re shed upon the en-
tire Jewih natiojp-When the
Gentile wrldsthiinks of Na-
than Straus and his ceaseless
efforts to alleviate human
suffering, regardless of creed,
they must think of Nathan
Straus THE JEW.
But to me, the last wish
of Nathan Straus showed the
kindly old soul that he was.
He dirzted-that he be buried
in a lin unadorned pine
casket. Straus well knew that
his children could afford to
buy a casket that would run
well into the thousands of
dollars, but he also knew that
aman came into this world
unadorned and would leave
unadorned.
A man is known by the
life that he led, not by the
funeral he was given.
Nathan Straus, the prince
in Israel, believed as did our
sages of old that as man was
born equal so he should die
and be buried equal.
I wonder how many know
that years ago even Jews
were buried in the richest of
garments, the finest of cas-
kets and with the most valua-
ble of gems. And how many
know that abuses grew and
grew until the poor in Israel
abandoned their dead, unable
to give their dead the burial
and pay the honors that the
rich received.
And today even here
in Miami Yes, we know
of instances where hundreds
of dollars were spent on eas-
lests and on giving the dead
* wonderful funeral but
not one emit was given for
charity to honor the memory
of the departed. Even as they


lived, so they died.
May the lesson given us by
Nathan Straus, may his soul
rest in peace THE PLAIN
PINE CASKET, ever remain
with us.
"You say your engage-
ment was iboken as the result
of a misunderstanding?"
"Yes," replied the rl with
weepy eyes tI k.. I
e w him to 6 to
:" :: .-- .. l.: -rf ""'
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Charles, said his mother to
her six year old son, "is it
possible that you are teach-
ing the parrot to use slang?"
"No, niamma," replied
Charles. "I was just telling
him what not to say."
I !
"When I was once in dan-
ger from a lion," said the x-
plorer, "I tried sitting don
and staring at him, as I h
no weapons."
"How did it work?"
"Perfectly; the lion didn't
even offer to touch me."
"Strangel how do you ac-
count for it?"
"Well, sometimes I've
thought it was because I sat
on the top branch of a very
tall tree."
I ,!
Often a man's character
would be unable to recognize
his reputation were they to


meet.


When sh
engaged an
not it oftei
decide.


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e says they are
d he says they are
n takes a jury to


i !
Minnie-Do you buy shoes
that pinch ?
Tonka You should hear
my husband holler when he
gets the bills for them.
I I !
Dusty Ike-Please, sir, I've
a sick wife-could you help
me out?
Business Man-I can give
you a job next week.
Dusty Ike-Too late! She'll
be able to go to work herself
by then.
I I !
Boarder-Come quick; two
rats are fighting in my room.
Landlady-What do you
expect for 50 cents, a bull
fight?
I
Miss Gush-I just adore
caviar, don't you?
Mr. Flush-Iseldom listen
over the radio and care little
for those foreign singers.
!


And no
what it is
Misery
stones on 1


mere man knows
to be a woman.


! !
.dumps
the road
! I !


a lot of
to success.


Blessed are they who ex-
pect little, for they usually
get it.
S .


Some
borrow
notes.


musicians are able to
real money on their


!! I


year,
Swear to change their man-
ners,
As the time is drawing near
They are hardy planners.
Turn a new lea in their liv-
Chuck a fault or two,
Be more generous in their
givln
Lots of wondrous things
to de.

Ere the new year's two hours
old,
Hundreds of them falling,
Resolutions getting cold,
Isn't t appallingl
A politi dark horse is a
Mtj:i~#k Of
!Z ~X-.7 r


Most men are cheerful giv-
ers when they have a chance
to hand out advice.
f !
The man who is looking for
a soft place without honest
labor can usually find it right
under his hat.
!
Some with pledges greet the
Flapper Flo has a beau,
But spite of her contriving
he'll never park and have a
k
But always keeps on driving
"Was there e're a slower
poke?
I swear to goodness, never.
Cars may come and cars may
go,
But his goes on forever."
I I I
In an address before the
National Beauty convention.
Dr. Ninstrom, of Columbia,
predicted that beards would
become popular in the near
future. Mannish styles are
bound to appeal to men, in
the long run.
I
I asked the Lord to make it
rain.
He understood, but a look of
pain
Over His face so quickly
spread,
And the sign I saw was easily
read.
It said, "Don't meddle!"
I prayed again this time for
luck,
And I saw again it was nip
and tuck.
The answer came by the self-
same route,
A sort of "Have care what
you're about."
It said, "Don't meddle I"
I took to the Lord a selfish
plea.
It looked at first all right to
me
But the same result came as
before,
So I'm thinking twice e'er I
go for more.
It said, "Don't meddle!"
I never ask now for half so
much;
I'm a bit afraid I'll get in
dutch.
I guess it's fair on your
bended knee
To test your prayer lest your
report be
It said, "Don't meddle!"
I
Stuffing a turkey is culin-
ary taxidermy.
I !
A $10 overcoat will keep
a man warmer than the pawn
ticket for a fur-lined one.

It is the rolling wheel that
gathers the most punc-
tures,
I I I
Tears of joy and sadness
are both drawn from the
same sack.
i I I
No jeweler has ever been
able to improve on the set-
ting sun.
Doctors of a Chicago bes-


pital advertised for a man
with a headache, to aid in e-
tain experiments. Since tey
do pot a pain in the
f be of no

*i fa:'


ONLY A FEW IDEAS
Twenty years ago I heard a famous editor deliver a
talk on advertising before the Chicago advertising club. I
was just out of college and had seen very few great men, so
the talk made a deep impression. I remember the editor
said that "reputation is repetition," and he told some stories
to illustrate the point.
The other night in New York I heard the same great
editor speak on the same subject. To my surprise it was
the very same speech.
Another speeker was a celebrated banker whom I had
heard on two previous occasions. He, also, repeated him-
self.
As we left the dining room one of my friends who had
noted the repetitions remarked on them gloomily.
"Rather discouraging to see that even the big minds
have so little in them," he said. "Makes you wonder if hu-
man ingenuity is coming to an end."
S "They say that though the stars appear so numberless,
you can not count more than a thousand," he said, "Well,
there are few thoughts. Count the books and you would
think that there was immense wealth; but any expert knows
that there are few thoughts which have emerged in his
time. Shut him in a closet and he could soon tell them all.
They are quoted, contradicted, modified, but the amount
remains computably small."
It is a good thing for humanity that this is so. Nature
apparently designed the game of human progress to last a
long time, and provided that only a small advance should
be made in any one generation. suddenly discover everything. How it would take the zest
out of the game!
Moreover, it is decidedly heartening to us average folks
to know that only a very little difference separates us from
the smartest. Lincoln remarked on it. "I have talked with
great men," he said, "and I can not see wherein they differ
from others."
Generally speaking, the great achieve their greatness
by industry rather than by mere brilliance. The editor
whom I quoted is said to be the highest paid in the world.
But if you divide his salary by the more than two hundred
newspapers (which print his editorials, he is the lowest
priced worker whom each of those papers employs. He pro-
duces more than anybody else and works longer hours to
do it.
I was glad that I went to that dinner. It reminded me
how little wisdom and genius really rule the world; how far
industrious effort can stretch the few ideas, or even one
idea.


F THE IFAM'LY


D DOCTOR
JOHN JOSEH GA1NESM.D
WINTER EPIDEMICS
I claim originality in this saying that, "infections work
behind closed doors." I carry the thought with me daily, as
I go about my work. The first duty, if you would dislodge
the enemy, is, open the door, be it ofwood, glass, or human
tissue; get at the unwelcome invader and destroy his works.
The worst epidemics-small-pox, measles, diphtheria,
scarlet fever, and infantile paralysis, take place at a son
when our houses are tightly fortified against winter inmem-
encies of weather. One of the most epidemics of small-pox
that I ever experienced, ceased promptly when spring
breezes were permitted to enter bed-rooms'and living-rooms
to "air out" residences in every remotest corner.
The worst case of small-pox I ever attended was in a
family that kept every crevice of the dwelling plugged for
fear outside air would enter. The patient recovered-but
it was an accident!
It follows then, that if free ventilation ends the epide-
mic, it must be valuable as a preventive of diseases of in-
fectious nature. I intrust my families to see that the resi-
dence from top to bottom, is thoroughly aired t least nce
a day; if the sun is shining, an hour or two is not tooe lng
for the internal air-bath. I do not like to enter a dwei
where the first thing to greet my nostrils is the odor of
meat and vegetables cooked at yesterdy's ditmupu. Yes, it's
"old stuff" I'm writing, ut its dily xriene in t i ad-
vanced age-and I don't live in the leakwiode alter-so
there!
The family doctor must be just as dead ganlist foetid
air indoors, as he is against the deadly stream o ugt~r,
pouri an window, over the 4 wherf
dare Ia agp~idL folks slee ^ .


r danc~c6r tis~ fou~rre.~~Y Lw
ri~a~as~lk wisr
~ ~~rs-.


CHASER


I


Friday, January 16, 1931


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


Page 8


|


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1~1


7: : '.~,-- -~
=1;
: _.L'1.
i..iL'r.-, -'_6:










Pare 4


4A.********++++++*****"*rim**qv*T


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


Louis Shochet who acted as
toastmaster. Charles Adelman
the Bar Mitzva celebrant re-
neated his confirmatory ad-


o y I M I d dress, and Rev. Nathan
S I Wroobel sang several Hebrew
5 selections.
I *Late in the evening several
g **+++Io +g ++++++_+++++++_++__+i folk dances, vocal selections
and instrumental numbers
Crimson roses and fern and son, Samuel, of Port- entertained the guests. Tele-
were used in the decorations chester, N. Y. grams were received from all
of the home of Mrs. Larry parts of the country includ-
Fay in Shenandoah Friday In celebration of the birth- ing a telegram from Rabbi
afternoon, when she was hos- day anniversary of A. Men- and Mrs. Israel H. Weisfeld
tess at a mother and daugh- delson, Mrs. Hessie Scher of which received a very en-
ter tea. Guests were enter- Cleveland, Ohio, who is resid- thusiastic ovation. At a late
trained with musical numbers, ing at the Shelbourne apart- hour a Dutch luncheon was
including piano selections by ments, gave a dinner party served, and the birthday cake
Miss Frances Kane, vocal in his honor Saturday at Cave was cut.
solos by Mrs. Fay and violin Inn, Miami Beach. Guests in- *
selections by Mrs. Daniel cluded Mr. and Mrs. William Mr. and Mrs. David Chert-
Cromer, accompanied by Miss Schwartz, Cleveland; Mr. and koff of Baltimore, Md., is vis-
E. Van Nordell. Twenty Mrs. J. Roseman, Youngs- iting Mr. M. Chertkoff of this
guests were present. town, Ohio; Mrs. Lichtman, city for a brief vacation. Mr.
Philadelphia; Mrs. Rose Lee, Chertkoff is one of the
Mr. and Mrs. A. Green- Cleveland, and Mrs. H. Weiss, founders and president of the
baum and Mr. and Mrs. Henry Cornell, Maine. Forest Park Synagogue of
Stone of Atlantic City are at Baltimore, and an active
the Louvene Apartments. Mrs. Ida LeVine of Troy, worker in Jewish Communal
N. Y., is t season guest of the affairs there.
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Mey- Shelburne apartments. *
erson of 2112 N. E. Second Mr. and Mrs. M. Lyons
avenue, announce the engage- Mr. and Mrs. Max Dia- and daughter of Hagerstown,
ment of their daughter, Selma mond and daughter Joyce Md., are visiting Mr. and
to Samuel Swartz. The wed- are season guests of the Mrs. Nathan Adelman of this
ding will take place in the Brompton Manor apartments. city having arrived here for
near future. the Bar Mitzva of Charles
a Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Lowen- Adelman. Accompanying
Mrs. Sidney Leon of New thal of Chicago, Ill., are at them was also Mr. J. Cohen
York and sons, Ollie and Mor- the Brompton Manor apart- of the same city. They will
ris, are winter guests at the ments for the season. remain here for a short time.
M'lrvi tio14mwmnt+o TIhev will


Ji15g1 aputa em l. XbW. l
be joined about January 15
by Mr. Leon.
*
Mrs. Isidor Cohen presi-
dent, was chosen a delegate
to represent the Miami Chap-
ter of Senior Hadassah at the
coming convention in New
Orleans, La., at a meeting
Monday at the Tri club. Plans
were completed for the caba-
ret and dance to be given
February 22 by the Senior
and Junior Hadassahs, at the
Frolics. A number of chair-
men have been announced,
which include Mrs. S. Sim-
onhoff, general chairman;
Mrs. Barney Weinkle, tickets;
Mrs. Syaney Weintraub,
dance program, Mrs. S. Alt-
shul was elected second vice
president. Hymie Schulman,
6 years of age and son of
Rabbi Schulman of Colum-
bus, Ga., entertained with a
group of violin solos, accom-
panied by Miss Rosa Stern.

Mrs. Ruth Lenchtag and
son, H. D. Lenchtag, of
Brooklyn, N. Y., are season
guests at the Royal apart-
ments, Miami Beach.
0 *
Mrs. Meyer Gordon and
family of ,aicago are spend-
ing the winter at the Muriel
apartments. Qther winter
arrivals are Mr. and Mrs. A.
Smith of New York city, who
have arrived to spend their
ninth season at the Beach.
*0
Mr. and Mrs. D. Frishman
of New York city are season
guests at the Jefferson apart-
ments, Miami Beach.
0
Mr. and Mrs. M. Scher and
daughter Rose of Cleveland,
Ohio, are season guests at the
Muriel apartments.

Mr. and Mrs. Max W. Levy
of New York are winter
guests at the Bay View
apattments.
S *
:'Wir guests at the Com-
Seaprtmenile include
L itm,* I Mr.[nA A. Altmn


Mr. and Mrs. M. D. Sham- Last Saturday morning the
man, Mr. A. S. Goldman and Synagogue of the Miami Jew-
Mrs. M. Rose of Cleveland, ish Orthodox Congregation
Ohio, are season guests of the was filled with the friends of
Charlotte apartments. the Adelman family to wit-
ness the Bar Mitzva of their
One of the prettiest events son, Charles. Rev. M. Shul-
of the season was the Bar man of Columbus, Ga., dav-
Mitzva celebration of Charles ened "Shachris" and Rev.
Adelman the son of Mr. and Nathan Wroobel "Musof."
Mrs. Nathan Adelman of this Charles read the Maftir in a
city, last Sunday evening at fashion that elicited favora-
their home, 1421 N. W. First Ible comments from all who
street. The home was beauti- were present.
fully decorated with cut Rabbi Isaac M. Wapner
flowers placed in tall flower spoke in Yiddish on "Our
baskets throughout the porch Conception of a True Bar
dining room and living room Mitzva." After the services,
of the home. In front of the the parents were hosts at an
fire place in the dining room old fashioned kiddish in the
was a beautifully decorated Synagogue of the Congrega-
and heavily lhden oblong ta- tion. Seated at long tables the
ble with cakes, candies and guests partook of the lunch
fruits of all kinds. On the that had been prepared for
large dining table covered them. In addition to Rabbi
with a beautiful lace cloth, Wapner, Rev. M. Shulman,
and decorated with ferns, re- Rev. Nathan Wroobel, Mr.
posed a large birthday cake David Chertkoff of Baltimore,
as the centerpiece. Surround- Mrs. Ella T. Kaiser, Mr. Levin
ing this cake were fruits, of Chicago, Mr. Louis Van-
nuts, cakes, candies and gilder, Harry Seitlin, and H.
sweets of all kinds. M. Drewitch, Mr. Beaton, and
On the sideboard stood the others spoke. Mr. Chertkoff
punch bowl presided over by led in the singing of "Zmiros"
Mrs. Harry Seitlin, Mrs. and was given the honor of
S. Haas, and Miss Rachel "Benschen." In the afternoon
Adelman. Receiving were "Shalosh Saudoh" was cele-
Mrs. Nathan Adelman and brated with Mr..Nathan Adel-
Mrs. M. Lyons of Hagers- man as host. Mr. Klein pre-
town, Md., her sister. Assist- sided and Rabbi Wapner
ing the host Mr. Nathan spoke after "Zmiros" were
Adelman in the serving of again sung.
refreshments were Messrs. *
Harry Seitlin and H. M. Dre- The Sisterhood of Temple
witch. During the formal part Israel held its bridge party at
of the evening, speeches were the Floridian Hotel last Tues-
made by Rabbi Isaac M. day afternoon and despite
Wapner, Julius Simpson, Jack the inclement weather more
Lewis of Baltimore, T. M. than sixteen tables of bridge
Scullin of the Third Na- were played. Four door prizes
tional Bank, Dewey Knight, were given, and the raffle
well known attorney, J. Ger- won by Mrs. Marvin Bron-
ry Curtis, superintendent of ner. Refreshments were ser-
Public Parks of the city of ved and the afternoon was
Miami, Louis Vangilder, Max greatly enjoyed by those at-
Kupferstein, Mrs. Ella T. tending. Mrs. P. Scheinberg
Kaiser representing the was chairman of the commit-
Emunah Chapter of the 0. E. tee in charge of arrange-
S., Mrs. Ida Buckstein presi- ments.
dent of the Ladies Auxiliary *
of the Miami Jewish Ortho- 'ie committee In charge of
dox Coagregation, Mr. Na- the Sist;erhood
than Adelman, it a and Xr. J. Israel bit 'aAl*ftk4


..rid y," o-t :6,

'i' .
Friday, Jaur16, :


)- ; -_ -;-.~_--------------- c


ANNOUN C ING


GOLDSTROM'S
Cakes and Pastries
May Be Purchased FRESH
Daily at
The 5th Street Dairy
and Bakery
162 N. W. FIFTH STREET




CLOPTON'S
44 S. W. SIXTH AVE.
Corner 1st St.

Fancy Groceries
The Finest in Fresh
Meats Fruits and
Vegetables
We Deliver Phone 2-8544
11M1111I111111111111111111111 i11111111111


-1


SPECIAL ICE SERVICE

DAY OR NIGHT

NO ORDER TOO SMALL











CITY



FIREPLACE WOOD
1-8 CORD OR MORE .

PHONE 3- -.
.... .. ..' ,/ .',_. _- .. .-: ,


-TE


7'


V
,_~I YI-cu _


I


given on February 2,' at the
Floridian Hotel consists of
Mesdames H. E. Kleinman as
chairman and I. L. Seligman,
Jacob H. Kaplan, D. J. Apte,
Gordon Davis, Sig Baar, D. L.
Slann and Bert Reisner.
0 *
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Small
are now located at their new
home 1720 S. W. 22nd terrace
where they will be glad to
welcome their many friends.
*
At the meeting of the
Ladies Auxiliary of the Mi-
ami Jewish Orthodox Congre-
gation held last Tuesday
night plans for the Russian
Tea sponsored by the organ-
ization were announced. The
tea will be held at the vestry
rooms of the Synagogue next
Sunday evening, January 18,


at 8 p. m. Those who
preside over the Samovin
will be dressed in Rusesi
costume. Bridge will be pla.
ed and entertainment will
provided. There will be no ad.
mission charge made. The oft
ficers of the organizations
will act as hosts and all resi.
dents and tourists are urged
to attend and will be made
welcome. Mrs. P. Augustine ia
chairman and she will be as.
sisted by Mrs. L. Levitt and
others.
*
The regular bridge party
of the Ladies Auxiliary of the
Orthodox Congregation held
last Tuesday night was well
(Continued on Page 5)

AMBULANCE SERVICE
W. H. Combs Co, Estab. 1896
COMBS FUNaRAL HOME
Phone Miami 82101
Ie N. B. nd Aenue
MIAMI BRACH FUNERAL HOME
Phone M. B. 5-2101
12a8 WuWhinton Avm.


--


1

I


"HURRY BACK"
TO
SE LLERS
Honest, Courteous Service.
N. W. 7th Ave, at 28th Street


i':
I
it
i.
.


i;;. ,
'"'
:~~:
T










I Firday, January 16, 1931


THE 'JEWIH FLORIDIAN


attended more than thirty
tables of bridge being played
in spite of the bad weather.
Mrs. Morton was the winner
of a beautiful lamp in the us-
ual raffle that was held. Re-
freshments were served and
prizes were given at each ta-
ble. Acting as hostesses were
Mesdames, A. Daum, Harry
Dubler and Mandelbaum.

An unusually large number
of tourists gathered at the
Helene Hotel last Monday
night at the bridge party ten-
dered for the benefit of Beth
Jacob Sisterhood of Miami
Beach. A very splendid time
was enjoyed by all and fif-
teen prizes were awarded to
the highest scores. The com-
mittee in charge consisting of
Mesdames Sam Blanck, M. D.
Kirsch and Barney Weinkle
expressed their thanks to
those who attended and help-
ed make the evening an out-
standing success both finan-
cially and socially. Cities
from all over the United
States were represented at
the gathering. At a late hour
refreshments were served.
The next card party will be
held some time in February
and will be announced in these
columns.
*
Plans were completed for a
joint affair of the Senior and
Junior Chapters for a caba-
ret and dance at the Frolics
to be held on February 22.
Mrs. S. Simonhoff has under-
taken to sponsor this lovely
a tffamrl m Mrarnv ^Wein-
kle (phone 5-3764) 'has
charge of the tickets. Mrs.
Sydney Weintraub is busy
compiling the program which
she promises to be tip-top.
Tickets for this affair,
which happens to fall on
Washington's birthday, may
be had from any Hadassah
member, senior or junior, or
by phoning to Mrs. Weinkle.
It is hoped that each and eve-
ry Hadassah member wheth-
er of this city or out of town
will show true Hadassah
spirit by cooperating.
*
Mrs. A. Naiman of New
,York city, a cousin of Mrs.
Max Schaaf and Mr. M. B.
Frank is visiting Mrs. Schaaf
for the winter season.
0
Elaborate ceremonies will
witness the marriage cere-
monies of Miss Fanny Gold-
stein the daughter of Mr. and.
Mrs. Henry Goldstein of Lou-
isville, Ky., to Mr. Leo Stein-
berg of this city. The guests
will assemble at the Hotel
Nemo, Miami Beach, where a
beautiful canopy will be pre-
pared for the ceremony, bank-
ed with roses and cut flowers,
in the large ballroom of the
hotel. Rabbi N. N. Rosen of
the B. B. Jacob Synagogue
of Savannah, Ga., will offi-
ciate at the ceremony. This
is the Synagogue with which
the Steinberg family has
been affiliated all their life,
the grandfather of the groom
having been an active official
there for many years. Im-


mediately after the ceremony
dinner will be served -to the
guests consisting of the im-
ediate members of both;


on Tuesday evening, January
20. The bride will have as her
attendants her sister, Miss
Jean, and her prospective sis-
ter in law, Miss Tee Stein-
berg.
Mr. Steinberg will have as
his best man, Mr. Sam Stein-
berg, of Savannah, Ga., an
uncle. Guests from Savannah,
Ga., Norfolk, Va., and Louis-
ville, Ky., will arrive here
next Monday in time for the
wedding.
*
The Sisterhood of Beth
David entertained at a card
party in the Talmud Torah
all, last Sunday night at
which a number of visitors
and residents of the Greater
Miami district were present.
The officers of the Sister-
hood acted as hosts. Prizes
were given and refreshments
were served.
The Bible Class for Jewish
Women conducted by Rabbi
Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan of Tem-
ple Israel will meet next
Wednesday morning at 10 a.
m. in Kaplan hall.
*
The Parent Teachers Asso-
ciation of Temple Israel will
be hosts at a book review and
musical at the home of Mrs.
D. J. Apte on February 3,
when Mesdames Harry Rubin
and Max Dobrin will enter-
tain. Quite an elaborate pro-
gram will be presented.

Preparations are now being
made for the Sisterhood
birthday luncheon at the
Floridian Hotel, Miami Beach
on February 2, by a commit-
tee headed by Mrs. Herbert
E. Kleinman. This luncheon
will celebrate the birthday an-
niversary of the founding of
the Temple Israel Sisterhood.
*
A very large and enthusia-
stic audience gathered at the
Frolics last Sunday night at
the benefit staged there by
the Sisterhood of Temple
Israel for the benefit of its
Organ Fund. Dave Roth the
well known and versatile en-
tertainer was responsible for
the forty minutes of unusual
and novel entertainment pre-
senting a galay of well
known vaudeville stars. The
committee headed by Mrs. I.
L. Seligman deserves and has
received much commendation
for its management of the af-
fair and the splendid sum
realized because of it.
*
The Council of Jewish Wo-
men is bending every effort
to make the night of January
25, one long to be remembered
by tourists and residents of
Greater Mami. On that night
the Council will hold its an-
nual event ,to realize funds
with which to carry on its
welfare work. This year the
event will be staged at the
Spanish Gardens, atop the
Alcazar Hotel and will be in
charge of a committee headed
by Mrs. I. L. Seligman as
chairman. Admission will be
only seventy-five cents.
*0*


: SOCIETY:
*^^ ^^' 'J^ ^ ^ ^T ^ ^ ^^--*^ ^*^^ ^^ *^,--^*^ _^ 1


Registered at the Fountain
apartments are C. R. Bricken-
hoff, Boston, Mass.; Mr. and
Mrs. N. W. Pickus, Wauke-
gan, Ill.; Mr. and Mrs. S. Lei-
fer of Flushing, L. I.
*


I A arv ntreAating and in- I


Surrounded by members of structive meeting was that BR
their family and a large num- given under the ,auspices of Ex
ber of their friends, Mr. and the Miami Branch of the
Mrs. L Hart celebrated Arbeiter lasr t Thry 8L
h eBddi nitt at th Se .Dav TWE _




.4.^r ti ^ .... I 1


- ----__ _~_ ~ ~~_ 1~ ~ -...-,---. ,.- .r


their daughter, Mrs. Sol. g1ot-
fort, 1421 N. W. Second street
last Sunday night. The home
was beautifully decorated
with silver bells hung all
about the house, and cut
flowers placed midst a profu-
sion of fern and sweet peas.
In the receiving line to wel-
come the guests were Mr. and
Mrs. L. J. Hartz, the celebr-
ants, their daughters, Mrs.
Sol. Rotfort of Miami, and
Mrs. R. V. Brandt of Long
Island, N. Y., and their two
granddaughters. When all had
gathered they proceeded to
the large dining room where
a turkey dinner was served to
the guests.
Upon entering, each guest
received flowers, the men a
rose, and the women corsages
of sweet peas. At the dinner
Mr. George M. Morgan acted
as toastmaster and delivered
the principle congratulatory
address. Other guests made
brief talks and congratulated
the couple. Telegrams from
different friends throughout
the country were received and
read.
Entertainment during the
dinner and after was provided
by a colored vaudeville troup
who played, danced and sang.
After dinner dancing was en-
joyed by all. Mr. Hartz pre-
sented his bride with a dia-
mond ring in memory of the
happy event and gifts from
their children, relatives and
friends were presented to the
couple. Among the guests
present were Mr. and Mrs.
Sol. Rotfort, Mrs. R. V.
Brandt and daughters of
Long Island, N. Y., Mr. and
Mrs. George M. Morgan and
Jr. Morgan, Mr, and Mrs. J.
M. Beebe, Mr. Wm Mosner,
Mr. and Mrs, M. Pepper, Mr.
and Mrs. L. Johnson, Mr. and
Mrs. E. Weisglass, Mr. and
Mrs. Larkin, Mr. Lou Rotfort,
Mrs. R. Ginsberg, Mrs. J.
Silberstein, Miss Sadye Silber-
stein, Mrs. Sadye G. Rose,
H. Taylor, Mr. M. Kahn, Mr.
Mr. and Mrs. C. Larsen, Mrs.
M. Resua, Mrs. M. Barbatzi,
and Messrs. T and G. Bar-
batzi.
*
Mr. and Mrs. B. Ginsberg
of Flushing, L. I., are spend-
ing their seventh winter here
and are at the La Veeda
apartments.
C
Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Wurz-
burg of Chicago are living at
the Locust apartments.

Oscar Gross of Meridian,
Conn., is a winter guest at the
Royal apartments.

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Green-
field and daughter, Sara, of
Painesville, Ohio, are staying
at the Palmetto apartments.

Mr. and Mrs. J. Grodsky
and daughter, Bess, St. Louis,
Mo., and Mrs. M. J. Razorswy
and son, Donald Kenneth of
St. Louis, are guests at the
Locust apartments.
*


pern well known local commu-
nal worker presided and in-
troduced the famous writer,
A. Litwack of New York, who
lectured on the five phases
of Sholom Aleichem's humor
as depicted in his writings,
particularly stressing the
characters and traits as por-
trayed by the writer in the
famous figures of "Tevie the
Milchiger," and "Manachem
Mendel." Though apparently
different he showed that
both characters in the writ-
ings in many instances re-
sembled each other. The lec-
turer then portrayed the in-
tense and practical knowledge
that Sholom Aleichem pos-
sessed of characteristic traits
of the real Jew as shown in
his writings.
A large number of resi-
dents and several tourists at-
tended this meeting which is
the first of a series that will
be conducted here this season.
*
Junior Hadassah is the
first Jewish organization of
Miami to demonstrate for the
purpose of constructive Jew-
ish work, the real meaning of
the old familiar saying, "Time
means Money." Confronted
with the problem of providing
funds to. aid the Palestine
projects sponsored by the Na-
tional Junior Hadassah, the
local chapter is sponsoring
the novel idea of making eve-
ry second of a twenty-four


CORD WOOD
16-Inch and 22-Inch Lenrth
PHONE 8-2191
THE CITY ICE AND
FUEL COMPANY

NEW YORK
DELICATESSEN AND
RESTAURANT
"Everything for the Home in Food"
800 N. W. SECOND AVENUE
Phone 21-9.18


L. (Pop) GERSON
Buyer of All Kinds of Scrap Metal
We Sell Auto.Parts
2141 N. W. SECOND AVE.
Phone 2s621

BAGS and METALS
EAST COAST BAG & METAL CO.
(Inc.)
I. L. MINTZER
MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS
435-445 N. W. 8th Street
Phone 4485
PEPPER METAL CORP.
SNrap Metal s a Machinery
N. W. Cor. s5t Ave. ad 14t St.
Phone 23946
BUILDING SUPPLIES
J. SIMPSON
Buil ng MXterolab,
Roofina Paper, Asphalt
428 N. .N. River Drive
Phone T721

DELICATESSEN
ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN
170 N. W. eth St.
We Supply Your Every Wamat


DRESSES


DUTIFUL DRESMBE
pnally Low Prled
LAB WOLPEBRT
. 96t Sat. Ap
ow 8L e
4 gas gna f


45


FISH & SEA FOODS
STANDARD FISH CO.
629 W. Flasler St.
Phone 2486s

PHARMACISTS
BRYAN PARK PHARMACY
Chas. Tannenbaum,
Pharmacist
(reg. pharmaist fo 17 year)
Cer 2ad Ave. a d IKth SL. W.
CRYSTAL PHARMACY
Dr. D. D. alpm, Ph G. P. 8.
PrescrDptios Our Spealty
128 N. Miamn Ave PhLae lSW1

PIPE aid STEEL
ADELMAN PIPE & STEmL O.
5I N. t26th St.
Aat F. E. C. R. Phemew
A. & B. PIIE AND METAL C0.
The Largest ear wumws In
Plead
58 North Bat sth Stret
Phone a 1


FLASH EXPRESS & STORAGE
CO, INC.
48 7W.h Stre
Telephone 2-486 ii, a.
AUTO PAMRT


atOs
N.: tr
'.3-;:i ft


AM.S S iRL.
[~ ~R00
"* atfZB j- ~ o'-


hour day mean "money" to
help in its work. A clock will
be wound and set in the lobby
of the Fairfax Theatre and
when the clock stops the very
second indicated on the clock
will determine the winner of
a trip to New York city.
However, and this is the se-
cret of the campaign which is
being broadcast. The clock
will not be wound until every
second of a twenty-four hour
day will have been sold for
the sum of one cent for each
second. A committee headed
by Miss Reggie Goldstein are
going to try and prove that
time means money to every
Jew in Greater Miami, resi-
dent and tourist alike, when
that money is devoted for a
purpose so splendid as is
Hadassah,
*
The annual ball given by
the Jewish Welfare Bureau
to raise funds without which
its annual budget cannot be
met will be held at the Black-
(Continued on Page 6)


Ferguson
Undertaking
Co.
1201 South Olive Ave.
Phone 5273
West Palm Beach, Fla.
LADY ATTENDANT


Well-Worth
SHOE SHOP
Corner of
5th St. & 2nd Ave. N. W.

MASTER DRY CLEANING
SHOE REPAIRING
By The Most Modern
Method. Makes It Well-
Worth Your Coaing.
Cut Frife-Work Gunrntoe .


'w; ,I


Page 5


:seOSeS S*e S* S

I BUSINESS DIRECTORY
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Page 6


ADDITIONAL
SOCIETY

(Continued from Page 5)
stone Hotel this year on Sun-
day night, February 15,
with a splendid program be-
ing prepared for the enter-
tainment of the guests in ad-
dition to the dancing and reg-
ular program presented by
the Hotel management. The
committee in charge of ar-
rangements has not yet been
named but will be announced
shortly.
*
All Jewish men and women
are urged to. try out for the
Minstrel show of the new
Mens' Club which will be giv-
en in the latter part of Febr-
uary. Those desiring to try
out are requested to appear
at the Beth David Talmud
Torah next Monday evening,
at 7:30 or to communicate
with Mr. Abe Aronowitz at
the Seybold building.
At the last meeting of the
Junior Hadassah, Mrs. Buck-
man, prominent Atlanta Ha-
dassah worker gave a very in-
teresting talk on the work of
the organization. The Hawa-
ian Trio rendered several se-
lections during the evening.
The various committees pre-
sented their reports. Plans
for the League of Nations
party to be given January 26
at the home of Mrs. Jennie
Rotfort, 1421 N. W. Second
street were announced.
*


TO OUR READERS
We are in receipt of a
one hundred page booklet
from the Florida De-
partment of Agriculture,
beautifully illustrated,


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


Gifts Pesented
To Synagog
Last week the Miami Jew-
ish Orthodox Congregation
was presented with a very


containing hundreds of large and beautiful chandel-
tested recipes for the ier which *as hung over the
use of fruits and vegeta- p e i to h o
bles. It is a book well pulpit of the Synagog in
worth having and we front of the Holy Ark. Mr.
shall be glad to have this and Mrs. Louis Jacobskind
cook book sent free of of HialeaH were the donors
charge to any one who and a plate bearing their
will send us a postal card names with suitable inscrip-
requesting a copy of this tion will be affixed to com-
book. If you want a copy, memorate the gift. At the
hurry and let us know. same time the traditional
"Tablets and Lions" carved
+o+++++++++++++++++x+o + of wood to be placed on top
pointed will meet at the home of the Holy Ark was present-
of Miss Lesnoff, 1037 N. W. ed by Mrs. M. Grossman the
First street on Monday eve- mother of the president of the
ningi January 19, when the Ladies Auxiliary. Resolutions
ning, January 19,of thanks were adopted by
committee consisting of Jean thanks were adopted by
Mohilner, Gilford Ornstein,the Executive Board of the
Jack Lapin, Ruth First and Congregation and were sent
Celia Flitnan will draft the to the donors of these gifts.
changes in the Constitution
that will be presented to the Attorney Obtains
membership. The next meet-
ing of the club will be held Court Vindication
at the club rooms in the Con-
gress building, next Wednes- Bernard Gould, attorney,
day evening. Dancing will fol- disbarred by Dade county
low the business session. ~ i ~ ,,,- m+ r n.


Last Saturday afternoon
Charles Adelman entertained
a number of friends to celebr-
ate his 13th birthday..Games
were played and favors were
given each of the guests. Re-
freshments were served.
Among those present were
Norman and Shepard Simp-
son, Rosalyn Daum, Rosalyn
Klein, Rose Dubler, Morris


The bridge party given by Wroobel, Fred Shochet and
the Friendship League at others.
their club rooms, last Wednes-
day was a decided success. ORGANIZATION TO MEET
High score prizes were won The Miami Jewish Ortho-
by the Misses Celia Flitman dox Congregation and the
and Minnie Lesnoff. A well Ladies' Auxiliary will hold an
known Radio singer sang sev- important joint meeting next
eral popular songs which were Tuesday evening at 8 p. m.
well received. The constitu- in the Synagog. All members
tional committee recently ap- are urged to attend.


PREMIER GREYHOUNDTRACK OF AMERICA,


HIGHEST TYPE OF

Greyhound Racing
AT THE MOST
COMPLETE AND MODERN TRACK. IN AMERICA

ONLY 3 MILES FROM DOWNTOWN MIAMI
On Miami's Main Thoroughfares
FLAGLER ST.- N. W. SEVENTH ST.
AND DOUGLAS ROAD

STREET CARS DIRECT TO TRACK
BUSSES LEAVE OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE
AMPLE FREE PARKING SPACE-SPACIOUS GRAND-
STAND INVITING SURROUNDINGS PUBLIC
ADDRESS SYSTEM, MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT
10 Race Nightly-Except Sunday-Post Time, 8:15


CHAMPION HURDLE RACING EVERY NIGHT
ADMISSION, 50c


and reinstated by the State
Supreme court May 1, 1930,
was given a verdict for $25,-
000 against Ben Silver, for-
mer real estate partner, yes-
terday in Circuit court. The
trial judge suggested that the
verdict be reduced to $7,500.
Gould, represented by S.
Grover Morrow, filed suit
for libel against Silver, based
on Silver's affidavit to the
Dade County Bar Association
seeking Gould's disbarment.
The affidavit accused Gould
of embezzlement in real es-
tate transactions.
Silver was not in court yes-
terday and was not represen-


ted by attorneys. After the
complainant had stated his
case and presented testimony,
Judge A. V. Long, supply Cir-
cuit court judge from Gaines-
ville, directed a verdict in fa-
vor of Mr. Gould. He told the
jury it must fix the amount
of damages. The jury found
for the full amount.
"The Supreme Court of
Florida has previously re-
viewed all charges against
me, and by its unanimous de-
cision has completely exoner-
ated me from all blame, bas-
ing its decision on 'equity and
conscience and not legal tech-
nicality.' This verdict removes
the last remaining charge
against me.
"The accusation in this case
arose out of a real estate
transaction during the 1925
boom, wherein the complain-
ant sought to compel me to
assume certain losses result-
ing from the collapse of the


JOSEPH E. WIDENER
SChairman of the Board


MAJOR BARCLAY H. WARBURTON,
Prmldmt


NINE
GAMES NIGHTLY
Except Sunday


fJfz!F& f~-/ JA~


*i:


SYour Opportunity

To get the best in new and second hand
furniture at exceptionally low prices.



McKeehan


Furniture Co.,Inc.
531 to 549 N. W. Third Avenue
OUT OF THE HIGH RENT DISTRICT
Phone 3-1524


0 /~/p Will


OFF!


Into the Home Stretch and Running Well!


HIALEAH


PARK


MIAMI RACING ASSOCIATION


4-Y
PruAnE I..ErSNi
7.-i : ~


1re JEriS iLOIflIAi ^ MO
S''. .*- '. : :- "" .- .._ .. .. .. -
.
,,, .O ".


THEY'RE


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5-
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5


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Music by Caesar La Monaca and His All Miami Band
Race Trains Direct to Track Leaving F. E. C., City Station at 1:30 p. m.
Racing Every day but Sunday
Busses at Frequent Intervals from Venetian Aracade, Direct to Grand Stand



Friday, Jauary 16, 1
boom, whereas in fact, I
advanced considerable 'ToS
of my own on behalf o t
complainant.
"I wish to thank my man
friends for their staunch c00
fidence and loyalty in m
throughout these entire pro.
ceedings."
Love and war go hand it
hand. Even the din of battle
has a sort of engagement
ring.


JAI ALAI

Biscayne Fronton
Thn World's Ftaat Sport





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