The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 1930
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00066

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Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text
.4- -- Z'. 9~f~,-,


XXII. Miami, Florida, Frida
* XX II. Miami, Florida, Frida


--- t 'd l-. .--.


193;


Price 5 Cents


Campaign Briefs


Campaigning actively an(
attracting favorable comment
by his concise characterize
tion of important issues, i
Leo Rosen a candidate for th4
Democratic State Executive
Committee. Mr. Rosen is a
son of Mr. and Mrs. M. Roser
and has been a resident ol
ths city for a number ol
years having previously re
s:ded in Montreal, Can. He
is a graduate of the Stetsor
University at De Land, Fla.
and had previously attended
McGill University at Mon-
treal and the University of
the city of New York. He has
practiced law in Miami since
1926, is married and has one
child. Mr. Rosen comes from
family that has been very
prominent in Jewish affairs
in Montreal and has partaken
actively in local Jewish af-
fairs since their residence in
Miami. His many friends
point out that the Democratic
Committee needs young men
in its midst and also point to
the fact that he is the only
Jewish candidate for the
State committee.

Otto C. Stegemann candi-
date for the Reppublican
nomination for the State Leg-
islature in Group 2 is 32 years
old, a lawyer for ten years-
and five years in Miami. He
has received the highest
scholastic honors at the New
York University and at Har-
vard Law School. He volun-
teered and saw service in the
United States Navy. This is
the first campaign for Mr.
Stegemann, who is now as-
sociated with Bernard Gould
in the practice of law, and he
is making his campaign on
a platform of good govern-
ment, endorsing tke Republi-
can party platform. He is fa-
voring a change in the Bank-
ing laws so as to protect the
private and public depositors,
and legislation favoring an
equal distribution of the tax
burdens of the State. His
friends point to the fact that
his scholastic attainment and
professional experience make
him the best candidate avail-
able.

S. P. (Pete) Robineau who
is in the race for re-election
to the Florida Legislature in
Group 2, is making an active
canvass of Dade County and
urging his past record of
achievements as ample reason
for his return to the legisla-
ture. Having been educated
at Lake Forest, the Univer-
sity of the South, The Univer-
sity of Freiburg, Baden Ger-
many, and at Sorbonne,
France, and received his le-
gal training at Harvard Uni-
versity he was admitted to
the Massachusetts Bar in
1912, and the Florida Bar in
1915 since which time he has
been practicing here. During
the World's War he $erved in
the French Army and was
demobilized because of wounds
He re-endised i tithe Ameri-


can Army *o-o overseas ana
was demobiUie in 1919 as
Captain. e Was City attor-
ney of M 1 19 to
1921 and to a of


Dlck Byrd's Back


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Rear-Admiral Byrd photographed
at Panainm on his return from his
Anrrctic voyage of discovery and
flil'ht over the Softh Pole.


Miami Synagogues
Observe Shvuoth

The usual Friday night ser-
Vices which begins at Sun-
down will be observed this
Friday, with regular morning
services beginning at 9 a. m.
Saturday. "Shvuoth" will be-
gin promptly at 7:15 p .m. on
Sunday night when services
will be held. The Holiday
services will continue on Mon-
day morning and immediately
after the reading of the Torah
a sermon will be preached by
Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld. On
Tuesi~ aymnorning the services
will begin promptly at 9
o'clock with memorial ser-
vices (Yjzkor) being recited
at 10 a. m. Rabbi Weisfeld
will preach a sermon on the
significance of the day im-
mediately preceding the "Yiz-
kor." All who desire that the
names of the departed rela-
tives be recited at the Mem-
orial services are urged to
communicate with the office
of the Synagogue not later
than Sunday noon.
Shvuoth will be observed
beginning at 7 p. m. Sunday
night with the usual services.
Monday morning the services
will begin at 9 a. m. On Tues-
day morning services will be-
gin at 9 a. m. with "Yizkor"
being recited at 10 o'clock.
The services will be conducted
by volunteer members of the
congregation led by Rev. I.
Herman.

Nat'L Fund Flower
Day Next Week

Miami will again observe
the Jewish National Fund
Flower day this year as has
been the custom here for a
number of years. The com-
mittee of the Hadassah is
headed by Mrs. Morris Dubler
who is chairman of the local
Zionist District National
Fund. Flower Day will be ob-
served for three days begin-
ning Monday, Jdne 9th.
Headquarters for the three
days will be at 230 Biscayne
boulevard in the Everglades
Hotel building. The personnel
of the committee will be an-
nounced in the columns of
next week's issue of the Jew-
ish Floridian.
Florida in 1929.
In addition to being chair-
man of the Judiciary com-


Convention of
Rabbis and
Laymen Closes
The conference of Southern
Rabbis and Laymen held in
Savannah, Ga., closed last
week with the adoption of im-
portafit resolutions and the
election of officers. The offi-
cers elected were: President,
L. Weitz, Savannah, Ga.; Vice
Presidents, L. Weinkle, Mi-
ami, and L. Hershkowitz,
Nashville, Tenn.; Secretary,
William Pinsker, Savannah,
Ga.; Treasurer, Fred Rosen,
Savannah, Ga.; Asst. Secre-
taries, Harry Stern, Nash-
ville, Tenn., and Max Kupfer-
stein, Miami, Fla. The re-
maining members of the Exe-
cutive Board will be chosen
by the officers from the other
congregations and cities affi-
liated with the Union of
Southern Jewish Orthodox
Congregations.
Among the resolutions
adopted were:
1. That we laymen assem-
bled in convention express
our thanks to Rabbi Israel H.
Weisfeld of Miami and. Rabbi
Nathan Rosen of Savannah,
for their painstaking efforts
to make this conference pos-
sible.
2. That the congregations
in the Union engage only such
Rabbis .as have secured
Smicha from an accredited
Orthodox -alminical Semin-
ary providing these rabbis"
are recommended by the
Southern Conference of Or-
thodox Rabbis as explained in
Resolution I of the Resolu-
tions of the Southern Con-
ferenice of Orthodox Rabbis.
3. That cities shall not en-
gage any Shochet until he
has demonstrated to the Rabbi
of the city his authority and
ability to practice his calling
in accordance with the laws
of traditional Judaism.
That where the city enga-
ging a Shochet is without the
services of a Rabbi, the
Shochet must secure the ap-
proval of the Rabbi in the
nearest neighboring cty, pro-
viding such Rabbi passes the
qqualifications expressed in
Resolution 1.
That a committee of Rab-
bis draw up uniform curricula
for the Religious Schools of
the congregations in this or-
ganization.
That Talmud Torahs, He-
brew Schools, Sabbath and
Sunday Schools engage only
such teachers as are sincerely
observant of Jewish orthodox
religious practices.
That in order to .spread
Jewish education, this year
be known as "Send Your
Child to Hebrew School
Year," and that Rabbis, offi-
cers and laymen be requested
to take every occasion at pub-
lic and other meetings to fos-
ter attendance at the schools.
That every congregation
elect or appoint a special com-
mittee to aid the Rabbi in di-
recting the Hebrew School
and to foster attendance


mittee and a member of seven
other important committees,
and introduced and worked
for 1 important bills includ-
ing the Workmen's Compen-


"cJimmie" at


Rest
-.-:_


New York's popular mayor, HonI
James J. Walker, taking his ease it,
Bermuda where he went to recuperate
from his strenuous Job.

Rabbi Resigns
"Jazz" Position

Hammond, Ind. Rabbi
Louis Kruppin of the wealthy
Bethel temple has resigned,
because, his wife explained,
he found "dancing and jazz
music are inappropriate when
religious services are con-
ducted."
The difficulty arose after
the younger set of the con-
gregation decided to stage the
"Bethel Scandals," an ama-
teur production, May 29.
"The congregation is too
worldly," Mrs. Krupain said,
and announced- the- rubs-de-
cision was irrevocable.
therein.
That congregations belong-
ing to the Union of Southern
Jewish Orthodox Congrega-
tions be urged to have their
rabbis exchange pulpits with
other rabbis of the Southern
Conference of Orthodox Rab-
bis in their vicinity. These ex-
changes not to take place on
the same Sabbath so that one
Rabbi might act as host to
the guest rabbi. Also the con-
gregations benefiting by this
exchange shall defray the ex-
penses of the guest rabbi.
That the Union of Jewish
Orthodox Congregations urge
such communities as are fi-
nancially unable to maintain
their own spiritual leader to
invite the nearest orthodox
rabbi to preach in their pulpit
at certain fixed intervals, they
to defray the traveling ex-
penses incurred by the rabbi
at these visits.
That orthodox rabbis and
laymen take upon themselves
to encourage the sale of Kos-
her products by the restau-
rants, delicatessen stores,
and groceries of each com-
munity and to urge the con-
sumption of the above men-
thodox Jews of the same
communities.
That a sister organization
of women, whose aim it shall
be to promote the ideals of
traditional Judaism in the
South, be organized -by the
executive board of the Union
of Southern Jewish Orthodox
Congregations.
That the officers and the
executive board of the Union


station bil, etc.
The friends of Mr. Rob-
ineau point to the fact that
with his knowledgeof e I
tions in Dade Co yv E
invaluable
.= .. ;._ 4 -? .


of Southern Jewish Orthodox
Congregations shall be in con-
tact with the constituent con-
gregations in order to assist
them in their work.
At the Rabbinical confer-
ence Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld
of Miami was elected presi-
dent, and Rabbi I Axelman
of Charleston, S. C., was iwlee
ted Secretary and ditor. Heb
wf81d^ ai n anxW al tbmat su
hbe t -ied the in
ft 3 hon of Ran o

wo


Vol. III.-No.
__..-~-.--


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Temple Israel to
Confirm Class

The regular annual confir-
mation ceremonies will be
held on Sunday night, June 1
beginning at 7 p. m. Because
of the large number of guests
expected all are urged to be
on hand promptly as the
doors will be closed promptly
at 7 o'clock. The program is
as follows:
Procession of Comfirmands pre-
ceded by President and Vice-Pres.
Processional "How Blessed Are"
Hymn No. 96.
Invocation, Rabbi.
Solo, "The Lord is My Light"
(by Allitsen) Miss Mary Kahn.
I-Opening Prayer, Lois Louis.
II-Flower Prayer, Jeanette Slann
III-Confirmation Vow, Milton
Klein.
"Father See Thy Suppliant
Children" Hymn No. 101.
IV-Declaration, Maxine Kanter.
En Komocho, Choir.
V-Prayer Before Open Ark,
Joseph Fields.
"Adonoi, Adonoi, Choir.
VVI-The Torah, Reading from
the Torah, Roy Bernstein.
Shema, Choir.
VII-The Haftarah, Marian Fine.
VIII-Concluding Benediction, Guy
Goldsmith.
IX-Returning the Scroll, Buddy
Altmayer.
Hodo Al Eretz, Choir.
Etz Chayim, Duet, Miss Rose-
mary Gerson, Miss Mary Kahn.
X-The Cominandments, Dorothea
Levin.
XI-Our Faith, Shirley Suffens.
XII-The Jewish Festivals, Billy
Homa.
XIII-The Jewish Holy Days,
Alfred Nathan.
Solo-His Haven (by Hamblem)
Mr. Percy Long.
XIV-Address to Parents, Bertha
Marshall Ungar.
Solo-"Omnipotence" by Schu-
bert, Miss Rosemary Gerson.
XV-Our Solemn Pledge, Isabella
Mae Klein.
XVI-Motto, Sylvia Miles.
XVII-Address to Classmates,
Victor Kohn.
Lift Thine Eyes, by ~li J-
sohn, Mrs. H. U. Feiblemaw r3m
Mary Kahn, Miss Rosemary Ge-
son.
XVIII-Closing Prayer, Lester
Frank.
Blessing of Confirmands, Rabbi.
"The Vow of Faith"-Hymn
No. 98, Choir.
Sermon-"The Beginning of a
Jewish Life" Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan.
Solo--"Lead Us, O Father," by
Alfred Wooler, Mrs. Si Mendela.n.
Presentation of Contfiaqtion
Certificates, Pres. of Coagrega
tion.
Presentation of Bibles, Pree, of
Sisterhood.
Concluding Services Prayer
Book, pages 272-765.
Solo "Hallelujah by Hummel
Mrs. H. U. Feibelman.
Benediction.


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Friday, May 3_l0, 19
Mrs. Ben Watts and dauh.
ters, Miss Bernice and Janet,
will leave following the cloe
of school for Louisville, Ky,
where they will join Mr.
Watts. During the summer
they will visit in Cincinnati
and Cleveland, Ohio.
A joint meeting of the Ar.
beiter Ring and the Ladies'
Club of the organization was
held at the Workmens' Circle
hall last Tuesday evening
when a detailed report of the
activities of the school was
read by the school committee
through Mr. Levin the finan.
(Continued on Page 3)


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Friday, May 30, 1930


SOCIETY

(Continued from Page 2)
cial secretary. The report
showed that it had been nec-
essary to raise a sum of two
thousand dollars in addition
to the tuition fees collected
in order to pay for the main-
tenance of the school. There
is now a small balance left in
the treasury towards the re-
opening of the school in the
fall. Mr. J. Grohman the
teacher reported that the
children had received training
in the Yiddish language, lit-
erature and history; and
those attending regularly had
received agrounding in He-
brew elementaries according
to the methods recently adop-
ted by the National Arbeiter
Ring Schools. An examina-
tion showed that the Miami
school was far advanced above
the usual requirements of
similar schools elsewhere.
Public examinations are being
held Thurday night as we are
going to press. In closing the
meeting Dr. A. D. Halpern
who presided reviewed the
school history, the hardships
encounetred because of inter-
nal dissension and financial
difficulties and urged upon
the members the necessity of
utilizing the school vacation
for the purpose of raising
funds and preparing for the
reopening of the school n bet-
ter and more commodious
quarters.
Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Richter
held open house last Sunday
night at their new home, 1893
S. W. 10th street when they
received more than two hun-
dred friends who called to
pay their respects. The dining
room was beautifully decor-
ated with cut flowers, and
the long dining table was cov-
ered wth an imported table
cloth and surmounted by a
silver centerpiece. A musical
program was presented under
the leadership of Dave Roth.
Cards were played by the
guests during the evening.
The hostess was gowned in an
imported yellow gown and
was assisted in receiving by
a number of friends.
*
The Ladies' Auxiliary of
Beth David Talmud Torah
will hold one of its regular bi-
weekly card parties at the
home of Mrs. Manuel Rippa
1120 S. W. 19th avenue, when
Mrs. Sadie G. Rose and H.
Gottesman will be the hos-
tesses. Refreshments will be
served and prizes awarded at
each individual table.
*


The regular meeting of the
Ladies' Auxiliary of Beth
David Talmud Torah will be
held on Wednesday evening,
June 4, instead of on Tuesday
evening, because of the card
party which will be held the
previous evening at the home
of Mrs. M. Rippa. As business
of an important nature will
be discussed, all members are
urged to attend.
*
Of interest to their many
friends is the announcement
by Mr. and Mrs. John Wolf of
the engagement of their
daughter, Miss Norma, to
Harold G. Tobin. Miss Wolf
came to Miami .nine years
ago, is a graduate of the Mi-
ami High School and is a


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


member of the Miami Junior
Woman's club, the Junior
Hadassah, and is an officer of
the Junior Councilof Jewish
Women. Mr. Tobin is the son
of Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Tobin,
pioneer Miamians; was gra-
duated from the public
schools of the city, attended
a specialized insurance school
in Atlanta, Ga., and is now a
member of the firm of Tobin
& Tobin.
A number of attractive af-
fairs are being planned for
the bride-elect. The wedding
will take place late in the
summer.
*
Buffet supper celebrating
the eighth birthday anniver-
sary of Miss May Edith
Rosenthal for their daughter
at their home.
Present were Olga Kauf-
man, Miss Ruth Rappaport,
Sylvia Kellman, Mell Biggers,
Violet Sweeting, Carrie
Locket, MrM. and Mrs. Ja-
cobs, Charles Cromer, Harold
Zonn, Murray Kellman.
*
Miss Frances Druckerman
will present her pupils in a
piano recital Friday morning
at 10 o'clock at her studio.
Those appearing will be Syl-
via Leibovit, Maurice Cromer,
Mortimer Fay, Frank Solo-
mon, Esther Winer, Kabe
Morris, Dorothy Morris, Ar-
lene Aronovitz, Lillian Relle-


man, Chester Cassel, Marion
Freed, Rose Marion Golden
and Bully Gray.
*
Mrs. Herbert S. Sepler left
today for Pensacola where
she will spend two months
at the San Carlos hotel, visit-
ing relatives.
S* *
Mrs. Milton Weiner enter-
tained last Friday afternoon
at a beautiful bridge and
kitchen shower at the Pan-
coast hotel in honor of Miss
Reggie Goldstein whose mar-
riage to Mr. A. H. Furr will
take place in June. Receiving
with the hostess and the
guest of honor were Mrs.
Chas. Goldstein, Mrs. Abe
Aronovitz and Mrs. Henry
Spitzer. Among the guests
were Mesdames. Milton Wei-
ner, Alex Goldstein, L. Sap-
ero, L. Rifas, M. Rauzin, J.
S. Fields, M. Beldner, M. Col-
lins, Esther Klein, Louis Hay-
man, S. Simonhoff, I Rubin,
L. Rubin, Jasper Cromer, Abe
Aronovitz, Sue Schechter, S.
Aronovitz, P. Boyer, Dan
Ruskin, M. Orovitz, Stanley
C. Myers, A. Kanner, Chas.
Rosenfarten, H. Orlin, M.
Wesson, M. Solomon, J. N.
Morris, Chas. Tobin, Henry
Spitzer and the Misses Mar-
tha Spiegelman, M. Rubin, L.
Chisling, Dorothy Brill, Syl-
via Katz, Ida Weingarten,


ELECT
Thomas S. Ferguson

Judge of the Civil
Court of Record
If elected, I pledge my entireI
time to the business of the Civil
Court of Record and will faith-
fully perform the duties of my
office.
1 Your Vote and Support will be
Appreciated.


I respectfully present
Myself to the Democratic
voters of Dade County
for nomination as their
candidate for the office
of Representative from
Dade County to the Flor-
ida State Legis!ature
Group 2
I served in the Ses-
sions of 1929, and believe
my experience will en-
able me to render better
service.
Democratic Primary
Election, June 3, 1930

S. P. Robineau
(Political Advertisement
paid by a friend)


BEN C. WILLARD
CANDIDATE FOR
JUDGE OF
COURT OF CRIMES
DADE COUNTY
In the Democratic June
Primaries
YOUR VOTE AND SUPpbORT WILL BE
APPRECIATED


Page 3


No:ma Wolf, Adalyn
and Mona Safar.


Ross


Walter Kehoe


Mrs. Meyer Schwartz pres-
ident of the Council of Jew-
ish Women who was recently
reelected for a second term
will entertain the members of
her Executive Board at a
luncheon at her home at noon
of June 4th.
Temple Israel Sisterhood
was host to the children of
the Sunday school last Sun-
day at a picnic at the Holly-
(Continued on Page 6)














O


A VOTE FOR

JAMES J. MARSHALL
DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATE FOR
BOARD OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
DISTRICT NO. 2
Is a Vote for
Business System, Legal Experience
and Enlightened Educational Methods
in the County School Board

(Political Adv. paid for by a friend)

The Second District Comprises Election Precincts 19 to 29 and
31 to 50 Inclusive


VOT E FO R



Uly 0. Thompson


Candidate To
Succeed Himself
FOR


judge Of

the

Circuit

Court


SResident of Dade
SCounty for Sixteen
Years and Formerly

Judge of the Crimi-
nal Court of Record.

(Politicsl Advertisement paid by a friend)


ItANI DO YOU?


THINKING JEWS ALL SUBSCRIBE TO THE JEWISH FL(


Al~


~*F~n*"m"l"~"llnrr3Ilr~31111~ I II a I III I


For Representative
GROUP 1

Will appreciate your support


(Paid Political Adv.)








Page 4


PALM BEACH
ACTIVITIES

The worshippers at the
Friday night services at Con-
gregation Beth El were en-
tertained at an old fashioned
"Sholom Zochor" last Friday
night immediately after the
services at the Community
House by Mrs. Julia Rosen-
wald in celebration of the
birth of a baby boy to her
daughter, Esther Jacobs of
Atlanta, Ga.
*
Last Sunday night the Sis-
terhood of Congregation Beth
El was the host to a large
number of residents and visi-
tor at a fish supper at the
Community House. More than
one hundred and thirty peo-
ple were present and sat at
the festive board. Immediate-
ly after the supper bridge
was played. Among the dis-


tinguished guests were
Mayor and Mrs. John Beach-
am of West Palm Beach and
former Mayor Vincent Oak-
smith of West Palm Beach.
Attending from Hollywood
were Mr. ana Mrs. Stein
From Miam there were pres-
ent Mr. and Mrs. L Robinson.
Miss Sarah Shochet and Mr.
and Mrs. J. Louis Shochet. In
charge of the affair were
Mrs. Mary Schrebnick. Mrs.
Anna Samuels. Mrs. Jack
Sneider. Mrs. Harry Lerner
and Mrs. Helen Hirschkorn.
Also assisting in the shc-
cess of the eveniugs affair
were Mrs, H. L.mer. Miss
Sara Bergman. Mrs. J Wolf.
Mrs. L Schutzer. Mrs. B.
Wax. Mrs. Lee R&der. Mrs.
H. Bhicher. Miss May Gruner
and Messrs, Jack SNeider and"
Johz WOXf. pre siet of Be&h

p *
Last Thursday after -v
the Sisterhood was host at a
bake pcaic at Palm Beach
where the major pv rtl of
the memNbership of the Cm-
grTgamtkc an Sisterhood a:-
tended and spent a very es-
joyable afternoon.

S'h-oth will be celetated
with special series arramed
for vday night ali k
time Rabi N. Wrtwe wil
pech on "I-Toughts on Pen-
tftwt." Regular serrims wil
be hed on Monday and spe-


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


cial memorial services will be
conducted on Tuesday at
which time a sermon will be
preached on "The Great Be-
yond."
A social hour has been in-
augurated by Congregation
Beth El after the Friday
night services.
*
Next Tuesday night the
Sisterhood of Congregation
Beth El will hold a meeting
at which time definite plans
for a boat ride will be an-
nounced.
*
Mr. and Mrs. I. Barash ac-
companied by their family
will leave West Palm Beach
on June 10th. for a motor
tour which will take them to
Denver. Coe.. where they
will spend the summer. On
their way they will visit
friends and relatives at Chi-
cago and ST. Louis. They ex-
pect to return in time for the
High Holdays,

Rabbi Dr. Gustave N.
Hausman will preach the fi-
nal sermon of the season on
Friday night at the Reform
Congregation of West 'ralm
Beach. This will be the con-
chding services until the
High Hohldays.


THE BLVE AND THE GRAY
By ^ A iMcis iJ Ft.W
s the dc of the inland rir,
AIB the fees ci ir.c have fld,
qWbhT te bldes of the grave-gras
qmerz
A"ep are AE ranks of the dead:-
Vtder the s.d! and the dew.
waiting the Jdment Day,
Uader the cte. the Blue;
Undir the ether, the Gray.
Frm te silence ei c srrowiul hours
The des-lae nx~srner g.
Lc-xivgl aden With lowers,
UAlie icfr ..-e fir and the foe:-
Ut'dr :he s-. and the dew.
\Waimg the Judgmen:.Day:
Under the rce. the Blue:
Utoer the libmes the Gray.
Sqcw th an -equa splendor
ti :'-ming sum-rays fall.
With a tcuch impar.ialy tender,
On the b.koesce blooming for all:
Under the sx-c and the dew.
W'aiti the Judgmen: Day:
BXdere- w %i: gcld the B'ue;
Mek-wec wit. gold. the Gray.
So 'wher. the summer calleth
Cf. forest ad a reld of grain.
wV': as: equJ n:7.-mur ia]eth
The cx!:ng drip i :he rain:--
Utder jhe -," : *' dew.
Wai::-g the Judgmen: DaNy:
Wet with the rain. :he Blue:
We: pwi the rain. :he Gray.
No nc-re sa'1 rte war-crv sever.
Or :he T -.c-.r.c r:-er; he -ed:
They banr.i? cur anger igre\er
wher. the'v a:re: "the graves of our
dead:-
', -.r h"be -'-. ,nl' the dew.
\Vat:: c the !udcmen: Day:
S and tears icr :he Blue:
Tears and I've fcr the Gray.

Curiosity often hides be-
hind the mask of sympathy.


Palm Beach County Political


FAr
Commy C-m--- -_


Epaw ekT f*.-Bi peK %
- e zEm m a


Re-lekt

Elmore Cohen
CLERK OF CRIMINAL
COURT


Paba Bea
A mas o es

WHY EXP


1 _


Dan Chappell has made an
energetic campaign for re-
t'.ctlon to the State Legisla-
ture. and he has been en-
dorsed by the Miam Herald,
and a number of important
men in civic life. Pointing to
the time it generally takes
for a new member of the
State Legislature to be able
to effectually benefit his dis-
trict by legislation, they urge
that Chappell be returned be-
cause of the experience he has
gained, and because of his ag-
gressiveness and ability to do
things. Having made the ac-
quaintance of the major por-
tion of the representatives
from all over the State at the
last Legislature he will now
be able to benefit Dade Coun-
Sty far be |er than any new
and inexperienced legislator
possibly could.

'. Cecil Watson, chairman
of the Board of CCounn, rnm


h County missioners points to the fact
S that Dade County has at no
atw. |- time defaulted in the paying
ari fairesa of bonds, and that the various
__ roads built during his service
ERIMENTF ? as commissioner were found
necessary for the proor d.
velopment of Dade %wt


courtesy n the Bench. ie
has made a splendid record
since his appointment sleral
months ago and bears the dis-
tintion of having been e.0
dorsed by U. S. Senators Hoke
Smith, Wnd Tom Hardwiek of
Georgia for the position of
Judge of the United States
District Court of Georgpa
when Judge Collins was
Judge of the City Court of
Reidsvile, Ga. at one time
called the model court of
Geora e ws member
of the arw nm of Collin
ConBl IMa Lapkin untilbe
as udir


E JWIKNA MEDIUM OF AND FOR MIAMI JEWIW


EDWIN T.

OSTEEN
CANDIDATE FOR

State Attorney

PALM BEACH
COUNTY

Satject to Democratic
Primary on June 3rd

,----o----

Your vote and -upsort--
wiE be appreciated
~Fi* t~t ~~srC~C~f e j


VOTE FOR



BRY AN



Far Jelge of

Criminal Cout

of Rec rd
PALM BE A(H


Yoee ad supor
wvl be a pwbre

4%" In d"


THE JEWISH FLORIDDkN


Campaign Briefs

(Continued from Page 1)
received in the last legisla-
ture, he would be able to have
passed much improtant legis-
lation needed.
Frank Markle is making a
very active campaign for
Clei k of the Criminal Court of
Record and points to his rec-
ord as a member of the Mi-
ami Boxing Commission, and
his general business ability.
He is a member of the Civi-
tan Club, Knights of Phy-
thias, the Masonic order, the
Shrine, and is also a member
of the Shrine Patrol. He has
been a resident of Miami
since 1912, and is a native of
Florida. At resent he is a
tomato grower, and prior to
that was a member of Jaudon
Bros. prominent fruit and
vegetable packers of Dade
County. If elected he promises
to devote his entire time to
the office and to give an effi-
cient administration.
Judge Davia J. Heffernan
has shown his devotion to the
duties of his office by refus-
ing to neglect the Court work
during his campaign.
The Civil Court of Record
has been ip continuous ses-
sion despite the fact that
Judge Heffernan is now a
candidate and would ordinar-
ily be expected to leave his
duties to devote time to. a
campaign. He has left the
Campaign in the hands of a
fuimber of prominent mem-
bers of the Bar who realize
that his record on the Bench
in a fair, courteous and effi-
cient treatment of lawyers,
litigants and the general pub-
lic demands a return to office.
Judge Heffernan has been a
resident of the County for 19
years, and has had considera-
ble experience on the Bench
having served as Judge of
the Municipal Court of Mi-
ami, and for the past approx-
imately three years as Judge
of the Civil Court of Record.
During his term he has sat
in chambers whenever neces-
sary from early morning un-
til late at night so that cases
before him might be disposed
of.


:F:;"T` i;_. m;;FU.il::-I~,-r2: ~~rlC:~-~?~-:in17y7u--r~l*a--~ur -lr-r~ji~rr~---l ~X
.I


d May 30, 1930
His friends point out the
many interests of Dade Coun.
ty require a man as County
Commissioner who not only
has had a busi Uss experience
but that specialized experi.
ence in the office which comrs
though actual sarvie only.
Mr. Watson has been a resi.
dent of Dade County for
many years and is an active
participant in fraternal and
civic organizations.

Herman Swink candidate
for State's attorney for Dade
County once served in the of.
fice from Nevember 1, 1922
to June 1, 1927. He was born
in South Carolina and has
been in Florida since 1912. He
served in the United States
Navy during the World War.
His friends point to his record
while in office during the
boom period as one of the
reasons for his election, and
to his long experience as a
means for an effective ad.
minstration of this important
office.
Ben C. Williard candidate
for Judge of the Court of
Crimes was born in Florida
in 1891 and has been a rsei-
dent of Dade County for the
past 27 years. He has prac-
ticed law since 1914 with
the exception of a year and
a half overseas with the
United States Army during
the World War when he was
the only lawyer private
from Florida. He is a gra-
duate of Stetson University
at De Land. He has had a
splendid record of public
service having been a mem-
ber of the Legislature in
the 1921 and 1923 sessions.
He is the author of the Con-
stitutional amendment per-
mitting three representa-
tives and one senator to
Dade County.
He is the father of the bill
authorizing the Juvenile
Court over which Judge
Edith Atkinson is now pre-
siding. He introduced a Work-
mens' Compensation bill in
both sessions of the Legis-
lature in which he served.
His many friends urge his
election and point to the fact
that he has participated in
some of the most important
criminal cases in the County,
and that he possesses a judi-
cial temperament and has a
reputation for courtesy and
fairness, which is essential in
the office to which he aspires.
He is a member of the local
Bar, the Florida and the
American Bar Associations,
as well as the American Le-
gion, 40 and 8, Elks Lodge
and other organizations.
Judge E. C. Collins a candi-
date for re-election as Judge
of the Criminal Court of Rec-
ord has gained many friends
because of his fairness and


I


I


I








Friday, May 30, 1930 _

An Open Letter

The Editor of the
Jewish Floridian:-
May 29, 1930
It has come to my at-


tention that it is being
whispered in Dade County
that I am asking the citi-
zens of this county to vote
for and support me in my race
for Judge of the Civil Court
of Record, because my oppo-
nent, Judge D. J. Heffernan
is a Catholic and I am a Prot-
estant. I wis hto take this op-
portunity to deny these re-
ports and ask that you pub-
lish this letter in your news-
paper.
I am basing my right to ask
the citizens of this county to
vote for and support me in
this race solely upon my
qaulifications. The people of
Dade County will remember
that two years ago I made
the race for this same judge-
ship and I did not mention re-
ligion once during my cam-
paign.
I feel that I am qualifide
for this position from the
standpoint of legal education
and legal experience. I am a
graduate of the University of
Florida, receiving from that
institution the degrees of
Bachelor of- Arts and Juris
Doctor, the highest legal edu-
cation that can be had in the
State of Florida. I have been
working for myself since I
was fourteen years of age and
feel that I have had the prac-
tical experience necessary to
qualify me for this position.
For the past six years I have
been practicing law in Dade
County for myself. It is upon
my qualifications that I am
asking for the vote of the
people of this county.
Signed:
THOMAS S. FERGUSON
1- IIN11111 IIIIII I II IIIII II ll l l lll l IIII l


A VOTE FOR

Leo Rosen

FOR

DEMOCRATIC STATE
EXECUTIVE
COMMITTEE
Is a vote, for
energetic~~ adintrto


energetic administration
of party affairs


(Paid Political Advertisement)

.iiisinusMuauuinununuimnnuniuniiuuuunniununimu nu ttum oun


and


VALUES
A boy is worth $9,333 when he is
born, if his family has an income of
$2,500 a year, an insurance expert
calculates. That is what it would
take, put out at interest at 3y2 percent,
to rear him to the age of eighteen
and produce the net income which
he may be expected to earn from then
on. It costs the average family $7,238
to bring up a boy and put him through
high school. By the time he is eigh-
teen, however, he is worth $28,654,
again figuring his potential earning
capacity.
On that basis the male population
of the United States is worth one
trillion, one hundred and forty-four
billion dollars.
GASOLINE
Cheaper gasoline and a smaller sur-
plus of heavy fuel oil are the results
expected from the adoption in this
country of a new Ge man process for
adding hydrogen gas to crude petro-
leum. This is one of the revolutionary
discoveries of science, which are be-
ing made so rapidly that every indus-
try has to be constantly on the look-
out lest its whole methods have to be
changed over night.
Not so many years ago gasoline was
a waste product. Then Daimler in-
vented the gasoline engine and that
part of the petroleum suddenly be-
cme the most useful. The Deisel en-
e, which uses heavy oil fuel, has
ot yet been sufficient developed to
consume anything like the surplus Wt
after the gasoline has been tractd
DEFENSE
Thirty-seven ships of war steamed
into New York harbor through the fog
the other morning. Overhead 160
Navy airplanes, loosed from the deck
of the airplane carrier "Saratoga,"
soared over the city. It was the
Navy's demonstration of strength, and
an impressive one.
Navy men do not like the program
of reducing armaments. They would
like us to believe that all the rest of
the world is watching for a chance to
pounce upon us and that only an enor-
mous Navy can keep us from being
gobbled up.
One does not have to agree with
their point of view, however, to admit
that a battle fleet in the Hudson River
is a magnificent spectacle and that a
flock of airplanes can draw everybody
away from their desks and tools to
the roof-tops to watch the show. We
older folk will never get over our
wonder at seeing men fly. To the
youngsters it is already common-
place.
ENERGY
Most people think that the brain
needs as much food as the body does.
People complain of fatigue after men-
tal effort and because they feel as
tired as if they had been using their
muscles they think they must have
used up as much energy as if they had
been working with their bodies.
Scientists at Wesleyan University
have been studying the energy re-
quirements of brain-workers for years,
and have announced that all of the
energy expended in a solid hour of the
most intense mental effort can be re
placed by eating half of a salted pea-


A clean, vigorous


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


FOR
STATE LEGISLATURE
GROUP 2
Republican Primary
June 3rd, 1930












Otto C.
Stegemann
Pledged to Republican Plat-
form and the Princip'e of
Two Party Government for
Florida.

"Honest Government Is
Florida's Greatest Needs"

(Paid Political Adv.)


$100... $150... for
Beach Apartments
To November 1st.
SHELBURNE
710 Jefferson Ave.


Page 5


nut Five minutes spent in dusti a
a desk oosmwM more energy tha
an hour of hard mental work at the
desk
SMuch of th so-calld mental
fatigue I$ l fati. ledThe writer
who i tired after a day at the typ
writer or pen Is tired because of the
physical effort of writing. Many who
complain of brain-fag after a day of
business conferences should rather
complain of "talk-fag." The physical
effort of continuous speaking is a great
energy-consumer, as every orator and
actor knows.
Most often, so-called mental fatigue
comes from the failure to eliminate
wastes properly from the body. The
one thing the brain-worker needs most
is physical exercise in the open air.
MOVIES
Mr. Will H. Hays, President of
the Motion Picture Producers and
Distributors of America, very
courteously writes to me concerning
a comment in this column a few weeks
ago to the effect that the movies do
not give a real picture of life, and
sends me a quantity of printed matter
to prove that the picture men are do-
ing their best to keep the movies pure.
Purity is one thing and intelligence
is something else again. You can lay
down rules which if followed, will
prevent the movies from giving offense
even to the most prudish mind. There
are no possible rules by which people
who do not know the difference be-
tween truth and falsehood can be pre.
vented from putting false ideas on the
screen.
The motion picture is today the
most influential force in the world,
because it impresses the very young
through the most effective chL.:;.cl
for impressions, the eyes. For that
reason, the movies are a fair target
for criticism all the time.


A man with an empty head
is better off than the man
who loses his head.


It costs more to avenge the
wrong than it does to let it
go by default.


PINKY'S IDEA OF SAYING NOTHING


By Terry Gilkison


PINKY-DINKY


--


I ...... .. .. ..... .............................. ---------- -- -------------- --


1 ~llclll. t


BUSINESS DIRECTORY

L. (Pop) GERSON PHARMACISTS
Buyer of All Kinds of Scrap Metal
We Sell Auto Parts BRYAN PARK PHARMACY
2141 N. W. SECOND AVE. Chas. Tannenbaum,
Phone 20621 Pharmacist
(reg. pharmacist for 17 years)
BAGS and METALS Cor 22nd Ave. and 8th St. S. W.
BAGS and METALS

EAST COAST BAG & METAL CO. CRYSTAL PHARMACY
(Inc.) Dr. A. D. Halpern, Ph. G. Ph. D.
I. L. MINTZER Prescriptions Our Specialty
MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS 128 N. Miami Ave. Phone 29713
435-445 N. W. 8th Street
Phone 4485
PIPE and STEEL
PEPPER METAL CORP.
Scrap Metal and Machinery ADELMAN PIPE & STEEL CO.
N. W. Cor. 5th Ave. and 14th St.
Phone 22546 58 N. E. 25th St.
e 2 Aat F. E. C. R. R. Phone 21420

BUILDING SUPPLIES A. & B. PIPE AND METAL CO.
J. SIMPSON Phone 31355
Building Materials, 53 North East 25th Street
Roofing Paper, Asphalt -
423 N. W. N. River Drive PRINTERS
Phone 7251
MIAMI PRINTING CO.

DELICATESSEN "Printing That Pays"
Phone 23261
ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN 107 South Miami Avenue
170 N. W. 5th St.
We Supply Your Every Want AUTO PARTS
BLOOM AUTO REPAIR
FISH & SEA FOODS & PARTS CO.
N. W. 17th Ave. at 23rd St.
STANDARD FISH CO. Phone 23631
629 W. Flagler St. The Largest car wreckers in
Phone 2-3362 Florida

King AMBULANCE SERVICE
W. H. Combs Co., Estab. 1896
Undertaking Co. COMBS FUNERAL HOME
Phone Miami 32101
1539 N. E. 2nd Avenue
29 N. W. THIRD AVENUE MIAMI BEACH FUNERAL HOME
Phone M. B. 5-2101
Phones 23535-31624 1236 Wahington Ave.



VOTE FOR





For Judge of

Criminal Court

of Record

and continue the prov-
en record of a fair,
impartial and efficient
administration of an
office affecting your
very liberty.
(Paid Po'itical Advertisement)







Pae 6


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


la_ SOCIETY


IN PRAISE OF EARTHWORMS
If the earthworms were to publish a magazine. sore
dramatic success stories would he recorded.
It would tell. for example, the remarkable career of John
G. 'Worm. Born of humble parents, in dark surnroundings he
managed by his own effort to push himself up to the surface.
There he was spied by Fortune in the form of a robin. which
snatched him high into the clouds. His moment of elevati:On
was brief. but while it lasted the vision was splendid.
It would tell of Frederick L. Worm. who was working
along quietly one day when an upheaval tossed him to fame
and glory. Success was attended by pain, as is often the case.
He was impaled upon a fishhook and carried away to be
immersed in a strange element. There his life ended. but n!o:
before he had done the biggest Job ever achieved by a:1c men:-
ber of his family. The fortune he landed devoured hin. bu:
it was a big fortune.
To the other worms these stories might t, dis:couragig.
"Fame is for the few." they would say. "Nothir ever khap-
pens to us. We just stir around awhile and die."
It would surprise them to know that a xook was written
about worms by the great scientist Darwin. Their surprise
would be intensified if they were to learn tht this bk
makes no mention of the exceptional members of their :ribe.
The few worms that are carried into the clouds, or su -ccee
in landing big fish, are dismissed by him as of small impxr-
tance.
But the rneat mass of unknown worms, who spend their
whole lives beneath the surface of ob-ervation, he hails as the
most important creatures in the world.
If for one year they should cease their industrious d-e-s-
tion of the leaf nmld and their inc'ss-nt stirring of :he
gnrund. no crops wMould gmw, and animals and n~e&' wou'd
die.
1 think that Darwin's book on earthworms should be a
part of all education. ak-mg iwth the inspiring biogrphies of
the great. It woukid tei to teach us humihiy. We human
beings who walk s. proudly as ninrch-s of the worki-wha:


S are we, alway T Beneficiaries of the worms, without whose
leave we would h live a year.
As fo ffate, it is stiimulatg. tand lifts the sp~in of the?
crVwd. But shall we despair be 'ase to nost: ot us :: :i
Beneath the surface hfe is carried forward by :he sus-
:airnti kva'y of the niass. And who s'.a: ub :he: ubt heS r
are Purposes as far lvy ou rrekotir. as our lives-wh ch
they nake po-ssibke----are beyon the -visio of the worms ,


j HERMAN SWINK


I ____


State's


Attorney


YTer Vte amd S
pm Wil Be Grte-
fhy ApFpriated


I.


L


s+t~r
d


1



t

t

i

i

i
i
a
Ii
i!
a
i
f
1


newM ..4 J s .-3S -
PR. M. i~. saFre


,._________-_______


w,\\ Casino. Athletic con-
:st:s wr in::':fged in by both
:the young and old. and re-
,,~cnhawrts consisting of ice
Cn. cake candies and
-un..h was served to the chil-
r'n". l':tis were awarded to
-ci .:nn.rs i: each event.
On Wednesday afternoon
Mrs. Morris Dubler entertain-
i a ttnumber of friends at a
'br:i g .uncheni at her home.
Pr::es were awarded to the
hikes: scores. Among those
A VOTE FOR


David J.


Heffernan
FOR

Judge of the
Civil Court
of Record
Is a vot:e for a compe-
*en:, efficient, courte-
ous anr. experienced
judiciary.
An unexcelled record
As


Judce of the Munici-
pal Court from 1925
to 1926
Jud>tg of the Civil
Court of Record by
appointment of the
Governor in July 1926
Approved by the
people of Dade Coun-
:y in :he elections of
192S
Free from bias
Ciour:eous to lawyers
i ,ugants and
'Urors
A:: :nmr worker
r efftciencDe
e-C ideit cf Dade
'Cc:y for 19 years


S YuAr voe will b
?apreiated
i ,',ta-i e-y A --nwnyh


1


present were Mesdames S.
Blanck, Joe Reisman and I.
L. Mintzer of Miami Beach,
Mrs. Barack of New York
city and Mesdames M. B.
Frank, Chas. Goldstein,
Harry V. Simons, Max Hoff-
man and A. E. Freidman of
Miami.

Mr. and Mrs. Harry I.
Magid of Hollywood Heights
entertained a number of
friends at bridge on Thurs-
day night at their home.
Among those present were
Mr. and Mrs. Steinberger of
Hollywood, Mr. and Mrs.
Lewis Brown, Mr. and Mrs.
P. Scheinberg, Dr. and Mrs.
Max Ghertler, Dr. and Mrs. S.
Aronovitz, and Mr. and Mrs.
Morris Dubler. Prizes were
awarded to the highest scores
At a late hour refreshments
were served.
*
The Ladies' Club of the
Workmens' Circle will be the
hosts at a farewell dinner and
musical next Sunday eve-
ning, June 1, at 8 p. m. at
the Odd Fellows hall, corner
of Northwest 2nd ave. and
4th street, to honor Mr. Jacob
Grohman the teacher of the
Workmens' Circle School who
is leaving next week for a
trip to Europe. At the same
time the recently elected offi-
cers of the Ladies' Club will
be formally inducted into of-
fice. This dinner will also
mark the formal closing of
the school for the season. The
committee of arrangements
consists of Mesdames A.
Dock. B. Gross, H. Seitlin, S.


Friday, May 30, 1930
Pont, N. Rosin, S. Shwart,
A. Kopkin and S. Kaplan. h
committee is trying its up
most to make this dinner an
musical one of the outstand.
ing events of the season.


James R. Cooper

(Jimmie)
Candidate For


JUDGE OF
CIRCUIT COURT
GROUP 2


Your Vote and Support
will be appreciated


VOTE FOR


FRANK MARKLE


FRANK MARKLE


FOR
CLERK OF CRIMINAL COURT

OF RECORD
Bonafide resident of Dade County
for 18 years
Believes in home products and
home employment
Your support will be appreciated
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ho inspired these infinite
truths ?
ho spoke through the
mouth of the prophet?
o mapped out the high-
ways of ages,
he glorious lines of the
Scriptures?

ho planted the flowers of
wisdom
This sacred s6il of the
angels?
dream of Eternity-Bible--
Light that is all and for-
ever.
We just wonder whether
n the occasion of Shvuoth
here cannot again be revived
Sthe heart of the Jewish
y and girl, the Jewish man
d woman, that love for the
orah which was handed
own to us at Sinai on that
memorable occasion, which
ove has carried the Jew un-
alteringly through the ages
despite persecution and tor-
ure.
And we wonder whether
he beautiful custom of de-
orating the house of wor-
ship with flowers on Shvuoth
s not because of the fact that
the Torah should be to us an
everlasting symbol of the
beauties and truths contained
therein just as the flowers


) iday, May 30, 1980

HE JEWISH

LORIDIAN
weekly newspaper published at
Miami, Florida
by
SJewish Floridian Publishing
Company
652 S. W. FIRST STREET
Phone 2-8745


EDITORIAL STAFF
J. LOUIS SHOCHET
A CHOCHOM
BEN DOROM
A. N. ASHER


".-





SHVUOTH

Just abrief thought occurs
one when the second of the
ree festivals in Jewish life
Ils around once again. The
east pf Weeks coming after
e seven weeks of abstinence
lowing the Holiday of Lib-
ration, is best remembered
however, for the "Zman Ma-
n Torasaynu" the giving to
e Jewish people of the Book
Books, the Bible. And the
ought that cannot help but
cur to the thinking Jew is:
hy amongst all the nations
nd people of the earth must
e Jew alone be ashamed of
e greatest heritage ever be-
ueathed to man? Why is it
at in the schools it is inevit-
ly the Jewisn child that
nows least of the Bible. And
e cannot help but think of
e beautiful lines written by
e late Morris Rosenfeld, the
owned Yiddish poet, which
e delight nere to quote:
Bible
it a book, a world, a heaven,
re those words, or flames,
or shining stars,
)r burning torches, or clouds
of fire
Vhat is it, I ask ye-the
Bible ?


and ferns are an everlasting
reminder of the beauties of
nature and the glory of God.


OLD PREJUDICES
A NEW WORLD


IN'


(Reprint from
Brai Brith Magazine)
Our fathers would feel ag-
grieved if they would see
Christians and non-Christians
sitting together in counsel,
said the Archbishop George
Gauthier of Montreal. The
good archbishop was address-
ing the multitude on the mat-
ter of the Jews having schools
of their own in Montreal.
In the Province of Qusbec
there is no public school sys-
tem, and education has been
altogether in the hands of the
Catholics and the Protestants,
each group conducting its own
schools.
Now when the Jews 'be-
came numerous in the city of
Montreal they considered it
was time to have representa-
tion on the Protestant school
board; 12,000 of their children
were attending the Protes-
tant schools. When represen-
tation was refused, the Jews
asked for permission to es-
tablish schools of their own,
and this the legislature
granted them over the pro-
test of the cardinal of Quebec
and the archbishop of Mon-
treal.
The archbishop was sad to
see the Catholic government
officials of Montreal consult-
ing with Jews to bring this
about; therefore, his dament.
If the archbishop directed
his eyes across the Canadian
boundary line he would be
grieved even more by what
he would see. His old eyes
would be. scandalized by the
sight of Jews and Catholics
consulting together in many
places. He would see rabbis
and priests breaking bread at
good will dinners. He would
observe Catholic and Jew uni-
ting for causes of the social
good and Jews and Catholcs
serving together in public en-
terprises, and neither group
seeking the advantage of the
other. A few. years ago he
could have see a Jew-Louis
Marshall-arguing before the
United States Supreme Court
against the constitutionality
of a law tnat would have
abolished parochial schools in
a certain state.


A woman's figure, like her
age, is sometimes a doubtful
quantity.

Put on your thinking cap
when some one offers you
something for nothing.
*4
A young widow has a pe-
culiar way of seeing a man
without looking at him.

If death loved onl ya shin-
ing mark very few men would
have cause to fear it.

Some men stand just in-
side the door ready to grasp
opportunity by the back of
tse neck when it knocks.
*


It happened in Denver. A
oc uple stood in front of a bis-


r
r


Pace 7


SCHAI EER Y


and say, "Divorced." Then
may come a time when one or
both of the interested parties
will die and the officiating
personage may merely re-
mark, "Dead," and the earth
will begin to fall into their
resting place. We are reach-
ing quite a terge age, aren't
we?

Too many touches will har-
den the easy mark.
*
Even the milk of human
kindness isn't always adult-
erated.
*
There is either too much
rain or not enough to suit the
farmer.
*
Early to bea and early to
rise gives the average man's
wife a surprise.
*
After a man has been mar-
ried about six months he
ceases to have illusions about
women.
*
Some of the people who
are dissatisfied with this
world will be disappointed
with heaven-if they get
there.

Harrington-This traction
problem is a serious one.
Carrington-If you were a
married man, you would find
the subtraction problem
more serious.
*
Howell-I see that our
friend the composer is a hap-
py father again.
Powell-Yes, I understand
that when his wife asked him
what he wanted to name the
baby he said "Opus 2."
Take A Day Off.
Take A Day Off.


Forget for a day all those
petty precepts
That urge you to sweat like
a slave;
Take a day now and then, and
rest while you live.
For you'll rest overlong in
your grave.
Remember that Rome wasn't
built in a day,
That ever time was and
will be;
A day of your life is far less
to the world
Than an atom of salt to the
sea.

There are trees in the wood-
land to offer you shade,
There is grass upon which
you may- lie,
There are birds in the mea-
dow to sing you to sleep,
There's a spring of pure
water hard by;
There's a landscape to view
that no painter has done,
There's the fragrance of
flowers in May,
There is pure air to breathe,
piled high in the sky,
That is going to waste eve-
ry day.


If you're thirsty, just drink
and taste every drop,
Sprawl out and relax; let
'er go!
Soak up all the comfort the
day has to spare;
For the world will wag on,
don't cha know.
*
Flora-What's the trouble
between you and Ferdy?
Fauna-He hasn't been to
see me for a week Just be-
cause I said I never wanted
to see him again.
*
Artist (at the ballet)-Ah!
Did you ever see such poetry
of motion?
Poet (sadly)-No. But yes-
terday I saw the motion of
Poetry, when the editor
threw my contributions in
the waste basket.
*
"You certainly look the
height of fashion in that
derby, Mr. Giraffe."
*
Philippi-You know, I fell
in love with Jack Huggins at
first sight.
Perdita-When is your en-
gagement to be announced?
Philippi-Never. I took a
second look.
*
Maid (washing Johnnie's
neck)-I certainly do hate
dirt.
Johnnie-So do I.
Maid-What should make
you hate it, too?
Johnnie-Because it makes
you wash me.
*
A man is unhappy before
he is married. After he is
married, he is more unhappy
than he was before he was
married. If he doesn't get
married, he is always unhap-
py in the thought that he
might have been happy if he
had married.
If he gets unmarried, be-
cause he was unhappy when
married, he becomes even
more unhappy than he was
before. So if you want to
marry, get marred; if you
don't want to, get married
anyway, because, one way or
the other-the line forms to
the right.

The Cynical One-Women
age faster than men. They
also lost their powers of
memory first.
The Other One-Can you
prove it?
The Cynical One Yes.
Just notice how many women
at the age of 30 have diffi-
culty in remembering how old
they are.

A guy invents a flivver
plane, a kite he hopes to
use
And navigate by hand, at
least, to pedal with his
shoes.
Instead of common troubles
and those gruesome gar-
age bills,,


ovuyrvHe
hop. They joined hands. The He'll take his e
bishop said, "Married"-and Just take a day off and live who'll give
nothing more. Denver attor- every hour;
neys say the marriage was You deserve it; don't wor- In place of ca
legal. Possibly, some time, ry, just smile, his heart
this same couple will stand If you're hungry, why eat knock;
before a judge seeking sepa- and enjoy every bite, There'll no m(
ration, and possibly the judge If sleepy, doze off for tons be, bu
will merely look them over awhile; his block.
-~~~


engine to a Doc
i it liver pills.

rbureter grief
will show a

ore leaky pis-
it headaches in


He'll have to guard the mix-
ture in his pipes and
"tummie," too;
His 'pendix he must keep in.
tact, in fact, as good as
new.

He'll have to keep in keen re-
pair his entire fuselage,
A broken arm or leg will send
him straight to Doc's
garage.
His liver, kidneys and his
spleen and all his work-
ing parts
Must always be in tip-top
shape before he ever
starts.

This boy's success will spell
"nogood" for erstwhile
mechanicians;
But business should improve
a lot for clever dietitions.
Instead of gas and Mobile A
or new induction coil.
The service stations will dis-
pense hot-dogs and cas-
tor oil.
*
In the alphabet of egotism
there is but one letter.

Sometimes a. man lies when
he smiles and says nothing.
*
Every time men play at the
game of love they try to
cheat.
*
Time may be money, but it
is hard for a man to make his
creditors believe it.

A man makes more good
resolutions wnen he's broke,
than at any other time.
*
Marrying a man to reform
him has been known to
change the color of a woman's
hair.
1C *


If men could read
other's thoughts there
be a radical change in
ing.
*


each
would
think-


You can't do it all, but it's
up to you to do what you can.

After you get a dollar in
your clutches the taint soon
evaporates.
*
Every man has a worthless
hobby that he wastes a lot
of time on.

How dear everything is
when you want to buy and
how cheap wnen you want to
sell!

The girl-friend says that
just because a girl carries a
vanity case it need not be as-
sumed that she has a case of
vanity.

Many a woman wants a
new wrinkle on how to re-
move one.

It takes a pretty girl to
teach a gay old dog new
tricks.
*
In a restaurant, a girl is
sweet enough to eat.

Many a woman tells the
truth when she says that she
wouldn't marry the best man
on earth; she couldn't get
him.

Men who know the least are
likely to assume the most.
i0.,
Some men go when duty*
calls-but in the opposite di-
rection.


TE E WISH FLORIDIAN-A MEDIUM OF ANtDFOR MIAMIJEWRY


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-THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


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Page 8


I THEr IFAMII

V: DOCTOR
JOHN JOSEPH GAINES M.D.
SELF-DRUGGING
It grows on people-the habit of "taking something" for
every little discomfort they happen to feel. Self-dosing is
never the wise thing to do; you would not employ a physician
to treat you who made no pretense to any knowledge of
treating the sick or indisposed; now, would you? Then why
do it to yourself?
A diagnosis of any indisposition is necessary before any
sort of intelligent treatment can be instituted. Even the
intelligent physician may be puzzled over the actual cause of
a given complaint, often a comparatively trivial, yet a very
annoying thing. Not long ago I met a lady who had spent
over s500 on a peculiar neuralgic headache without more
than temporary relief; she had taken every variety of "head-
ache tablets" that she heard of-seriously impairing her blood
and weakening her heart very perceptibly; I suggested exam-
ining her nasal passage and sinuses; "0, there's nothing
wrong there-I have no catarrh," she insisted.
Nevertheless a few treatments to reduce the swollen tur-
binates cured the headache.
.Many elderly men in the western section of our country
are sure they have "prostate trouble." They hear their symp-
toms accurately described daily over the radio, by the adver-
tising miracle-worker; they hear the promises of absolute
cure by a simple operation-they make their own diagnosis,
and drug themselves frantically without benefit; they accept
the fakir's "simple operation," payingfor it in advance with
all the money they can scrape to er; they reason that, if
the quack were not honest, the government would not permit
him to broadcast his ballyhoo! A nasty mess, isn't it'? They
do broadcast just the same; we are so busy trying to avoid
foreign entanglements that we haven't time to protect our
people from fraud!
Several men have recently lost their lives because of
their own gullibility, according to newspaper reports, in one
of our western states.


Advertising Clubs
To Meet Here
Miami will be the scene of
the convention of the Fourth
District Advertising Fedeia-
tion of America on June 8, 9
and 10, when headquarters
will be established at tne Al-
cazar hotel.
Clubs represented at the
convention will be Jackson-
ville, Orlando, St. Petersburg,
Tampa and Miami as well as
the Club of Atlanta, Ga. The
Advertising Federation of
America will probably be rep-
resented by its President C.
C. Younggreen.
At the same time that this
convention will be held, the
Florida Newspaper Advertis-
ing Executives will hold their
1


gathering wnich was pur-
posely postponed from last
April.
The tentative program in-
cludes the following ad-
dresses, after the formal op-
ening of the convention by
Karl Lehman governor of the
fourth district, and speeches
by John T. Alsop, mayor of
Jacksonville, and Mayo r
Reder of Miami.
"Flat Tires in Advertising"
Lee R. Uhler, Tampa.
"Telling the World" Tren-
ton C. Collins, Tampa.
"Sex in Advertising" Ar-
thur Ivor Sibbring, Pres., Ad-
vertising Club of Tampa.
"Some Phases of Commun-
ity Advertising" C. C. Carr,
Mgr., St. Petersburg Times.
"This Business of Serving
the Public" T. Carlyle" T.
Carlyle Crump, Direct6r Pub-
lic Relations Florida Power
Corporation.
"Scope of Agency Service"
Noble T. Praigg, Praigg
Agency, Jacksonville.
"Advertising Your City"
U-CYCICLI~IC~


p._ _f __ __ ---


DEWEY KNIGHT


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


If reducing taxes
over 50% in past 4
years, and paying all
interest, bond matu-
rities and expenses is
GOOD BUSINESS
A man every one can
meet and talk to, eve-
ry day, election time
as well
VOTE AND WORK FOR

W. CECIL WATSON
County
Commissioner
(Paid Po'itical Advertisement)


I respectfully solicit your
vote in the Democratic pri-
mary on June 3rd, for
Representative
GROUP THREE
Dade County, Florida, to the
Florida Legislature
Chief among the measure


to which I am pledged to
give my untiring effort and
support are:
1. Speedy enactment of Equi-
table Wprkmen's Com-
pensation Act.
2. State aid to the University
of Miami.
3. Reconstruction of criminal
law and procedure.
4. Material reduction in the
expense of operation of
State and County govern-
ment.
5. Obtain representative in
Congress for southeastern
Florida by re-districting
the State.
6. Local determination of
amusements.
(Political Advertisement
paid by a friend)


CANDIDATE FOR
House of
Representatives
GROUP 3
Deserves your sup-
port for re-election
because of his record
as your servant in
the last Legislature.
With Your Help He
Will Vigorously
Champion
1. Uniform school
la w s, guaranteeing
full school term and
adequate salaries for
teachers.
2. More equitable tax
laws, with a view of
relieving real estate
from present exces-
sive burdens.
3. A Workmen's Com-
pensation Act.
4. Legalized racing.
5. Constitutional con-
vention.
6. The care and pro-
tection of indigent
persons.
7. Strengthening of
BANKING LAWS to
better protect deposi-
tors.
The record of the last
Legislature shows that I in-
troduced and passed a bill
creating the Florida Crip-
pled Children's Commission,
providing for the care and
hospitalization of the poor
crippled children of Florida;
a bill affecting the advance.
ment of aviation and provid-
ing adequate landing fields;
the Homestead Experimental
Station; the Miami-Okeecho.
bee Canal highway; the
Kosher Bill, and many other
bills for the improvement of
this community and the
State.
(Pn;d P I;,:-:i .,


I -lu' U Z5Ltai AAV.) |


WANTED
WANTED


Two young women desi
passage to Washington, D.-
between the 1 and 10thi
June; will share expenses ag
help drive. Phone 2-s616.

A VOTE FOR


Harry E. Burns, Burns
Agency, Jacksonville.
"Successful Real Estate
Advertising" Brown Whatley
Telfair Stockton & Co., Jack-
sonville.
"Direct Mail" Senator
Franklin 0. King, Orlando.
"Amusement Advertising
and Publicity" Wm. R. Man-
delcorn, Pies. Orlando Adv.
Club.
"The Advertising Future in
the Southeast" E.V.. Dunbar,
Pres. Atlanta Ad. Club, Pres.
Southeastern Broadcasting
Company.
Advertising exhibits from
newspapers, magazines, agen-
cies, department stores,


W. CECILI

WATSON

Asks
.4


FOR


County

Solicitor


Is a vote for govern-
ment of the people,
by the people and for
the people.

County Solicitor by


approval of
pie of Dade


and
the
1917


the peo-
County,


appointment of
Governor from
to 1925; nomi-


nated by' the people
in 1928 primaries but


not appointed by
Governor for
known reasons.


the
un-


My Platform
1. A record of con-
viction of criminals
during eight years as
public prosecutor that
is still unmatched.
2. Prosecution with-
out fear or favor, but
without persecution.
3. Devotion of entire
time to duties of the
office to the exclu-
sion of private prac-
tice.


I1


4. Attentive reception
and investigation of
all complaints with
prompt and just ac-
tion.


(Paid Political Adv.)
" ...d


OUR ADVERTISERS SAVE YOU MONEY AND GIVE YOU SERVCi--

. .. -' -.3 : ,. : .


i


A VOTE FOR


Richard H.


(Dick)


HUNT
SFOR
COUNTY
SOLICITOR
Is.a vote for
Harmony
Efficiency
Able
Honest

(Paid Political Adv.)


chambers of commerce, etc.,
are being planned; as well as
exhibits of industrial and
agricultural resources of the
state.
The program includes
luncheons, banquets, theatre
pal ties. swimming, golf,
bridge and other entertain-
ment features. A post con-
vention tour to Havana by
Steamer or airplane, with
special low rates, has been ar-
ranged through R. T. Bell-
chambers, of the Miami Club,
and President of United
Tours Inc.

DAN CHAPPELL


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PINE