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The Jewish Floridian ( May 23, 1930 )

UFJUD
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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
May 23, 1930
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00065

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
May 23, 1930
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00065

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text













Vol. III.-No. XXI


Campaign Briefs

Judge Uly u. Thompson ol
the Circuit Court who is a
candidate for re-election t(
the office he now occupies
was born in Sylvania, Ga., ir
1883 and graduated froi
high school at the age of 18
when he secured a first grade
teacher's license. Teaching ir
the public scnools he entered
Mercer University and re-
ceived his A. B. and LL. B,
degrees and tnen began the
practice of law. He came to
Florida where he pursued his
profession ana has been prac-
ticing in Miami for fourteen
years. Judge Thompson was
chosen one of the Trustees of
mercer University in 1926
the first man so choseii hot
a resident of Georgia. A past
president of the Bar Associa-
tion, he has been active in lo-
cal campaigns for a number
of years. In the early part of
1929 he was appointed Judge
of the Criminal Court of Rec-
ord serving in that capacity
until February of this year
when by appointment of the
governor he became Circuit
Court judge to succeed Juage
Rose who resigned. Ke was
married in 1914 and resides
with his wife and three chil-
dren at Miami Beach. His
many friends point to the
high esteem in whicn Judge
Thompson is held by the
members of the local Bar wno
came before him in their
practice before the Criminal
Court, and now as Judge of
the Circuit court.


-Pr~~lle1~ -.-- -_ EIIu._ _.-..


Iuvsitflcul17


Miami, Florida, Friday, May 23, 1930


New Supreme Judge


O wen J. Roberts, famous Philadlphia
Lawyer, named by President Hoover
for the Supreme Court Bench. Like
Chief Justice Hughes, Mr. Roberts is
of Welsh descent.


West Palm Beach
Celebrates

The Jews of West Palm
Beach are making very elab-
orate preparations for the
benefit supper for the West
Palm Beach Talmud Torah
this coming Sunday evening,
May 25, at 8 p .m. In addi-
tion to the supper which will
be served at a nominal charge
the proceeds of which will be
applied towards, the upkeep
of the Talmud Torah, a very
Splendid program of enter-
tainment has been arranged.
Several parties from Miami
and Miami Beach are expect-
ed to attend the affair.
In charge of arrangements
is a committee of the Beth


Vernon Hawthorne, candi- El Sisterhc
date for the office of State scoring the
Attorney for a second term All Miait
is a native Floridian having promised
been born at Plant City. He time.
received his general educa-
tion at Norman Institute, and
he subsequently graduated ik
from Mercer University at A
Macon, Ga. During the Worla Att
War while a lieutenant of the
82nd. Div. he received sev- Alexande:
eral degrees at the Univer- dent of th
sity of Aix Marseilles. He of Commeri
a"i as City Attorney for ence with a
*Plant City from 1915 to 1917 dairymen la
and came to Miami in 1919 their endeav
and has practiced here ever to the cc
since, threatens (
He is a member of the Ma- and a milk
sonic order, the Shrine, sponsored b
Knights of Pythias, Lions commerce a
Club, American Legion and weeks hav
the Acacia Club. thus far, M
In campaigning for office, "The dair
Mr. Hawthorne and his ami's largest
friends lay great stress upon and it is ne
the splendid record he has efficiently o
made since he assumed the the different
duties of his office. He ef- various grc
fected a complete reorganiza- each other 1
tion, of the Police Department the causes c
prosecuted public officials troversy wh
who had violated their trusts, become mos
secured a dismissal from of- surplus mi
fices, etc. He saved the tax lem land tl
payers of the county more care of if ti
than $600,000 in preventing will agree t
the issuance of abond issue the dispute.
to pay for a sea wall for Mi- Mr. Orr
ami Beach, eighty per cent of the use of
which would bave been bene- poultrymen
fitting private property own- er factorie
era. He had a& t regula- Machinery
tions preventing pWgieWional plus milk fo
bondsmen from ofpet r gm 1 and ice crea:
a manner tadig to set up and
(Ci i PA in Miami.
.. .
t, i~: j~fEj'~


Dod which is spon-
affair,
nans are urged to
e event and are
a very splendid


Settlement
tempted

r Qrr, jr., presi-
e Miami Chamber
ce, was in confer-
& group of Miami
ist week in a fur-
or to bring an end
controversy which
drastic price cuts
war. Negotiations
y the chamber of
during the last few
e been fruitless
r. Orr said.
y business6 is Mi-
it vasic industry
cessary that it be
organized and that
ces now causing
Dups to distrust
be settled. One of
Af the present con-
iicn promised to
It serious is the
1k disposal prob-
his can be taken
ne various groups
;o a settlement of
pointed out that
surplus milk by
operating "broil-
s" is one outlet.
to condense sur-
or use in bakeries
m plants has been
is being operated


Southern Rabbis
Hold Conference
A three-day session of the
Jewish rabbis and laymen of
the South and Southeast,
opened last Tuesday at Syna-
gogue B. B. Jacob, Savannah,
Ga., with Rabbi Nathan Ros-
en as host.
The object of this confer-
ence, which incidently is the
first of a contemplated series
of meets throughout South-
ern states, is to weld together
the orthodox Jewish activi-
t.es in the South ana South-
east, to, spreaa orthodox Ju-
daism in this area, and to es-
tabilsh a spirit of co-opera-
tion between the clergy and
the congi egations.
Rabbis and lay representa-
tives from Georgia, Florida,
Alabama, South Carolina,
North Carolina, Tennessee
and discuss synagogue activi-
ties, extra synagogue activi-
ties, prospect for uniform
curriculum in Hebrew schools
of South, probability of ob-
taining graduates from relia-
ble normalschools and teacb-
er agencies for distribution
among Southern Jewish
schools, adult education of
men and women, merging of
*activties of Jewry, and the
;possibilities of having, one
board of directors composed
of rabbinical assembly and
lay tcongathiiiThtsT. "
The purpose of this gather-
ing of rabbis and laity of the
Southern Jewish district is to
show that true Judaism ema-
nates from one responsible
source, and can be governed
along popularly approved
lines, to demonstrate the re-
sponsibility in comradeship;
and to show that state and
county lines must be ignored,
if the traditional banner of
Judaism in the South is to
be carried on it was stated.
the visitors expressed
their appreciation, through
Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld of
Miami, Fla., to Savannah and
Georgia for the hospitality
shown them, stating that the
"visit to Savannah would al-
ways be remembered."
Rabbi Rosen, in introduc-
ing the speaKers, paid tribute
to the two rabbinical speak-
ers of the session, Rabbi Ni-
san Heifetz, of Nashville,
Tenn., who during his short
stay in Nashville, has attain-
ed a splendid record of 'spirit-
ual achievement; and'Rabbi
Weisfeld of Miami, who is
noted for his leadership and
accomplishments in the field
of education and child pschy-
cology."
Among the lay speakers on
the first day's program were
I. Hirshkowitz and H. Stern
of Nashville, Tenn.; L. Wein-
kle and Max Kupferstein of
Miami, Fla., and Max Wil-
ensky of Savannah.
Wednesday's session in-
clude a discussion of impor-
tant matters, and the draw-.
ing of resolutions, an address
of welcome from Mayor
Saussy, and a banquet at 8
o'clock at the Jewish Educa-


tional Alliance.
Among the rabbis attend-
ing are: Rabbi I. Weisfeld of
Miami, Rabbi Heifetz of
Nashville, Rabbi H. Epstein
of Atlanta, Rabbi H. Gold-


John Masefield, former sailor,
New York bar-boy and world-fa-
mous poet, appointed Poet Laureate
of England, the post Tennyson once
held.

Officers Chosen At
Temple Israel
Day J.' Apta was re-elected
president of the fourth an-
nual meeting of Temple Israel
of Miami Reform Jewish con-
gregation last night in Kap-
lan hall, 137 N. E. Nineteenth
street. Rabbi Jacob H. Kap-
lan was re-elected spiritual
guide.
Other officers chosen are
H. I Homa, vice president;
Herbeit U. Feibelman, secre-
tary, and S. C. Levenson,
treasurer. Eugene L. Mann,
Norman J. Mirsky and Her-
ma'Kleih were 'ile TedTo fill-
three-year term vacancies ana
J. Levin the two-year term
vacancy on tne board of trus-
tees.
Mr. Apte, who is planning
to make a tour of Europe, was
presented witn a traveling
case.

Federal Position
Is Open
Applications for positions
as customs patrol inspector,
eighteenth customs district,
will be receive until June 13,
the United States Civil Ser-
vice Commission said yester-
day. Blanks may be obtained
at room 327, r'ederal building.


Price 5 Cents


|Jnl I mi -


berg of Mobile, Rabbi Fegion Dies Suddel*
of Gastonia, N. C., Rabbi --
Stampher of Memphis, Tenn. William Rubin, 56, senior
Rabbi Mandiebaum of Louis- member of the firm of Wil-
ville, Ky.,' Rabbi Axleman of liam Rubin & Son, jewelry
Charleston, S. C. anduggage merchants, 31 N
The local reception commit- Miami avenue, died sudden
tee is composed of Sam WednesdaybNf hart disease
Blumenthai, president of the whiten his home, 1869 S. W.
B. B. Jacoo Synagogue; L. Twelfh street.
Weitz, M. Wilensky, Sam ,Mr. Rubin came to 1iani
Portman, Nathan Persky,, five years ago and esta$liph-
William Pinsker, Isaac Blum- ed the business which he
berg, Alb'ert Blumberg, Rev. headed at the time his
H. Geffen, Morris Slotin, death. He previously fi t
Fred Rosen, Charles Garfun- Stamford, Conn, and a a
kel and it. Horovitz. native of Paterson, N. J..; ;
Wednesday's program in- He was a member of the
cluded the following: Benevolent and Protective
10 a. m.--Session B. B. Ja- Order of Elks in Miami and of
cob Synagogue. the Woodmen of the World in
1 p. m.-Luncheon. Paterson. Besides the widow ,
2-Business session and Mrs. Pauline Rubin, he leaves.
election of officers. one daughter, Mrs. Rome Le-
4-Signt-seeing tour. vine, and one son, Herman,
4:30--Mayyor's welcome, all of Miami.
8-Banquet, Jewish kduca- Funeral services were; col-
tional Alliance. ducted yesterday
At the banquet telegr~ ms in the rsidew &
of felicitation were reedved .e Miami r .B.
fr m ay or the- co Ia r wtin the.
tioss an# one from .the Lae i
Auxi#w* pf Bt 6S6
mud Toral. -.
i5


Temple Israel
Holds Graduation
At the regular services at
Temple Israel on Friday eve-
ning, at 8:15 p. m. the gra-
duation exercises of the first
High School Class will take
place. The following three
young man have finished
their work in the High School
department and will receive
diplomas, Alfred Kahn, My-
ron Zeientz and Ellis Klein.
The program for the eve-
ning is as follows: The gra-
duating class and the next
years' graduation class will
take part in the services and
program.
Jerome Goldsmith, page 6
to 12, player book; Harriet
Kanter, page 30-32, prayer
book; closing services.
En Kelohunu, choir and
congregation; Myron Zeientz,
essay, Haym Salomon; Alfred
Kahn, history of the class;
Bernard Weintraub, review of
history, Jewish daily bulletin;
Alvin Richter, review of Bible
study; Ellis Klein, class will
and prophecy.
Presentation of diplomas
by Chairman of School
Board, Louis Zeientz.
Address or brief remarks
by President ot Congregation,
Day J. Apte.
-Addrss,-- te-', eaiT Jew,
Rabbi. Close with America.
Sunday m6rning--the, clos-
ing exercises of the Religious
School wJl take place. Every
class will be represented by
one of more pupils, who will
give an outline of the work
done in that class. Subscrip-
tions to Young Israel will be
given to the best pupil in each
class, and certificates of hon-
or to the next and honorable
mention to those who have
been regular in attendance.
After the exercises the en-
tire :school and the parents
of the children will go to
Hollywood for their annual
picnic.

Miami Merchant









THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
S- Campaign Briefs


A LETTER TO A YOUNG MAN
You ask me how you can get a better Job.
SMy answer is that you can't.
All over the country are millions of young men who. in
a vague sort of way, want a better job: and here and there
among them are the worth-while few who want the .-etter
job.
I And the millions wonder why the few move on. while
they stand stationery year after year.
You must, first of all, pick out the better job-some par-
ticular job that is better than yours. Then train your guns
on that and capture'it.

$25 a week.
I know certified public accountants who earn 1i,.")' :~
year and more.
If I were a bookkeeper earning $25 a week. I should 1go
out for a public accountant's job. I might die on the road.
but whoever found my body would notice that my face was
toward the summit.
Second: You can never make anybody pay you more
money until you have more to sell.
I can advertise in a newspaper to-morrow morning and
have a hundred bright young men here at eight o'clock. Each
one will have just as much to offer me as you have: the same
two years of high school; the .me experience in keeping
books, the same good record. Every one of them will be
S willing to work for $25, and some of them for $18.'
The only way you can lift yourself out of that $25 class
is by giving yourself an equipment that the rest of the fellows
I in that class do not have. In other words, by study--by
education-by specialized training.
Third: When you have picked out the one particular
S better job that you want, when you have fitted yourself for it
then be careful of your letter of application.
Your letter is your representative. For heaven's sake, if
you have in you any spark of originality that other men have
ot, make your letter a tiny bit different from the other
letters that the otier men will write.
Fourth: I receive many letters of application. In one
form or another, they usually say something like this: "I
want a better job: I am thinking of getting married"; or. "I
have a mother to support"; or, "I have been three years in
this place. without a raise and see no future."
All of which interests me not at all.
The only letter that I read with interest is the letter of
S .the young man who has studied my business and who points
out to me how I can make more money for my employer by
employing him.
Ideas are the keys that unlock big men's doors.
When you have fitted yourself for the better job, let your
letter of application contain an Idea.
; i
] ELECT

Thomas S. Ferguson

Judge of the Civil
Z Court of Record

If elected, I pledge my entire
time to the business of the Civil
Court of Record and wi.1 faith-
fu ly perform the duties of my
office.
Your Vote and Support will be




.J(I-IN B. PHELP~4
1 CANDIDATE FOR I


Purchasing


Agent
I promise an earnest, effi-
cient and an economical ad-
ministration, cooperating
at all times with County
officials, when for the best
interests of the taxpayers
of Dade County.
Your support wil be
appreciated.


(Political Advertisement paid
by a friend)

IrWVWVOw wawr% wmrp% q q


MERGERS
Cnsi:da?:! of e ;--:ra: enal' en-
te .-pse?% : make a :rs' .e large one
is t cc -nei r n- 3Ctur g. in-
U: z :a*:-7r A.:"ur7 Capper. or
Ka:ss. wh :-. kn what he is talk-
a1i .-:Tu" 5 : te :;:e. says :at


.-e ta a .:l::-n r-e ef ans
: =r, ia.-=.?s are e~w .y- :e- by cor-




'-' C' -

w- 'av" -e:7 :e :::. to
g .-:-: d .p :n the crop.
In :''r-ey hire er :: en to
corme ia and harvest: the cr p. The
re.T -' -i e year n i'd lives on the'
b:c ianns. '
That s ns menacing t the Sena-
tor iroem Kan.as. He thi::k it will
result in depletion of the so!. through
lack of crop rotation, maintenance of
ier:ility and diversification. It is hard
to believe that any group of capital
engaging in business on a large scale
would be so short-sighted as not to
take those things into consideration
ad apply the most modern principle
of agriculture to their aterprie.

TRADEMARKS

It would be mtereting t make a
list of words which w i;-a @m
to ere as trademarks for a particular
product, but which have cor into
-mrr I e -sto desaie anyduarg r
emblin the original article. "Cl-
hdoid" is one of those words; it
strictly means only the product of the
Celuloid Company. "Kodak" is an-
other; the same belongs to George
Eastman's cameras but we use it to
mean any small camera. Wen you
say "Colt" everybody familiar with
firearms knows you mean a large-
caiber pistoL Probably nine men out
of :en in the region where "five-gal-
loc" hats are worn refer to their head-
gear as "Stetsons." "Winchester" is
almost a synonym for 'rifle." And
everybody refers to the abbreviated
i -ascul-ne underwear which is now in
such general use by the trade-mark
of the firs* :f its kind, "B.V.D.'s"
The ad--,p-:.n oi such words in
genera! usage is one oi the ways in
which language grows. A hundred
years from now probably. nobody will
say "dirigible" but everybody will
know what you mean by a "zep."


(Continued from Page 1)

the County losses. He con-
ducted investigations of
closed banks, and had four
bankers indicted; secured by
>proper bonds the deposits of
I public moneys so as to pre-
i vent a re-occurence of events
which caused the County a
loss of over three hundred


thousand dollars in one in-
stance. Prosecuted over for-
ty-one capital cases and only
lost four. His friends point
out that if the tax payers of
this County desire an effi-
c:ent administration they
shoulc return Mr. Hawthorne
to office.

James J. Marshall a candi-
date for the County Board of
Public Instruction, District
No. 2. is a graduate of the
University of Pittsburgh
where he received his general
education as well as his law-
yer's degree. Before studying
law he took a post graduate
course in education at Har-
vard. He was admitted to the
Pennsylvania Bar in 1924 and
practiced there until he came
to Miami. Under the auspices
of the Pittsburgh Y. M. C. A.
he acted as regional director
in educational work for immi-
grant adults in the steel mills,
and devoted considerable time
to settlement work. For a
number of years he was con-
nected with the well known
Irene Kaufman Settlement, a
Jewish community center in
Pittsburgh, where he was a
leader in boy's work, director
of dramatics and a member
of its advisory board. He
was extension lecturer in sci-
ence for the University of Mi-
ami in 1926, and is now a
(Continued on Page 6)
-.mlut nr(lllhnAIIImnIHm ,llhm nmHlmlmgm fmH
YOU CAN'T BEAT
NEW YORK
BAKING CO.
Pumpernickle and Rye
i Breads
( Watch For Our Label)
CAKES, PASTRIES, ROLLS
On Sale At
ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN
S EMPIRE DELICATESSEN
MAX'S DELICATESSEN
FIFTH STREET BAKERY
SNEW YORK DELICATESSEN I
s N IIIIIIIIf IIII,,, ,,, ,,,,, ,,,,, m u,,1,


A VOTE FOR
JAMES J. MARSHALL

DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATE FOR
BOARD OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
DISTRICT NO. 2
Is a Vote for
Business System, Legal Experience
and Enlightened Educational Methods
in the County School Board

(Political Adv. paid for by a friend)

The Second District Comprises Election Precincts to 29 and
31 to 50 Inclusive


DR. M. J. SAFFRA,
Expert and Antiseptic
Mohel
243 Meridian Ave., Miami Beach
Phone 5-3954
Reasonable fees to nearby cities


FridyMaye 2930

WEST PALM BEACH
POLITICAL

i -


VOTE FOR
GUS JORDAHN
For
County Commissioner


Home work for home people
Safeguarding public funds
Publicity funds spent at
home
County supplies should be
bought from local merchants




THE

FAIRWAY

DAIRY
SOLICITS YOUR
PATRONAGE
--o----
Phone Miami
7105

FOR PROMPT
SERVICE


Ever believing in the preser
vation of Health in Ged'
Own Country, we have de-
dicated ourselves to the proP
duction of the finest and
purest
MILK
For the Baby and the Adult
Our own old Fashioned
BUTTERMILK
Poultry and day old Eggs

IVES


I


CERTIFIED

DAIRY
OJUS, FLA.
Fler a t Crtif
bauy *,
MM.:aI Y 2J8


THE JEWISIIFLORIDIAN-A MEDIUM OF AND FOR MIAMI.
I


Pave 2


'F' ~*Isi

~i': '~


I I 1 III _,


..mw


rl-r


1











,THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


Paie 8


THE JEWISH

FLORIDIAN
A weekly newspaper published at
Miami, Florida
by
The Jewish Floridian Publishing
Company
652 S. W. FIRST STREET
Phone 2-8745


EDITORIAL STAFF
J. LOUIS SHOCHET
A CHOCHOM
BEN DOROM
A. N. ASHER


ABOUT TOWN
It is remarkable how much
one can really learn about
town these days. Honestly, I
n* ever knew how many
"Ohavey Yisroel" Miami pos-
sessed, until the campaign
began. I have yet t find one
aspirant to office who did not
tell me "Why my best friends
are Jews." Some of them, I
know, told the truth. Others,
"Ihr versteht doch allem."

We wonder why it is that
our intelligent Jewish law-
yers cannot exercise the good
business judgment we know
they possess, when it comes
to running for office. Why is'
it that everyone must run for
an office, unimportant though
it is, and yet not one aspire
to an office worth while.
Why not exercise the old poli-
tical strategy, of "rather be-
ing licked for a worthwhile
office than winning one not
worth _while." And if one feels
the urge for office so strong-
ly, why choose that office for
which a fellow Jew is run-
ning.

We have been asked our
position in the matter of Jews
aspiring to office in this
campaign. And though we
thought we had made our
position quite clear and un-
mistakeable in our last week's
editorial, we ao not hesitate
to reaffirm our position. With
us, it is a question solely of
fitness and q uahiation for
the office to which one as-
pires. In determining that,
we take into consideration
the man's previous record,
his possession of particular
knowledge needed for the par-
ticular position he aspires to;
his reputation for keeping his
promises. If he is a Jew, we
want to know what has he
done amongst his own peo-
ple. How has he behaved in
Jewish communal affairs? If
everything is equal, frankly
and unhesitatingly, we will
vote for our own. It is natural
that we do that. BUT-the
mere fact that a candidate
is a Jew will make us expect
more of him than of any oth-
er candidate. Unfortunately,
if a non-Jew makes an error
or a bad public record, the
world at large will say "John
was no good, he did not keep
his promises." But if that of-
fice holder be a. Jew, then the
world will say "That JEW
was no good, Jews don't keep
their promises." Unfortunate,
but true never the less.


HOW TO READ

Lafcadio Hearn, the noted
critic, once said that few peo-
ple know how to read. Only
the rare man, he contended,
is able to read well before
reaching the age of twenty-
five years.
By reading, of course,
Hearn meant the ability to
read with complete under-
standing. Most people read
merely to kill time. A week
after they have read a book
they have forgotten what it
was about.
Hearn says that with thou.
sands of people the habit of
reading for amusement be-
comes exactly the same kind
of habit as wine-drinking or
opium-smoking; it is like a
narcotic, something that
helps to pass the time; some-
thing that Keeps up a perpe-
tual condition of dreaming;
something that eventually re-
sults in destroying all capac-
ity for thought.
A young clerk, for example
reads every day on the way
to his office and on the way
back, just to pass the time;
and what does he read?
"A novel, of course," says
Hearn. "It is very easy work,
and it enables him to forget
his troubles for a moment, to
dull his mind to all the little
worries of his daily routine.
In one day or two days he
finishes the novel; then he
gets another. By the end of
the year he has read between
a hundred and fifty and two
hundred novels; no matter
how poor he is, the luxury is
possible to him, because of
the institution of circulating
libraries. At the end of a few
years he* has--read- several-
tnousand novels. Does he like
them? No; he will tell you
that they are nearly all the
same, but they help him pass
away his idle time.
It is utterly impossible that
the result can be anything
but a stupefying of the facul-
ties. The result of all this
reading means nothing but a
cloudiness in his mind. That
is the direct result. The indi-
rect result is that the mind
has been kept from develop-
ing itself. All development
necessarily means some pain;
and such reaaing as I speak
of has been employed uncon-
sciously as a means to avoid
that pain and the consequence
is atrophy."
Chances are against the
nan who never takes chances.
*


It's advice when you give
it and a lecture when you re-
ceive it.

Before acting on free ad-
vice investigate the motive
behind it.

It takes a born diplomat to
pick a quarrel and dodge the
consequences.
*
Some men consider them-
selves brave because of their
ability to keep out of a fight.
*
He is truly a wise father
who brings up his children
as if they belonged to some
one else.
4 *
His Dad-What makes you
think that Lord Blessus is a
poor man?
Little Bobbie-Cause he
can't afford a pair of eye-
glasses and has to get along
with only one.


rj~3it


Mrs. Junebride- I want
you to try this fish, dearie.
I learned to make it in my,
correspondence course In
codkery.
Her Husband-Hadn't you
better test it by correspon-
dence?

It's easy to find trouble and
make excuses.
4 *
Men who know it all are
seldom able to furnish the
proof.
*
Ingratitude is always ready
to offer some kind of excuse.

If a pair of shoes are too
small they may fit a woman
but if they are too large she
has a fit.


The Grocer-Yes'm, you'll
find this 30-cent butter would
be cheap at twice the money.
Mrs. Borden-Lodge-Yes, I
know it would, I've used it be-
fore and my boarders eat
hardly any of it.
*
Her Husband-But I'm not
unreasonable. I don't under-
stand why you insist that I
am.
Mrs. Chatters-Why, any
one would call it unreasonable
of you to expect me to give
a reason for every opinion I
have.
*
Bigamy is having one hus-
bad4 o:-0w0anyW--wQeosSy
is very often the same thing.

Many a girl who is pretty
as a picture is handicapped by
an ugly irame of mind.

The girl who takes a long
time to make up her mind is
usually short of material.
*
Willie Please, teacher,
what did I learn today!?
Teacher-What a peculiar
question!
Willie-Well, they'll ask
me when I get home.

An actress was gently re-
buked by her manager for
wearing excessively brief
skirts. "Pooh," she said flip-
pantly, "don't you know that
since women took to wearing
short skirts the number of
street accidents due to trail-
ing gowns has been reduced
by half?" "I see," said the
manager gently, "and you are
hoping to do away witn acci-
dents altogether."
$ S
Somebody spoke of a mil-
lionaire who played 500,000
francs on the wheel at Monte
Carlo, and Dora thought that
would be a revolving fund.
S S S


He-Two can live as cheap.
ly as one, and we could start
out by doing light house-
keeping.
She--'hat would be fine i
we only knew where we could
find a vacant lighthouse.
S *
Dryden-No,, sir: I don't
know what wisky tastes like.
Wetmore I understand.
Since we've been reduced to
this synthetic stuff I, also,
have forgotten what real
whisky tastes lke.


The clock gets there hand
over hand.

Actions and some people's
clothes speak louder than
words.

A woman never attempts
to bake bread unless she
kneads it.

Even the man who makes
nothing but mistakes is in
the manufacturing business.
S* *
Attempt to follow the ad-
vice of all your alleged friends
and it will be a padded cell
for you.

The longer a man- is mar-
ried the less he tells nis bet-
ter half.

If a man has a nervous wife
he has no need for an alarm
clock.
*
A man's mind sometimes
runs to the contrary-a wo-
man's always does.
*
Sometimes a man leads a
woman to the altar and some-
times she drags him there.
*
When a girl gets sweet on
a young man she takes to
sour pickles as an antidote.
"Mary, if you misbehave
like that you will make your
mother angry at you."
Little Mary-.-Th-at don't,
scare me, she ain't my wife.
*
Horace My exercises
make every bone in my body
ache.
Pat-Oh, that accounts for
your numerous headaches.
*


It's easy to
alone-between
*


Luck consists
what some other
*


live on love
meals.
*


of having
fellow wants
*


If a man is honest he can
afford to stay out of politics.
*
A promoter is a man who
makes a strenuous effort to
boost his own interests.
'S
It's useless to try to estab-
lish universal peace as long
as people will get married.
*
After capping a climax one
should drive a nail in it to
prevent. some other fellow
from uncapping it.

"Imagine my embarrass-
ment." said Dumb Dora,
"when, according to my cus-
tom, I looked under the bed
before retiring. I had forgot-
ten that I was in an upper
berth."
S
A budding genius does not
always turn out to be the
flower of the family.
*


Barbers thing it is "shear"
non-sense to let your hair
grow.
*
Tie girl-friend says that
leading s horse to water and
then making him drink is
easy comp to the dii-
culty of fmii f a "de"
for a huslbd a l~ then hav-
ing hia stay fi .: ev.gtB.
-_.., .. -. -


THESE

CHAIIER


Mother-Don't be so fussy.
Yo uneedn't eat the holes
-


Miss Unwed-You tell aw-
ful whoppers aoout yattr b
This afternoon yo te d u.l
he weiated 12 Ix~id and
arwa Iheam

thk ",--.. ...: _


.-Tfi JAtES FL J-RIDI IMF
~.


___


The girl-friend. s it
doesn't mean so much e say
that a girl is handy with a
needle nowadays, because it
may be just a phonograph
needle.

"You seem to be pretty
sick, but I think I can pull
you through," gravely con-
fided the doctor. "I have some
medicine in my case-"
"Hold on, doc!" exclaimed
the invalid, springing out of
bed. "Don't you think I could
use a whole case?"

Mr. Huggins-Miss Prym-
me refused to go out in my
car last evening, out of con-
sideration for her good name.
Miss Dill-She's so careful
of her good name because she
never expects to have an-
other.

Friday Night Supper
This is the best meal of them
all.
Across the table. shadows fall
Made by the candles, white
and tall,
On Friday nights at home.

Around the table, those I love
Reveal what they are think-
ing of,
And we our close communion
prove
On Friday nights at home.

Some search abroad with jad-
ed will
To find that same reviving
thrill
Which keeps our hearts so
warm and still
On Friday night at home.

But I would rather ue with
you
In comradeship so fine and
true,
And know you love me as you
do
On Friday nights at home.
*
Lots of men will never
know what it is to experience
brain fag.
*
He who invests money in
an inn thinks he will get more
out of it.
*
A patient.man can win the
admiration of any woman-
except his own wife.
.*
Step-ladaers. and alarm
clocks have helped, lots of
people to get up in the world.

You may say t you
please, but it nMY.t.er to"
say what please: eter peo-
ple;

Doctors at Johns Hopkins
cut away a large part of a
patient's brain without caus-
ing any decrease in his intel-
lectual powers and to the
great improvement of his
health. I suppose when you
have an obscure ailment the
doctors will now recommend
having your brain outaai well
as 3yur teeth, and putting in
a false one.
*,
Bobby--ia, I don't like
this bread with all those holes
in it.


MdO


_ __


__ -_---__
1


Friday, May 23, 1930










































r
















ri
i





1








t-f


Page 4
.1C)r~ in..om....aulRIinuin.


S


We would appreciate your
forwarding all society and
organization items to the
Jewish Floridian, 652 S. W.
1st street, or phone 2-8745
not later than noon Wed-
nesday.

When informed that Mrs.
I. Buckstein, the beloved
president of the Ladies' Aux-
iliary of Beth David Talmud
Torah was to leave on Mon-
day morning, instead of next
month, a number of the ac-
tive workers and several of
her friends gathered at the
home of Rabbi Israel H. Weis-
fe'd late Saturday night and
planned a farewell party for
last Sunday evening. As
many of the friends of Mrs.
Buckstein as could be reached
were telephoned to and on
Sunday night quite a large
gathering were present at
the Talmud Torah Auditor-
ium to bid Mrs. Buckstein
farewell. Mrs. Van Gelder the
first vice president of the
Auxiliary was toastmistress
and she presented the several
speakers of the evening,
among whom were Mr. John
Wolf, J. Louis Shochet, Na-
than Adelman, and the guest
of honor Mrs. I. Buckstein.
Mrs. Julius Simpson was then
introduced and read a splen-
did original poem which
voiced the sentiments of those
present and concluded with
the presentation of a beauti-
ful fitted overnight bag on
behalf of the friends of Mrs.
Buckstein. The guest of hon-
or responded, and because of
her joy and appreciation.
broke into tears. Refresh-
ments were provided and late
in the evening each bade the
guest of honor bon voyage
and a speedy return. During
the evening messages from
Rabbi and Mrs. Israel H.
Weisfeld, Max Kupferstein
and Louis Weinkle who had
left early Sunday morning for
Savannah to attend the con-
ference of Southern Ortho-
dox Rabbis and Laymen, were
read;
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Pe-
retzman and daughter, Celia
have just returned to the city
from an extended Northern
trip during which they visited
Hartford, Conn., and Wash-
ington, D. U.

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Lear left
last Tuesday night for New
Conn. Mr. Lear will attend
the unveiling of his late fa-
ther's tombstone on May 30.
They expect to return to Mi-
ami about the middle of June.

Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Richter
will hold open house next
Sunday night beginning at 8
p. m. at their new home, 1893
S. W. 10th street and will be
glad to greet their many
friends.
The Sisterhood of Temple
Israel will be hosts at a re-


ception and bon voyage party
at Kaplan Hall Friday nig.
immediately after the ser-
vices in honor of Mr. and Mrs.


O CT E


I~tF qwr


Day J. Apte who will leave
for a European tour early
next week. Mr. Apte is presi-
dent of Temple Israel, the
Jewish Welfare Bureau and
very active in the communal
and Civic work of Miami.
*
Mrs. I. L. Rosendorf re-
cently elected president of
Temple Israel Sisterhood en-
tertained the members of the
new Board and officers of
the Sisterhood at a bridge
luncheon at her home in Mi-
ami Beach last Monday.
*
At a called Board meeting
of the Sisterhood of Temple
Israel, Mrs. I. L. Seligman,
its former president, read a
paper on "Peace," in celebra-
tion of Good Will Day.
$
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Dubler
entertained at their home last
Saturday night for a number
of friends. Cards were play-
ed and refreshments were
served. Among those present
were Mr. and Mrs. H. Leavitt
of Miami Beach, Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Isaacs, Mr. and Mrs.
H. H. Farr, Mr. and Mrs. W.
L. Williams, Mr and Mrs. S.
Wallerstein in addition to the
hosts
*
The Sisterhood of Temple
Israel will entertain at Kap'an
Hall on Wednesday afternoon
May 28, at 2 p. m. at a card
party to which the public is
invited. Prizes will be award-
ed and refreshments will be
served. In charge of the af-
fair are Mrs. Mendel Cromer
chairman and Mesdames Ja-
cob H. Kaplan, J. A. Richter
and J. G. Lewis.

Mr. and Hrs. Michael Ar-
nold entertained last Sunday
night at their home in Coral
Gables at cards. Among those
present were Dr. and Mrs. M.
D. Kirsch, Dr. and Mrs. S.
Aronowitz, Dr and Mrs. B.
Weinkle, Mr. and Mrs. Mor-
ris Dubler and Mr. and Mrs,
Haussner. At a late hour a
salad course was served.
*1' *
Mr. and Mrs. S. Tannebaum
will leave by auto next Sun-
day morning for an extended
tour to New York city and
Vicinity. They expect to re-
turn to Miami the latter part
of September. Mrs. Tanne-
baum (Cecil) was one of tne
most active workers and or-
ganizers of tne Ladies' Aux-
iliary of Beth David Talmud
Torah and was the recipien--
of a number of events in her
honor last week.
Mrs. Van Gelder of Shen-
andoah entertained last Tues-
day afternoon at a luncheon
bridge in honor of Mrs. S.
Tannebaum who is leaving
for New York city next Sun-
day. The large dining room
was beautifully decorated,
and the centerpiece of the
large table was a beautiful
venetian lace table cloth sur-
mounted by large vases filled
with cut flowers. Prizes were
won by Mrs. Chas. Tanne-
baum and Mrs. Alex Gold-


stein. Among those present
were Mesdames J. Simpson,


TY


I


J. L. Shochet, Harry Wein-
berg, Alex Goldstein, S. Tan-
nebaum, B. Tanneuaum, S
Futterfass and the hostess.
*
Mrs. B. Hirschfield left by
auto last Tuesday to visit her
sister in New fork city. She
was accompanied by Mr. and


Mrs. A. Magid 'who will visit
Atlantic City and New York,
and Mrs. Stella Fulda who
will visit St. Louis, Mo. They
expect to return to Miami in
September.
I


Good

and

Bad


Look for the Big Signs at



Miami- Mather
NORTH MIAMI AT FOURTH ST.


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


Dr. A. N. nalpern tne pop-
ular communal worker re- Continued on Page 5


New

and

Asis


THINKING JEWS ALL SUBSCRIBE TO THE JEWISH FLORIDIANI DO YOU?
"t.DO .. V.


~ ~' ~7~r:1---~---------- ---~- ~--~_ I --C


Cotton -,



Mather



Keeper of the


Puritan Conscience


Sayeth :




Prepare Now for the Future


VISIT OUR MIAMI STORE AND CONVINCE YOUR-

SELF THAT WHEN WE ISSUE A CHALLENGE, WE

ARE BACKING IT UP.




-When Lower Prices Are

]Made, We Will Make Them


OUR PRICES PROVE IT


GUARANTEED Mather Finance Plan
PRIC E S! The World's Most Liberal
Credit Terms
We guarantee every price the lowest ever f1. A PER WEEK PAYS FOR
before offered by us and *e also guaran- pA. $80.00 WORTH
te the prices as low or lower than offered PER WEEK PAYS FOR
by any dealer....We positively will not sell $5.00 $400.0 WORTHYS FOR
any advertised merchandise to dealers0000 W TH
here or elsewhere. .. $25.00 PER WEEK PAYS FOR
--- .W $2,000.00 WORTH
I--


Friday, May 23,1930

turned to the city Wednesday
morning after having spent
a well earned vacation in New
York city and Stamford,
Conn., his former nomes. 'ne
Arbeiter Ring will be hosts
at a party in his honor next
Sunday evening to celebrate
his return.
Mr. M. Rosalsky the pop.
ular restaurateur and co-
owner of the G. & R. Restau.
rant, ana recently the lessor
of the Pioneer Hotel, was a
patient at the Victoria Hos-
pital for several days last


lx


--N 'o ow-wo.-. -- -- .am ----.


i'


- ----------------------------- ----------


11111111111~


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Friday, Mav 23, 1930


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


Page 5


SOCIETY

(Continued from Page 4)
week. He is feeling much bet-
ter now.
*
Mr. Dave Kahn who left
Miami several weeks ago to
attend the bedside of his
brother at Elizabeth, N. J.,
returned to the city' last
Thursday morning. His bro-
ther succumbed to an opera-
tion and was buried at Eliza-
beth several weeks ago. The
many friends of Dave ex-
press their sincere sympa-
thies, and are glad to see him
back again.
.4 *
The regular bi-weekly card
party given by the Ladies'
Auxiliary of Beth David Tal-
mud Torah will be held on
Tuesday evening, May 27, and
prizes will be awarded to the
highest score at each tabe.
Refreshments will be served.
Acting as hostesses for the
evening will be Mrs. I. H.
Weisfeld, H. Seitlin and Mrs.
Lapg. The public is invited.

SA number of friends gath-
ered at the home of Mrs. Chase
Tannenbaum last Wednesday
night to bid Mrs. Sam Tan-
nenbaum boa voyage on her
trip to New York and other
Northern points. As a mark
of appreciation they. present-
ed her with a beautiful pocket
book. Among those present
were Mr. and Mrs. L. Van
Gilder, Mr. and Mrs. Nathan
Adelman, Mr. and Mrs. J. L.
Shochet, Mrs. L. Simpson,
Mrs. S. Grosman, Mrs. M.
Friedman, and Mrs. Gottes-
man. Refreshments were ser-
ved and a good time was en-
joyed.
*
Dr. and Mrs. A. E. Freid-
man have issued invitations
to a large number vf
children for the celebration at
their home on next Saturday
of the 5th birthday of their
son Fred. They will entertain
with children's games and
other amusements. Fred is
the grandson of Mr. and Mrs.
Morris Dubler, long time resi-
dents of Miami and active in
the communal work of the
city. *
*
Invitations have been is-
sued for the wedding of Miss
Reggie Goldstein to Mr. A.
H. Furr for Jane 15th. at the~
Coral Gables Golf and Cou -
. Clab. Rabbi Israel H.
lifeld of Beth David will
officiate.
*
Mrs Morris Dubler enter-
tained at an elaborate bridge
luncheon last Wednesday aft-


ernoon for a number of
friends. Prizes were awarded
to Mrs. Morris Rubin, Max
Ghertler, H. H. Farr, Jack
Bernstein, P. Scheinberg and
Stanley C. Myers. A chicken
dinner with the usual garn-
ishments and salads was ser-
ved. Among those present
were Mesdames Lewis Brown,
Harry I. Magid, Dave Letaw,
Max Ghertler, S. Wallerstenm,
C. Walder, Harry Freed, of
Detroit; A. E. Freidman,
Morris Rubin, S. Aronowitz,
P. Scheinberg, Nat Brown,
.Michael Ainold, Isidor Cohen,
Jack Bernstein, Mendel Sche-
einberg, Stanley C. Meyers,
Aaron Kanner, S. Miller, of
Miami Beacn, M. B. Frank, S.
Snowe, H. H. Farr, Harry
Dubler, Max Schwartz, Jake
Engler, Morris Dubler, Rae
Falk, J. A. Richter and Mor-
ris Aronowitz.
*
Mr. Joe Mechlow the gen-
ial proprietor of the Sun-
shine Kosher Market at Mi-
ami Beach left. Wednesday
hight on a business trip to
New York city, after which
he will go to Roumania to
visit his parents. He expects
to return to the United States
in November and will return
to Miami in time for the win-
ter season.
*
Mrs. Saul Abenson ana
Mrs. Max Hoffman entertain-
ed at a luncheon bridge show-
er Thursday afternoon at the
Shenandoan home of Mrs.
Hoffman, in honor of Miss
Reggie Goldstein whose mar-
riage to Bob Furr of this city
will take place on June 15th.
Assisting the hostesses in the
receiving line were the guest
of honor Miss Reggie Gold-
stein, Mrs. Cnas. Goldstein,
and Mrs. Abe Aronowitz. The
home was decorated in a yel-
low and white color scheme.
Prizes were awarded to the
highest bridge scores. After
the luncheon the guest of
honor was presented with
gifts of topaz glassware on
behalf of the guests. Among
those present were Mesdames
Carl Weinkle, Louis Leibovitt,
Chas. Tannenbaum, Sol Wein-
kle, Abe Aronowitz, Sam Fut-
terfass, A. r. Freidman, Bar-
ney Weinkle, M. Miller,, A.
Goldstein, Louis Baron, M.
Schaaf, B. Kandel, J. Katz, S.
J. Spector, J. Silberstein,
Michael Arnold, John Wolf,
M, Rippa, I. Silver, Jack Au-
gust, L. Weinkle, Chas. Gold-
stein, H. Green M. Pepper, A.
Predinger, Morris Dubler, H.
V. Simons, J. Reisman, B.
Spoont, Sam Blanck, L. L.
Mintzer, A. Pepper, M. B.
Frank, J. Engler, Herbert
Seppler, Jasper Cromer; and
the Misses Adeline Ross, Syl-
via Katz, Lillian R. Chisling,


Selma Spoont, Dorothy Kap-
lan, Marjorie Predinger and
Ruth Davis.
*
The Ladies' Brancn of the
local Arbeiter Ring elected of-
ficers for tne next term at
a meeting held last week. The
organization has no presi-
dent, the chairman being
chosen at each meeting, The
officers elected are as fol-
lows: Mrs. Kotkin, financial
secretary; F. Slavita, record-
ing secretary; A. Dock, treas-
urer; L. Elkin, corresponding
secretary, and Mesdames H.
Seitlin, M. Rosin and S. Shw-
arts to the executive board.
Mrs. A. D. Gross was chosen
chairman of hospitality, and
Mrs. L. Elkin chairman of
publicity.
*
The regular examinations
of the Arbeiter Ring school
scheduled for June 2 and 3,
were postponed because of
'the holiday of Shvuoth, and
will be held immediately
after.
*


Mr. Lionel Cassel formerly
of New York has returned to
Miami where he will now re-
side permanently. He is now
associated with Samuel Un-
gerleider and Co. local brok-
ers.


FOR
STATE LEGISLATURE.
GROUP 2
Republican Primary
June 3rd, 1930











Otto C.
Stegemann
Pledged to Republican Plat-
rfonm and the Principle .of


Two Party Government for








$100 .. $150 ... for
Beach Apartments
To November 1st.
SHELBURNE
710 Jefferson Ave.


BUSINESS DIRECTORY


L. (Pop) GERSON
Buyer of All Kinds of Scrap Metal
We Sell Auto Parts
2141 N. W. SECOND AVE.
Phone 20621

BAGS and METALS
EAST COAST BAG & METAL CO.
(Inc.)
I. L. MINTZER
MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS
435-445 N. W. 8th Street
Phone 4485
PEPPER METAL CORP.
Scrap Metal and Machinery
N. W. Cor. 5th Ave. and 14th St.
Phone 22546

BUILDING SUPPLIES
J. SIMPSON
Building Materials,
Roofing Paper, Asphalt
423 N. W. N. River Drive
Phone 7251

DELICATESSEN
ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN
170 N. W. 5th St.
We Supply Your Every Want

FISH & SEA FOODS
STANDARD FISH CO.
62 W. Flagler St.
Phone 2-3S62


King
Uudertalung Co.
29 N. W. 1~IRD AVENUE
Phone 205314P


A man with an empty head
is better off than the man
who loses his head.


PHARMACISTS
BRYAN PARK PHARMACY
Chas. Tannenbaum,
Pharmacist
(reg. pharmacist for 17 years)
Cor 22nd Ave. and 8th St. S. W.

CRYSTAL PHARMACY
Dr. A. D. Halpern, Ph. G. Ph. D.
Prescriptions Our Specialty
128 N. Miami Ave. Phone 29713

PIPE and STEEL

ADELMAN PIPE & STEEL CO.
58 N. E. 25th St.
Aat F. E. C. R. R. Phone 21420
A. & B. PIPE AND METAL CO,
Phone 31355
53 North East 25th Street

PRINTERS
MIAMI PRINTING CO.
"Printing That Pays"
Phone 23261
107 South Miami Avenue
AUTO PARTS
BLOOM AUTO REPAIR
& PARTS CO.
N. W. 17th Ave. at 28rd St.
Ph"ee 286S1
The Largest ear wreckers in
Floridp


AMBULANCE SERVI
W. H. Combs C., stab. 16
COuIM FUNERAL BOM

KUM Sm*0


It costs, more to avenge the
wrong than it does to let it
go by default.


PINKY-DINKY


EASY ENOUGH FOR PINKY


By Terry Gilkison


Tf xJEWS ALL I:SUEBSRIBE TO HE

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A


James L Cooper

(JCimmie)
Camdid4te For


JUDGE OF
cIcrIr COUR
GROUP 2


Towr Vae ad S~prt


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


Campaign Briefs
iCcat-rnued from Pap 2)
member of the Law faculty of
the same institution. He has
been heard frequently over
the local broadcasting sta-
tions on educational matters,
and has been a contributor to


ITH FAMILY

DOCTOR
JOHN JOSEPH CANES MD.
OLD REMEDIES-AND NEW
Fifty years ago, we demanded just one thing of a drug-
it must produce results. No medicine survived that did not
measure up to this one requirement. The patient expected
action in return for his effort at swallowing the massive.
obnoxious dose with often the abominable smell: if it cured
the malady, one considered himself amply repaid for the
awful experience of swallowing the mess dipped up by the
rusty knife-blade of the old family doctor. There were few
drugs then that were of known reliability.
It is amazingly different to-day. About the most un-
popular thing I know of is the coarse, unpalatable dose. The
doctor who makes a practice of giving medicines without a
supreme regard for the patient's aesthetic tas:e will. in time.
work himself out of a respectable cientele. No mattr what
its supposed v-ue as an eradicator of dseas. people wil
have the docti o who dispenses the minute. sugar-ct ted. o':en
forceklss thinr.
ti~nce the t'bbing up of the h:~rh- y os.ercia.izd pha:r-
maceutical "houses." who have flooded he .u niver-se -*i h :ithr
products--robably three-fourths of which might be done
without a particle of risk. For all this -trif. pecp-ie are -
posed to be paying at the rate of a billion doars a year: The
business has grown and flourished, until the larger half of
our country is the manufacturing half: when will it end*
I have a patient, a little woman of thirty-five, who had
thirteen qquarts of dropsical fluid removed from her abdomen
two weeks ago by a surgeon-the proper thing was done. but
-the fluid is returning slowly!
A happy thought-the old "compound jalap powder." She
had never heard of it. One dose daily is removing the strff
at the rate of a quart every 24 hours-while I am attending
to the underlying cause of it. What a grand old remedy that
just won't fit into the discard! Let's honor the old remedies
for awhile yet, before throwing them all overboard.


BEN C. WILLARD
CAMDATE PWO*
JUDGE OF
COURT OF CRIES
In the ,ark Jun je

VCLu %CTI[ ASO suWoW lat. aEE
tcr[ #X D


Curagd Ab
and Abe.


Por~Liea Adiertc EE
pai; ,y a friend *.


I 'rspetfy present
Myself to the Democrati
voters of Dade Cemty
for mimatiM as their
canaiate fr the office
of RlepC etative from
Dae Cm.tv t. the Flr-
ida State Legiga lre
S Grs a 2
I served in the Ses-
sif 29S. and beirev
My eeprimeu wIN rn-
aie me t rehaer ibe


bc Jme 3. IS
S P. Robinea=-


Page Six


Photograph taken close of World
War in aniform of U. S. Naval
Officer
Native. Florid'an, 55 years of
az. Lifelong Democrat. voting
straight Democratic ticket Law-
yer by profession and held posi-
Etcn Shell Fish Commissioner un-
der five governors. Long experi-
ence in public life.
I am opposed to the excessive
automobile Ecense and other ini-
quitous and abominable tax meas-
ures that have been imposed upon
the people of the State of Florida
through the influence of Governor
Carlton. I am opposed to his poli-
cies. and if he has ever proposed
anything beneficial to the State,
I am not aware of it. If he should
make such a proposition. I will be
rad to support it. but I have my
s.:icus doubts about his ever do-
Cc "o.
Your vote and support is re-
-:crfu lly solicited.
,P pid A


id2ay.May230
the local school board needs
men of his qualifications and
knowledge to make Dade
county schools really success.


leading magazines. He served
as Camp Lee during the
World War and is a member
of the Masonic fraternity,
Knights of Pythias, Dade
County Bar Association, Mi-
ami Lions Club and the
American Association for ad-
vancement of science.
His friends point out that

T. R HODGES
Anti-Carton Candidate for
Secretary of State


If redua g taxes
over 50% in past 4
years, and paying al
interest, bond matu.
cities and expenses is
GOOD BUSINESS
A man every one can
meet and talk to, eve-
ry day, election time
as wen
VOTE AND WORK FOR
W. CCIL WATSON
County
Commissioner
Paid Po ideal AdvertiMraet)


a fraill ver iS mentI


VOTE FO R


Uy 0. Thompson

Candidate To
Suemed Himself
FOR

Judge of

the

Circuit

Court

Resident of Da*
t for S:xtu
Years ad Fr
Jude .rt


(Niltical Advecummat paid by a firn)


OUR ADVERs SAVE YOU MONEY AND GIVE YOUS
%


VERNON
HAWTHORNE
STATE ATTORNEY
F: ai se-,: 1I T':


I


F. G. (Pat) Railey
Candidate Fw
Comty Commissiser
DISTRICT NO. r3
bect to Jime 3rd
Year Spper is Sacited
EDlet thaM the Job Needs
#PEhicl Ad& said ffr vy
sense :- ft: Rsane-


K


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--


ful.


W. CECIL

WATSON

Asks


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