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The Jewish Floridian ( May 2, 1930 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
May 2, 1930
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00062

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
May 2, 1930
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00062

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text










IJreiws/P FlkDrIdfiaIrl


Vol. III.-No.XVIII.ami, Florida, Friday, May 2, 1930
I '. I- rMiami, Floriaa, Friday, May 2, 1930


Price 5 Cents


Campaign Briefs
@


Judge David J. Hefferman
of the Civil Court of Record'
has announced his candidacy
for reelection for a full term:
of four years. Judge Heffer-
nan, a resident of Dade Coun-
ty for 19 years came here
from Massachusetts in 1911
and has practiced law since
1912. He served as judge of
he Municipal Court until he
became judge of the Civil
court of Record oy appoint-
ent of the Governor subse-
uently receiving Lae ap-
roval of the citizens at the
election, which because of a
technical question, causes his
erm to expire shortly. His
record shows that instead of:
' case in his court taking'
bout 18 months, it now!
kes from but two to four
months to be disposed of.
During 1929 out of 1214.
cases that were tries 880
cases were disposed of by
final judgment, 699 cases
ere tried by jury, 344 dis-
issed, and special appoint-
ents for the hearing of de-
urreis and motions num-
ered 1437. A remarkable
record has been the running
f the Court in continuous
ssion since January 7, 1930
mpleting about 15 weeks of
ry trials. More than 250
ses, and more than a hun-
.ed motions and demurrers
ere disposed of by special
pointments. More than 200
nal judgments were entered
he friends of Judge Heffer-
an poi) with pride to this
paralleled record and on
at ground alone urge his re-
ection.
In an address, Tuesday
eight, Dan Chappell, candi-
ate for re-election to the
ate legislature in Group 3,
aid:
"' he experience gained
during my first term has
own me that it is necessary
r a representative to be al-
ays on the job if he is to
watch wits with his fellow
embers ana obtain for his
section needed legislation.
"Several measures that will
e of great benefit to Dade
county, lost last session, I
ope to see passed this year
nd, if re-elected, I will woric
ardI for their passage. They
include:
"The bill to legalize pari-
utuels in connection with
acing, the workmen's com-
:ensation act, the bu tio ap-
ropriate sufficient monies
or a full school term and to
pay adequate salaries to
teachers, the bill to establish
a state experimental station
n Homestead and several
others of vital importance to
Dade county.

Judge E. C. Collins of the
Criminal Court of Record is
a graduate of Mercer Law
School, Macon, Ga,, of the
class of 1898, has had pre-
vious judicial experience as
au.age of the Civil and Crim-
iUal Courts of Reidville Ken-


oBins nmd l
mtanent homeni. dIwh.s
oied a sl4 ii
tSone ofthE
^"'^"'B^?^*^^^


Flew to Bermuda


Rosedale Is Sued
For Damages
Asserting that he was de-
fending the interfl;t of his
employers when he was
robbed of the company's
money last fall, Dave Alper
filed suit for $15,000 yester-
day in Circuit court against
his former employers, the
Rosedale Delicatessen, In-
corporated, of which he was
the cashier. Alper suffered a
fracture of the skull and was
a patient at the Jackson
Memorial Hospital for quite
a long time, at one time, his
life being despaired of.


SCatain Lewis A. Yancey, who made
the ,rst successful fight from Long., R ej ted Because
Island to Bermuda, landing on the
water near his goal and finishing the She Is Jewess
flight the next day.


Chesed Shel Emes
To Hold Meeting
At a special meeting of the
Executive Board of the
Chesed Shel Emes held last
Sunday morning a resolution
was adopted, subject to which
a general meeting of the en-
tire membership wil be call-
ed shortly.
The Chesed Shel Emes was
founded several years ago by
a group of women and men,
prominent among whom were
Mr. and Mrs. Manuel Rippa.
The object of the orgaiiza-
tion was the ,. rovildng of
burial shrouds and' cemetery
lots for the poor of Miami. A
tract of land was purchased*
at Woodlawn Cemetery and
about twenty interments
have been made there, in-
cluding a number of Miami's
prominent citizens who ex-
pressed a desire to be buried
on the cemetery of the
Chesed Shel Emes because of
sentimental reasons.
Last year a meeting of the
membership at large was call-
ed and officers and an exe-
cutive board were elected.
----------
Friday Night Ser-
vices Continued


Regular Friday night late
services are being held at
Beth David beginning at 8:30
p. m., when Rabbi Israel H.
Weisfeld will preach the ser-
mon based on the portion of
the week. The usual social
hour which is sponsored by
the Beth David Ladies' Auxi-
liary, will follow the services.
The library of the Talmud
Torah is now ready for the
distribution ot books to those
who have obtained library
cards. The Sunday school and
Bar Mitzva Boys Club meet
as usual on Sunday mornings.
bers of the local Bar. Recent-
ly he was the head of the law
firm of Collins, Collins and
Lumpkin. By appointment of
Governor Carlton, Judge Col-
lins assumed his duties as
head of the Criminal Court of
Record where since his term
of office began in January
of this year, Judge Collins
.e taJiMged I aneWf1ib
reord to rds both the
bar and those defendaAts
S- rt W him, r ft,", -
. t. ued ca' ap ..


m,
Ne wYork City-The Den-
tal College of New York Uni-
versity recently published an
ad. requesting applicants for
positions as instructors in the
Dental Department of the
University. When Dr. Anna
R. Bruen, a Jewess, applied
she receive the reply that
they regretted that because
only non-Jews would be em-
ployed, her application would
be rejected. Dr. Allan T. Nei-
man, the Dean of the Dental
department admitted the
truth of the charges as did
Dr. McGeehy, professor of
Dentistry at the University.

Hoover Democrat
Ruled Out of
Primary
First casualty among Hoo-
ver Democrats seeking a
place on the party's ticket
was reported Wednesday
when it became apparent that
LeLroy Edwards, formerly
regarded as a formidable can-
didate for county commission
against Hugh Peters, incum-
bent, was out of the race.
When Mr. Edwarus ap-
peared to qualify, ne was pre-
sented win the oatn, swear-
ing he had not supported any
candidate of tne opposing
party at the last election. He
replied he could not take such
an. oatn.
E. B. Leatherman, clerk of
circuit court, explained that
the state law mace this re-
quirement an offered to get
a special ruling from the at-
torney general to-remove any
doubt in the case. This was
done, and the attorney gen-
eral's wire confirmed Mr.
Leatherman.
3 I


Julius iarnes, Chair i f" th
U. S Chamber of Commerce, wh,,
told leaders of industry they mus-
find a way to keep workers busy th
ryea round.

Beth David Forms
P. T. A. Society
Great enthusiasm is being
shown by the parents of the
children attending the Beth
David Talmud Torah and
Sunday School in the forma-
tion of a P. T. A. Assmoiation.
This organization will have
for its purpose the coopera-
tion with the Rabbi and
teaching staff of the schools
in the problems of the child.
A large number of the par-
ents have agreed to join and
next week a meeting will be
held and the formation of
this needed organization will
be effected. Those who desire
to join may communicate
with the office of Beth David
Synagogue.

Jewish Board of
Deputies to Protest
London- 'he Jewish Board
of Deputies will shortly pub-
lish a detailed protest against
the majority report rendered
by the recent Investigation
C commission on the Palestine
massacres of last August.

Hebrew Free Loan
Meets
Because of a misunder-
standing on the part of Board
members, the meeting of the
Hebrew Free Loan Society
called for last Monday eve-
ning was. postponed to Thurs-
day evening and a meeting of
the Board is being held as we
are going to press. We re-
gret that at this time fe are
unable to announce when the
public meeting of the organ-
ization will be held, but an
announcement will be made
in the next week's issue of
this paper.


Mrs. Owen Is
Again Candidate
In an official announce-
ment made this week, Mrs.
Ruth Bryan Owen member of
Congress for this ditrict de-
clared she would again be a
igms g r a rm candidate for the office she
now -holdB M-rs. Qwm

ter:


Esrogim to be
Branded
The Jewish planters and
fruit merchants of Palestine
have determined to prevent
non-Palestinian Esrogim to
be sold as Palestinian this
year and have provided a
special design which will be
branded upon every Palestin-
ian Esrog. The Co-operative
organization is known as
"Esrog" with headquarters in
Tel Aviv.

New York to Have
Negro Judges
N:w York City-For the
first time in the history of
New York two negros will
shortly be appointed as
Judges of the Municipal
court. The recent legislature
authorized the appointment
of eight additional Judges for
New York and both Republi-
can and Democratic parties
have nominated two negros
each for appointment.

High Commission-
er to Commute
Death Sentence
Jersualem-Though not of-
ficial, it appears from relia-
ble sources that the' death
sentence twice passed upon
Joseph Misrach Urfalli of
Jaffe for participation in the
August riots, making him
the only Jew to be under aa-
tence of death, wiR shorire
commuted Hi*gh
aier Sir hFam ^i .
I S ^2^ S^,E^K
W31V T BKWI^IE


' '


--


Plans are Ready
For Baby Parade
Arrangements' are practi-
cally complete, and hundreds
of children have been entered
in Miami's second annual
baby parade and pageant,
which will be held under sup-
ervision of the municipal di- ;
vision of parks and recreation'-
in Bafront park, at 4 p. m.
Saturay5
The participants in the par-
ade will assemble at Bscayne
blvd. and N. E. Fifth st., at
3:30 p. m., and march to the
bandstand in the park, led by
the Firemen's band, the Jun-
ior Chamber of Commerce
drum and bugle corps and as-
sist by the Boy and Girl
Scouts.
Numerous prizes have been
offered to winners in various
costume events and children
may be entered through the
recreation director's ofnce in
the courthouse. Judges will
include City Manager Frank
H. Wharton, Charles M. Fish-
er, school superintendent, and
Dr. John W. Shisler, welfare
director.
Editor's Note: We wonder
whether those in charge of
arrangements knew that the
po.tion of the week read in
the Synagogue this Saturday
deals mainly with mothers
and BABIES.


vM^s




uJ LIIla-~-


Page 2


WHEN'S THE TIME TO MARRY?
I once did my very best to prevent a marriage. It was
immediately after the war. The young man came out of the
army without a job. He owed me some money, which was
incidental. I would gladly have loaned him more to get a
-, start in business, but when he asked for a loan to finance
his marriage, I refused.
"You're crazy to get married now," I said. "There are
enough difficulties in keeping a marriage happy without add-
ing worries about money. You have not yet demonstrated
that you can make a success of one life, yet you propose
blithely to undertake the t sponsibility of two. Wait awhile
till you have more judgment and some savings. Then you can
start right."
Ihus I spoke out ofj-y aged wisdom; and he looked at
me pityingly,, borrow dthe money elsewhere, and was mar-
ried at once.
Recently I visited his home. He has three children. He
owns his house. He has a responsible position and money in
the bank. All in all, it is as happy a family as one would want
to know.
I have also visited in the home of a successful man of
fifty. He did not rush into matrimony. Far from it. He ac-
cumulated money, and, carefully no his guard, he looked over
the whole feminine sex for many years.
S Thus insured with wealth and wisdom, he proceeded at
the age of forty-seven to pick himself a foolish and empty
headed little gril. Already the marriage shows signs of strain;
it surely cannot last.
Earnest articles are written about the necessity for mak-
ing marriage difficult. Young people should be compelled to
wait,, they say, until they have funds and experience.
It seems a sound argument, and yet such restrictions
would have prevented the marriage of Thomas Lincoln and
the birth of Abraham. They would have kept penniless Haw-
thorne from contracting one of the finest marriages of liter-
ary history. They would probably have postponed, if not pre-
vented, most of the happiest unions that have taken place
since the beginning of the world.
So having been a watcher of weddings for many years, I
find myself less impressed with the judgment of maturity
and more confident of the impulses of youth.
For what is mature judgment, anyway, but the total of
our disappointments and worries, our burned fingers and our
fears?
S Maturity has judgment which is the wisdom of age, but
youth has instinct which is the wisdom of the ages.


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN --


TUNNEL
The committee appointed by the
British Government to investigate the
feasibility of a tunnel under the Eng-
lish channel connecting England
with France. has reported in favor of
the project It seems to Americans
such a simple and desirable engineer-
ing job that we wonder why it has not
been done long ago, but there are
plenty of "die-hards" in England who
fear that such a tunnel would make it
raster for an enemy to invade the
British Isles. They are deaf to the
i,,vioius answers that all that would
r, necessary to stop a French army
.,oulld be to let the water into the
The British Channel, from Dover to
(alais~ is about twenty miles across,
measured directly north and south.
ihe shallow waters of the Channel
*r" easily stirred up by winds and
*(< crossing is one of the roughest in
the world Under the water is a bed
ot solid chalk, miles deep, through
vh,ch a tunnel could easily be bored
o, electric trains It would cost about
t1 0.000.000 the committee estimates,
vnd take eight year% The French
.c, ernment is friendly to the project.
A'r,,. done. England would no longer
:. r. position where an ene-v's
*o.is wouldd cut off her food supply.
There are some women-some
young women in fact-who have
worn the bare brow you wonder
when you see them whether they
never look in a mirror or whether
they really don't care to look their
best. And because women wear
these hats who ought never to have
considered them, the fashion has
been somewhat discredited. On the
other hand there are some women
whose beauty is so enhanced by
them that we are loathe to see


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


them pass from the field of fash-
ion.
This season the milliners have
been generous in their offerings.
They have retained the high-brow
hats for those who can wear them
or who insist on wearing them,,
and they have made other hats
with a crown just deep enough at
the front to give the more gen-
erally becoming line.
Above is shown a sports wear
bonnet of lightweight tweed to


match the coat, worn off the fore-
head. Below, a low-brow hat of
black baku, trimmed with ribbon.

Announcing the Return of
MRS. BUTLER'S
BEAUTY SHOP
To 1237 8. W. 8th St.
Phone 2-1674
Mrs. Hirahberger formerly
with Wa. Penn Beauty Parlor
is now associated with us.


"VERY LATEST"
By MARY MARSHALL

The high-brow hat, or the low-
brow hat-which shall it be?
If you have a smooth, wrinkle-
less fore-head, if your features ap-
proach the artist's idea, if you are
under thirty and do not look twen-
ty-two. if your neck is not too long.
nor too short, if your eyebrows
are naturally well shaped-then
you may wear the hat that leaves
your forehead unprotected.
If on the other hand you wear
glasses, if your eyebrows are too
wide or insignificant, if you
wrinkle your forehead in the sun-


Ever believing in the preser-
ration of Health in God's
Own Country, we have de-
dicated ourselves to the pro-
ductijn of the finest and
purest
MILK
For the Baby and the Adult
Our own o*d Fashioned
BUTTERMILK
Poetry and day old Eggs

IVES

CERTIFIED

DAIRY |
OJUS, FLA.
Flrida's First Certified
airyl
Miami 'Phwe 2-8u31
sgngstgp fiiflg~ fff^


light or scowl when you read fine
print, if your neck is too swan like
or too short-then by all means


choose one of the new hats that
give s e protection to the brow.


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN-A MEDIUM OF AND FORIAMI J


unless that enemy happened to (be
France.
It seems more likely now than.ever
before that the Channel tunnel will be
built in the next few years.

POLICE
One of the reasons why criminals
are caught more speedily in England
than in America is that England
has a single police force for the en-
tire country and in the United States
we have as many different police de-
partments as we have towns, each
operating under a different system
and with no coordination between
them except in rare instances.
The Commonwealth of Pennsyl-
vania has made a start toward
remedying this. A network of tele-
phone wires connecting every im-
portant town in the state with all
the rest, and with four main centers
of operation, operates a typewriter-
telegraph system in every police
headquarters. The moment a crime
is discovered anywhere, all the facts
and possible clues to the criminal
are printed in the office of every
chief of police and the whole crimi-
nal-catching machinery of the Com-
monwealth is set in motion.
We shall never get our crimi-
nal element under control until such
a tie-up is in effect in every state
and throughout the nation. Then
we may have a chance of equalling
England's record for the suppres-
sion of crime.

AGE
"A woman is as old as she looks
and a man is as old as he feels," runs
an ancient proverb. Many men of
eighty or more are capable of doing
as much work and with as much en-
thli :ssm as most men of forty; many
more men are old and past their use-
fuliess at sixty The difference, re-
cent scientific research has discovered.


Friday, May 2 19
lies in the saeton of cerain si.
of tme bod.pb, thae dimin'-
uipth neu Dr. Harryn,
ox Nw aYwi W in assa-..'
with DDr totFun
of iuenjami
vrowof of the fty of
Yor has faway of intr0dud
the ho or essential seCti.
of these n aI,. todlderly mei
surprising ru The effect [
to prolong lfa, I all probability, bQ
to enable a man to retain his youth
ful energy thaouh a period man
yeay loame than te' average.
o far t iperimental, but t
experiments have been successfuL
the time may be dose at hand whea
old age and helplessness will no log.
er be synonymous.

RUST
One of the greatest enemies of
progress is rst. For years the iron
and steel industries have spent hun.
dreds of thousands a year in re.
search into means of preventing tht
rust that destroys bridges, factories,
machinery, everything made of iron.
Protecting metals against rust is a
expensive part of all kinds of con.
struction and manufacturing
processes.
So called "stainess" steel is pro.
hiding one answer. Instead of pro.
testing the surface, certain other
metals are alloyed with the steel
and the metal becomes rustles,
capable of taking and keeping a
brilliant polish. Cheaper than
nickel plate, more durable than
chromium plate, one automobile
manufacturer is already turning out
cars whose bright partt are of tai.
less steel, and now other makers are
considering, entire bodies and chasis
of the same metal. If this works out
our roads may become as glittering \
as they were when everybody rode
nickel-plated bicycles.
































1


'has been unfair to the Jews
with respect to historic
claims to and Jewish efforts
in Palestine. It is a source
of much regret that a great
periodical like the Nation
should have taken the stand
that somleboay is betraying
the Arabs, at a time when
the Arabs are benefitted by
Jewish endeavor in the Holy
Land perhaps even more than
the Jews themselves. The Na-
tion has consistently ignored
the fact that Arabs are not'
dispossessed by Jewish set-
tlers; on the contrary, when
Jews purchase land, inhabited
by Arabs, they not only pay
exorbitantly to the owner of
the land, but also recompense
the Arab tenants with sums
which enable them to buy land
of their own and to become
free and secure instead of re-
maining vassals on lands of
effendis.
Upon the publication of the
Palestine Inquiry Commis-
sion report, however, it was
to be expected that the Na-
tion would be fair in examin-
ing not only the majority
opinion, but also the views of
the minority, expressed by
the Laborite M. P. Harry
Snell should more coely ear-
respond to the views of the
Nation. And Mr. Snell has
hailed Jewish effort with the
declaration that it is his view
"that notwithstanding their
failures, the achievements of
the Jews in Palestine in the
last decade are as significant
as anything that has hap-
pened. The minority opinion
is couched in terms of praise
for Jewish endeavor, and is
in great measure a vindica-
tion of Jewish aspirations.
But not a word about this
minority opinion in the Na-
tion's comment on the com-
mission's report. Which, in
view of all that the Jewish
people, which traditionally
belongs under the flag of the
liberals, has at stake in Pal-
estine, is very, very unfair.
WHAT N]XTT
Miami has .been Justly
proud of its Jwp h citizen.
It has been proud of it mer-


Friday, May 3, 1930

THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
A weekly newspaper published at
Miami, Florida
by
The Jewish Floridian Publishing
Company
652 S. W. FIRST STREET
Phone 2-8745


EDITORIAL STAFF
J. LOUIS SHOCHET
A CHOCHOM
BEN DOROM
A. N. ASHER







"LIBERALS" AND
PALESTINE
So-called liberal opinion


- -a KA a


avow

. ''< ..:_ a: ...-...


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
chants, and of its artists.
Though some of our finest
have taken but little part in I,.
real Jewish life, and have
not been heard from in ac-
tivities of Synagogue or Tem-
ple, or in Talmud Torah yet
until recently neither have If a man has plenty of
they done anything which money he can afford to marry w
might be construed as having for love. *
hurt things Jewish.
hurt things Jewish. Inasmuch as marriage is a
Those of you who read cur- combination of interests it tl
rent local news in the dailies must be a trust. di
must have gone over these *
items that I am about to re- A married man seldom
fer to several times. I know boasts that he doesn't know as
I did. "Miss ........ (daughter the meaning of fear. m
of a prominent Jewish mer- cl
chant) and Master ........ (son A marriage license is a
of a nationally known ar- kind of court plaster used in
tist) appeared with others at patching up cracked hearts. g'
the home of Mrs. ............ at *
a benefit performance for Men may come and men cl
the MISSIONARY BOARD may go, but a man's mother-
of the BAPTIST CHURCH. in-law takes off her things
Oh, I know some of you are and stays a while. b
going to say that I'm nar- *
row minded, but how can The masculine young wo- el
one'sJewish blood stopseeth- man and the effeminate
ing at the very thought of young man are more to be
help being given to MIS- pitied than censured si
SIONARIES whose doings ,
throughout the centuries The crack of a rifle startles
have caused so much Jewish The crack of a fle startles
suffering and blood shed. the average woman less than
Yes ............when one knows the crack of a dish in the
that the grandfather of this hands of the hired girl.
very boy who was perform-
ing on the Sabbath for the Jim-et's walk over and sl
Missionary Board, was a man talk to those girls.
(may he rest in peace) who Slim-It's no use; they are
was proud of his Jewishness telephone girls.
and his Jewish observance, Jim-Well, what of it? i?
and of his Jewish learning. I, Slim-They won't answer '
for one, would be happy to you.
aid our non-jewish friends in Mrs. MusselYes m hus-
their every endeavor for civic Mrs. Mussel-Yes, my hus-
uplift, for social betterment, band is somewhat undersized,
for educational progress. But but he's an easy little chap. ei
for Missions ? ? ? ? Need I can just twist him around
more be said ? ? ? ? N my finger.
moebesaid ? Mrs. Meekinmild-I reckon ly
What next? What next, you can. And then hardly be
may well be asked when mer- know he's tnere. si
chants of standing, when lu
Jewish artists of repute, turn "Tell me, Mrs. Jones, what
a deaf ear to things Jewish Tell ink of Mrs. ,
but are on the job to aid mis-really think of Mrs. D
sionaries. Too much have we Mrs. Jones (very confiden- d
suffered in the past! High tially)-Why, you kmn e Mrs.
time that public opinion ex- talk about
press itself in terms so UN- Brown, I never talk about
MISTAKEABLE that if not anybody, but I really feel f
MISTAKEABL tat it sorry for her husband. t
working for our own at least sory tt
not working AGAINST OR Kissing as a theory is far
OWN! _less satisfactory than as a
PAGE H. L ENCKEN practical example. g
PAGE H. L. MENCKEN t o .
When a woman makes poor be
Speaking at a luncheon of coffee her husband has good fi
the Threefold Movement, com- grounds for divorce.
prising the Union of East and *
West, League of Neighmors Women weep audibly when b<
and Fellowship of Faiths, Dr. they are angry; silent tears th
William R.-Shepherd, profes- indicate real. grief.
sor of history at Columbia *
University, said: It is better to love the per- m
"The finest, noblest, and son you can't marry than to or
greatest thing that came marry the person you can't
from the Orient is the idea of love.
the One God. We owe a great p|
debt to the Jewish people, for A scientist tells us that th
it is they who have given it metals get tired, the same as
to us." muscles do. This is particu-
Will some one please page larly true of coined gold and nI
H. L. Mencken or Harry silver. It soon "gives out"
Elmer Barnes? And whilst and never seems to "go very ^


some one is doing that, a can far."
might also be sent out for *
those Reform pulpiteers who Women pause to reflect--
for years declaimed against when they 'see a mirror. y
Judaism because, they said, *
it was "oriental," and then A bad man in jail is better
some more. Of course we don't than two good ones in a ceme-
expect Mencken or Barnes to tery. "1
be brought to reason by a *
mere professor, but some Fools wait for things to YE
Jews are very much guided by turn up; wise men go and
a non4Jew's opinion of Jews turn them up.
and JdaiM. a.
jH V is the woman who has as It's too much to expect an
mapur ehaw a of gownsas she has al-round politician to be ex-
of mind. actly square.
----------------








Page 4
^,__.-n---.- --


S


0


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
....-cc"-------- ----.


C


We would appreciate your
forwarding all society and
organization items to the
Jewish Floridian, 652 S. W.
1st street, or rhone 2-8745
not later than noon Wed-
nesday.

Mrs. I. L. Mintzer of Mi-
ami Beach entertained at a
bridge luncheon last week in
honot of Mr. and Mrs. Kat-
zen of Akron, Ohio and Mr.
and Mrs. Barack of Brooklyn,
N. Y. Prizes were awarded
to the highest scores. Among
those present in addition to
the guests of honor were Mrs.
Harry V. Simon, Mrs. J. Reis-
man, Mrs. M. B. Frank, Mrs.
Max Hoffman, Mrs. Predin-
gtr, Mr. and Mrs. Morris
Dubler, Mrs. B. Blank and
Mrs. Noble.
*
Mrs. Charles Goldstein en-
tertained last week at a
bridge luncheon in honor of
her daughter Reggie, whose
engagement to Mr. "Bob"
Furr of this city was recent-
ly announced. Among those
present were Mrs. Max Hoff-
man, Mrs. Simon, Mrs. J.
Reisman. Mrs. Kazan, Mrs.
Morris Dubler, Mrs. Predin-
ger. and Mrs. Blank. Prizes
were awarded to the highest
scores.
*
One of the impressive
events of recent days was the
bar Mitzva of Arthur Kahn
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Dave
Kahn. of this city last
Saturday at Beth David
Synagogue. The usual bless-
ings were recited by Arthur
in the Synagogue. and nearly
all of the officers of the con-
gregation were present be-
cause of the activity of Mrs.
Kahn who is the treasurer of
the Ladies' Auxiliary of Beth
David. The Haftora was
splendidly read by Arthur
and the services were chanted
by Canton I. H. Pekersky.
After the services all the
worshippers were invited to
the spacious auditorium of
the Talmud Torah where all
sat down to a splendid meal
prepared by the parents of
the boy. Mr. M. H. Rosen-
house, president of Beth
David, acted as toastmaster
and introduced the boy who
made a splendo speech ap-
propriate to the occasion.
Mr. I. H. Pekarsky who was
the boy's teacher then spoke
and told o0 his expeences
with American Jewish boys
and called upon the parents
to help along in the splendid
work of the Talmud Torah.
Rabbi Israel kt. Weisfeld then
concluded the festivities with
a splendid talk upon the
meaning of Bar Mitzva and in
Yiddish of the duties of par-
ents and how a proper home
atmosphere would help in the
education of the children.
After Benchtaen conducted
by the Rabbi all went home.
S
O( Sunday evening last
Mr. and Mrs. Dave Kah
were the hosts to a lie
ema er of friend at the Tal-


mad Tra AMditrui at a
re i n a or of the Bar
MiMaa their a Arthar.


the hall had been beautifully
decorated for the event was
filled with guests who had
come to pay tribute to the
parents. On one side of the
hall was a long sweet tale
laden with plenty of goodies
to eat and plenty to drink and
a birthday cake surmounted
by a large Mogan-Dovid bear-
ing the initials of the Bar Mit-
zva boy. At nine o'clock all
guests who were present
were groupedon and below
the stage anu a picture of the
entire group was taken. Mr.
Max Kupferstein acted as the
master of ceremonies and he
introduced the boy who re-
peated his Bar Mitzva speech.
He was then followed by a
few words of welcome and
admonition by Miami's fa-
mous Jewish orator, Mr.
John Wolf o nbehalf of Beth
David congregation and the
friends of the family Mr.
Jos. M. Fine then read the
numerous telegrams which
had been received from var-
ious parts of the country and
concluded with a few woros
or greeting from the Emunah
Chapter of the 0. E. S. of
which Mrs. Kahn is an offi-
cer. Mr. David Warschoff
then spoke a few words. All
then adjourned to the table
where a Toast was drunk to
the boy and his parents. A
splendid musical program
was rendered by Mrs. Wm.
Friedman at the piano and
her son Milton, president of
the Bar Mitzva Club, singing.
During the evening dane-
ing was indulged in by many
of the guests. A large dele-
gation representing the East-
ern Star was present. Arthur
is a member of the Bar Mit-
zva Boys Club and has won
several medals in Beth David
Sunday School and Talmud
Torah which he has attended
for a number of years.
*
The installation luncheon
of the Temple Israel Sister-
hood will be held this coming
Monday, at 12:30 p. m. at the
Mezanine of the Alcaar
hotel, and will be preceded by
a Board meeting which has
been called for 12 noon. This
will be the last official meet-
ing for the season as all
meetings both of the Board
and the membership at large
have been suspended until the
Fall. The annual picnic and
Confirmation exercises will
be in charge of special com-
mittees which have been ap-
pointed for the purpose. Very
elaborate preparations have
been made for the installation
luncheon and all who desire
to attend are urged to call
any member of the commit-
tee for immediate sreerva-
tions. The committee of ar-
rangemeat of whih Mnrs.
Herbert B. Kimmna is
chairman comiata of Mes-
dames Gordon Dvis Adolph
Wertheimer, Louis ZEetz
and Ben Watts. Mrs. L M.
Weinstein will be tmtamint-
res. The charges far the
dacheomn wi be 1.25 per
per* a.


A rqakul -i i of the
Com at Jewsh W" mem has


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YOU ARE INVITED
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g/ I IFIXXC IDINXXKM -IIIMYYT 011D~
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A N xpt from the factory will prepare food for you on thi
wicklesoil stove, demonstrating the speed, safety and economy
of cooking by FOCUSED HEAT.
Yo are heartily welcome to be present, make yourself at homs
L ,, &-- & &_- -_ -1 -- -"*


r~aiNKINGJBWAUSUBSCKIffiTOTH JEwBH FLORIIAN .B~!lSL

AHDWMM. q .u WI
.PILO=!&
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riday, May 2, 1930


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


Page 5


SOCIETY

(Continued from Page 4).
core and the raffle was won
y Mrs. S. Tannebaum. The
ext card party will be hed
n Tuesday, May 13, at the
almud Torah Hall and Mes-
ames Nathan Adelman will
ct as hostesses. The public
s invited to attend.
."
The card party sponsored
y the Loyalty Club of the
munah Chapter 0. E. S. was
eld at the Talmud Torah
auditorium last Wednesday
eight and one of the largest
gatherings this season was
resent. In charge were the
hostesses for the evening
esdames Rose Bogan, Ray
omberg, Sue Schechetr and
ophie Sapero. Prizes were
warded to the highest scores
nd refreshmentswereser-
ed.

Miss Lillian R. Chisling of
is city who has attained
uite a reputation as an ex-
nent of Dramatic Alt will
ave shortly to assume her
sition as Dramatic Coun-
ilor of the Blue Ridge
mountain Camp for Girls.
he has attended the McLin
school of Drimamtic Art of
irmingham, the School of
expression at the Conserva-
ry of the University of Mi-
i, and recently graduated
ith honors from the Mar-
rie Webster School of Ex-
ression at Washington, D.
SShe is also a graduate of
e Miami high School and
as taken part in a large
umber of plays and drama-
c productions.
*


Harry Finestein, Harold
Cromer, Harold Pont and
Oscar Bernstein and Worty
Fay.
*
The regular meeting of the
Yeddidim Club was held at
the home of Lewis Stein.
Plans for a boat ride for the
next meeting were announ-
ced. The athletic contest be-
tween the club team and the
Coconut Palm Lamp Co. will
be held this coming Sunday.
Refreshments were served
and the next meeting will be
held at the home of Harold
Cromer, 2534 S.W. Sixth
street next Wednesday eve.
ning.

Mrs. S. J. Spector was the
host to a number of friends
at a bridge luncheon last
Wednesday afternoon. Prizes
were awarded for the highest
score. Among those present
were Mesdames Chas. Gold-
stein, B. Kandel, J. Katz, S.
Aoenson, I.-Tannebaum, John
Wolf, S. Silberstein, Jasper
Cromer, Rubenstein, M. Arn-
old and L. Baron.
*
Mr. and Mrs. B. Kandel
have just moved their home
to 414 S. W. 15th Avenue.
*
No stage on earth could
put on such a show as Metro-
Goldwyn-Mayer has brought
together in "Chasing Rain-
bows," a new musical roman-
tic drama which opens at the
Tivoli Theatre next week.
This gripping picturization
of theatrical life takes you
behind the footlights as well
as before them, bringing be-
fore your eyes dazzling spec-
tacles of beauty.
Charles King and Bessie
Love are brought together
again in this feature, togeth-
Ani n.+h h011l0 favorRite AI


The monthly affair of the J Bennyir MarieDr- er,
Fededim Club was held Sun- Jack Benny, Marie Dressler,
y evening, April 20 at Polly Moran and Gwen Lee.
ay evening, April 2, at Sammy Lee, staged the
carter'ss Pier and a good time Sammy L ee, staged the
a l. A ng t spectacular dancing ensem-
as had by all. Among those bles, filmed in technicolor.
resent were: the Misses Janed in technicolor.
:aufman, Bee Silver, Char- *
tte Soll, Mary and Celia A startling new departure
iltman, Ruth Snider, Rose in screen entertainment is
'eingarten, Anna Kercbuk, "The Hollywood Revue," Me-
elle Seigal and Ida Mendel- tro-Goldwyn-Mayer's all-mus-
aum. The Messrs. Irving ical, talking extravaganza,
pplebaum, Nathen Levitt, staged for the screen after
ddie Miller, Jtie Specter, the manner of a Ziegeld's
ouis Stein, Joe Mandelbaum, "Follies" or a George White's
ike Silbenstein,, Herman "Scandals." The revue, which
ilman,, Bob Schwertzer,.. will open at the Tivoli Thea-


Expert and Antiseptic
Mohel
248 Meridian Ave., Miami Beach
Phone 5-3954

Reasonable. fees to nearby cities:


tre next week, brings togeth-
er the greatest group of mus-
ical comedy, vaudeville, revue
and screen stars ever assem-
bled for a popular entertain-
ment.

WEST PALM BEACH
ACTIVITIES
The recently elected offi-
cials of Beth El Sisterhood
of West Palm Beach have
planned an extensive social
program for the summer
months which will undoubt-
edly build up the morale of
West Palm Beach Jewry and
nlaterially aid the ,firm es-
tablishment of a real Jewish
community. The first of these
summer events will be held
this coming Sunday evening
May 4, at the Community
House, 414 Seventh street,
West Palm Beach, and will
be in the nature of a package
party. Jewish residents of
Miami and surrounding cities
are cordially invited to at-
tend and are promised a
splendid evening of enjoy-
ment. The proceeds are being
used towards the Talmud
Torah Fund.
*


Since the advent of Rabbi
S. Wrubel to West Palm
Beach, Jewish education has
taken a great impetus. With
the cooperation of Beth El
officers, the Rabbi success-
fully concluded negotiations
with the city authorities and
for a slight sum was given
the use of a portable school
building situated in the Cen-
tral school grounds. This en-
ables the children to go direct
from school session to the
Talmud Torah classes. To
demonstrate the progress
nade by these children in the
iast few tiiontht a public ex-
amination of the pupils of the
Hebrew School will be held,.
in the Community House
next Sunday morning begin-
ning at 10 a. m. All are in-
vited to be present. Begin-
ning on May 10, the hours of
Talmud Torah instruction
will be changed from the aft-
ernoon to the morning. The
classes will begin from 9 a.
m. and continue to noon. This
schedule will be good for the
summer months only. Rabbi
Wrubel is also the Hebrew
instructor.
*


About six week ago the
Beth El Juniors, a club con-
sisting of the children rang-
in gfrom 9 years and upwards
was organized for the pur-
pose of receiving general
Jewish instruction. After
every meeting a social pro-
gram including refreshments
is held. A large number of
adults have attended and wit-
nessed these meetings.


BUSINESS DIRECTORY


L. (Pop) GERSON
Buyer of All Kinds of Scrap Metal
We Sell Auto Parts
2141 N. W. SECOND AVE.
Phone 20621

BAGS and METALS
EAST COAST BAG & METAL CO.
(Inc.)
I. L. MINTZER
MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS
435-445 N. W. 8th Street
Phone 4485
PEPPER METAL CORP.
Scrap Metal and Machinery
N. W. Cor. 5th Ave. and 14th St.
Phone 22546

BUILDING SUPPLIES
J. SIMPSON
Building Materials,
Roofing Paper, Asphalt
428 N. W. N. River Drive
Phone 7251

DELICATESSEN


ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN
170 N. W. 5th St.
We Supply Your Every Want

FISH & SEA FOODS
STANDARD FISH CO.
629 W. Flagler St.
Phone 2.362

King
Undertaking Co.
29 N. W. THIRD AVENUE
Pi.nta 2353.-3124


UIIS nmt IUIIIIfIHi I tItii sgim lImii lIIIiIIUIIII flIHiIIIIIr.U
YOU CAN'T BEAT
NEW YORK
BAKING C.O.
Pumpernickle and Rye2
Breads
(Watch For Our Lbel)
CAKES, PASTRIES, ROLLS
On Sale At
ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN
EMPIRE DELICATESSEN
MAX'S DELICATESSEN
FIFTH STREET BAKERY
NEW YORK DELICATESSEN
.I.U.U.l.I.I.I...l.. iIII.UI.. lI. Il... II... I..... II-l~


PHARMACISTS
BRYAN PARK PHARMACY
Chas. Tannenbaum,
Pharmacist
(reg. pharmacist for 17 years)
Cor 22nd Ave. and 8th St. S. W.

CRYSTAL PHARMACY
Dr. A. D. Halpern, Ph. G. Ph. D.
Prescriptions Our Specialty
128 N. Miami Ave. Phone 29713

PIPE and STEEL

ADELMAN PIPE & STEEL CO.
58 N. E. 25th St.
Aat F. E. C. R. Phone 21420
A. & B. PIPE AND METAL CO.
Phone 31855
53 North East 25th Street

PRINTERS
MIAMI PRINTING CO.
"Printing That Pays"
Phone 28261
107 South Miami Avenue
AUTO PARTS
BLOOM AUTO REPAIR.
& PARTS CO.
N. W. 17th Ave. at 23rd St.
Phoame
The Largest ear wreckers in
Nlerida

AMBULANCE SERVICE
W. H. Combs Co, Estab. 1896
coMBS FUNERAL HOrs
Phone Miami 32101
1m8 N. E. SL Aven
XIAMI sBACH FUNERAL HOME
Phone M. B. 5-2101
IM1S Wbhlnst Ave.


PINKY-DINKY


PINK DID YOU
$AV TOOAY WA* vout
BIU'THDAY AND TTHAT'U W)
AR-. GOING TO 4a )
A CAKLI voiTH o
SCAMLB4 ON lT ,%1


/
V-


PINKY TAKES THE CAKE


W PLLEMiIKYI I 40T
A pnrTER IOBA-
\#H/ MNOT AMW YOUR
A -He -.- -mq
v m" r m -* m i


I I r


By Terry Gilkison


4AY MOM, INTWAD OP HAv*WA ONE CAK6 AND
TEN CANDLBl FOR MY BSRTHDAY PARV -
WH- NOT M AVE TEM
CAKE4 AND ONE
CANDLE ?


ALLSU


1 .




TOE TO TE
11 V.


The Blue Ridge
Mountain Camp
FOR GIRLS
Ages 6 to 14
Reservations Limited
Make your reservations now.
If interested, Phone or Write
Bertha Berkowitz Levy,
Owner and Director
Phone 28780, 1625 S. W. 15th St.
for booklet or interview


/


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1111 wlA I~I II~.;~.~ ------


Page Six_


-TH FAMILYT

DOCTOR
JOhN JOSEPH GAINES M.D.
"PSITTACOSIS"'
Nothing like being up to the minute nowadays. when one
can be it so quickly and economically: all you have to do is
remd the papers systematically during your spare time.
Hencet' psittacosis-understoo commonly as "parrolt-
croup," If you have a sick parrot, it isn't goXi1 policy to nose
around him when he has a coughing spell, or is especially
vociferous: no matter how much you love the feathered pet.
Syou had better not put on any necking paties with him. if
'- he exhibits any signs of not feeling fit.
The very latest advices tell us that the danger is limited
to hirds that have been recently imported. It is said that no
throWughly acclimatitle birds have it, or almost none. But
if you have a friend visiting within the tropics who notifies
you of the shipment of a Polly, you vitk indulge iust a bit
Spep-'ene-a-d '-isely hang her in the garage for a
,e* after her arrival.
This psittactsis thing is desribed by those who have seen
it at first hand-as being singularly fatal, on the ntrer of
pneumonia. HowRver, no ges such as the bird carries have
beqh ftund in human victims; and that makes things all the
more peepexin for the physician in charge. I have never
sen a case: hop I never may. I'm just giving you such
information as I have gklead i nmy habit of reading every-
thing pertatinig t the vtWrv of my people.
1 dimhW reem~er rteding of a tkflk of turkeys. imported
ftromw Otykn, briWig diphtheria to America. This dread
dSease has be traced to cistern water from ro~fs freuented
Vy Entlsh spamrrws: .Iret fevt r the same. Modern sai-
ta"ry pywuti"s ha, h'wevrw, done away with the fithy
ciste*". Avnwy we shoA d be ctW stantty a ert f'r n-tres
prAlwhle iafwmta and--aovd therm.
EI ve today a go t ixer
1 s 0... s.,. f t ^ aNe a t track the ie.


IrI Ill Jett" MM
L SuiLRNE R



THE

FARWAY

DAIRY
DMIC'TS YA l l
uAT.N AGEr

N.


-rx rViprT
rVilE
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U .- r~~rI~


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


Campaign Briefs
(Continued from Page 1)
ness and the display of real
i judicial tenmterament. In
urgillnx tilt retention of Judge
Collins on th1' Bench [both
lawyers and laymen have
pointed to the record of Judge
Collins and his unexcelled
ability in the position he now
occupies.


A. S. (Red) Eldr
is seeking reelection
ty purchasing agent


TIVO

N W. Flagler at Sth
Theatre
X Western Elect
Talking Equipi
None Bettei
Fraiay and Sat.. M
"THE TRIAL
MARY DUGA
With Norma Sheai
All-Star Cast
\ Smd News and C
SWnday and mon.
ALL-STAR CA
CHASING
RAINBOWS
S~tati- S-T-A-R. V
I Hltrwpd Pathe
STweeda and Wed..
HOLLYWOOD Ri

D aciKIJ P kta
X a
Al '4it.,.i~i


tive Flondian and received
his education in Orange Coun-
ty public schools, Georgia mil-
itary School and the Georgia
School of Technocology of At-
lanta. He came to Dade Coun-
ty in 1920 and in 1926 was
elected to the office which
he now holds. In this office to
which he has devoted his en-
tire time, oeing engaged in
no other business, his friends
point out tnat he has saved


-------


edge who
as Coun-
is an na-

EI. 0iCoins
LI
For Judge of
Ave. C 0
A ve. '"Criminal Court

trick
-0--o-------
mc t Your Confidence and

r ,Support for the Nomla.
lay 2-3. ation to Succeed My.
OF .self in the June Deno.
cratie Primaries Wil
rer and
. Be Oreatly Appreciatea
*omits 4 Pid P -mAdwmrtibu
Way 4-:5


kST


voice of
Sound
May 7-;
EVUE
>yer'$
Rg and
re
s o-: c ,


'4J
5
* 1sJ. *


f Heffernan "






Ci ourt
Of .e.rd

4.. I 7' i
Il,- -,...'; ttA \.
ofec thfa Civii! Ct rt "

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L


M. J. PRUITT
CANDIDATE FOR


STATE LEGISLATURE
Group 2

If I am elected I will dedicate myself without
stint to the one task of making Dade County a ged
and useful representative. As a applicant for public
office I cannot honestly promise mere, and I cannot
promise less.
I favor and -will work for the Workmen's Com-
Iensatitn Act. a Licensed Barbers bill and such other
1i''s for the good of the people in Dade County and
the State of Florida.
I I sincerely so'icit your vote and support
Subject to Democratic primary, Jame 3rd.
r.".- ::n, ; ;&; Adwrtisemoent
4"..............--.....


k
I4


I)AN CHAPPELL
Announces His Candidacy for Re-eWection to the
HOL -.E OF REPRESENTATIVES
Ground 3.
.. :'t- n st.: in :he enactment of the following leg-s-
S. i nicrm -school laws. g-,arteeimg fBil schl term aId
adtQuaste aaries for t ecers equta tax laws
with View at relieuingreal
estate fin present es
3 A We mmm's Cempa%-
docm a PON

NSngthea the MeAkiW

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tae e Ia Wia





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UAAms s WANt) GIVE YOUV


A. S. ELDREDGE


Couty Pr chasing Agent

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Friday, May 2, 19
the County thousands of d
lars an dhas kept his pro
to spend "Dade County t
money in Dade County.,," Hl
office, they point out, h
been conducted on the high
est plane of efficiency, ecoi0
omy and narmony and il
strict accordance with bot
the letter and spirit of thi
law governing the office o
County purchasing agent,


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