The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
April 25, 1930
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00061

Related Items

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Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Vnl. IlL.-No. XVII. U-..r .


"Heads University ]


Waiter Williams, starting as a
printer's devil in a country news-
paper office, founded the first
School of Journalism and has been
iade President of the University of
Missouri.

I~,,~R..L.


Frank Markle, who is a
candidate for clerk of the
county criminal court of rec-
ord, has been a resident of
Miami since 1912 and is well
known throughout the coun-
ty.
He is a descenant of the
Pennsylvania Dutch and was
born in St. Augustine, Fla., in
1888.
In 1908 Mr. Markle married
Marksie Jaudon, of a well-
known Miami family, Capt. J.
F. Jaudon, Dr. E. K. Jaudon
and Paul Jaudon being nis
brother-in-law.
For years hd has been ac-
tive in Miami's business life
as one of Jaudon Bros., for-
mer fruit and vegetable pack-
ers, and as a handler of ex-
plosives. At present he is a
tomato grower.
Mr. Markle is a member of
the Miami Boxing commis-
sion and is a charter mem-
ber of the Civitan club. His
fraternal associations are the
Knights of Pythias and the
Masons, including the Shrine,
of which he is also a member
o fthe patrol.
C. L. Wheat of Miami a
candidate for the office of
purchasing agent of Dade
County is a native of Florida
and received his education
here. His business experience
includes a number of years
of connection with local enter-
prises in the mercantile field.
For more than two years he
was connected with the State
Motor Vehicle Department.
His .executive experience in-
cludes work with various
Chambers of Commerce, and
as Executive Secretary of the
Greater Miami Manufacturers
Association resigned by him
the other aay to enable him
to properly take care of his
campaign. The resignation
was accepted with expres-
sions of keen regret on the
part of the Association, and a
large number of the manufac-
turerp -have voluntarily of-
fered to aid the candidacy of
Mr. .WVet. While Executive
Secretary of ltie' Association
Mr. Wheat was sudessfal in
effecting plans for the great-
er distribution of 'locally

had -a-dvo eGl t a- Workmen's
Compensation law for t
and has spoken extex y
throughout the State in its

hiiic^-.. ^ -A-st- A~ s ^ fc.aA- .. ,...


Free Loan Society
To Meet
We are happy to note that
in accordance with the wishes
of Miami Jewry as expressed
in this paper, Mr. Samuel J.
Spector, president of the He-
brew Free Loan Society has
called a meeting of the Ex-
ecutive Board of the society
for Monday night, April 28th.
at 8 p. m. at his home 479 N.
W. Fourth Street, corner of
Fifth avenue. This meeting,
Mr. Spector says, is prelimin-
ary to a general meeting of
the entire membership which
will be called within the next
ten days. All Miamians are
urged to attend this meeting
and hear of what has been go-
ing on in its affairs.


Miami Beach Plans
Talmud Torah
Building
Congregation Beth Jacob of
Miami has taken the first
steps towards the realization
of its ambition to make Miami
a real Jewish community. On
the last day of Passover, im-
Smediately preceding the Yiz-
kor services an eloquent ap-
peal was made to the worship-
pe~rs an4 more than three
thousand dollars was pledged
towards the purchase of land
for the erection of an ade-
quate Torah building. On
Sunday night more than fif-
teen hundred dollars were
paid on the pledges made. The
committee in charge consist-
ing of the officers and the
Board of Trustees are bend-
ing every effort to raise suf-
ficient money at this time
to purchase the lot so that
when the next winter sea-
son comes, actual construc-
tion of the Talmud Torah may
be begun. At the present time
while the number of children
attending the daily classes in
the Beach Synagogue are
very small, Dr. Saffra har
been elected to the teaching
staff and will have charge of
the educational work during
the summer. In the winter
season when tourist children
arrive the teaching, staff will
be greatly augumented.

Jewish Citizens
Club Being Formed
Petitions are now being cir-
culated throughout the Great-
er Miami district in which
Jewish citizens are being
asked to join in the formation
of a Jewish citizens league.
The object as stated in the
petition are to create a great-
er interest in 'governmental
affairs and to encourage the
Jewish citizens of this dis-
trict to register and vote in
the respective partyprimaries
that will be held in June.
advocacy. He is a member of
the Miami Optimist Club, the
Junior Chamber of Commerce
.a..seveAl fratelral ,or.gni-
zatlion. M. Wheat's, rm
*pledges the purchase of local
Wiotacts' for the UP of' the
oiftuy, and partieozdarlY the
employment of local labor.


An Appeal to Reason


The Jewish Floridian is in receipt of a letter from
a prominent Jewish citizen of this City protesting con-
ditions existing in the affairs of the Chevra Chesed
Shel Emes of this City and making certain charges
against its officers. i
We feel that the time has arrived in Miami when
amity and good will should and must exist between
all. Unfortunately that is not the case now. The af-
fairs of a number of Jewish institutions have been
conducted with an open disregard for the will of the
people. Meetings of a number of important institu-
tions have not been held for a long time. In one parti-
cular instance, laxity on the part of the officers will
cause a great monetary loss to the execellent and much
needed institution. Nothing can be gained by stub-
borness on the part of officers of any organization,
no matter how much good work they have done at a
great personal sacrifice.
An example of what good will and concerted ac-
tion can do was shown last week when such action
averted a schism between communities and Court ac-
tion which would otherwise have occurred.
We make just this appeal: Let general meetings
of the Chesed Shel Emes, the Hebrew Free Loan So-
ciety, the Zionist District and such similar organiza-
- tions be called immediately. Let the respective mem-
bers know all the facts. Let these members, decide
the future course of these worthy institutions. Avoid
the dark clouds of discontent which threaten to break
into storms.
Above all, let's have a frank and free public dis-
cussion of everything in a real Jewish peaceful manner.


Last Week for
Registration

Clerks handling registra-
tions for the June primaries
will remain on duty until 9
p. m. every night next week
until Wednesday, when they
will work until midnight, the
last night in which to regis-
ter, Carl Holmer, jr., super-
visor of registration, said
yesterday.
Registration yesterday was
822, ,bringing the total regis-
tration to 15,519 persons.
Registration was delayed
considerably yesterday by
foreign persons who failed to
bring their naturalization pa-
pers with them.
Under the law every per-
son must register every two
years, and persons who regis-
tered two years ago for the
June Democratic primaries
must reregister this year.
Various organizations have
been at work during the last
few days urging persons to
register and it is believed that
this has caused the increase
in registration.


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TA-LK' AoBT I-i oNW"It
FO6-K, DON'T MENTION /


Miamian Elected
To Office
At the annual election of.
the Jewish fraternity, Tau
Epsilon Phi at the University
of Florida, Joseph Shapiro of
Miami Beach was chosen
president. Joseph is the son
of Mrs. M. Shapiro owner of
the Mare Vista Apartments
on the Beach and one -of the
early residents of this section.
Other officers are: J. I.
Davis, Gus Feuer of Miami;
David Adelson of Tampa,
Jules Lerner of West Palm
Beach and Hyman B. Sobol of
Gainesville. The fraternity
have their own home in
Gainesville.

Jewish Lawyer
Is Candidate

Among those seeking office
in the Democratic primaries
June 3rd. is Leo Rosen a well
known member of the Bar of
Miami who seeks election as
a member of the Democratic
Executive Committee repre-
senting the section bounded
by Flagler street, 8th. st.,
17th. and 22nd. avenues. He
is the son of Mr. and Mrs. M.
Rosen of this City and has
been a resident of Miami for a
number of years. He is mar-
ried and has one child.


Price 5 Cents.


, HeAds Gire Frwmwts
'-SD


: C. E. Huff of Salina, Kansas, just
ected president of the Farmers
national Grain Corporation, nation-
1 cooperative marketing agency

Tool Campaign In
Progress

The Tool Campaign for the
Palestinian Workmen is now
in full swing and committees
are making a house to house
canvass to raise funds to pro-
vide tools and machinery for
the Palestine workmen. When,
the funds are sent to the
Palestine Histadruth (Work-
men Organization) a request
will be made that the funds.
be applied for the purchase of
a tractor to bear a plate of
Miami, Fla. The authorities
have signified their willing-
ness to grant this request and
thus perpetuate the name of
Miami Jewry in a very prac-
tical and helpful way. As is
already known the official be-
zinning of the campaign was
the meeting presided over by
Rabbi Weisfeld and addressed
by him,, Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan
and by the noted Zionist
worker Dr. bn Yuris.


I
Services Resumed
At Beth David
The regular late. Friday
night services at Beth David
will be resumed Friday night
at 8:30 p. m.' when Rabji
Israel H. Weisfeld will preach
the sermon. Saturday morn-
ing services will begin at 9:00
a. m. and will be featured by
,.the Bar Mitzva exercises of
Arthur Kahn, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Dave Kahn. Immediate-
ly after the services the par-
ents will be hosts to the entire
congregation in the vestry
rooms of the Synagogue. The
Adult Bible class has discon-
tinued for the season Ad will
not be resumed uft a Iter the
High Holidays next Septem-
ber. The regular Sunday
School classes will begin at 10
a. m. The Bar Mitzva Boys
Club meets as usual at 8 a. m.


Beth David Library rowing of books has been es-
Formadl Opened tablishe d ibrry c
are. b r issued' to wtr
-applicant. The library i-
Beth Dvid Li pos- sesses vumes of interest
sessing books in the Eglsh the adult as weU as thellh
Yiddish and Hebrew eg- and "Oisoibef W Ab.O
a~%Cw w frmallyope ~Ste, A reading erow b
to the
library system for the s


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I, _mamlrloda, Flriday, April 25, 1980


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THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


f *consumed in larger quantities than
ev-er before. America has contributed
corn oil, peanut oil a::d cottuni;ed
00 o1 to the l. \\We proce more Ln-
see ~oil, from flxgruwninte
th-...,r ~ n 2nv other nation.


WHEN IS A MAN OLD?
"I dread to come to the end of a year," said a friend to
me recently; "it makes me realize I am growing old."
That suggests a question. When is a man old?
*
In Shakespeare's time a man was old at forty, and often
invalided long before that.
Sir Walter Scott at fifty-five bemoaned the fact that he
was an old man.
Montaigne retired to his castle at thirty-eight to spend
his declming years in peace and study.
Dr. Samuel Johnson once remarked that at thirty-five a
man had reached his peak, and after that his course must
be doWnward.
0
Physiologists tell us that in all mammals except man the
period of life is five times the period of growth. A dog gets
its full growth in two years, and lives ten; a horse in five
years, and lives twenty-five. On this basis a man should live
from one hundred to one hundred and fifty years.
But William James,, the great psychologist, said that
most men are "old fogies at twenty-five."
*
He was right. Most men at twenty-five are satisfied
with their jobs. They have accumulated the little stock of
prejudices that they call "principles," and closed their minds
to all new ideas: they have ceased to grow.
The minute a man ceases to grow-no matter what his
years-that minute he begins to be old.
*
On the other hand, the really great man never grows old.
*
Bismarck, who died at eighty-three, did his greatest
work after he was seventy.
Titian, the celebrated painter, lived to be ninety-nine,
painting right up to the end.
Goethe passed out at eighty-three, and finished his
"Faust" only a few years earlier; Gladstone took up a new
language when he was seventy; Commodore Vanderbilt in-
creased the mileage of his lines from 120 to more than 10,000
between his seventieth birthday and his death at eighty-three.
Laplac. the astronomer, was still at work when death
caught up with him at seventy-eight. He died crying, "What
we know is nothing; what we do not know is immense."
*
I suppose that is the real answer to the question, When
is a man old?
Laplace at seventy-eight died young. He was still unsat-
isfied, still growing, still sure that he had a lot to learn.
As long as a man can keep himself in that attitude of
mind, he is still young.


Fior.da is beginning to produce tung phystipans c:ief duty to aid in pre
oil, extracted from the nut of a tree venting disease that the world owe
native to Ch.na. The pursuit of him a debt of gratitude. Ever believing il the preer.
whales for their oil has developed in ation of Health in Go's
the past twenty years to such an ex- vatlof HealthiG
the past international la s for the Crabson-So you can't get along Own Couatry, we have de.
pro-ection of these huge bcats are with the cook, eh? Why don't you dicat ourselves to the pro.
under consideration. A:viat.un ha. treat her as an equal? duction of the finest an
st.mulate t:e i rcn:..nJ iTr ct r o.l. --t h f a purest
which remains tflu;J at low tkm. era- purest
lures and does not carb-.n ze. Ld-MILK
liver oil is in grate: dcma:nd than IJ
ever. I'orp.,Ye o.l is ue.t i r lubri- 'Tr< For the Baby and the Adult
caing .a sA the oil from UTILITIES, INC. Or own old Fashioned
coconuts is usid i:n a thousand ways.I
for foods, canOi:s and cosmetics.ERS- BUTTERMILK
One or t:;' newest scientific discov- -OWNERS BU ERMILK
er es is a gnrm wh w ill extract GAS COMPANY Poultry and day old Eggs
the oil from coconuts without pres- Miami
sure, cconommcaly and completely. of Miami Beach
WELCH Fort Lauderdale Florida
"No human bc:ng in this couritr Gas Co. CERTIFIED
is not h.s deb:or, t hu,;:1 mil;.on -
have never heard his name." GAS SERVICE A I
No greater tribune cou-d be paid tc
any man than that phrase which wa, Fort Lauderdale, Holly. D A IRY
ap-led to Dr. \i:.am H. \\e:ch oi wood, Dania, Miami Shores wJu FLA.
Ba:t:more "Dean of American Mei- Miami each
cine," on his eight.eth b.rtih ay Florida's First Certified
Dr. Welch s great work has bee --Offices-- Dairy r
in starting in th s country t:ie metoN ROAD- O f .
of medical reearc: i h ca.:e a:: 1036 LINCOLN ROAD Miami 'Phone 2-8831
prevention of (:,case a.1 ;n IMi-. MIAMI BEACH
*1~~ ---


A WORD TO OUR JEWISH FRIENDS

The Farway Dairy, ever proud of its reputation of fair dealing with the public,
sincerely regrets that during a radio announcement over Station WIOD, on Tues-
day evening, April 15th, certain statements were made in the Yiddish language
tending to reflect upon one for whom we have always had the highest respect.
We want our Jewish friends to known that we are extremely sorry for the entire
incident.
We want our Jewish friends to know that we have always had and will always
retain the greatest respect for the Jewish people and particularly their spiritual
leaders.
"We are sorry."
Sincerely,

FARWAY DAIRY, INC. ,
TeL. 2-71i5 Producers of Quality Milk


FACTS
The basis of all successful busi-
ness is facts. The head oi one of
the wo-l's greatest corporate ns has
a s; n over the door of his private
office reading: "W'hat are the facts?"
The difference between leaders and
follower; in th.s world is that lead-
ers k:cw how to use facts. The way
to begin to prepare for leadership
is to s.udy facts.
The greatest collection of facts
about the United States, our gove-n-
ment. ndustr:es, business, people and
conditions, is in a book published an-
nually by the United States govern-
ment. It is called "The Statistical
Abstract of the United States."
Anyone who wants to be able to
ansv er any quest ons of fact about
our nat-nn can pet them a'l in this
book fr'- one dollar e t to the
P-a:iz: P.intcr at Washington
WILLAMS
The most widely known news-
aner man in the world is probably
Water Will:ams. Williams started
as a rinter on a country paper
in Missouri. His education, except
for a few years in the common
els came from his newspaper
wk. travel and reading. He con-
air.I the idea of a coleVe of iour-


nalism and in 1908 established the
first ,_hool of that kind, at the Uni-
versity of Missouri. Tnere are liity
or so colleges of journalism now, ii
different universities, all foundedion
the Williams model.
The other day Walter William:
was made President of the Univer-
sity of Missouri. He still retain
the title of Dean of the School oi
Journalism. He is the first news-
paper man ever to head a great edu-
cational institution.
SUGAR
Straw and cottonseed may soon
supply the world with sugar. X.vl
one of the most widely d.str.butc
organic compounds in na.ure, i
found in all vegetable fibers. It i
a sugar which does not pro luce fa
when eaten. It was first discovered
in 1886 and chemists have been
working for 44 years to find a chea,
way to extract it. Up to rccenily
is cost about a dollar a poun to t
get it out. of the fibers. Under a
grant by Congress two years ago
the Federal lareau of Standards
has been engaged in chemical re-
search into xylose, and now an:oun:e
the development of a process which
extracts it from cottonseed hulls at
a cost of only five cen:s a pound.
The salvation of the co:ten farmer
may come through this added by-
product of the cotton seed, though
it will hurt the sugar-grower.
OIL
Oil is the world's most precious
commodity. I am not thinking es-
pecially of petroleum, which is the
first thing we think of when we say
oiL" Palm oil from interior Africa.
ach oil frm the Mediteranean
des, whale ail from the seven seas,
' artides of i'Mtiml traffic
rarirr efm Cobahm
Tody the min and vegetable ol s
ate saM vgkht for ertywhe and


research to the practice of medicine
His especial ir.te.est has been in pre-
ventive meJ:c ii-. The public head
systems of America owe their origir
largely to h:m. It is because he es-
tablished t~:e principle that it is tho


Ii'_-


The Greatest Underselling

USED CAR SALE
In Years


A Sacrifice Sale


Now On


Starting last Tuesday Morning at 10 a. m. the Reliable Motor Corp. of Miami Has
Thrown its Entire Stock of '29 and '30 Model Cars at the Mercy of the Public-
the End Has Come-the Season Is Over-We must Raise Cash-So Out Goes
Our Entire Stock
ItsHr--Ti-igni NDRELNG Ue.a


It's Here--This Gigantic UNDERSELLING Used Car
Event ever in the History of Automobile Merchan-
dising Have Prices Been So Ridiculously Low
EVERY DEALER IN SOUTH FLORIDA WILL BE THERE
-COME EARLY AND SELECT YOURS
'29 DeSoto Sport Roadster ...............597 '28 Pontiac Cabriolet-......-............. $377
'28 Buick Standard Sedan ... 67 '28 Hudson Sedan............................$49
'29 Essex Challenger Coach .... 497 aad Sedan......... $47
'28 Hudson Sedan. .... ......397 26 card Club Sed............ $447
'29 CChrysler 75 Sport Coupe.... $??? '28 Chrysler 65 Sedan.................$.677
'27 Cadillac Victoria Coupe...............$497 '29 Buick Sedan................ ........$797
'28 Essex Sedan......... ............$297 '29 Nash Sedan......... .................$1097
'28 Buick Master Landau Sedan......$697 '29 Chrysler 75 Sedan..............$.897
'29 Nash Sport Coupe ......................$1,447 '29 Whippet 6 Sedan .........................$697
'28 Chrysler 72 Sedan $.... 697 '26 Hudson Sedan.............................$597
'29 Whippet 6 Coach-...- --.........$597 '27 Buick Brougham .....................$447
'28 Oldsmobile Sport Roadster$........ $? ?? '28 Buick Standard Sedan..................$697
'29 Reo 4-Passenger Coupe ........$1,047 '28 Buick Master Sedan....................$747
'28 Hudson Sedan ............................... $497 '26 Buick Sedan .........................$297
'26 Lincoln Sport Phaeton....... $497 '26 Packard Limousine Sedan..............$497
'28 LaSalle Landau Sedan...........$877 '26 Studebaker President --* .... $477
SENSATIONAL Practically New Cars at UNBELIEVEABLE PRIS and We
Will Take Your Old Car in as Down Payment-.
Sale Conducted and Under the Personal Supervision of
Stanley J. Maxwell, Used Car Expert

RELIABLE MOTOR CORP.
644 WEST FLAGLER STREET


.1


THE JEWI FLORIDIAN-A MEDIUM OF AND FOR MIAMI


K ji A


riday, April 25,

His Wife-I tried to, but
warned me that I was getting
familiar.


Page 2


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ccmsumed in larger quantities than
ever before. America has contr:bated
corn oil, peanut oil a::.t cottons d
oil to the hi. \Ve produce more ln-
seed oil, from flax grown in tim
x-^_.t. ..... ,h 2.tr other nation.


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PAYING THE PRICE

A Goal
No goal is ever attained ex-
cept at a price. If there is no
price to be paid, the goal is
not worth the effort it takes
to gain it.
Runners in a great tourna-
ment dropped into position. At
the crack of the pistol they
dashed away in a solid group.
Soon one of the contestants
a favorite, dropped back-
just a little. All eyes of the
crowds along the side lines
were upon him, and there
was a mark of disappoint-
ment. Despite all his coaches
could do, he remained in his
position at the rear.
Then the final lap came. Re-
lieved of the strain bofleading
the race, the favorite leaped
t othe front and was an easy
winner.
In the front line of rooters
stood a young fellow admir-
ing the winner. "Gee!" he ex-
claimed, "I'd like to be a run-
ner like that fellow." But the
young man did not know of
the long, hard training
through which the runner had
passed-the price of being a
successful runner.
Before an audience that
taxed the capacity of a great
auditorium in New York, a
brilliant young musician step-
ped out buoyantly. Thousands
of faces were tense with in-
terest and admiration. The
young virtuoso seated himself
at the instrument and,,, al-
most by magic charmed his
hearers. No music was before
him, and his fingers seemed
to drop to the keys without
effort. The audience marveled.
At the conclusion of the
number scores of other musi-
cians leaned over to their seat
mates. And what were they
saying? "I wish I could play
like that!" They did not take
account, in their admiration,
of the endless hours of appli-
cation and practice on scales
and finger exercises the
price of being a great musi-
cian.
In the well-stocked library
of a rich home in a western
city sat a youth, ambitious
and promising. Books of ad-
venture-thrllling stories of
heroism-were his favorite
reading. He worshipped the
hero and admired the writer
of such stories.
"I wish I could write a
story like that," he said, fer-
vently. But little did he real-
l what long years of prepa-
1rtjp, it tiLat, mingled with


Friday, April 25, 1980


THE JEWISH

FLORIDIAN
A weekly newspaper published at
Miami, Florida
by
The Jewish Floridian Publishing
Company
652 S. W. FIRST STREET
Phone" 2-8745



EDITORIAL STAFF
J. LOUIS SHOCHET
A CHOCHOM
BEN DOROM
A. N. ASHER


proprietors of these houses
Jews or non-Jews. Apply
economic screws and these
gentry will soon come to
terms.
Such measures might be
the cure for an evil that is
a disgrace to American life
and institutions.

Many a man who started
out to be a social lion has end-
ed up by making a goose of
himself.


CHASER


rejection slips, discourage-
ment1 diligent study, deter-
mination, and a persistence
that knew no end-the price
of being a successful writer.
The uninitiated see only the
display of success. They are
strangers to the price that
must be paid. But they are
strangers, too, to the thrill
that comes from doing some-
thing unusual, something out-
standing, something worthy
of the admiration and plaudits
of the world.
The price must be paid, but
the glory of the goal is worth
all that.

WE DISAGREE

Written in his column, "It
Seems to Me," in the New
York Telegram, Heywood
Broun, who is doing such
splendid work for the unem-
ployed,, says:
"I want to return to the
question of prejudice and un-
employment. At random I
find "I was refused the posi-
tion for religious reasons"
and "The fact that I'm a Jew
makes it much more difficult
for me to get work." The head
of an employment agency
writes to say that it is per-
fectly true that many of his
clients specify "Christians
only." He wants to know if
it is fair to accuse him of dis-
crimination when he must do
so for "business reasons," but
then he goes on to complain
that many Jewish applicants
give Gentile names when ap-
plying for positions. "Is it
fair ?" he wants to know.
It seems to me that this,
too, might justly fall under
the head of a "business rea-
son." If I were jobless and
despairing and found the
name Broun a handicap in get-
ting employment I don't be-
lieve. I would hesitate long in
changing it to Levinsky.
I wonder why Christian
ministers do not take up this
question of fierce un-Christ-
like prejudice. In fact, what
are the Christian ministers
doing just now?
We don't at all agree with
Heywood Broun. Running
away from a difficulty will
not overcome it. Naurally
when hunger gnaws at one's
stomach one does not ques-
tion the means by which that
hunger may be assuaged. But
as a general proposition Hey-
wood Broun's advice does not
appeal to us.
This unfair discrimination
will have to be fought out
sooner or later; There is one
way in which it can be com-
bated and that is for Jews and
fair--minded people generally
to refuse to deal with firms
will not employ decent folks
for no other reason than they
belong to a faith or to a peo-
ple which does not have the
approval of these narrow-
minded bigots. A little boy-
cott will make a lot of differ-
ence.
Don't deal with firms that
will not employ Jews, be the


decide it. They get more mon-
ey than we do.
Felix-Well, whatcher say
if we call it a day ? We've done
our duty and kept a lot of ob-


Scene-A customs office.
Felix and Gus, two clerks, are
lying on the floor looking over
books.

Felix (inspecting a British
seed catalogue)-This flower
book puzzles me. Here's a
passage about lilies. It says,
Lilies are a rich heritage.
Down through the ages better
lilies have come as man has
gradually wrested from na-
ture the secrets of her hidden
treasures." What's that mean?
Gus-I dunno, but I'd im-
pound it on general principles.
I don't like that reference to
nature's secrets.
Felix-It might be all right
for you and me to read such
stuff. But we've got to think
of the women and children.
Here's one by an Italian. It's
called "Beauty Spots of Flor-
ence."
Gus-I wouldn't pass any
book with a name like that.
Those Italians get pretty per-
sonal when they write about
women.
Felix-here's another. It's
called "Elizabeth and Essex."
Gus-That's probably about
the automobile business. You
can let that through all right.
Did you see this? It's a novel
by Manuel Komroff, called
"Coronet."
Felix-I used to play a cor-
onet once.
Gus-I guess it's just for
musicians. Here's one called
"The Affair at Jutland." I'll
impound that without hesitat-
ing.
Felix-Sure. The minute
you hear that word "affair"
you know it's a sex story.
*
Gus -what did yof do
about that Powsy book,
"Kindness in a Corner?"
Felix-Impound it on the
title. It sounded too much like
one of them necking stories.
Gus Here's a book called
"The Life of An Egoist," by
a German guy. What's an
egoist ?
Felix-An egoist is a wo-
man who leads a double life.
It's the same as a paramour.
Gus Here's another,
"Problems of Neurosis."
What's neurosis?
Felix-You don't pronounce
it right it's Nerosis. Nerosis
means a collection of off-loror
stories that have come down
from the time of Nero.
Gus I'll take it home and
read it, and then impound it.
*
Felix-here's one that puz-
zles me, it's called "Mata Hari
Courtesan and Spy." I wonder
what it's about?
Gus-Mata Hari is what a
Japanese commits when he
kills himself. It's the same as
suicide in American.
Felix-But what's a courte-
san?
Gus-A courtesan is some-
thing you make when you
bow on entering a room.
Felix-The book ought be
all right, I guess.
Gus-Why take chances?
Impound anything you don't
understand and let the courts


dinner."
S


A woman's shape is merely
a matter of form.


Page 3


"What's that ? You say the
doctor prescribed cognac for
your illness. Did it help you
any ?"
S Ah! It was great! But the
pains since then come on
S much more frequently."
*


The Visitor You poor
man! Did they put those bars
in your windows to keep you
in?
The Inmate-No'm. They
trust to me honor. Them bars
was put there to keep the
mosquitos out.
S *
Age makes most men wise
and most women stubborn.
*


A decided blond
haired woman who
sists upon having
way.
*1


is a light-
always in-
her own


scene literature from reaching
people who can't understand
it.
Gus-Okay.
*
The Last Straw
She's selling our wares, she's
keeping our books
She's keen upon taking a
chance;
She's cutting our hair and
improving our looks,
In effect, she is wearing
our pants.
She knows how to dress on a
hot summer's day
Much better than any of us.
She's doing our work and
she's drawing our pay,
She's driving her own little
bus.

She's pulling our teeth, she's
peddling our pills,
She's practising some of
our law.
She's taken our job and she
must pay our bills
And be good to her father-
in-law.
She's drinking our gin with-
out any regrets.
And occasion'ly gets really
stewed;
She swears, if she must, and
smokes cigarettes.
With confidence she is
imbued.

She's playing baseball and
tennis to boot,
She fishes, she swims and
she skates;
She's stepping out now and
learning to shoot.
She arranges her own party
dates.
She's welcome to golf and to
football and such,
But this is what gives us
the blues,
She's taken our stand-by and
now we're in Dutch-
The women are pitching
horseshoes.
*
No matter how homely a
man is he always imagines
that he has a pleasing person-
ality.
*
"Sometimes the boys like
to have moonshine, but they
often get plenty of kick from
pop."
Gentleman (buying a cigar)
-By jove! If I haven't left
my pocketbook at home.
Saleswoman That's all
right; you can pay me to-
morrow.
Gentleman- Yes, but sup-
pose. I should get run over or
get hit by a falling brick.
S a 1 e s w o man Well, it
wouldn't be any great calam-
ity, anyhow.

Brown-You haven't been
married long, have you ?
Smith-No; it just seems
long."
*
"John," said Mrs. Newly-
wed, "run to the drug store
quick and get a bottle of
paste."
"Library paste?" asked her
husband, in surprise.
"Yes if you can't get kit-
chen paste. I'm going to make
some French pastry for your


Hubby(entering home, sniffs-the
air)-Ah, do I smell a gooe ?.
Maid-No Sir, it's the adbub
curling her hair. j
$ $ $ *,-t


SThe man ma dbM i gkA
to getleft


*. 4


TH JEIWISH FLORIDIAN-A MEDIUM OF AND I1'


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The very stern father was
standing with his back to the
fire glaring at his son and
daughters, who had just ar-
rived home late from a dance.
"This is the second time you
have been late this week," he
said angrily.
"But, father," put in the
boy, "surely you don't mind
us having a good time now
and again?"
"That's the trouble with
you young people," went on
the parent angrily, "you
dance, smoke and drink far
too much !"
"But dad darling," protest-
ed one of the girls, "that's not
trouble-it's pleasure."
*
Woman (reading sign)-Don't
kill your wife. Let us do your
dirty work.

His Mother Haven't you
learned your letters by this time?
Little Bobbie-Not all of 'em,
mother. Dad and Mr. Gaysport
took two of my alphabet blocks
and put spots on 'em and they're
shooting' craps with 'em.
*
Teacher-Now, we can't take
four from three, so what can we
do, Teddy?
Teddy-We can borrow.
Teacher That's right. And
where do we borrow?
Teddy-Next door at Jenkins';
we always do.
*
Customer-What stock would
you recommend to me, the com-
mon or preferred?
Broker-The preferred stock is
much more common, so I, think
the common is to be preferrer.
*
Oldbatch-Were"nt you rather
reckless to marry a widow? She's
heard all the old classic excuses
before.
Gaysport-That's why. I knew
her first husband and know just
the line of fiction she'll fall for.
.* *
Bright-Better come over to the
club tonight; we are going to have
a foreign lecturer to speak to us,
and a Jugoslav.
Green-Sure, I'll come; but what
kind of a drink is Slav?
*
Mother-What are you playing,
Betty ?
Betty-That I am to be married.
Mother-But where is the bride-
groom?
Betty-Nowhere! You see, it's
going to be a very quiet wedding.
4* *


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


:I
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THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN



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- --.-. -.. -- u ,-,-.-, I,


We would appreciate your
forwarding all society and
organization items to the
Jewish Floridian, 652 S. W.
1st street, or rhone 2-8745
not later than noon Wed-
nesday.

It will interest Miamians to
know that Mrs. Hyman N.
Levy (Bertha B.) a resident
of Miami for a number of
years will reopen her camp in
the Blue Ridge Mountains for
Girls for the coming summer
season. Mrs. Levy is well
know for her activities in the
social field throughout the
country, having been active in
many Jewish organizations.
She was the founder of and
President of the Baltimore
Y. W. HA., secretary of the
American Jewish Relief dur-
ing the World War, a member
of the National Board of Y.
M. & Y. W. H. A. and kindred
associations, a member of the
Public Athletic League of
Baltimore and for a long time


*1.

associated with the Federated
Jewish Charities. During her
stay in Washington, Mrs.
Levy was president of the Y.
W. H. A. there, and conducted
what is probably the largest
gymnasium class in the his-
tory of Washington at the
Central High School. She has
had charge of Y. W. H. A.
camps in Baltimore and
S Washington. One of the out-
standing features of the Blue
Ridge Mountain Camp which
is located in the Blue Ridge
section of Pennsylvania near
the Maryland border, ,is the
strict adherence to the Jew-
ish dietary laws and religious
observances. The camp will be
limited to sixty girls between
six and fourteen years of age
and in addition to Mrs. Levy
will be taken care of by staff
of able workers among whom
will be Miss Lyl Chisling of
this city who is dramatic
counsellor and will leave for
the Camp about July 1st. A
number of Miami girls have
already registered for the
Camp.
The-Loyalty Club will hold
its monthly card party at the
Talmud Torah Auditorium
Wednesday evening, April 30,
at 8:30 p. m. Prizes will be
awarded to the highest scores,
and refreshments will be ser-
.ved. Those who have attended
'the Loyalty Club parties will


surely be present and urge
their friends to do the same.
Mesdames Rose Bogan, Sue
Schachter, Ray Somberg and
Sophie Sapero will be the hos-
tesses.
*
Mrs. H. A. Badt and daugh-
ter, Lois May will sail for
Baltmore next Wednesday
after having spent some time
in Miami. Commander Badt
of the United States Navy has
been stationed in Cuba for the
past two years, but has re--
cently been assigned to the
United States Naval Academy
at Annapolis where he expects
to remain for about three
years. While in Miami Com-
mander and Mrs. Badt vis-
ited Mr. and Mrs. Hyman N.
Levy.
*
Mrs. Adele Vince Rose en-
tertained at her home on
Sorolla ave., Coral Gables,
with a surprise birthday party
honoring her mother, Mrs. R.
Vince Rose. A low bowl of
sweet peas, birthday cake and
refreshments carried out an
effective pastel color scheme.
Guests present were: Mr.
and Mrs. Henry Berg, Mr. and
Mrs. Harry W. Weinberg and
their guests, Miss Ethel Mac-
cabe, Miss Grace Brasiere,,
Mrs. Mary Maccabe and Ben
Liffitz, all of Brooklyn, N. Y,;
Mr. and Mrs. I. A. Russcol,
Mr. and Mrs. Alex Goldstein,
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph S. Fields
and Moe Kurman.
Dr. Sh. Yuris the noted
Zionist worker addressed the
members of the Arbeiter Ring
at the Workmens Circle Hall
last Thursday night and
stressed in particular the
work of the "Histadruth,"
and gave a detailed descrip-
tion of its inception, growth
and accomplishments. He de-
scribed the life of the various
institutions and painted a
vivid word picture of Pales-
tinian workingmen's Condi-
tions.
He left the same evening
for the North because of
previous speaking engage-
ments. The work inaugurated
by him for the Palestine
Workmen's Fund is slowly
progressing and committees
are now out trying to have
every Miami Jew contribute
his share.
The Installation Luncheon
of Temple Israel Sisterhood
will be held on Monday, May
5th., at 1:00 p. m., at the
Alcazar Hotel at which time
the officers recently elected
will be formally installed. Mrs.
I. M. Weinstein will act as
Toastmistress, and the ar-
rangements are being.. made
by a committee headed by
Mrs. Herbert E. Kleinman.
Reservations may be made by
calling the Temple or any
member of the committee.
A very pleasant evening
was spent by the Workmen's
Circle organizations last Sun-
day night when the annual
Peretz Memorial meeting was
held. Children of the Arbeiter


Ring Schule furnished most
of the talent for the evening
entertainment. Shirley Elkin,


one of the pupils and Ethel and gave a number of inter-
Lazar, another pupil,, recited sting sidelights and related a
some of the works of the number of anecdotes of the
noted Yiddish writer, and ,,, ., ,,i,,p Mr A. Dock gave


gave some character delinea-


tons of the writer as exhib- I g y, L1 gIL VI bT*J %y
tions of theis works. Mr. Grhi- J.L. Peretz and a recitation. corporate. He has been a
man, the teacher of the school Refr-'shments were served at dent here fort yea
spoke on the life of the writer a late hour. Continued on Page 5
li111 I llllllll l l llllllll illlrllll!iii i il!tii iiii IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIrIIIIIII lIIIIIII MIIIIM I I II^





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Page 4
ii ** -- ^.-
i '"' ^ ^ '"" '" '"- "^ "** -<" --- -* -* ^* -* n **- -**- -


THINKING------ JS ALL S RIBE TO THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN DO YOUl
TfflN W SBwoS ALL SUBSCRIBE TO THE JEWISH FLORIDIANI Do YOU'


ili-
rsi.


Friday, April 25, 1930
Engagement of Miss Ba
ette Simons to Leo Ackennan
was announced Sunday by her
parents,, Mr. and Mrs. Harr
Simons. Mr. and Mrs. Simona
received at their home, 5Igg
S. W. First street, for their
daughter and Mr. Ackerman
from 8 to 5 p. m. 14st Sunday.
Miss Simons is an attract.
tive member of the younger
set here an Mr Ackerman
is president of the Ackerman.
Lewis Insurance Conmnan, Tv


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nid fro mthe work of










'Friday, Apri 25, 1930


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


SOCIETY
***--
(Continued from Page 4)
Colorful costumes repre-
senting Japanese, Hebrew,
Italian, French, Spanish and
Indian nationalities,, featured
the recital given Mo y at
the Mana-Zucca Music club
for the Dade County Council
of Girl Scouts.
Artistic interpretations of
compositions by Mana-Zucca
were given by Frances Druck-
erman,, Percy Long, Frances
Tarboux and Dora Miller.
Outstanding in the program
was the costume representa-
tion of Mana-Zucca's "Rac-
hem," with the composer at
the piano, Frances Tarboux at
the organ, Dora Miller as so-
loist and members of the club
assisting in the chorus.
The Girl Scouts gave a
short drill and sang the na-
tional anthem at the close of
the program.

Leonard Rose, ,youthful
student of Walter Grossman's
class in chamber music at the
University of Miami, was the
featured soloist on the Miami
Conservatory's program
broadcast over WQAM at
5:50 p. m., Sunday. Mr. Rose
played Goldenman's G-minor
concerto for the violincello. A
trio and vocal soloist assisted
on th program, one of a ser-
ies broadcast over WQAM on
Sunday evenings.
*4
First place in the prelimin-
ary of the intercollegiate ora-
torical contest on the consti-
tution held at the University
of Miami was won by Miss
Reba Engler. This is the sixth
year that a nation-wide con-
test on the constitution has
been conducted by the leading
universities of the nation, and
is the outstanding oratorical
contest of the year.
Miss Engler, who will go to
the regional contest May 1, is
a senior A. B. student at the
University of Miami and also
a freshman in law. She is
president of the debating
council, and has never lost a
varsity debate; president of
Beta Chi, women's legal fra-
ternity; a member of Rho
Beta Omicron, public speak-
ing fraternity sponsored by
Ruth Bryan Owen; a member
of the Wing and Wig club and
has won numerous public
speaking honors.

Formal announcement of
the recent marriage of Miss
Annette Wansker of Jackson-
ville,, Fla., to Mr Hyland
Rifas of this City, which was
reported in these columns


some time age, has just been
made. The couple who recent-
ly returned from their honey-
moon are now making their
home at 1958 .Pennsylvania
ave., Miami Beach.

Mr. and Mrs. A. Engler of
this city,, pioneer Maimians
have just announced the en-
gagement of their daughter
Reba Mae to Mr. Leonard Ep-
stein of this City. Miss
Engler is one of the most pop-
ular members of Miami's
younger Jewish set, is an ac-
tive member of the Junior
Hadassah, president of the
legal fraternity at the Uni-
versity of Miami and a star
debater representing the Uni-
versity in a number of inter-
state collegiate debates. She
will represent her college in
the regional constitutional de-
bates to be held next month.
Mr. Epstein is one of the
younger members of the Bar
and has been prominent in the
affairs of Temple Israel, at
one time being president of its
Junior Congregation.
** ^ .
The annual election of offi-
cers for the local section of
the Council of Jewish Women
will be held at Kaplan Hall
on May 4th. at 2:00 p. m.
when in addition to those rec-
ommended for election by the
nominating committee, the
members will be permitted to
vote on such as may be addi-
tionally nominated from the
floor. The installation will
take place at an Installation
luncheon which will be given
on Friday, May 16th. the
place to be announced shortly
in these columns. Mrs. J.
Morris is Chairman of the
Committee of Arrangements,
and Mrs. Ben Watts will act
as Toastmistress at this
luncheon.
*
When Mrs. I. H. Weisfeld
the wife of Rabbi Weisfeld
of Beth David returned to her
home late Sunday evening she
was surprised to find a num-
ber of her friends waiting to
greet her on her birthday an-
mniversary. They had brought
cakes, candies, fruits and oth-
er goodies and a number of
gifts including flowers. A
pleasant time was spent by
all. Among those who took
part in the informal gathering
were Mesdames Max Kupfer-
stein, J. Simpson, I. Buck-
stein, C. Tannenbaum, Dave
Kahn, N. Adelman, B. Tann-
enbaum, M. Rippa, J. L.
Shochet, M. Friedman. At the
close of the evening the hus-
bands of the ladies called to
extend their greeting and con-
gratulations.
***


visiting in Miami for the past
week left to attend the con-
vention of the Reliance Life
Insurance Co., at Havana,
Cuba. They will remain there
during gthe Convention and
then return directly to Balti-
more.

Mr. and Mrs. Dave Kahn
will celebrate the Bar Mitzva
of their son Arthur on Satur-
day next at Beth David Syna-
gogue. Immediately after the
services they will entertain at
a reception in the vestry
rooms of the synagogue for
the worshippers and on Sun-
day night for a large number
of invited friends at the Tal-
mud Torah Auditorium. Mrs.
Kahn is one of the organizers
of the Ladies Auxiliary of
Beth David Talmud Torah
and is now its Treasurer.
*
The regular bi-weekly card
party of the Ladies Auxiliary
of Beth David Talmud Torah
will be held next Tuesday eve-
ning at the Talmud Torah au-
ditorium when Mesdames J.
Simpson, B. Max and Van
Gelder wil be the hostesses.
Prizes will be awarded to the
highest scores at each table
and refreshments will be
served.
*
The regular meeting of the
Yededim Club was held at the
home of Mike Silberstein. The
club is to have an athletic
meet with the Coconut Palm


Lamp Co. The meet
place Sunday, May
all forms of athletic
tion will be engaged
regular course of
was gone through.
ments were served.
*


will take
3rd. and
competi-
in. The
business
Refresh-


Mr. and Mrs. Morris Dubler
entertained a number of
friends at their home last
Monday night at bridge, the
party lasting until the late
hours of the night. A Dutch
supper was served during the
evening. Among those pres-
(Continued on Page Six)


[. BUSINESS DIRECTORY

L. (Pop) GERSON PHARMACISTS
Buyer of All Kinds of Scrap Metal .
We Sell Auto Parts BRYAN PARK PHARMACY
2141 N. W. SECOND AVE. Chas. Tannenbaum,
Phone 20621 Pharmacist
(reg. pharmacist for 17 years)
BAGS and METALS Cor 22nd Ave. and 8th St. 8. W.

EAST COAST BAG & METAL CO. CRYSTAL PHARMACY
(Inc.) Dr. A. D. Halpern, Ph. (4, Ph. D.
I. L. MINTZER Prescriptions Our Specialty
MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS 128 N. Miami Ave. Phone 2971
435-445 N. W. 8th Street
Phone 4485 s s
P PIPE and STEEL
PEPPER METAL CORP.
Scrap Metal and Machinery ADELMAN PIPE & STEEL CO.
N. W. Cor. 5th Ave. and 14th St 5 N. E. 25th St.
Phone 22546 58 N. E. 25th St.
Phoe2546 Aat F. E. C. R. R. Phone 2142
BUILDING SUPPLIES A. & B. PIPE AND METAL CO.
Phone 81855
S. SIMPSON 53 North East 25th Street
Building Materials,
Roofing Paper, Asphalt
423 N. W. N. River Drive PRINTERS
Phone 7251
MIAMI PRINTING CO.
DELICATESSEN "Printing That Pays"
Phone 23261
ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN 107 South Miami Avenue
170 N. W. 5th St.
We Supply Your Every Want AUTO PARTS
BLOOM AUTO REPAIR
FISH & SEA FOODS & PARTS CO.
N. W. 17th Ave. at 23rd St.
STANDARD FISH CO. Phone 23631
629 W. Flagler St. The Largest car wreckers in
Phone 2-3362 Florida

AMBULANCE SERVICE
King W. H. Combs Co., Estab. 1896
Undertaling Co COMBS FUNERAL HOME
Phone Miami 32101
1539 N. E. 2nd Avenue
29 N. W. THIRD AVENUE MIAMI BEACH FUNERAL HOME
Phone M.'B. 5-2101
Phones 23515-3i624 1236 Washinston Ave.


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BAKING
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CAKES, PASTRIES,
On Sale At
SROSEDALE DELICAI
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MAX'S DELICATE
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S NEW YORK DELIC
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Mr. and Mrs. I. B. Jacobson W"MY eI.. ." CAKIS iMteAL r~Il l'
of Baltimore, Md., who were
I


PINKY-DINKY


TWEET! TWEET!


TWEET!


By Terry Gilkison


S lE ANA- BI.D/ OFYOU
V4AT mew CANARI BIRD/, rwm1/


OH! O YOU CALL OUR 6PA
JO Poe o THAT nTANP
POR JOSEPH ORR IoR-
a JOSEPHINE? ,


.4E ,ON'r KNOW/
THAT' \NH 4 We.
SALl- IT JOE/


Page 5


The Blue Ridge
Mountain Camp
FOR GIRLS
BUENA VISTA, PENNA.
Ages 6 to 14
Two hours drive from Baltimore
Reservations Limited
-Phone for Catalogue
Bertha Berkowitz Levy,
Owner and Director
Phone 28730, 1625 S. W. 15th St.


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Page Six


SifHEA HMILY


DOCTOR
NJOSEPH GAINESM.D.
"HEART MEDICINE"
Are you going to believe me, when I tell you that you
have the best and most dependable heart remedy known, al-
ways within your reach and absolutely free from cost to you?
Well, you most certainly have. In these days of sudden death
from "heart disease," it seems worth while to me to do a lot
of sober thinking.
The horizontal position-the recumbent posture-lying in
bed-cal it whatever you please-is first and foremost in car-
ing for a tired heart. I saw an aged man, not long ago, with a
rapidly failing heart; one month in bed completely restored
lim, so far as I could discern; he shows no sign of heart
failure today, and is apparently healthy as a man of his years
can be. He took perhaps sixty cents worth of medicine! The
recumbent position cured him; he was not permitted to even
sit up to take his meals; orders were orders here; disobedi-
ence might have cost him his life.-
Of course your heart isn't like that. But do you know
that the eight hours you should spend in bed each night does
the very thing for you that was done to the old man? And
don't you know that the heart does three times as much work
when you are up and doing as it does when the body is in the
horizontal position? Then, if! the heart becomes weakened,
failing in its strength and function from overwork and abuse
-the very first thing to do is, give it REST. In many cases
that's all it needs.
The heart may be abused-overworked, in a thousand
different ways; what are you doing to your heart? Are you
giving it the rest that it absolutely must have? You, who
are up all day, and extend the festivities till past midnight?
Then, do you whip up the tiring vital organ with cigarettes,
heavy food, or with alcoholic? Or with "medicine"? Let
me tell you: You are tampering-flirting with danger to your
life!


SOCIETY


(Continued from Page 5)
ent were Dr. and Mrs. Max
Ghertler, Dr. and Mrs. S.
Aronowitz, Mr. and Mrs. L.
Seiden, Dr. and rMs. S. Snowe
and Dr. and Mrs. A. E. Fried-
man
Dr and Mrs. Max Ghertler
entertained at bridge last
Sunday evening at their home
for a number of friends.
Bridge and pinochle were
played and prizes were award-
ed t othe highest scores. At a
late hour refreshments were
served. Among those present
were Dr. and Mrs. S. Arono-
witz, Mr. and Mrs. Morris
Dubler, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis
Brown, Mr. and Mrs. M. Wein-
garten, Mr. and Mrs. M.
Blum-enthal, Mr. and Mrs. R.
Wolpert, Mr and Mrs. C.
Greenfield, Mr. Greenfield of


New York city, and Mr. and
Mrs. Isidor Cohen.
*** *
So This Is College, a Gold-
wyn-Mayers talking and sing-
ing comedy romance of cam-


THE

FARWAY

DAIRY
SOLICITS YOUR
PATRONAGE


Phone Miami
7105
FOR PROMPT
SERVICE


I 8 )OZSZZ ZZZbI)*OIZ ...


Announcing
The
Candidacy


FRANK
MARKLE
for
Clerk of the
Criminal Court
of Record
Have lived in Dade
County Continuously
Since 1912
Subject to the Demo-
cratic Primary,
June 3rd, 1930
Your Support will be,
Appreciated
(Paid Political Advertisement)
T,.; ; :::::ii :::."::::


I hereby-
announce my candidacy
for the office of Solicitor
of the Criminal Court of
Record of Dade County,
Florida, in the coming
Democratic Primary of
June 3rd, 1930.
...I held this position
for eight years from
1917 to 1925, by vote of
the people and by ap-
pointment of the Gover-
nor. I am proud of my
official record. I was
nominated in the pri-
mary two years ago, but
for unknown reasons
wa not appointed by
Governor Carlton. G. E.
McCaskill was appoint-
ed the day after the
State Senate adjourned
on June 21st, 1929.


FRED


PINE


For

County Solicitor


Friday, April 25


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


pus life is coming to the Ti-
voli Theatre April 27 and 28.
At last a suitable role for
Greta Garbo has been found.
She takes the part of a Swed-
ish girl who, brought up with-
out care or guidance, chose
a shameful career to escape
the tyranny of life on a Min-
nesota farm. But after she
spends several months with
her father on an old sea barge.
The love of an Irish sailor in-
spired her to seek a fresh
start in life. This all talking
picture comes to the Tivoli
next Tuesday, Wednesday,
and Thursday.
Norma Shearer, Raymond
Hackett, Lewis Stone, and H.
B. Warner make up the cast
of the all talking production
"The Trial Of Mary Dugan"
which comes to the Tivoli Fri-
day and Saturday, May 2 and
3.


TIVOLI

W. Flagler at 8th Ave.
Theatre
Western Electric
Talking Equipment
None Better
Sun. and Mon., April 27-28
ALL-STAR CAST
in
'SO THIS IS COLLEGE'
All-Talking,, Singing,
Dancing
Tues., Wed., Thurs.,
April 29-30-May 1
GRETA GARBO
in
S"ANNA CHRISTIE"
SGarbo Crowning Triumph
Fri. and Sat., May 2-3
NORMA SHEARER
$in
S "THE TRIAL OF
MARY DUGAN"
An All-Talking Mystery
Melodrama
^s ^^s6eee I 74


Candidate for


Purchasing Ag t


Dade County


C. L WHEAT
If elected will always give
preference to products and
material made in Dade
County and local labor.

Subject to Democratic PrimariM
in June

iPaid Political Advertisement)


Announcing My Candidacy For


Purchasing


Agent


I promise an earnest, effi.
cient and an economical ad-
ministration, cooperating
at all times with County
officials, when for the best
interests of the taxpayers
of Dade County.
Your support wil be
appreciated.


JOHN B. PHELPS
iPaid Political Advertisement)
$.


My Platform-
in the June primary in
1928 and my platform
now is:
1. Eight years' public
prosecutor in this coun-
ty.
2. An unexcelled rece
ord of conviction of
criminals.
3. Earnest prosecu
tion without favor and
without persecution. -
4. Devotion of entire
time to duties of office
to the exclusion of pri
vate practice.
5. Attentive recep-
tion and investigation
of all complaints with
prompt and just action;. ~
I solicit your suppo,,t
and pledge efficient pub
lie service.
Respectfully YTeur
FRED


i am positive Governor Carlton will appoint me if I am nminatd in the comlin Prima. B
in his sense of fair ply and ieals of Democracy, I know from absolutely reliable Iamaae ~t the
the voice of thei Mel ,'in th is ltanee.( Pag Peie l
,. "- Pale
Q m a1 f/a s /a s /ss s ,/ -- ,* *,. .-.* ,.' ,1 :_


QOUR .4 1 AV YOU MONEY ANDGIVE YOU R


e,
V' -~' j;9.1.;,,n;
~rrups--
etaas
3


Announcing the Candidacy of


--r~N~~hJ~l~bC~aCh~C~k


---~~~.~N~i~j~PC~CYPcP~fYPIW~--'~P~C~P




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