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The Jewish Floridian ( April 18, 1930 )

UFJUD
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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
April 18, 1930
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00060

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
April 18, 1930
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00060

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text









"A


Vol. III.-No. XVI.-


Miami, Florida, Friday,-April 18,jIi


Price 5 Cents


Campaign Briefs

George E. McCaskill, the
present County Solicitor has
announced his candidacy for
re-election to the office which
he has occupied since last
June. He is a native of Louis-
iana, and a graduate of Louis-
iana Polytechnic Institute and
the John B. Stetson Univer-
sity. He has practiced law
since 1811 and came to Miami
in 1912. In 1917 Mr. McCaskill
assumed his duties as attor-
ney for the County Commis-
sioners which he held for
about six years, and then act-
ed as City attorney for Miami
Beach for about the same per-
iod. He is forty five years old
and has been active in the Ma-
sonic order and the Shrine
and is married and has two
children,


George F. McCall, appointed
as clerk of the Criminal Court
of Record June 8, 1929, has
announced his candidacy for
re-election, subject to the De-
mocratic primaries in June.
Mr. McCall, in his announce-
ment, says he will make the
race on the record he has est-
ablished in the office.
Mr. McCall has been a resi-
dent of Miami since 1921, and
is a native of Florida, having
been born in Hamilton county.
He is a certified public ac-
countant, a Mason, a member
of the American Legion. He
is married and has two child-
ren.
A complete system of rec-
ords for the Criminal Court
of Record and for the Court
of Crimes has been installed
under Mr. McCall's supervis-
ionl and he is the first man
ever to hold the office to turn
in to the eclnty any surplus
from its operations. He paid
to the county treasurer $2,-
196.53, 'which represented
profits for the seven months
ending December 31, 1930.
His records indicate that
there has been a cash profit
to the county of $4,9M81 for
the three months ending Mar.
31, 1930.


Dan Chappell announced
himself as a candidate for re-
election to the House of Re-
presentatives in Group 3, from
this county, subject to the
coming Democratic Primary.
Mr. Chappei served in the
last Legislature -6-aiionsor-
ed some very important bills,
some of them being: the Com-
mission to care for Florida's
cripple children,.the Parimu-
tuel racing bill, mrtaige and
liking -a8z, -i region of
the rules of pleading for the
state, the creation of an ex-
perimental station at Home-
stead, and the Miami Lake
Okeechobee .higzway.
Mr. Clh ppeU a member
of several commit-
tees, m .apropri'-
tions, ju
diciary, ,
county .-. it ,.


Queen of the states


Miss Helen Moser Hannigan of
'errysburg, Ohio, crowned Queen of
ie annual Festival of States at St.
'etersburg, Florida

Beth David to
Observe Yizkor
The usual late Friday night
services will begin at Beth
David at 8:30 p. m. when
Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld will
preach a sermon. On Satur-
day morning the combined
holiday and Sabbath service
will begin promptly at 9 a. m.
and Rabbi Weisfeld will
preach a holiday sermon.
Sunday morning the holiday
services will begin promptly
at 9 a. m. with Yizkor ser-
whenR abbiW eisf eldwill -
vices starting at about 10:30
when Rabbi Weisfeld will
preach a sermon on "The
Great Beyond."
Those who desire that the
names of their departed be re-
cited in the customary man-
ner must arrange to leave the
names of those to be remem-
bered at the office of the Syn-
agogue not later than Friday
afternoon. Passover will con-
clude promptly at Sundown on
Sunday.

Temple Israel Ob-
serves Passover


Services will be held at
Temple Israel, Friday even-
ing, "Forward with Memory,
urday morning at eleven.
Dr. Kaplan has chosen for
his subject-for Friday even-
ing, "Rorward with Memory,
Feeling and Hope." Saturday
morning his subject will be
"No Servile Work."


Tivoli Installs
Talking'Pictures

The Tivoli Theatre, on West
Flagler street, owned and
operated by. Messrs. Waller-
stein and Walters have an-
netinced chafige in policy
and beginning next Sunday at
noon will operate the latest
and most; modern Western
Electric Company-talking pic-
tures offering the fineIt voice
synchronization. Contrary to
what one would have'expected
there will be no advance in
prices. Equipped with a splen-
did ventilation system and
offering the finest in pictures
the Tivoli will now be one of
t*e finest neighborbooLqi
* ^ the county.


Zionist Meeting
Opens Campaign


The Zionist meeting arrang-
ed for last Wednesday night
at the Talmud Torah hall af-
forded the audience present
an opportunity not often of-
fered local Miamians. Dr. S.
Yuris noted Palestinian wor-
ker arrived in Miami from
Cuba late Wednesday evening
and arrived at the hall about'
10:30 p. m. when a great num-
ber of .those present fearing
that the guest speaker of the
evening would no longer ap-
pear, had already left.
The meeting was opened by
Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld as
chairman, after he had been
presented by Mr. John Wolfe,
Rabbi Weisfeld made a few
brief remarks and then pre-
sented Miss Rose Gerson who
spoke briefly in behalf of Ha-
dassah. She was then followed
by the well known Zionist
worker Dr. A. D. Halpern who
spoke in his usual inimitable
manner and presented some
aspects of Palestine today.
Rabbi Jacob H. Kaplan then
spoke briefly and pledged his
support to the local campaign.
Dr. Yuris arrived as Dr. Kap-
lan was speaking and was in-
troduced to the audience. He
spoke in Yiddish and though
many of those could not com-
pletely follow the idomatic
- yiddisaieMl.he abie speaker,
nevertheless could understand
because of the manner in
which the address was pre-
sented. He spoke feelingly of
the work of the Chalutzim
and Chalutzos; pictured the
scene when the late Lord Bal-
four spoke at the opening of
the Hebrew University at Mt.
Scopus, and compared it with
the scene when the Jewish
Agency pact was signed. He
held' his hearers spellbound
and as he concluded he was
given a splendid ovation.
Though the hour was exceed-
ingly late an appeal by Rabbi
Weisfeld netted several hun-
dred dollars. The committee
in charge of the Workmens
Fund Campaign for Palestine
is meeting as we are going to
press and plans are being
made for a brief but effective
campaign in Miami. Unfor-
tunately, previous engage-
ments prevented Dr. Yuris
from remaining in Miami
later than Thursday night
when he left for New York
City.
gra consisted of a number
The musical part of the pro-
of vocal selections by Miss
Gerson who was accompanied
at the piano by Miss Druck-
erman.












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rMKa WAlIT W M-Aj
"9iAO ITCH M:H I
FIN -MIANDL


Missing Boy Found


The mysterious disappearance of
Robert Emmet Boyle, Fordham Uni-
versity student, from the university
campus in December, 1928, was solved
when he was found driving a taxi in
Vicksburg, Miss.

Hadassah to Hold
Music Symposioum
The Miami Chapter of Ha-
dassah announces a change in
time and place of the Sympo-
sioum on Jewish music origin-
ally scheduled for April 22nd.
The event will 8e held at the
lounge of the Everglades
hotel and will take place Wed-
nesday evening, April 23rd,
at which time Mrs. J. Louis
Scheim .,..ell letown Ia-
dassah worker and president
of the New York region will
review Prof. Idelson's latest
book on musit. A musical pro-
grar will be presented by the
well known artist Hannah
Spiro Asher, of the University
of Miami and will consist of
singing by the choir of Tem-
ple Israel as well as individual
numbers by Miss Rose Mary
Gerson, and Mrs. Sonya
Snowe. A splendid evening of
entertainment is promised all
who attend. The general pub-
lic is invited.

Friendship League
Sponsors Dance
The officers of the Friend-
ship League are now planning
what promises to be one of
the outstanding events of the
spring season, in the form of
a dance and vaudeville per-
formance in the Ballroom of
the Miramar hotel, N. E. 17th
terrace, ,on Monday evening,
April 21st. Anexceptional pro-
gram has been arranged in-
cluding Miss Chang Lee, who
will give several Hawaiian in-
terpretative dances during
the evening. Splendid music
will be furnished by a band
from the La Salle hotel, of
Detroit, Michigan.


Austrian Court


Musical Recital Is
Great Success


Hannah Spiro Asher, or-
ganist and choir director at
Temple Israel once more prov-
ed herself to be a true artist
at the piano Wednesday night
when she appeared in recital
at the Civic Theater, under
the auspices of the University
of Miami Conservatory of Mu-
sic of which she is a member
of the faculty. Her concert
was marked by the inteli-
gence of her interpretations,
and the great brilliance of her
technique, which added to her
sympathetic warmth made a
combination which delighted
her audience.
Mrs. Asher played "Cacon-
ne" (Bach-Busoni); Preludes
9, 10 and 13 from Opus 11
(Scriabine); "The Submerged
Cathedral" (Debussy); Pre-
ludes 21 and 24 (Chopin);
"Intermezzoo" and "Rhapsody
No. 79" (Brahms); "Concert
Etude in F Minor" (Liszt);
"Tamborin" Rameau-Godow-
sky); "Legend" (Albeniz).
Mrs. Asher has had wide
experience as a pianist. She
studied for five years with
the great Leopold Godowsky
in Berlin and Vienna and gave
concerts in many cities of Eu-
rope. Before coming to the
Uniarui y V Miami 4in 1Q26,
she had been a teacher in the
Silesian Conservatory in Bras-
lau.

Special Appoint-
ment is Made Here
George E. McCaskill, coun-
ty solicitor, announced Friday
the appointment of Sidney L.
-Weintraub-as special-assistait
county. solici.tQLfr_-the Tpur-
pose of investigating,, with
him, the affairs of the Ffag-
ler Bank and Trust Company
which closed its doors nearly
two years ago..
Mr. Weintraub has-been're-
tained by a committee of de-
positors, it was learned yes-
terday, and investigationsin-
to the affairs of the banking
institution have been filed
against former officials frm
the county solicitor's office'


Africa to Receive
Jewish Immigrants
Cape Townr S. Africa-Ac-
cording to advice -received
here more than three thoe-
sand East European Jews will
settle in South Africa before
:the new .immigration laws be-
come effective the latter part
of April which will prohibit -
further immigration.


unishes L er Soviet Sends i
Punishes LE oviet nds Rbbi
... .. .- S-nds.-


Vienna--During the course
of a trial in which a Jewish
Danker was involved, one of
the attorneys Carl" Hbel
made a decidedly an-Semit
remark ahout Jews; The. Court
immediately held the ttbriaer
fin ontefupt of Cout it;#OSen-
S Upa m

dta~oll b t~li59 tt^fl


and Son to Phison
Rabbi Laarim v n.l -
grad and five other.W-Mrwe
sentenced to serve -om yAer
in' the Dt coliny of S .


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THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


SVoyage to Puriliu," in which he satir-
izes the movie standards of truth,
morals and ethics. It is a book which
everyone concerned with the training
soof lhidren ought to read and profit
rff&^M/^^f^\^ *0^


SIDE LINES
This is the business record of John Smith, wh' is now
forty-one.
He started work on a newspaper, and while he was there.
he pieced out his income by selling real-estate. Then he
transferred into the bond business and sold insurance on the
side.
He is now selling wall-paper, which, according to him, is
such a poor job that he has to carry samples of floor-wax and
a patent attachment for radiators in order to keep going.
John is honest and hard-working. His complaint about
the meager returns which the business world has given him
caused a friend of mine to make an investigation. It revealed
the following facts:
One of the men who started on the newspaper with John
Smith is now part owner of the paper and has an income of
more than twenty-five thousand dollars a year.
Real-estate has steadily advanced in the city where John
Smith played with real-estate as a side-line, and a number of
real-estaters, no older or smarter than John, are now very
well-to-do.
Both the insurance business and the bond business have
prospered in John's old town, providing automobiles and com-
fortable homes for several men who were formerly his col-
leagues.
As for wall-paper, I myself happened to be riding with the
sales manager of a wall-paper company a few days after hear-
ing John's story.
"I understand your business is a poor business," I said.
"Does anybody ever make a really good thing out ot it ?"
Said he: "Old Adrian Meeker is the best answer to that.
He worked for us as a salesman for twenty years. Hard
ten itory his was, too. The other day he retired with one
hundred and fifty thousand dollars and took his family out to
California."
So it seems that each of the businesses which John Smith
tried on the side has been very good to the people who stayed
with it on full time.
J. C. Penney told me the other day about a young man
who might have been one of his first partners. The young
man played the trombone and was compelled to leave the
store early every night because he made five dollars a week
by tooting his horn in an orchestra. He is still tending store
in the daytime and tooting at night. Mr. Penney is the head
of more than eight hundred stores.
There are men who have made fortunes by running boot-
black stands, by buying junk from automobile factories, and
even by contracting with a city to collect its garbage. Almost
any business seems to be a good business if a man gives it
all he's got.
But the side-line is the slide-line.


BAKER
George F. Baker celebrated his
ninetieth birthday the other day. He
is still the active head of the First
National Bank of New York, one of
the world's greatest financial institu-
tions, in which he owns a controlling
interest.
George Baker was a country boy
eo Cape Cod when he heard his uncle
tell about lending money out at inter-
as It truck heboy as a mw idea
hat you could make our money work
for you. He resolved then to go into
the business of making money earn
He has never been a speculator, a
omoter or anything but a banker.
other banker in New York
oo up to him and relies upon his
dgmeent He never made a speech.
He says that most of the talkingpeo-
pledo is um sary. But when be
sas "no to a man who wants to bor-
row money from him it is as convinc-
ing as if he had talked for an hour.
'HICKS"
I went to a movie theatrethe other
night and saw a "comedy" which made
me boil.
It was a "talkie" taken direct from


the vaudeville stage, and it repre-
sented the people of a country town
in caricature of costumes w h i ch
might have been worn forty years
ago, and with manners, dialect and
habits which prevail nowhere in the
United States today.
I live a good part of the time and
rote at every election in a country
town of a few hundred inhabitants.
It is distinctly rural, yet its people
ire as up-to-date in their clothes and
as correct in their manners and speech
as well-bred people in any city; much
more so than the general run of New
Yorkers. Yet New York and the
other cities get their impression of
small towns from such movies as this
Dne.
No wonder they call village folk
'hicks." They forget that the men
who head the business enterprises of
their cities-New York, Chicago and
dll the rest-nine times out of ten
grew up in these country villages and
lave proved themselves better than
dty-bred folks in the competitive
Pme of life.
a. a
MOVIES
According to Mr. Will H. Hays,
President of the Association of Mo-
ion Picture Producers, the movies
re going to clean themselves up
gain They are going to eliminate
ndecncy and sugge ene incen-
ives to vice and crime and about
everything else that censors have ob-
ected to.
That. is all ve good as far as it
roes, but it doesn't go far enough.
What the movies need more than any-
hing else is some relation to real life.
rer real danger to the young is
be false impression they give of the
way in which people .of different
minds and clsar a atd live.
IEmer Rice has write a book, "A


HOUSING
The British Government proposes to
rebuild all of the unsanitary dwellings
in the British Isles. The program will
take forty years. Owners can be com-
pelled, under this plan, to tear down
old houses and rebuild them.
We rebuild everything every forty
years. That is the average life of a
building in America. Many dwellings
are much older than that; I live in
Winter in one that was built in New
York about 100 years ago and in Sum-
mer in a farmhouse that is 144 years
old. But ideas of construction, sani-
tation and the utilization of space
change so rapidly that most people
want a new house every twenty years
or so.

The regular weekly meeting
of the Yededim club was held
at the home of Edward Mil-
ler. The regular course of busi-
ness was gone thru and re-
freshments were then served.
A reading was given by Louis
Stern. An affair will be given
by the club Sunday night, at
Carters Pier.


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Page 2


C. D. LEFFLER
IDETTE G. LEWIS
IEO. W. MOORE
RED W. McKAY
H. 3. OLIVER


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


A LETTER

TO THE CITIZENS OF MIAMI
By J. C. PENNEY


April 1, 1930
In the early part of 1928, several of my associates and I ac-
quired the majority of the stock of the City National Bank in
Miami, believing that in so doing a great service could be rendered
to the community. Our purpose was to help stabilize the banking
situation in Miami.
About two years prior to 1928, the Bank had absorbed two
local institutions-Miami Bank & Trust Company and Commercial
Bank & Trust Company-and as a result it sustained losses which
were made more severe because of the hurricane and the collapse
of real estate values in Miami.
It became necessary to make good these losses and according-
ly in 1928 and shortly thereafter we put into the Bank Two Mil-
lion Dollars of new money and removed from its assets a like
amount of bad paper. While this action on our part went a long
way toward remedying the situation, we have found now after a
searching examination and evaluation of all the Bank's receivables
that it is advisable to still further rid it of questionable assets.
To carry into effect our decision to keep the Bank in a thor-
oughly sound condition, we have as of date of March 31, 1930, put
into the Bank another One Million Dollars of new money and have
at the same time reduced our capital funds by One Mllion Dollars,
thereby charging off Two Million Dollars of bad and questionable
assets.
So we now advise the public of the steps'that we have taken,
feeling that they will appreciate this frank statement of facts.
As has been shown we have in the past three years sustained
heavy losses, but we have made good these losses and put the
Bank in a strong and enviable position.
Our capital and surplus of One Million Dollars gives adequate
funds with which to operate a bank with many times the total de-
posits that we now have.
It is our purpose to conduct the City National Bank in Miami
along conservative lines. We have ample funds with which to
meet the legitimate demands of business, and we stand ready to
accord credits to any of our customers whose business is in such
condition to warrant assistance.
I have the utmost confidence in the future of Miami and the
whole of Southern Florida, and my associates and I have evidenced
this faith by our investments in Miami. We have been squarely
behind the City National Bank in Miami since we entered it three
years ago. We have backed the Bank and Miami unreservedly in
the past, and we shall continue to do so in the future. The City
National Bank in Miami solicits the business of the people of this
section.
I want to take this opportunity to thank our depositors for
their patronage and to express the hope that they will join us in
building a greater Miami.
(Signed)
J. C. PENNEY,
Chairman of the Board of Directors
of City National Bank in Miami.

OFFICERS


HUGH H. CORDON. Jr.
President


R. H. DANIEL,
Amt. Cuhier


8. M. TATUM
P. W. VANDIRPOOL
W. J. WELLER
G. CONRAD WESTmERVLT


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN-A MEDIUM OF ANj) FOR MIAMI JEWRY!


H. G. RETALICK.
Art. Vice-Prmident


D
J. C. PENNEY,
Chairman of Board
WALTER R. COMFORT. ,
F. M. HUDSON BUIB
HUGH H. GORDON, Jr. TI
ERNEST R. GRAHAM FP


H. B. OLIVER,
Vice-Preident
Vice-PrstMdet 'ad CaUer
MAX OROVITZ,


DIRECTORS
RICHARDSON SAUNDERS,
Vice-Chairman


_-- II Il I Il e I n rm ---~-1-;1-1-----~---- -------


Mr. and Mrs. Max Kupfer-
stein both active workers in
Beth David and other local in-
stitutions were the hosts of
the entire Congregation of
Beth David last Friday night
in the vestry rooms of the
Synagogue immediately after
the services.
*
Mrs. Barbara Greenberg re-
turned fro mher honeymoon
------------


UNITED GAS

UTILITIES, INC.
-OWNERS-
GAS COMPANY
of Miami Beach
Fort Lauderdale Florida
Gas Co.

GAS SERVICE
Fort Lauderdale, Holly-
wood, Dania, Miami Shores
Miami Beach
-Offices-
1036 LINCOLN ROAD
MIAMI BEACH


GNP-


~Z~P~u~k~p~k~,


--


.iday, April18 1930
last week and is now rin
her home in W. Palm Beach
where her husband is asso
cited in business withher
brother.


Ever believing in the prefer.
ovation of Health in God's
Own Country, we have de.
Sdicated ourselves to the pro.
duction of the finest and
purest
MILK
For the Baby and the Adult
Our own old Fashioned
BUTTERMILK
Poultry and day old Eggs

IVES

CERTIFIED

DAIRY

OJUS, FLA.
Florida's First Certified
Dairy
Miami 'Phone 2-8831


a


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Friday, April 18, 1930

THE JEWISH

FLORIDIAN
A weekly newspaper published at
Miami, Florida
by
The Jewish Floridian Publishing
Company
652 S. W. FIRST STREET
Phone 2-8745



EDITORIAL STAFF
J. LOUIS SHOCHET
A CHOCHOM
BEN DOROM
A. N. ASHER


THE FESTIVAL
OF FREEDOM

Two elements serve to make
the Passover a bulwark of
strength for the Jew. The joy
that radiates in every home
on this festival, and the faith
that Israel derives from it,
have made this period in the
year stand out as the happi-
est. While the Rosh Hashonah
and Yom Kippur days are
awe-aspiring and call for reck-
oning, Passover reigns su-
preme as a festival of un-
bounded joy and courage.
The story of Passover has
been repeated for 3,500 years.
Yet the people can not tire of
repeating its lessons, of chant-
ing its songs, of relating its
stories. In a sense it is a uni-
versal holiday. Because it
grew out of the striving after
the first Magna Charta. It
celebrates the first revolt of
a people against slavery. It is
the festival of freedom after
which have been patterned all
the great revolts in all his-
tory.
But for the Jew it means
even more than this. It is the
reservoir for unending cour-
age and faith. It is the festi-
val which proclaims to Jewry
that "the Guardian of Israel
neither sleeps nor slumbers,"
The lessons of this, the old-
est of festivals, are as appli-
cable today as they were more
than a hundred generations
ago, and they proclaim to the
Jew that righteousness will
yet prevail; that the people
will yet regain its heritage.
Coupled with the courage
that is derived from the festi-
val's lessons is the joy which
it ushers into the Jewish
home. Song and laughter, ]
thanksgiving and faith, rule
the day, and proclaim that Is- ,
rael is unconquerable.

MATZOTH WIN IN
RUSSIA t
I
The important question '
concerning the suppression of t
religion in Russia is whether e
the people willingly submit to 1
oppressive measures and ac- s
cept them as the expression t
of their own sentiments, or
whether they rebel against f
them. It is, after all, the will i
of the people that must tri- f
umph. r
In the case of the Jews, in a
spite of the fact that they are i
Jews who have led the cam- ii
paigns against Zionism, He- r
brewism, Judaism, all indica- t


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


tions are that the masses re
bel, whenever rebellion is pos
sible, against the oppression
We have, in proof of this, th,
report of the Jewish Telegra
phic Agency from Russia thai
"the anti-Passover campaign
in Moscow this year will be a
weak affair because the Jew-
ish Communists will have nc
issue and will have to limit
their Moscow program to
merely a few anti-religious
concerts during Passover eve
which actually amounts to
nothing."
This report also states that
"on the other hand the num-
ber of Jews registering for
matzoth baked from leavened
flour (a special emergency
ruling permits this) at the
Moscow synagogues is grow-
ing daily. Matzoth bakeries
are now being opened in dif-
ferent sections of the city
with official sanction."
Which goes to prove that
while some Jews will always
be in the front line trenches
fighting for reaction, the
masses follow the natural in-
stinct and remain Jewish in
practice. While the Yevsect-
zia's remnants will.stage anti-
Passover campaigns Russian
Jewry as a whole will be cele-
brating the Festival of Free-
dom with their hopes directed
to the day when Soviet Russia
will be freed from proletarian
reaction, just as it was freed
from Czarist autocracy.

THE MARRIAGE
BROKERS ORGANIZE

The shadchanim of New
York are now incorporated as
the Marriage Brokers' Asso-
ciation, and the traditional
matrimonial agents now hope
to protect themselves for the
collection of their fees, just
as the real estate brokers are
protected in their dealings.
Several months ago a Phila-
delphia judge refused to en-
force the collection of a shad-
chan's fee because he inter-
preted it as public policy that
marriage be contracted by the
;wo parties free of any influ-
nce "brought to bear by some
nore experienced or powerful
vill." An editorial writer in a
New York daily saw in this
ruling "neither very good con-
ract law nor good sociology"
becausee "by that definition a
pntract to purchase a sky-
craper is not valid if a couple
f real estate shadchans help-
d to bring seller and buyer
together. The purchase of
10,000 worth of bonds would
e null if brought about by
ie intervention of an attrac-
ive young bond shadchan
Ltely out of Harvard."
A spokesman for the fair
ex, writing in a London An-
lo-Jewish weekly recently,
declared that she could not
nd it within her "to shed
tany tears at the passing of
le marriage broker as an im-
)rtant Jewish life factor."
o this feminist "the work of


ie shadchan in Jewish soci-
;y of all grades has long out-
ved his earthly'and none too
y m p a thethic corporealiza-
on."
With all due respect for
Bminine pride-and there is
>om also for defense of the
mint-hearted male-let it be
corded to the credit of the
ladchan that he was once an
iportant factor in the Jew-
h community. The mar-
ages he has contracted have
Ben successful and were ac-


CHASER
1\ (EU"""


Some men drink to forget,
but few forget to drink.
4* *
Every man thinks his wife
has the best husband on
earth.
*
There is a period in every
girl's life when she dislikes
her surname.
*
Fewer flowers to the dead
and flour to the needy living
would help some.
*
The average woman can
waste a lot of time trying to
transform a wrinkle into a
dimple.
*


"Women don't always
their agreements, but
are sure to keep their
pacts."
*


keep
they
com-


Let a women talk herself to
death and she will die happy.
**
Nature never made a mis-
take-not even when woman
was created.
*
The doctor's bill is about
the toughest dose the patient
has to swallow.
*
Virtue may be its own re-
ward, but there is more mon-
ey in selling gold bricks.
*
A man likes to have it said
that his baby looks like him,
but he gets mad if told he re-
sembles the baby.
*
We were afraid, while the
big gusher was spraying Ok-
lahoma with oil, that some-
one would try to show non-.
chalance by lighting a Murad.
*
Tasting one of those arti-
chokes served in the restau-
rant the other day, it occurred
to me that the cook had spoil-
ed a very nice buttonhole
bouquet.
*
"A Michigan man," says
the Newark News, "tried to
kiss a married woman in a
dance hall. She slapped him.
He slapped her. She slapped
him. He slapped her. Who
knows? This may form the
basis for a new dance."
*
A woman that meeteth her
husband with a frown and
arms akimbo is like unto a
cloudy morn. A storm is brew-
ing for that day.
companies by fewer divorces
than the modern elopements.
If "faint heart ne'er won fair
lady," the shadchan as inter-
mediary has given courage to
man. The religiously minded
at least never had reason to
doubt the wisdom of mar-
riages so contracted because
"marriages are made in hea-
ven" and mere mortals cannot
stay the hand of Providence,
and whatever they oy is to
advance the Alnighty's
choice.
Even if only to keep alive
in Jewish life one of the most
powerful elements for humor,
the shadchan may continue to
function. And if figures do
not lie, and celibacy is on the
increase, then we say to the
shadchan: "Carry on."


The selfish and greedy of
gain filleth a gunny sack with
greenbacks to lay his weary
head on at death.

Those who seek to take
away by law a man's pipe and
tobacco are like unto the old
tavern boarder who borrowed
the only lobby lamp to make
his toilet, and then failed to
return it.
*
A late spring is like unto
those who are always a sea-
son behind in meeting their
accounts.

Women, like bad eggs,
should be handled with care.

The wise wife feeds her
husband before asking him
for money.
*
Chasing dirty linens up and
down a washboard is hard on
wedding rings.
*
Girls should set a good ex-
ample if they want young
men to follow them.
*
No woman is ever half as
good looking as she thinks
some man thinks she is.
*
Some workmen are merely
machines; others use their
heads as well as their hands.
*
If a girl is unable to marry
her ideal she has to content
herself with marrying some
other girl's.
North-Let's see. Where
and by whom was the Declar-
ation of Independence signed?
West-By my lawyer, *in
Reno, old man.

Mr. Follies-Walter, here's
a dollar tip.
Walter-I thank you, sir.
Do you wish to reserve a
table ?
Mr. Follies No, I shall
bring in a party of friends.
Just tell us that every table
is engaged.


Mrs. Gassaway-Have you
heard that the president of
the electric company has had
his little girl christened "Elec-
tra" ?
Mr. Gassaway (president of
the gas company)-Then we
will call our little girl "Gas-
andra."
*.
The Junior Yegg-Wot's de
nighty for?
The Senior Yegg-Sh! Put
it on. Den w'en de guy wakes
up an' sees you friskin' his
clothes he'll t'ink you're his
wife.
Little Arthur (reading his
book.-Papa,, it says here
"The beast in man awoke."
What do they mean?
Papa-What do they mean?
Just go over there and' set
down on mamma's new hat
and you'll find out.
*
Bill-Poor old Jim is sure
in a quandary today.
Ed-Did he get his salary
reduced?
Bill-No; he don't know
whether to telLthe staff about
his latest golf score or what
his kid did at home last night.


Page 3


Mrs. Chatterton-Love me
still ?
Her Husband Certainly!
In fact, I prefer you that
way!
*
First Beggar Yesterday
you were blind: today you are
deaf and dumb.
Second Beggar Yes.; you
see, I've enlarged my busi-
ness.

It isn't so bad if it only
rains cats and dogs, but the
item about a St. Louis airman
taking a cow for a ride over
the city has us wodried.
*
"It may take years to make
a tree, but most girls can
make a sap in a hurry."
*
Jimmy (four year)-Mam-
ma! I just saw a rat!
Mamma-No, Jimmy, it's
just imagination.
Jimmy (a little later)-
Mamma! Has imagination a
long tail?
** *
Mrs. Pester Well, you
married me after boasting
that you wouldn't marry the
best woman in the world.
Her husband-And I didn't.
I know lots of better ones.Y'
*
Martin-If you refuse to
marry me I'll blow out my
brains.
Mabel-Why, that's impos-
sible.
Martin-Perhaps you think
that I haven't a pistol?
Mabel-Oh, no doubt, you
have a pistol.
*
When a long-winded orator
pauses to take a drink of wat-
er, it is a case of water mak-
ing a windmill go.

Mrs. Newlygilt (to daugh-
ter) Jane, dear! Sing the
song the French professor
charged $50 an hour to teach
you!

The Peroxide Ingenue -
you seen my new act? I in-
troduce a trained cat.
The Henna Soubrette I
getcha. It's one of them sis-
ter acts.
S* *
C o u n s elor Widemouth-
Better let me handle your
case. Don't try it yourself.
Don't you know a man who is
his own lawyer has a fool for
a client?
The Litigant-Even so, I'd
rather have a fool for, a client
than a fool for a lawyer.
*
The Man Friday-This is a
pleasant place to dwell. All it
needs to make it a true Gar-
den of Eden is an Eve and a
serpent.
Robinson Crusoe-Bring on
the snake if you want to, but
nix on the janes, I'm hiding
away from my wife right now.
4
What some public speakers
need is better terminal facil-
ities.
*


Every girl on
likes being kissed
wrong fellow.
4a *


earth dis-
- by the


Few men, would care to be
as wicked as they like to have
women think they are.

The greatest mistake a man
can make is to believe that
people like to hear him talk.
*
A woman thinks she is a
man's superior because he
takes off his hat to her.


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN-A MEDIUM OF ANDFOR MIAMI JEWY!

_Aw-


a.-* I. ..


'

. s

. -


1


--


.


--Y------ -- ----g~II- ----~Yii


- I







THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


We would appreciate your
forwarding all society and
organization items to the
Jewish' loridlan, 652 S. W.
S 1st street, or phone 2-8745
not later than noon Wed-
nesday.
The Miami Chapter of Ha-
dassah held its annual elec-
tion for officers last Tuesday
afternoon and among those
elected to office were the fol-
lowing: Mrs. I. Cohen, presi-
dent; Mrs. I. A. Ruscol, first
vice president; Mrs. M. Krie-
ger, second vice president;
Mrs. A. L. Kanter, Recording
secretary, Mrs. Harry Wein-
berg, corresponding secre-
tary; Mrs. Milton Weiner, fi-
nancial secretary, Mrs. H. Ru-
bin, treasurer, Mrs. Sam Sim-
onhoff, auditor and Mesdames
Louis Zeientz and Samuel
Snowe, active members and
Mrs. M. Plant, honorary mem-
ber of the board of trustees.
SThese officers will be install-
ed at an installation banquet
which will be held some time
during May, the exact time
and place to be announced
shortly in these columns.
*
Mr. and Mrs. I. B. Jacobsen
of Baltimore are visitors to
Miami, during Passover week,
on their way to Cuba to at-
tend a convention of the Re-
liance Life Insurance Com-
pany. Mr. Jacobsen is presi-
dent of the Million Dollar club
of the company and is well-
known in Baltimore in com-
munal affairs having been
president of a number of or-
ganizations during his resi-
dence there.
*
Mana-Zucca Music club in
presenting Richard Hageman
to its members on Monday af-
ternoon at the Civic theater
had the rare privilege of hav-
ing at one of its regular meet-
ings a great director and com-
poser as guest artist.
Applause that greeted Mr.
Hageman continued several
minutes and became a spon-
taneous ovation. Similar ap-
preciatifn was extended at the
conclusion of the concert.
Mr. Hageman played the
accompaniments for members
of the club who sang his
songs.
Members who participated
in the program were Adelaide
Rittenhouse, Ruth Rarrell,
Percy Long, Ruby Showers
Baker, Dora Miller, and Mana-
Zucca and Jane French who
gave a splendid performance
of Grieg's "Sonata in F. maj-
or," with piano and violin, by
request.
*
Mr. and Mrs. Alex Miller
entertained at a dinner party
last week at their home.
Guests were Mrs. E. Morton,
Mrs. J. Rappaport, O. Schreib-
er, Miss L. Cohen of Faust, N.
Y.; Miss Sadye Schwartz of
New York City, Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Bell, Mr. and Mrs.
Adolph Wertheimer, Miss
Katherine Goldstein of Pitts-
burgh, Pa. and Mr. and Mrs.
GI Krt King.
*** S,


Supper bridge given by Mr.
and Mrs. Irvin Cassel Wednes-


day evening at their home in
Miramar assembled a small
group of friends that included
Mr. and Mrs. John E. Nor-
man, Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Shinn
Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Macfar-
lane, Mr. and Mrs. Vernon
Seaver, Mrs. J. Murray Jac-
oby, E. Swope, Miss Doris
Cromer, Mr. and Mrs. Lee
Rogers, Mrs. Arthur French,
Ms. A. J. Cushman, Mr. and
Mrs. G. Weizl, Miss Tarboux
and Mr. and Mrs. A. Bolton.
Prizes for scores were award-
ed Mrs. Norman, Mrs. Jacoby,
Mr. Swope and Mr. Shinn.
*
Among those celebrating
the first seder at the G. & R.
Kosher Restaurant were: Mr.
and Mrs. Max Berni, Cleve-
land, Ohio; Mr. and Mrs. M.
Barasch, Miami; Mr. and Mrs.
Hyman Weingarten, Leslie
Weingarten and Meyer Wein-
garten. Flint, Mich.; Mrs. M.
Bushkuer and Estelle Bush-
ker, Chicago; Mrs. B. Mendel-
son, Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. J.
S. Cowan, Detroit; Molly Cra-
mer, New York; Mr. and Mrs.
J. W. Epstein and Theodore
Epstein, Chicago; Mr. and
Mrs. I. Kamerman, Pitts-
burgh, Pa.; I. L. Reisman, Mi-
ami; Mr. and Mrs. Harry Is-
aacs, Miami; Mr, and Mrs.
Max Srolovitz, New York; Al
Friedman, Isador Friedman
and Jennie Friedman, Chica-
go; Mrs. Reah Duggan, Chi-
cago; William A. Stearns, De-
troit; Ruth Jones, New Or-
leans; Mrs. B. Fisher and
Daughter; Muriel Faith Fish-
er, Harrisburg, Pa.
Marvin B. Schlanger, the
son of Mr. and Mrs. Dave
Schlanger, entertained a large
number of his juvenile friends
at his home last Saturday to
commerate his fourth birth-
day anniversary. The home
was decorated with kewpie
dolls, and other child decora-
tions, and animal novelties.
Games were played and re-
freshments were served.
During the afternoon a
large birthday cake was cut.
Among those present were:
Macky Kraft, Shirley and Al-
vin Kraft, Margery and Joyce
Rosengarten, Morton Kauf-
man, Herbert Altschal, Mar-
ion, Rose, and Jerry Blanck,
Eugene and Edward Somberg,
Jerry Rauzin, Isadora Schech-
ter, Eunice Belaga, Phyliss
Jean Rosenthal, Belle and
Carolyn Tannenbaum, Jean
Weinberg, Grace Berg, Alice
and Paul Stratford and Jos-
eph Goldman.
Next Sunday night a mem-
orial meeting to honor the
memory of the late I. L. Pe-
retz, noted Yiddish writer,
will be held at the Arbeiter
Ring hall, 701 N. W. 5th ave.,
when Dr. A. D. Halpern, J.
D Grohman, A. Dock, Shirley
Elkin, Ethel Lazar and others
will tell of the accomplish-
ments, life and work of the
noted writer. A musical pro-
gram will be presented at the
same time. The public is urg-
ed to attend and no charge of
any. kind will be made.
*


The official installation of
the recently elected officers of


IE


r


Page 4


mavm


the Sisterhood of Temple Is- she is being assisted oy Ries- o r.... nome.
rael will be held on Monday, dames Gordon Davis, Adolph Among those present were
May 5th, in the form of a Wertheimer and Ben Watts, Mrand Mrs. L. Seiden, Mr.
luncheon and the exact place Mrs. I. M.'Weinstein will actand Mr. H.Freed and daugh.
will be announced in these as toastmistress at the lun- ter, Mr. and Mrs. F Brown
columns shortly. Mrs. Her- cheon. Freedman, and M r. and. E.
bert E. Kleinman, is chair- ree an d r. and Mrs.
man of the committee in The Executive board of the Michael Arnold.
charge of arrangements and Council of Jewish Women will Continued on Page 5





Cotton I



Mather


WE ARE FIGHTING

HIGH PRICES
In This Sensational Sale of Our $75,000 Stock of
the Market's Finest FURNITURE and RUGS. Buy
Now for the Present or Next Season's Use and
SAVE HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS.


Our



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S____IS NOW ON I



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All Maple Wood with Cane


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= G UARANTEE D Mather Finance Plan
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SLook for the Big Signs at I

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= Badlaml-er
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befoeorrdb sadw logaa-$00 O
te h rc s o lw La lee



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= NORTH MIAMI AT FOURTH ST. 5
lllllllllllllllll lllllllllllllll~ M f llI fll~ni llIn i ~lllll.l l.ll .. | ||i,|Ha


THINKING JEWS ALL SUBSCRIBE TO THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN! DO YiOTl
'. 'l .


nc- .l?'t


_-'-. n- --V
T Y -

1 1 1---


41 -_ -


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I I


r ri4y, April 18, 193o0
hold its meeting on Wedne.
day, April 28rd, at Kapt
hall at which time imporsa
business will be taken up

Mr. and Mrs. Morris Dub.
ler entertained a number of
relatives and friends at Seder
last week at ha..


Iw~orw~orw~~ ,.IY


.agC~i ~Y~i~E~p~~..-i...,-a~.L.*L,~ _.~P- ~r~Ybl I;L-IIIIPY~LCIU~;~-~~_~i~iU_








Friday, April18, 18, 0


SOCIETY


(Continued from Page 4)
Goldie Warschoff was the
guest at a surprise party giv-
en at her home, 1342 N. W.
seventh Court by her parents
Mr. and Mrs. D. S. Warschoff,
Friday night, the date being
her birthday. The house was
decorated in blue and gold. A
salad course was served.
The guests were Goldie
Warschoof, Margaret Ray-
num, Ruth Mannis, Jessie
Fink, Elizabeth Durdan, Ger-
trude Rappaport, Faye Silver-
man, Be a Alpert, Lillian
Wucher.
William Elman, Jake Jac-
obs, Morty Fay, Abe Winer,
Albert Riesman, Arthur
Thompson, Harold Zonn, Mike
Silberstein, Jerry Goldberg,
Stanton Field, KennethWJ..
and Stanton Field.,

In charge of the distribu-
tion of baskets of Passover
necessities which the Council
of Jewish Women distributed
to more than twenty needy
Jewish families were Mrs. P.
Scheinberg, chairman, Mrs.
Morris Dubler, Mrs. Max Do-
brin, Mrs. Max Ghertler, Mrs.
Meyer Schwartz, Mrs. M.
Weingarten and Mrs. S. Ru-
bin.

Mr. & Mrs. Harry V. Simon
entertained a number of their
friends at .a card party at
home last week. Refreshments
were served and prizes award-
ed to the highest score.
Among those present were
Mr. and Mrs. M. WWeintraub,
Mr. and Mrs. Nat Roth, Mr.
and Mrs. Morris Dubler and
others

A regular meeting of the
Friendship League, was held
at the clubrooms of the club
on the 17th floor of the Con-
gress bldg., last Wednesday
night. Mr. Gilford Ornstein
was elected to the Board of
Governors to fill a vacancy.
The following were appointed
to committees: Murray Kell-
man to Good and Welfare,
Wilton Brill to Finance, Fred
Platt to Educational, and Abe
Shonfield to Athletics.
The next meeting of the
Board of Directors will be
held at the home of Miss Paul-
ine Shonefield, 344 N. E. 26th
street, on Monday .evening,
April 28th, ~iad all members
and visitors are invited to at-
tend.
*
We extend our sincere sym-
pathies to Mr. Mack Green-
berg on the sudden death of
his father last week at Jer-
sey city.


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


Mr. and Mrs. I. B. Jacobsen
of Baltimore, entertained a
party of friends at the Pala-
tial Kosher Restaurant last
Monday evening. Among those
present were Miss Sarah
Shochet and Mr. and Mrs. J.
Louis Shochet and family.
*
Quite a large gathering re-
presentative both of Miami as
well as cosmopolitan Jewry of
the entire country enjoyed
the Passover Seders at the
Palatial Kosher Restaurant.
Mr. I. H. Pekarsky conducted
both Sedorim and was assist-
ed by a number of the guests
present. The usual ceremonial
was followed. Among those
present were: Mr. and Mrs. H.
Levin, Reading, Pa.; Mr. and
Mrs. I. B. Jacobsen, of Balti-
more, Md.; Mr. and Mrs. Tom
Williams, M. Kaplan and par-
ty, Mr. and Mrs. J. Wolf, De-
troit; A. Stimson, DesMoines,
Iowa; Mrs. Simon and party
of New York, S, Drisen of
Yonkers, Mrs. Greenwood of
New York; L. Baldinger,
Brooklyn, M. Nathan, Mr. and
Mrs. Harry Goldberg and par-
ty, Mr. and Mrs. Goldiner and
party, Mrs. Offis, New York;
Mr. and Mrs. L. Friedman of
Chicago; H. Bernstein, Atlan-
tic City; M. Finn and family
of Detroit, Mr. and Mrs. Ben-
net of Cleveland; Mr. and
Mrs. Rubin of Chicago; Mr.
and Mrs. Kosternoff, Mr. and
Mrs. J. Grodin, Mr. and Mrs.
J. Mills and daughter, Mr. and
Mrs. N. Neufeld, Mr. and Mrs.
Sam Kanter and Mr. and Mrs.
Herbert E. Scherr and party,
Mr. and Mrs. Krister and par-
ty of Akron, Ohio, Mr. and
Mrs. Lieberman and Mr. and
Mrs. Kane of Chicago, Ill.;
Mr. and Mrs. Berman and son,
Mr. and Mrs. Wagner of Bos-
ton, Mass.; Mr. and Mrs.
Fine and son of Cincinnati,
Ohio, Robert Roth, Mr. and
Mrs. H. Seitlin, M. Home, M.
Davis of Evansville. Indiana.

The regular bi-weekly card
party of Beth David, sponsor-
ed by the Ladies Auxiliary
was held at the Talmud Torah
Auditorium last Tuesday even-
ing at which time Mesdames
John Wolfe and S. Futterfass
acted as hostesses. A large


The Blue Ridge
Mountain Camp
FOR GIRLS
BUENA VISTA, PENNA.
Ages 6 to 14
Two hours drive from Baltimore
Reservations Limited
Phone for Catajlgue
Bertha BerkowilW Levy,
Owner and Director
Phone 28730, 1625 8. W. 15th St.


number attended and enjoyed
the Passover treats which
were given the guests. The
next card party will be an-
nounced shortly in these col-
umns.


"VERY LATEST"
By MARY MARSHALL

One hears much of the new pep-
lum suit, which is more often of
silk than of cloth. Here there is
usually a narrow belt of the mat-
erial to make a distinct division
between the slightly bodice section
and peplum.Suits of this sort are
worn now under warm coats and
will be worn without coats when


weather is warmer. Ir making
plans for your spring and summer
wardrobe be sure to consider the
importance of the peplum suit. It
is sure to be important in the fash-
ion panorama for spring: and sum-
mer.
The peplum jacket juit shown
here is of black crep( silk and is
worn as a dress with a sleeveless
blouse of belge organdie.


BUSINESS DIRECTORY
'*;i DSS*SS^s^gZSZSSSpSSp*.S^p^>ZE^gg


L. (Pop) GERSON
Buyer of All Kinds of Scrap Metal
We Sell Auto Parts
2141 N. W. SECOND AVE.
Phone 20621

BAGS and METALS
EAST COAST BAG & METAL CO.
(Inc.)
I. L. MINTZER
MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS
435-445 N. W. 8th Street
Phone 4485
PEPPER METAL CORP.
Scrap Metal and Machinery
N. W. Cor. 5th Ave. and 14th St.
Phone 22546

BUILDING SUPPLIES
J. SIMPSON
Building Materials,
Roofing Paper, Asphalt
423 N. W. N. River Drive
Phone 7251

DELICATESSEN
ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN
170 N. W. 5th St.
We Supply Your Every Want

FISH & SEA FOODS
STANDARD FISH CO.
629 W. Flagler St.
Phone 2-3362


PHARMACISTS
BRYAN PARK PHARMACY
Chas. Tannenbaum,
Pharmacist
(reg. pharmacist for 17 years)
Cor 22nd Ave. and 8th St. S. W.

CRYSTAL PHARMACY
Dr. A. D. Halpern, Ph. G. Ph. D.
Prescriptions Our Specialty
128 N. Miami Ave. Phone 29713

PIPE and STEEL

ADELMAN PIPE & STEEL CO.
58 N. E. 25th St.
Aat F. E. C. R. R. ,Phone 21420

A. & B. PIPE AND METAL CO.
Phone 31355
53 North East 25th Street

PRINTERS
MIAMI PRINTING CO.
"Printing That Pays"
Phone 23261
107 South Miami Avenue
AUTO PARTS
BLOOM AUTO REPAIR
& PARTS CO.
N. W. 17th Ave. at 23rd St.
Phone 23631
The Largest car wreckers in
Florida


AMBULANCE SERVICE
ng W. H. Combs Co., Estab. 1896
Undertaking Co. COMBS FUNERAL HOME
Underting o. hone Miami 32101
1539 N. E. 2nd Avenue
29 N. W. THIRD AVENUE MIAMI BEACH FUNERAL HOME
Phone M. B. 5-2101
Phones- 23535-31624 2 Wasihlgtoa Av,

-/ -@,@4rsiS!


D. P. GAUTIER
Announces His
Candidacy
e-1, f ha n t itin nf


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JVA
Clerk of the

Criminal Court
of Record


A long time resident of
Dade County
Your Support is solicited and
will be appreciated.
Democratic Primary,
JUNE 3, 1930

(Paid Political Advertisement)
(Paid Political Advertisement)


-PINKY-DINKY SIR WALTER PINKY'S LETTER By Terry Gilkison


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HII JAUBSCRIBE TO THE JWIS FLORIDIAN! DO YOU?


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THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN -


MA ft Apri19


nFUl FA[M l



J"N JOSEPH GAJNE5MD
MIND OVER MATTER
One of the most potent causes of disease in the digestive
tract is mental unrest. The average medical practitioner, I
believe, will agree with me when I assert that nerve-condi-
tions are more frequently the cause of constipation, liver dis-
orders and sour stomachs-far oftener than "germs." And
here I may say parenthetically-that germs have been con-
siderably overworked as a "cause" of many of the ills that
the flesh is heir to; in other words, I have arrived at the stage
in medical practice when I look out for the nerve situation
in my patient before I go gunning for the "bugs." Of course
if the malady is one of known germ-origin, and its pathology
is thoroughly established, that is different.
I believe thousands of people have told me that they
become constipated only when they travel a day or two on
railroad trains. Certainly no germs here; the nerve-currents
have simply been diverted from their usual channels; suppose
they are continually being detoured? Anxiety, business cares
grief, apprehension, any of the legion forms of mental unrest
will do the same thing. If continually indulged, they will set
up very uncomfortable chronic conditions, and may lead to
invalidism itself.
A tranquil mind is the superlative blessing of mankind.
I know of no condition that pertains more to long life and
happiness; yet men and women are toiling, moiling, day by
day, year by year, for everything else but that! The pearl
of great price slips away from them because they do not
strive to attain it ... which they might lay hold of, if they
would.
The man who expects to cure his constipation with medi-
cine is only heaping future trouble for himself. I have seen
a proper form of mind, a carefully selected diet, and strictly
regular attention to bodily routine cure the most obstinate
cases-but it takes good generalship and an obedient soldier
to win such a battle.


VOTE FOR


A. S. (Red) ELDRIDGE
CANDIDATE FOR RE-ELECTION TO THE
OFFICE OF


County Purchasig Agent

To insure a dean, honest, economic and efficient ad-
ministration in the PURCHASING of County Supplies.

(This Political Advertisement Paid for by Friends)



I will be a candidate to succeed myself as a member
of the
House of Representatives
in the Democratic Pri-
mary.
I shall qualify in
Group 3,
which is the same group
I ran in at the last elec-
tion. I feel that the val-
uable experience gained
by having served in the
last Legislature will en-
able me to render a
greater service to this


community and state in
ring needfal and nec-
y essary Ikgislati.
A Representative
must, of necessity, seek
r~ee-letiem ipea his rec-
rd of service; this I am
primd d4..


, ran- n..n


Jewish Cantor
Is Excluded

London-Cantor Oltschul,
noted German Jewish cantor,
who was called to a position
in Glassgow, Scotland was de-
ported when he arrived to as-
sume his duties on the eve of
Passover, to Ostend Belgium
whence he had originally em-
barked for England. Appeals
to the Home Secretary result-
ed in a promise that a visa
would be immediately issued
permitting his entry to Eng-
land.
Mr. I. H. Pekarsky and Mr.
and Mrs. I. B. Jacobsen were
guests on a trip down the Bis-
cayne Bay on the Se-Bot-M
Boat, last Wednesday and
spent a very enjoyable and
instructive afternoon


TIVOLI


W. Flagler at 8th Ave.

Western Electric
S Talking Equipment
None Better
S Sunday and Monday,
April 20-21
RAMON NOVARRO
in
S"DEVIL MAY CARE"
The Musical Romance
Sensation
SThe Golden Voice on the
Silver Screen
4 4
Tues., Wed., Thur. Apr. 22-24
MARION DAVIES 0
in
"MARIANNE $
The Most Tuneful Talkie Yet
SFri. and Sat.. Apr. 25-26 '
S ALL-STAR CAST
in
S"BROAD AY Y
MELODY"
? All-Talking, All-Singing,
4 All-Dancing
4 4


I here


~T~~An cing for
qS,
S... State
Legislature
"N V 1 GROTP 3.

S J.B. SOMMERS
Resident of Miami for Ten
Years.
"- lHonest, Loyal and Fearless
Your support is solicited and
will be appreciated.
Demoratic Primary,
JUNE 3, 1930

(Paid Politiml Advertisement)


Announcing the Candidacy of



,- FRED My


announce my candidacy
for the office of Solicitor
of the Criminal Court of
Record of Dade County.
S Florida. in the coming
Democratic Primary of
June 3rd. 1930.
S I held this position
for eight years from
S 1917 to 1925. by vote of
the people and bv ap-
pointment of the Gover-
nor. I am proud of my
S official record. I was
nominated in the pri-
mary two years ago. but
for unknown reasons
S wa not appointed by
Governor Carlton. G. E
McCaskill was appoint.
ed the day after the
State Senate adjourned
on June 21st, 1929.


PINE
- .


For

County Solicitor


III L
1928
now i
1. 1
oroset


Platform-
e June primary in
and my platform
s:
Eight years' public
cutor in this coun-


ly.
2. An excelled rec-
ord of coviction of
criminals.
3. Earnest prosecu-
tion without favor and
without mpermtio
4. Devothoa of entire
time to duties of office
to the ex~a Oi of pri-
rate practice.
5 Attentive recep-
tion and ivestiation
of all paints with
prMM al iast action.
I a-.0M 7- suwpOt
and ~ e- dicirt pub-

Renpaftfal Yoers,
PaED PINE.


I am poitive CGoernor Carlton e lfl appoint me if I am nominated in the c"ing cmtw M aI
in his aense f fair pl y and Ideala of Democracy, I knew from & adI llu. 9 hL 'Qi MM W "nLbd
he voiee of the people in thlb instance. kw fre t r
aMeo nMe i ame-,-.o)


ADVM SAVE YOU MONEY AND GIVE YOU SERVI.


S'.
. .." ] .


EI I 11 -


- -


"
~'~~rr~n~3i~4m~.~ieffr~~";'
'


G. E. McCASKCLL
County Solicitor since Jane, 1 ItuM l O candidacy
for office of County Solicitor in th Dmcta e Party, rimua
election to be held June 3rd, 1930, ad plede:- :-
0 I e fes eeragtic and
t fear o favor having in
miW alwa & that I mIst
Mrme al the peple as their
Deseim4 "t-a my time
to e a I alw I done
drimg mW entire term o.
S YTht I de and will keep
aM ubd c onrable assist.
rs, 8itd tst cmie one of
u will alw ls be in the of-
flee to jn Y and court
oudy-m dee an persons
Comply i~nts whether courts
are ins sasi or not.
That I am fee from any
Sobliatin whatever to any
ataidatiOaR, newspaper, or
perws Iwhomgper.

I consider this office a public trout. My reputation and
activity in office are open to investigation and if I am elected
I further pledge an honest administration of the office.
Your vote and confidence will be appreciated.
S P A G. E. MK CASKILL.
rPaid Po:itical Advertisement)


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