The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
March 28, 1930
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00057

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Jewish Floridian of South Broward
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Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
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Jewish Floridian of South County
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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text












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Vol -No. XIII. Miami, Florida, Friday, March 28, 1930 Price 5 Cents


To My Way of
Thinking
by
Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld

(Continued from Last Week)
the morr ow. For, that type
man is happiest when all his
thoughts are concentrated on
concrete, physical objects, and
his hands are busily engaged
fashioning these objects.
Wealth, affluence does not
necessarily spell happiness to
him. For wealth means leis-
ure, leisure means idleness,
idleness means the cessation
of creation, of fashioning con-
crete, tangible things, and be-
ginning to toy with fanciful,
intangible ideas. And the av-
erage, of course there are ex-
ceptions, man who spends the
major part of his wakeful
hours to construct or fashion
something with his hands, is
ont overly anxious to trouble
his mind with speculative
theories and abstract ideas.
It may, therefore, well be
that George is working hard,
and needlessly so, but who
can definitely say that ,he is
not gaining happiness
through his work.


Apparently the depths of
man's genius have already
been tapped. When we have
finally stopped gasping and
ah! ing over the latest ex-
tremely marvelous and incon-
ceivable invention, something
new and even more wonder-
ful and incredible 'appears,
and again, we're gushing and
exclaiming and rhapsodizing
The most recent one is not
a mechanical marvel, but
something that despite its
utter simplicity should and
does posses untold potential-
ities for the future. Imagine
being able to definitely de-
cide beforehand what gender
your offspring shall be .. .
male or female. And yet, such
is the case.
Professor Franz Unterber-
berg, Germany, has caused
a stir in the medical world
with his announcement that
parents will henceforth be
able to determine what their
offspring shall be boy or
girl. How? It is extremely
simple. A certain chemical
salt is employed to produce
the desired gender. Only a few
of the fifty odd cases experi-
mented upon proved failures.
Think of the inestimable hap-
piness the discovery will re-
sult in. Think of the numer-
ouA parents who have been
"dying for a girl" and have
had five boys in a row. Or, of
those parents who were bless-
ed with seven girls when they
would gladly have given their
most precious possessions for
a kaddishh.".
RUT on the other hand,
think of the considerable
fun this discovery precludes..
No longer wil mothers pre-
pare two complete layettes,
because "it'll probably be a
girl, but, then again, you nev-
er can tell; it might be a
boy." No more flush of pride
and happiness at the pleas-
ant discovery that the stork
delivered the correct order.
The element of chance will be


Stranger Than Fiction
I --------- -TTTI' ~ ~ ^ -- ----- I


Esther Leve, 21, was separated from
her parents at 7 and brought to
America. Her father hinted all over
V"urope for her. In the press clipping
I -:'rva in Chicago where she works
i.she ,fund his name and address and
;' startuiL for_.Palestine to join him,

Miamian Guilty
of Tax Evasion

Morris C. Hodes, president
of Maryland Shirt shop, In-
corporated, was sentenced to
a year and a day in the federal
prison at Atlanta and fined
I300 yesterday when he
pleaded guilty in United
States District court to a
charge of income tax evasion.
Louis Joel, United States
assistant district attorney,
told the court that Hodes de-
frauded the government of
several thousand dollars by
making false income tax re-
turns.
Judge Halsted L. Ritter
suspended the sentence and
paroled Hodes to the United
States marshal and ordered
him to pay the fine at once.

Club Initiates
New Members

The Yeddidim Club held its
first annual initiation of mem-
bers and installation of offi-
cers at a Banquet held at
Roth's Restaurant last Wed-
nesday evening. Various haz-
ing stunts were indulged in
at the expense of the initiates.
The Yeddidim Club was or-
ganized sometime ago for the
purpose of the cultural and
athletic development of its
members and during their
brief existence have sponsor-
ed a number of interesting
literary debates and exercises,
as well as having had a series
of athletic contests at the
grounds of the Agricultural
High School at Lemon City.

Wealthy Jew
Is Kidnapped

Kansas City- The Kansas
City Star reports that Michael
H. Katz, head of the wealthy
Katz Drug Company, was kid-
napped by a gang last Wed-
nesday and was not released
until $100,000 in ransom had
been paid. The kidnapping
took place in broad daylight
a short distance from Katz's
palatian home. When his
brother Isaac paid the ransom
he was released the next day.
gone but so will disappoint-
ments and much heartache.
Daily, the world is surely and
rapidly becoming a more and
more convenient place in
which to live.


Benefit To Be For
Libraray Funil
What is hoped to be the
final benefit affair for the
containing volumes of Jewish
establishment of a Library
interest for children and
adults to be known as the
'eth David Library will be in
t form of a bridge party to
be eld this coming Sunday
even at the Talmud Torah
auditorium. This is the final
of a series of affairs given in
various homes throughout the
City by Jewish women inter-
ested in the establishment of
such a library.
Prizes will be awarded and
refreshments will be served,
in addition to which there will
be several very interesting
novelties presented for the en-
tertainment of the guests.
Those who will be in charge
of the benefit and act as host-
esses are Mrs. Israel H. Weis-
feld, Mrs. Morris Rubin,, Mrs.
Abe Aronowitz, Mrs. Van Gel-
der, Mrs. Morris Solomon and
Mrs. J. Louis Shochet.

Obtains Divorce
Because of Bridge


SEATTLE, Wash., Be-
cause he trumped his wife's
ace in a bridge game, William
Ellis was a single man today.
"In spite of the presence of
two of our friends who were
playing against us," Ellis told
the court yesterday, "my wife
completely lost her temper
when I spoiled her play. She
threw an alarm clock at me
and knocked out one of my
teeth. Then she packed my
clothes and ordered me out of
the house."
Judge Robert M. Jones
granted him a divorce.

Women To Practice
Shooting Husbands

Manchester Guardian: A
gunsmith in Paris has opened
a shooting galleyfor women,
and the frequenters are not
invited to fire at clay-pipes,
clay-pegions or celluloid balls
dancing on a jet of water. The
targets are all men's figures,
and the customer can select
any shape or size she wants,
from slim and tall to short
and stout. Enterprising, but
a little too much particulari-
zation.


4a AL.4 THe WORLD'* TRiour
ARe WOMEN' FAULT. THE 4
ARE 1O BLAME FOR T'HS
oTMapR MALF "


ToHead World Bank
--o-.ldB^.. ,--


Gates W. McGarrah, Chiirman of
New York Federal Reserve Bank,
who has been chosen to head the
Bank for International Settlements
established under the Yanig Plan will
headquarters at BIasel, .wJitttrland,.


Jewish Immigrants
At Last Released
LONDON-This week saw
the liberation of the last 30
immigrants held at the immi-
gration Detention camp in
East Lee, near Southampton
since 1924. They were kept
prisoners because of the
change then in the American
Quota law and this week re-
ceived their American visas
permitting them to leave.
This closes the last chapter in
the, tragedy involving more"
than 1900 Jewish immigrants
who were detained in 1924
and partially released to be
sent to different parts of the
world.


Prominent Zionist Honor System to
Paid Last Honors Finance Church


Last week we carried a
brief announcement of the
death of Louis Topkis as hav-
ing happened Thursday, night
March 20th..The information
received by a brother indicat-
ed that death had occurred as
reported in these columns.
However, though Mr. Louis
Topkis was then at death's
door, actual death did not hap-
pen until Sunday evening,
March 23rd.


Wilmington,-Louis Topkis,
millionaire manufacturer of
this city, and prominent in
Jewish charities, died last
night in his home, 2302 Bay-
ard boulevard, here. He was
fifty-seven and had returned
from his Florida winter resi-
dence recently. He had been
ill for several weeks.
Mr. Topkis was born in
Odessa, Russia, coming to
this country with his parents
when he was nine. He came to
Wilmington in 1900 and start-
ed business selling small art-
icles from a suit case. Later
he formed the Delmyra Manu-
facturing Company which
later became the Topkis
Brothers Company. The firm
now has seventeen branches
in Delaware and Maryland.
Mr. Topkis was prominent
in the Zionist Organization of
America, in the Jewish Agen-
cy of the World, chairman of
the board of trustees of the
Adas Kodesch Synagogue,
here, and head of the Hebrew
Charity Association.
In Miami where Mr. Topkis
had made his winter home for
several years he was chair-
man of the building commit-
tee which erected the Beth
Jacob Synagogue of Miami
Beach, and had been either a
speaker or presiding officer
at nearly every Zionist winter
gathering held in Greater Mi-
ami in the past several years.
He is survived by his widow
the former Miss Esther M.
Krigstone; six children, Ab-,
raham, E. Victor, David L.,
Jacob H. and Mrs. J. Wolson,
of this city, nd Mrs. Nathan-
iel J. Gold an, of Philadel-
phia, and tree brothers and
a sister, David L. Topkis,
Harry Topkis and Mrs. James
N. Ginns.
As* we are going to press
Memorial Prayer services are
being held in his memory at
Beth Jacob Synagogue, Mi-


Park Street Church, Bos-
ton, is experimenting with a
new system of church finan-
cing which it calls the "hon-
or system."
Under the new plan no
pledges are asked of anyone
but envelopes have been sent
to each regular attendant.
The honor system has been
in operation two months. The
financial condition of the
church is reported ahead, of
thj3 condition fo; the same
period a year ago.

Coroner Is At
Odds With Jews
London-In Coroner's Court
a number of Jews, who were
sitting "Shiva" in their homes
because of bereavement, did
not report when summoned
for jury duty. When the cor-
oner was advised of the rea-
son for their non-appearanCe
he demanded their immediate
presence in Court, saying
that the law was paramount
to religion. The Jewish Board
of Deputies took a hand in
the controversy and compell-
ed the Coroner to recede from
his stand.

ami Beach. Addresses will be
made Rabbi Israel H. Weis-
feld of Beth David, Rabbi Dr.
Jicob H. Kaplan of Temple
Israel and Rabbi Levin of
New York City. Other promi-
nent men will speak and Mr.
Harry I. Lipnitz, prominent
local attorney and president
of the local Zionist District,
will preside.
The funeral was held on
Monday and interment was in
the Jewish LemJ brdy ceme-
tery in Wij~iington.
It was attended by the en-
tire Jewish community 'of
Wilmington ana was one of
the largest ever witnessed
there. A delegation consisting
of Morris Rothenberg, Judge
William Lewis, Bernard Ros-
enblatt, Morris Weinberg,
Harry Furst, Joseph Weiss,
Philip Wattanberg, Dr. Bern-
stein, I. Maltin and Meyer
Weisgal represented the Zion-
ist Organization of America,
which had adopted resolu-
tions of condolence at a spec-
ial meeting of its Executive
Board called for the purpoa.
*' .,' ;'-









Friday, March 28, 1930


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


GOLDENROD
Goldenrod is a beautiful flower and
Sa pestilent weed. It grows all over the
country and so comes as near as any
to being our national flower. Modem
tnedical science says it is not golden-
frod but ragweed which causes hay
fever. If Henry Ford's experimental
goldenrod farm in Georgia succeeds in
,commercializing Edison's discovery
that goldenrod contains rubber, we
;may see goldenrod farming becoming
as widespread as wheat farming is to-
day. That is not impossible, though
,hardly probable. Yet every crop the
,!farmer grows was once a weed and
'has been made into a crop by some-
t.ody's discovery that it is useful to
humanity.

BUILDING
Plans already developed for new
Buildings to be constructed in 1930
iall for an expenditure of nearly
double that of 1929.' And this does
not include private residences. States
and municipalities have raised more
funds by bond issues in the past three
months than in any similar period, and
the proceeds of those sales will be
used for new roads, public buildings
:nd other improvements. Everything
points to a greater volume of construc-
tion work und-r way in the near fu-
ture than we bave seen since the first
year or two following the war. And
that means employment for everybody,
money freely in circulation again, re-
newed prosperity for all sorts and con-
ditions of men

ARLINGTON
The great National Cemetery In
Virginia, cross the Potomac River
from kWhingtoa, where William
Howard Taft, President and Chief
Justice, was laid to rest, is one of the
most beautiful spots in America. It
was the estate of Robert Lee, and
was confiscated by the Federal Gov-
ernment when Lee threw in his lot
with the Confederacy. Only men who
have served their country in war may
be buried there.
From the Lincoln Memorial in
Washington the great new bridge over
the Potomac leads directly to this an-
cient home of the Lees, tying the mem-
ary of the two great Civil War leaders
together and riding the gap between
North and South with a final gesture
of reconciliation.
Arlington is to America what West-
minster Abbey s to England, the bur-
ial place and shrine of our devoted
dead. No one has truly seen America
who has not seen Arlington.

BRITISH
Thirty years ago, in 1900, the Boers
of South Africa gave up their unequal
war against the British. American
sympathy was complete with the
Boers In that conflict and against the
British. It looked to all of us like a
parallel to our own Revolution. We
expected reprisals and oppression of
the conquered on the part of the Brit-
ish, but on the contrary the new gov-
ernment set up n South Africa proved
to be far p9re liberal than the old one
which the Dutch Boers had operated.
The U. S. A.--meaning in this case
the Union of South Africa-is today
an independent nation, a member of
the British Commonwealth of Nations,
to be sure, but in every respect a self-
governing state. Dutch and British
participate on even terms in its gov-
ernment, as do the French and British
in Canada. General Smuts, greatest of
the Boer war leaders, has served .as
Prime Minister.
SThis object-lesson, proving that the
the tyrannical monster which it seemed
td be under George III, has done more
than anything else to establish the
friendly feeling toward Great Britain
which now prevails almost everywhc,.
in America.

TREES
When Admiral Byrd's returning e:-
plorers reached New Zealand, the
sight which stirred them most deeply
was trees. For nearly two years they
had tot seen a tree. It is difficult:
for most of us to imagine a world


"VERY LATEST"
By Mary Marshall
The tuck-in blouse no longer
looks like a flapperish affectation,
and instead of asking ourselves, as
we did six months ago: "Will the
tuck-in blouse be accepted?" we
ask: "How long before the over-
blouse will look out of date?"
Of course no one can answer
this question but certainly fewer
over-blouses and more tuck-in
blouses are sold at the present
tjme. There are blouses made to
be worn beneath the skirt band,
others that may be worn either
way and the tendency is to shorten
the overblouse so that it extends


only a few inches
mal waistline.


below the nor-


At the same timg there is a new
type of blouse, that hardly seems
like a blouse at all, because it is
even longer than dresses of twelve
months ago. This is the new over-
blouse and the first time you see
it-with the skirt appearing several
inches below the hem-you may be
inclined to think that it is really a
last season's frock with a skirt
worn beneath to give needed length
On second glance you will see, by
the cut of the sleeves and the
shoulders and by, the placing of
the belt, that it is really quite up-
to-date.

The Doctor Young Man,
you should never marry.
The Patient-Then you do
think my ailment is incur-
able ?
The Doctor-No. It's trif-
ling. But you never can be

without trees, though in Iceland a
hundred generations have Ived and
died without ever seeing one.
We are cutting down trees faster
than we are planting new ones. We
do not think of trees as a crop, but
as a natural resource to be mined
without replacement. The Federal
Farm Board's chairman lately made
a plea for the restoration of the
"woodlot" as an important part of
every farm. Trees as a crop do pay.
They take longer from seed to market
than any other irop, but every sound
tree adds its little to the value of any
farm, and with the inevitable reduc-
tion in acreage devoted to money crops
and pasturage there is no better use
to which surplus land can be put than
growing trees for the future. More-
over, many states now exempt refor-
ested land from taxation


WORRYING DOESN'T PAY
On his way back to a college reunion, one of my friends
stopped off in the little town where he had spent his boy-
hood.
"How is business?" he asked a local merchant.
"Awful bad," was the reply. "And what's more, I don't
like the outlook."
"Why not?"
"Well, there's elements in the situation that might de-
velop a lot of trouble. At least that's the way it looks tome."
My friend lighted a cigar, and leaned over the counter.
"George," said he familiarly, "those are almost exactly
the same words I used to hear from the storekeepers when I
was a kid here twenty-five years ago. I've been a subscriber
to the local paper ever since I left, and most of those old store-
keepers have died. I have taken special notice of the size of
their estates. How much money do you think they left? Be-
tween a hundred and two hundred thousand dollars each.
And here's the funny thing-every penry was made out of
business which were always bad and always on the verge of
getting ever so much worse."
I suppose that if gravestones told the real truth, nine out
of ten of them would bear a line to this effect: "This man's
life was shortened several years by the fear of bad develop-
ments, most of which never occurred."
Even very wise men, as their years have increased, have
suffered from the evil habit of fearing the worst. The Rev.
Dr. Cotton Mather, who died two hundred years ago in Boston
was the most eminent graduate of Harvard and virtually the
founder of Yale. He had courage and a wonderful mind.
Yet in his old age he viewed the future disconsolately.
He concluded that God had brought the Pilgrims across the
ocean to "a New England desert" for a very special purpose,
but that this purpose had obviously been accomplished and
that the whole colony would "soon come to naught."
The colony shows no sign of coming to naught, but there
are doubtless a million men in it today who are losing the fun
of their current success because of the dread that something
unfortunate may be about to happen.
"One-fourth of life is intelligible," said Mark Rutherford,
"the other three-fourths unintelligible darkness; and our ear-
liest duty is to cultivate the habit of not looking around the
corner."
Those of us who do not look are likely to get an unex-
pected bump occasionally, but how much faster we travel!
And what a lot more fun we have because of the imaginary
bumps that we miss!


cured of your habit of talk-
ing in your sleep.
*
She-And don't you ever
forget that I threw over a
millionaire's son just to marry
you.
He-Yes, that guy was not
only born rich but lucky as
well.

S YOU CAN'T BEAT
NEW YORK
BAKING CO.
Pumpernickle and Rye
Breads
(Watch For Our Label)
CAKES, PASTRIES, ROLLS -
On Sale At
ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN
EMPIRE DELICATESSEN
MAX'S DELICATESSEN
FIFTH STREET BAKERY
NEW YORK DELICATESSEN


A Real
Yom Tov' Dige Meal
and Beautiful
SSADER SERVICES
.May Be Had at

BERLIN'S

I RESTAURANT
"KOSHER"
S 158 N. E. Third St.
I --o- .i
S Phone 2-0859 for
RESERVATION
----
REASONABLE PRICES
nnIInIIu u noiun unIiiiiiIIInii nnh u aiUIIiiiiiiii niiini


NOW PLAYING

Matinee Sat & Sun.
Midnight Show Sat.








PALATIAL

KOSHER

RESTAURANT
265 N. E. 2nd Street
Announces With Pleasure
The Conducting of
SADER
SERVICES
By
I. H. PEKARSKY
Cantor of Beth David
-o-
Make Your Reservations
NOW!
SADER $3.00 Each
Passover Week, including
both Sader's and three meals
daily, only
$25.00

Pho -883
Phone 2-9883


_____ ',w. ________~i~Si
--I


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THE ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN
170 N. W. FIFTH STREET
WILL SUPPLY YOUR EVERY WANT!

Manischewitz Matzos, Matzo Meal and Noodles
Coffee Teas Sugar Prunes Nuts of All
Kinds Spices Vinegar Nyfat Passover But-
ter, Cheese and Cream Direct from New York.

KOSHER MACAROONS AND CAKES OF ALL KINDS

WE SUPPLY YOUR EVERY WANT!

ROSEDALE FOR RESULTS


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THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN-A MEDIUM OF AND FOR MIAMI JEWRY!


*- o .t- '.


Page 2


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By Reliable and experienced
Gardener and wife, position as
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Friday, March 28, 1930


L I -" .


THE J-EWISH

FLORIDIAN
A weekly newspaper published at
Miami, Florida
by
The Jewish Floridian Publishing
Company
652 S. W. FIRST STREET
Phone 2-8745



EDITORIAL STAFF
J. LOUIS SHOCHET
A CHOCHOM
BEN DOROM
A, N. ASHER




iforW



PASSOVER CUSTOMS
AND TRADITIONS


It may be that there are
some among us who know lit-
tle about ,Passover or its im-
portance to the Jews as a hol-
iday. To trace some of the
customs that still survive af-
ter all these centuries, such as
the eating of unleavened
bread, the gathering and
burning of crusts, which give
the final touch to the clean-
ing of the house, and the cele-
bration of the Seder, one must
take a little journey into Jew-
ish history as recorded in the
Bible.
When the Hebrews took
their flight from Egypt, their
preparations were necessarily
hurried. That the order to be-
gin their journey came all too
soon is shown by the fact that
the dough, which was set for
baking on the following day,
had only been mixed with
water, and in this first stage
became part of their burden
to be" carried along with the
rest of their worldly posses-
sions. This dough, baked by
the intense, scorching rays of
the sun (which travelers tell
us bakes the very sand of the
desert into a hardened sub-
stance resembling clay), be-
carhe the unleavened bread of
the Israelites, staying the
pangs of hunger and giving
them renewed strength for
their journey. That marvelous
Book of Exodus that tells of
Israel's wanderings in the de-
sert would that we could
read it with the ever-present
light of history to shine upon
and illumine its pages! If it
were written out fok us by
the finger of God that, in or-
der to fulfil the destiny of our
race, we must travel wild un-
trodden lands, cross angry
seas, and be subjected to
feuds of alien and unfriendly
peoples; on yoke. of comfort
reaching to us, no perception
of an earthly goal, nothing
but that strange, indescrib-
able fluttering of the heart
called hope, undying and im-
perishable; were all this to be
our portion, should not be
making history page upon
page, tragic, ennobling, preg-
nlant with' thought and mean-
ing for all time? Surely our
endurance under suffering,
our determination to over-
come all obstacles, our pray-
erful desire to fulfil God's
word and to reach at last the
land of His promise, wherein
we were to dwell under the
safety of His Law, would mer-


it the love and reverence of
our children and their child-
ren unto all generations. In-
asmuch as our pilgrimage
might subserve the highest
aims and ideals of humanity,
we would desire that poster-
ity should dwell upon it for
their own well-being, recall-
ing it joyfully each year as a
lesson of hope as well as of
trust in Him who guides na-
tions as though they were
children. Doubtless our ances-
tors, gazing down the long
vista of the centuries, saw Is-
rael blessed and blessing, re-
counting to coming genera-
tions the stQry of Exodus,
glorifying it by their willing-
ness to continue in the strug-
gle for humanity, evincing
their devotion by loving ad-
herence to the letter as well
as the spirit of the law of
Sinai.
The crusts,* placed in con-
spicuous places to be gathered
for burning, are a sign of
fealty to those gone before,
who have held close to the
commandments and made tra-
dition for us. It is a symbol
that the worK of purifying
the house from leaven has re-
ceived sanction through the
final grace and prayer of the
master of the house. A cus-
tom growing out of this, and
one appreciated by those who
receive the generous gift, is
that of bestowing all remain-
ing leaven-whatever it be in
quantity, great or small-up-
on Christian families in need.
To those who have lived
calmly and contentedly all
their years under the banner
of Judaism and the healthful
influence of its laws, it seems
the most natural thing in the
world to pay full measure of
tribute to a nation whose her-
oic struggle our imagination
alone can help us to under-
stand, and whose eventual
triumph the world agrees
with us in recognizing as the
keynote of all ubrequent civ-
ilization and prbgkeg. There-
fore, when we et unleavened
bread, and observe with cere-
mony the ,edr, it is not only
because itis commanded us in
the Bible but because of our
own desire to perpetuate the
memory of our ancestors; to
celebrate as nearly as possible
in detail the great events
which Passover commemo-
rates.
From beginning to end
these customs, though they
vary in different countries in
some slight respects, convey
the same meaning of distinct
law and purpose. In the main
it is history that is honored,
the history of a great event.
The traditions of a race are
being perpetuated, traditions
that reflect glory and honor
upon a nation. Intelligently
understood and observed, cus-
toms such as these bring into
the home atmosphere an ele-
ment of joyus activity, love
and veneration for the past,
present peace and content-
ment not to be attained by all
the intellectual striving of a


lifetime.
Notwithstanding all this, it
has become the fashion a-
mong many of our brethren
to decry customs which they
declare to be obsolete, more
to be honoredd in the breach,
than the observance." It is
well for us as a race that the
backbone of Israel thinks dif-
ferently. CustomA like these
keep the circulation of an en-
tire people in a state of health
(Continued on Page 5)


When Father Drives the Car
When Father has a trip to do
To some outlying town,
He backs the bus out of her
pew-
Gives her a dressing down;
Then wheels her to a service
stand
And has her filled inside
With gas and oil and water
and
He's ready for his ride.
So Father lights his pipe and
starts
A smiling on his way;
Pays little heed to passing
carts,
Or to the time of day.
He views the gentle country-'
side,
Gets out to take a stretch
And chats awhile with Bill
McBride
About his peas and vetch.
He calls on Smith and brother
Brown,
And when with work he's
through,
He rolls serenely back to
town,
The car as good as new;
For Father never tries to
break
A record, fast nor far,
But just a moderate mileage
make,
When Father drives the car.

Being Myself

With Gladys I am literary.
I'm never quite at ease with
Phil.
I'm musical with Ruth and
Mary-
But I am justmyself with
Lil.
When Jennie calls, I am the
mother,
And talk of spinach with a
will,
Then feel relieved, somehow
or other,
That I can be myself with
Lil.
When Sue drops in, it's song
and laughter,
And joyous conversation-
still,
It's good to sit rejoicing after
That I can be myself with
Lil.

I talk of verse to Marguerita.
Of love to Tom, of art to
Bill.
And find that life holds noth-
ing sweeter
Than being just myself
with Lil!
*
The Stevens in Chicago was
filled to overflowing. Rooms
were at a premium. The occa-
sion was the football game be-
tween Notre Dame and South-
ern California Universities.
Notre Dame won and her co-
horts were celebrating-well
but not too wisely. Charlie
and Jack, two Sophomores,
had engaged a room together.
In the atmosphere: of good fel-
lowship, Charlie offered a
part of the bed to Bill who
was without a berth. It was


long past midnight when
Jack toddled in, managed to
undress and crawl into bed.
Though somewhat dazed, he
felt that things were not as
they should be. Waking up


Charlie, he asked, "Hey Shar-
lie, how many of ush ish in
this bed?" Charlie, thick in
sleep and his charitable act
forgotten, answered, "Jush
ush two go t' shleep, y'
fool." Jack tried to sleep, but
the thought that something
was wrong somewhere still
troubled him. Crawling out of
bed, he counted the feet,
crawled back and again shook
Charlie awake. "Ish all right,
Sharlie," he gurgled. "There-
'sh only four feet-ish all, ol'
man."
Meditation.
If we could only dwell upon
the heights,
Unmindful of the little
things that stir
Our hearts, and cloud our way
with fears,
When only petty grievances
occur!


If we could only quell these
useless doubts
And fantasies that need-
lessly are spun!
For they but keep us walking
in the mists,
That dim the glory of the
dawning sun.
*
Mrs. Shifty: "I must ask
you for your room. I'm one of
the easy ones to get on with,
I'm sure, but I can't see heye
to heye with a boarder who
makes a 'bit of hangingg 'is 'at
over 'is key'ole."
*
"Your work bears the clos-
est inspection," remarked the
girl with the dimple. "What
infinite pains you must take
with it!"
"Perhaps," replied the art-
ist; "but do you know, I en-
joy the pains."
"Then," she rejoined with
a bright smile, "you too,
pursue art for art's ache."
*
"He told me he could live
on bread and cheese and
kisses."
"What then ?"
"I found out that he ex-
pected father to furnish the
bread and cheese."
*
Mother-This letter from
Charlie is very short.
Father-Yes, so is Charlie,
or he wouldn't have written.
*
Union Station-The matri-
monial altar.
"Don't you suppose their
quarrel will ever end?"
"Never. You see, they are
fighting to see which will
have the last word."
*
"Is this a second hand
store ?"
"Yessir, what can we do for
you ?"
"Well, I want one for my
watch."

"How do we get condensed
milk children. Do any of you
know?" asked the teacher
"From calves," piped little
Robert, who had been on the
farm.
*
Mr. Uppitydate Where is
Mrs. Uppitydate ?
The maid- She is in the
library,, sir, with Mile. Sonia,
her smoking teacher, taking


Visitor: "I suppose every-
one in the hotel dresses for
dinner?"
Chambermaid: "Oh, yes,
madam, meals in bed are
charged extra."
^ '. *:'


Mrs. Hoyle I wonder if
that conductor kept my fare.
Mrs. Doyle-Very likely; I
have heard that the road was
inthe hands of a receiver.


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN-AMEDIUM.OF AND FOR MIAMI JEWRY!


a lesson on blowing smoke
rings.
While we admire the ingen'
uity of those chemists who
are making synthetic meat
from cotton seed, we shall
still prefer the kind made'
from grass by a dumb, stupid
steer.
*
The temperature in Akla-
vik, Canada, we read, has
been 20 below during most of,
the week. We fear it would!
take us some time to become
aklavikimated. I

A commercial traveler call-
ing upon a new customer pro-
duced by mistake a snapshot
of his fiancee instead of his
business card.
"That's the firm I repre-
sent," he said.
The customer examined the
somewhat determined-looking
features of the young woman,
and returned the photograph
with the remark: I'm afraid
you'll never be manager of-
that firm!"
*
Detroit has just adopted a
no-work-for-aliens rule in
school system. A natio
magazine commenting on
policy of Detroit, says:
the no-work-for-ailiens po
had been established in
first place, this would be a
post of a few hundred so

The course of psittacosis, it
seems, is from kissing a par-
rot's bill to kicking about a
doctor's bill.

The infernal question, "May
will you love me in December
as June did last July?"
We think the worst crack
of the month is in our right
fender.
An old, old slogan may soon
be changed to "See America
Thirst."
Having heard much of the
London fog, we hope our nav-
al delegates are not affected.
Perhaps the original happy
medium was the girl who
laughed wh en conducting
seances.
*
A Kansas artist called in
friends to help name a picture
he had painted, and one called
it "The Doctor," and another
"The Aral Sea," I understand
he really knew what the pic-
ture was all along it was
"Boy With Orange"-but he
wanted to see if he could fool
them.
*
A notice board outside a
church announced Sunda
sermon: "Do you know w
hell is?"
Underneath was printed
smaller letters: "Come a
hear our new organist."

"Please, miss, didn't y
say you'd give me a kiss if I
did an errand for you?"
"I did," replied the pretty
girl.
"Well, I've sold the kiss to
my big brother for a quart-
er."
*


PaVA R


i


*&


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


*0.,







Pare 4


I SOC IETY I

ii ._ .. _-__ .. .


We would appreciate your
forwarding all society and
organization items to the
Jewish Floridian, 652 S. W.
1st street, or rhone 2-8745
not later than noon Wed-
nesday.

The friends and acquaint-
ances of the late Max Shaff
are cordially invited by the
family to be present and par-
ticipate at the unveiling of the
tombstone, on Sunday, March
30, at 2:30 p. m. at the Beth
David Cemetery, N. E. 2nd
avenue.
*
The Bar Mitzva celebration
of Louis Spector, the son of
Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Spector,
was celebrated last Saturday
at Beth David Synagogue.
The usual Bar Mitzva ritual
was recited with the Cantor
I. H. Pekarsky as a special tri-
bute to the parents of the boy
conducting the Musaf ser-
* vices. Immediately after the
services were concluded, wor-
shippers and the numerous
friends of the family were
conducted to the auditorium
of the Talmud Torah where
the parents were hosts to all
at an old fashioned "kid-
dush." Mr. John Wolf, vice-
president of Beth David acted
as toastmaster and introduced
Rabbi Weisfeld who delivered
a splendid sermon on the
meaning of Bar Mitzva. He
was followed by Mr. M. H.
Rosenhouse the president of
Beth David, by Mrs. I. H.
Buckstein, president of the
Ladies Auxiliary of Beth Da-
vid Talmud Torah and Mr.
Maklof of Palestine. The Bar
Mitzva boy, Louis Spector,
then delivered his speech
which concluded the festivi-
ties. The guests were served
all kinds of fancy cakes, kich-
ach, fish etc.
*
At a meeting of the Coun-
cil of Jewish Women resolu-
tions were adopted express-
ing the sympathy of the en-
tire organization to the fam-
ily and relatives of the late
Dorothy Bloch who was a
member of the organization
for a number of years. Copies
of the resolution were spread
upon the minutes of the Coun-
Wil and also sent to the rela-
tives of the deceased.
The supper and card party
Sof the Sisterhood of Temple
Israel held last Sunday night
at Kaplan Hall was attended
by more than 100 guests who
were given a very enjoyable
evening by the committee in
charge headed by Mrs. Adolph
Wertheimer. Pri z es were
awarded for high scores at
each individual table. Girls of
the Sunday school Alumni
were in charge of he service,
the excellency of which re-
ceived a number of favorable
comments.
*
Election of officers for the
Sisterhood of Temple Israel
will be held on Monday, April
7th, at Kaplan hall. All mem-
bers are urged to attend and
participate in the delibera-
tions.


Pink and white la pur ar-
Pink and white larkspur ar-


ranged in vases and baskets
formed the decorative motif
at the bridge party given by
Mrs. Louis R. Roth Monday
afternoon at her home in
Shenandoah for Mrs. Cyril
Abrams and Mrs. Rose Scutti,
both of New York, who are
the guests of Mrs. Lionel
Levey.
The hostess was assisted
in entertaining by the Misses
Dorothy and Georgia Roth
and Miss Louise Deitz.
Guests included Mrs. Eman-
vel Deitz, Mrs. A. L. Kantor,
Mrs. Charles Feldman, Mrs.
A. N. David, Mrs. Sarah
Frank, Mrs. C. L. Reisner,
Miss Edna Weinstein, Mrs.
Sydney Weintraub, Miss Mar-
tha Speigelman, Mrs. Lee
Ruscol, Mrs. Leonel Goodman,
Mrs. Philip Somberg, Mrs.
Hugh Decker, Mrs. Julius
Goodin, Mrs. Elbert Bacher,
Mrs. Ann Samet and Mrs. Ed-
ward Fedder.
*
Presented by the Mana-
Zucca Music club at the Civic
theater Monday night, Celia
Saloman, concert pianist, in-
terpreted technique of Bach-
Taussig, poetry of Schumann,
and modernism of DeBussy
and Scriabine with marked
adherence to musical tradi-
tions yet with sparkling indi-
viduality.
Six preludes by Chopin in-
cluding the "C Sharp Minor"
and the "G Minor Ballade,"
showed versatility and com-
plete "at homeless" with
these themes played with de-
licate shading of tones.
Mana-Zucca's "Arabesque"
and Liszt's "Hungarian Rhap-
sody No. 10," gave brilliant
finale to the concert.
*
Mr. and Mrs. B. Kandel en-
tertained at bridge and pin-
ochle in honor of Mrs. Atlas
of Washington, D. C., who is
leaving for h(r home after
spending the season here. A
guest prize of a beautiful rose
necklace was presented to the
guest of honor. Prizes for
high score were awarded at
each individual table. At a
late hour a dutch luncheon
was served.
*
Mr. and Mrs. J. Katz en-
tertained a number of friends
last week at bridge in honor
of Mrs. Atlas of Washington,
D. C., who is leaving for her
home after having spent the
winter season here. A pearl
necklace was given as a gift
prize. At a late hour refresh-
ments were served. Prizes
were awarded to the highest
scores at each table.
*
Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Spector
entertained last Sunday night
at bridge. Among those pre-
sent were Mr. and Mrs. John
Wolf, Mr. and Mrs. B. Kan-
del and Mr. and Mrs. J Katz.
Refreshments were served at
a late hour.
*
Mrs. David H. Levine was
hostess at luncheon and bridge
yesterday at her home, 716
Alhambra circle, Coral Gables.
Table decorations and tallies
were carried out in yellow
and orchid.


Invited were Mrs. Edgar
Flanagan, Mrs. Gustave Falk,


Mrs. Florence Pamplin, Mrs.
Harry Goldberg, Mrs. Floyd
Chaille, Mrs. W. E. Wawson,
Mrs. Neil Miller, Mrs. H. H.
McFern, Mrs. R. G. Bachman,
Mrs. Hubert Singer, Mrs. J.
I. Bergen and Mrs. William
McFarland.
Samuel Phillips has arrived
Samuel Phillips has arrived


to join Mrs. Phillips, who has
been spending the winter in
the northeast section of the
city.
*
Bridge party was given last
night by Mr. and Mrs. Irwin
M. Cassel at their home. Their
guests included Mr. and Mrs.
Vernon Seaver, Mr. and Mrs.


Percival Wilde, Judge and
Mrs. William E. Walsh, Eda
Keary Liddle, Mr. and Mrs. F.
Wallace, Mr. and Mrs. War-
ren W. Zinsmaster, Mr. and
Mrs. Russell Miller, Mrs. F.
Kumnerfeld and Mr. and Mrs.
George Bolton.
The Sisterhood of Congre-
gation Beth Jacob, Miami
Beach will give one of its reg-
ular card parties in the gar-
dens of the Mayfield Court
apartments, Miami Beach,
next Wednesday evening,
April 2nd at 8 p. m.
Prizes and refreshments
will be served.
Continued on Page 5


-,





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PURITAN CONSCIENCE,




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HIGH PRICES Ro


In This Sensational Sale of Our $75,000 Stock of the Market's Finest

FURNITURE and RUGS. Buy Now for the Present or Next Season's

Use and SAVE HUNDREDS of DOLLARS.






















GUARANTEED Mather Finance Plan

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End si6


THINKING JEWS ALL SUBSCRIBE TO THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN! DO YOU?


%F ;drvJ "LJ L


Friday, 'March 28, 1930


- ------------


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


I


4












4'








THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


Page 5


SOCIETY


(Continued from Page 4)
The Wedding of Miss Bar-
bara Greenberg the daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Green-
berg of this city, to Mr. Jack
Greenberg of West Palm
Beach, will be solemnized at
the home of the bride's par-
ents, 460 S. W. 3rd street,
next Sunday evening, Rabbi
Israel H. Weisfeld of Beth
David officiating. Immediate-
ly after the ceremony the
couple and immediate mem-
bers of the family will attend
a nuptial dinner at Berlin's
'Restaurant. A number of
guests-from West Palm Beach
and Boston, the former home
of the bride are expected to
attend. After the dinner the
couple will leave on a honey-
moon for Cuba, where they
will spend several weeks.
.... .*
Mrs. J. Grossman, the wife
of Dr. J. Grossman of New
York is visiting Mrs. Chas.
Tannenbaum her sister-in-law
at her home in Shenandoah,
and will remain until after
Easter.
*


The Ladies Auxiliary of
Beth David Talmud Torah will
be hosts at one of its regular
bi-weekly Oard parties next
Tuesday night at the Talmud
Torah Auditorium. Prizes
will be awarded for high
scores at each individual table
and refreshments will be ser-
ved as usual.

To honor one of their out-
standing members, the offi-
cers and members of the
Workmens Circle and the
Ladies' Club will entertain at
dinner at the Palatial Kosher
Restaurant next Sunday even-
ing when an evening of real
entertainment will be enjoyed.
*
The Council of Jewish Wo-
men will consider and act up-
on an important amendment
to their By-Laws and Consti-
tutions at the next general
meeting on April 9th. All
members who are interested
in the important work are
urged to be on hand early.
*
Election of officers for the
Sisterhood of Temple Israel
will be held at the next gen-
eral meeting which will take
place the afternoon of April
7th at Kaplan hall.
*
The final drive for the ben-
efit of the Library Fund for
the Library being established
at the Beth David Talmud To-
rah is now on, and all who
have pledged to contribute


books in any language of
Jewish interest are urged to
deliver the books to the Tal-
mud Torah as early as pos.
sible. The establishment of
this library wil be the begin-
ning of a Jewish cultural cen-
ter not only for the children
of the Talmud Torah but for
all Jewish residents of Mi-
ami as well.
Very shortly a public re-
ception will be held to which
the general public is invited
and which will be the formal
opening of the new library.
*
A miscellaneous shower
was given in honor of Miss
Barbara Greenberg at her
home, 480 S. W. Third street,
last Friday afternoon. Games
of bridge and buncQ were en-
joyed by the many guests pre-
sent and prizes for high score
were awarded to each indiv-
idual table. Many beautiful
gifts were presented to the
bride whose wedding to Mr.
Jack Greenberg of West Palm
Beach will be celebrated this
coming Sunday. Piano solos
by Miss Mildred Greenberg a
sister of the bride and vocal
solos by Miss Eddie McGriff
featured the afternoon of en-
tertainment. Many beautiful
gifts were presented to the
bride. Among those present
were Mrs. F. Zohn of Boston,
Mass., a sister of the bired.

The Helping Hand Club
were hosts to Miss Barbara
Greenberg in honor of her im-
pending marriage at the club
rooms, 201 N. W. 4th street,
at a miscellaneous shower
last Tuesday afternoon. Miss
Greenberg is treasurer of the
organization and in apprecia-
tion of her faithful work, the
club presented her with an
electric percolator and Irish
linen table set. Many other
splendid gifts were presented
by the individual members to
the guests of honor. Refresh-
ments were served and bridge
was played.
*
Mr. Louis Spector enter-
tained a number of his friends
in honor of his Bar Mitzva at
his home last Saturday night.
Attending were his compan-
ions and felow students in the
Beth David Talmud Torah
and Sunday School. Games
were played and refreshments
were served. A large birthday
cake was cut in honor of the
event. Among those present
were: Rosalyn Daum, Rose
Landau, Aaron Goldenblank,
Charles Adalman, Rose Dub-
ler, Arthur Kahn, Lena Fried-
land, Rosalyn Klein, Char-
lotte Davis, Abe Berkowitz,
Sain Badanes, Paul Reece, Ida
Engler, Ben Swartz, Morris
Wroobel.


Mr. and Mrs. Charles Per-
etzman were hosts at a din-
ner party in their home,, 1042
S. W. 3rd street, last week in
honor of Miss Ada Shanzer,
and Mr. and Mrs. Vogel and
daughter Ruth Vogel, al of
New York City who returned
to their home by motor after
spending the season here.
Miss Celia Peretzman return-
ad with them for a visit of
about a month. Enroute they
will visit many points of in-
terest.
*
A very pretty wedding was
solemnized last Sunday after-
noon at the home Mrs. Morris
Pappaport on N. W. 8th Ave.
and 15th street, when Ben
Rappaport, the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Louis Rappaport of
Clarksdale, Miss., was mar-
ried to Miss Claire Schonfield
of Atlantic City, N. J. Rabbi
Israel H. Weisfeld of Beth
David officiated at the cere-
mony. A beautiful sik canopy
decorated with flowers was
the scene of the ceremony
which was attended by the
immediate members of the
families of the bride and
groom. Mr. Mike Silverstein
(Contiued on Page 6)

Passover Customs
and Traditions

(Continued from Page 3)
ful activity. They typify the
soul andlsentiment that serve
to unite and weld all men in
a common brotherhood, and
these broadly human elements
in all religions lighten the
way of men in a world of hard
dry fact, a disunion of intel-
lectual ideas, of overmuch
material striving. If Passover
has no meaning for Jews, if
the great events which led to
the writing of the Decalogue
do not appeal to a race of men
whose ancestry for unwrit-
ten generations has aimed to
carry its message of peace and
humanity to all the world,
then no other great human
event, no historical achieve-
ment, can ever hope to quick-
en its pulse or disturb its
serene egotism. If the exodus
from Egypt and the uprear-
ing of a nation whose history
has made and colored all sub-
sequent history have no mean-
ing for the descendants of Is-
rael, neither can the struggle
for and the declaration of
American Independence be ex-
pected to find response or
lodging in their breasts.
In the dry verbiage of such
an Israel (Heaven forefend
that even its shadow be cast
upon our world!) there will
hardly be room for such terms
as Love and Freedom, Patriot-
ism and Religion.


L. (Pop) GERSON
Buyer of All Kinds of Scrap Metal
We Sell Auto Parts
2141 N. W. SECOND AVE.
Phone 20621

BAGS and METALS
EAST COAST BAG & METAL CO.
(Inc.)
I. L. MINTZER
MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS
435-445 N. W. 8th Street
Phone 4485
PEPPER METAL CORP.
Scrap Metal and Machinery
N. W. Cor. 5th Ave. and 14th St.
Phone 22546

BUILDING SUPPLIES
J. SIMPSON
Building Materials,
Roofing Paper, Asphalt
423 N. W. N. River Drive
Phone 7251

DELICATESSEN
ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN
170 N. W. 5th St.
We Supply Your Every Want

FISH & SEA FOODS
STANDARD FISH CO.
629 W. Flagler St.
Phone 2-3362

FOUNTAINS

Cold Drinks


Candies and Lunches
HOME GROCERY
Corner 1st St. N. W. and 3rd


King
Undertaking Co.
29 N. W. THIRD AVENUE
Phbo. 23535-31624


illnllllllll llHIIIIIIIIIIIHHIIIHUII nIHIIIIE Ullfl HmIIIIII
DR. J. B. MARGOLIS
DENTIST
Third Floor Olympia Bldg.
Phone 2-4073


Ave.


INSURANCE
DADE FLORIDA INSURANCE
AGENCY, Inc.
-General Insurance-
800 N. E. 2nd Ave. Phone 27589

PHARMACISTS
BRYAN PARK PHARMACY
Chas. Tannenbaum,
Pharmacist
(reg. pharmacist for 17 years)
Cor 22nd Ave. and 8th St. S. W.

CRYSTAL PHARMACY
Dr. A. D. Halpern, Ph. G. Ph. D.
Prescriptions Our Specialty
1A8 N. Miami Ave. Phone 29713

PIPE and STEEL

VADELMAN PIPE & STEEL CO.
58 N. E. 25th St.
Aat F. E. C. R. R. Phone 21420

A. & B. PIPE AND METAL CO.
Phone 31355
53 North East 25th Street

PRINTERS'
MIAMI PRINTING CO.
"Printing That Pays"
Phone 23261
107 South Miami Avenue
AUTO PARTS
BLOOM AUTO REPAIR
& PARTS CO.
N. W. 17th Ave. at 23rd St.
Phone 23631
The Largest car wreckers in
Florida


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Dr. A



302 P


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Ibert E. Rosenthal
DENTIST
N. E. 2nd Ave.
professionall Building


PINKY HAS THE RIGHT IDEA


BUSINESS DIRECTORY


AMBULANCE SERVICE
W. H. Combs Co,, Estab. 1896
COMBS FUNERAL HOME
Phone Miami 32101
1539 N. E. 2nd Avenue
MIAMI BEACH FUNERAL HOME
Phone M. B. 5-2101
1236 Wauhlngton Ave.


PINKY-DINKY


By Terry Gilkison


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Friday, March 28,1930


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Friday, March 28,1930


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


Page' Six


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*
The first dance sponsored
by the Loyalty Club of the
Emunah Chapter, 0. E. S.
given at the Frolics was a
splendid success both from
the financial and moral view-
points. More than 500 mem-
bers and friends attended the
event which was held last
Wednesday night and enjoy-
ed the splendid program of
entertainment that was stag-
ed for their benefit. The chair-
man of the various commit-
tees greatly aiding in making
the evening one that will long
be remembered. Mrs. Olga
Schwartz was chairman and
she was assisted by Mrs. Ella
Kahn, chairman of tickets,
Mary Barber, chairman of
publicity, Edward N. Wolf,
chairman of program, Sadye
G. Rose, treasurer, and Jos-
eph M. Fine, Robert J. Wallis


RESOLUTIONS
Whereas, Almighty God
in his infinite wisdom has
seen fit to remove from
our midst the late P. M.
Rosengarten, a member of
the Board of Trustees of
Congregation Beth David,
who was highly esteemed,
beloved and respected by
the Community of Miami
and particularly the mem-
bers and officers of Con-
gregation Beth David.
And Whereas, during
his lifetime the said P.
M. Rosengarten has en-
deared himself to all by his
kindly acts of benevolence
and deep interest in the
welfare of his fellow men
and particularly Congre-
gation Beth David and its
Talmud Torah.
Be it therefore resolved
that the members and of-
ficers o f Congregation
Beth David through its
Board of Trustees does
hereby express its keen
regret and heartfelt con-
dolence to the family of
the bereaved upon their
irreparable loss.
And be it further re-
solved that a copy of these
resolution be spread upon
the minutes of the Con-
gregation Beth David and
copies be sent to the mem-
bers of the family of the
late P. M. Rosengarten
and copies be further sent
to the local Jewish press.
M. H. Rosenhouse,
President
Julius Simpson,
Secretary


.. fTH FAM iL


SDOC TOR
SJOHN JOSEPH GAINE5M.D.


SOCIETY
(Continued from Page 5)
Jacobskind was matron of
honor. In accordance with
was best man and Mrs. Gussie
Jewish tradition Mr. Max
Rappaport and Miss Hannah
Mack were "unterfihrer." Af-
ter the ceremony the guests
enjoyed refreshments from a
long sweet table set in the
dining room. Later in the
evening "Sheva Brochos" was
celebrated. The bridegroom is
connected with the New York
Baking Co. and the couple
will make their home in
Miami. They expect to leave
for their honeymoon the lat-
ter part of next week for
Clarksdale, where they will
visit the bridegroom's- par-
ents.


and Albert Bacher as the door
committee.


*
A regular meeting of the
Friendship League was held
in the Club rooms on the 17th
floor of the Congress building
Wednesday night, March 26.
The following new members
were voted upon and accepted
unanimously: Miss Beck Seit-
lin, Mr. Jules Spector, Mr. Abe
Schoenfeld, and Mr. Gilford
Ornstein. Miss Sophie Gordon
was appointed chairman of
the Good and Welfare Com-
mittee. Mr. Wilton Brill was
elected Sergeant-at-arms.
*
A Board Meeting of the
Friendship League will be
held at the home of Miss
Sophie Gordon, 67 N. E. 4th
street. Monday, March 31,
*
A delightful Bridge party
will be given Sunday night,
March 30th in honor of the
Friendship League Members
at 2112 N. E. 2nd Ave., at
8:30 p. m. with Miss Selma
Meyerson as hostess. Invita-
tions are being issued to all
members.
An Informal Bridge and
Dance will be held in the Club
Rooms of the Friendship
League on the 17th floor of
the Congress building, Wed-.
nesday night, April 2nd, 1930,
according to an announcement
of the Entertainment Com-
mittee.


DAILY AT 2:00 P. M.
BOAT LEAVES CITY YACHT
BASIN
N. E. Third St. and Bay
----
Fare Only $2.00
--0--
Don't miss the opportunity of
seeing the beautiful sub-mar-
ine gardens on the remodeled
and enlarged double hulled
SE-BOT-M BOAT
For Particulars,
Phone 22073


S1167 West Flagler Street
Manischewits Matzos Matzo Meal and
Noodles Coffee Teas Sugar Prunes
Nuts of all kinds Spices -- vinegar Nyfat


S, PASSOVER GOODIES OF ALL KINDS
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UNITED GAS
UTILITIES, INC.
-OWNERS-
GAS COMPANY
of Miami Beach
Fort Lauderdale Florida
Gas Co.

GAS SERVICE
Fort Lauderdale, Holly-
wood, Dania, Miami Shores
Miami Beach
-Offices-
1036 LINCOLN ROAD
MIAMI BEACH


WHY WASTE MONEY
BY PAYING MORE FOR YOUR
AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE?
INVESTIGATE FOR YOURSELF!
Let Our Representative Show You How To Save From 30 Per
| Cent to 40 Per Cent On Your Auto.
Dade Florida Insurance Agency, Inc
800 N. E. SECOND AVENUE


HOOSIER


Representing
CASUALTY


"FROM BOAT O TA
FRESH EVER DAY!


CO.


BLE"


A WE WELCOME
OUR JEWISH FRIENDS
TO THE RE-OPENING OF
Our Modern and Finest

Fish and Sea Food Establishment

In The South

1029- 33 N. E. FIRST AVENUE

Equipped to Supply Your Every Want in
SEA FOOD


GULF STREAM SEA
FOOD CO.
SCall Miami 21086 and we will Deliver
Your Order
4 Your Inspection Cordially Invited
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OUR ADVERTISERS SAVE YOU MONEY AND GIVE YOU SERVICE!
op r 6


A WORD TO THE WISE
It was during last summer that a fine little mother told
me she might need my services along about Thanksgiving.
Such things happen, you know, else this old world would be
a mighty lonesome place, now wouldn't it? The point I am
making is, the engaging of a physician so far ahead of the
expected need.
I promised the service. My first step, however, was to
request her to come to my office at her convenience, that I
might look into her health condition closely; one should be
fully advised, when he is called to look after the matter of
two lives..... .I found her in excellent condition.
I had her come in every four weest; then as the
time approached, every ten days. Imagine myS rprise and
apprehension when, two weeks before the expected event, I
found-ten percent of albumin in my usual test-ma.ng!
Here was a dilemma-all of which I kept to yself-in
which I acted quickly-intelligently; I put her at once on an
appropriate diet, and required daily sweet-baths to remove
a dropsical condition that developed rapidly. Under the very
best of care, we came out of it with a fine little girl, and the
mother in good condition. Both are now fine and well.
But, suppose this patient had waited to call her physician
until the hour for delivery was at hand; I would have been
totally ignorant of the kidney-condition, with no time for
making intelligent tests; I might have had convulsions to
deal with, possibly severe hemorrhages, uraemic poison,
maybe death for the mother-possibly the child too. Being
fully advised however, we came through happily for all con-
cerned.
The moral is: There is no graver mistake, than waiting
right up to the hour to call the doctor-in cases like this,
where the physician does not know you thoroughly.


dcme, Ad


THE

FARWAY

DAIRY
SOLICITS YOUR
PATRONAGE


Phone Miami
7105

FOR PROMPT
SERVICE


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