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The Jewish Floridian ( March 7, 1930 )

UFJUD
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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
March 7, 1930
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00054

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
March 7, 1930
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00054

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text











Vol III--No. X. Miami, Florid


FikniII II 7
flcvr !WPa


la, Friday, March 7, 1930


Price 5 Cents


To My Way
Thinking


of


by. i
Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld

Why is it that "liberals"
ire the most narrow-minded,
igoted, fanatic creatures?
Why is it that the under-dogs
If yesterday, those who were
mercilessly and without
hyme or reason ground under
oot, are just as relentless the
oment they come into power
nd so speedily forget their
wn suffering as hardened,
hey cold bloodedly regard the
anguish they cause the new
underdogs?
Latest reports from Riga
tate that the Soviet govern-
nent is coercing pious, obser-
ant Jews to publicly destroy
heir phylacteries and talei-
m (prayer shawls). Disobe-
ience speels death. From the
kraine reports are no pleas-
ter. Seventy scrolls are
aid to have been burned there
y order of the Soviet Govern-
nent.
Rabbi Tevels Katzenelenbo-
en, venerable patriarch of
ghty, is banished from Len-
grad to the most distant
ussian steppes on charges of
hunter revolutionary activi-
es. The strength of the Bol-
evik movement must be tre-
endous if it can be so tell-
gly challenged and threat-
ed %y the opposition of a
armless eighty year old
holar! Other rabbis, too,
e exiled or prepared for
ughter unless they public-
fro mthe pulpit and in the
ess, repudiate any and all
filiation with or belief in a
igion. Even after such de-
ations, his position re-
ins precarious. Anyone
ofessing belief in a Su-
eme Being, and observing
ma and ritual may be and
ually is ostracised in public.
e electricity in his home is
continued; the. post office
1 not handle his mail, in
*ef, he is boycotted by all
blic utilities.
For two centuries after
55 the enlightened cultural
rid would not forgive the
wish community of Amster-
for having excommuni-
ted Baruch Spinoza for his
eeistic doctrines and for
ving proclaimed a ban upon
Writings. In his case the
s were actually constrain-
to carry thru such string-
t measures because of self
eser*ation. The lives of the
ws werb actually threatened
they allowed this heretic to
unpunished. In, order to
pease the Christian Church
py even offered him a hand-
ne annual pension if he
uld conform at least' out-
rdly with religious pre-
ts. Now, our Soviet friends
o, prior to the Revolution
1917 complained of the un-
mpathetic, niggardly treat-
int the irreligious proletar-
was receiving at the hands
the unscrupulous smug
igion-supporting capitalists
w that they are in power,


[ proving to the world how
sadly tolerant a justice and
ality conselous labor class
onbe.
(Continued Next Week)


dmMIwO- K)4="4


ago was found guilty and sen-
tenced to jail for fifteen years
at hard labor. Though the de-
fendant confessed the crime,
his 'attorney Uni Abdul Hadi
pleaded for his retase that
Benwich was the Jewish
Crown Prince.


Lawyers Form
School Code Com-
mittee For State


Temple Israel to
Protest Russian
Actions Friday


State Considers
Jewish History
Course At High
The local School Board for
Dade County at its meeting
approved a request that a
course in Jewish History be
instituted in the Miami High
School which will receive cre-
dits in the usual manner, as
other courses do. The approv-
aT was given after the matter
had been presented by Rabbi
Israel H. Weisfeld who intro-
duced a similar course in the
University of Miami. After its
approval by the School Board
it was referred to the State
Superintendent of Education
whose approval is necessary
before the course is begun.
From information received
the course will be approved
and will be instituted within
a very short time. Similar
courses are being introduced
rapidly in most of the advanc-
ed High Schools and other ed-
ucational institutions thru-out
the United States.

Beth David Holds
Special Services
In accordance with a resolu-
tion adopted recently in New
York City by the Synagogue
Council of America, represen-
ting the Orthodox; Conserva-
tive and Reform wings of
Jewry, requesting that spec-
ial prayers be recited on Sat-
urday, March 7th for the ces-
sation of the persecution of
religion in Soviet Russia, Beth
David will hold special ser-
vices in connection with the
usual Saturday morning ser-
.vices at which time special
prayers appropriate to the oc-
casion will be said. Rabbi Is-
?ael H. Weisfeld will officiate
at the special services.

Hadassah Opens
Fifth Hospital
According to an announce-
ment made by Mrs. Edward
Jacobs of the Palestine Com-
mittee of Hadassah, the fifth
Hospital to be established by
Hadassah in Palestine will be
opened on May 1st, at Tiber-
ias. The new hospital will be
called "The Peter Schweitzer
Hospital" in memory of the
late Zionist leader who contri-
buted $25.000 towards that
purpose, which sum was re-
cently augmented by an addi-
tional contribution of eight
thousand dollars by. his
widow.

Bentwich Assail-
ant is Punished
Abdul Ghanni, the young
assailant of Norman Bent-
wich, the Palestinian attorney
General, who shot and wound-
ed Bentwich several months


Jacksonville; Mrs. Katherine ofFlorida. P _


Fred H. Davis, Attorney In conformance with the
General; Glen B. Terrell, decision of the Synagogue
Chief Justice of the Supreme Council of America to set
Court, State of Florida; and aside March 7 and 8 as dates
John C. Cooper, Jr., have been for prayer and protest against
appointed by the Educational the attitude of the Russian
Survey Commission of the Soviet government toward
State of Florida, a committeeS oyreno wr
of three to prepare a uniform people of all religious beliefs,
code of public school law for and instead of observing
the State of Florida. March 16, as the Christian
The Educational Survey denominations are to do, Tem-
Commission, after having a pie Israel, Reform Jewish
thorough study and analysis C regat w co t
of its Survey Staff Report Congregation, will conduct
which points out definitely services at 8:15 p. m. Friday.
the costly procedures and oth- Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan, rabbi,
er evils of our public school will discuss "Russia's Atti-
adminstrative and financial tude Toward Religion."
system, with remedies; and
after having made a compari- Miami Hig Forms
son of our present public Miami HighForms
school laws with those of Jewish Soc
other states having better Society
school laws and systems, has -
come to the conclusion that At th instance of Rabbi Is-
our present public school rael H. Weisfeld, a Jewish
laws are so complicated, dubi- club to be called,the "Sinai"
ous in meaning, and, in many
cases, obsolete-the result of club was organized last Thurs-
years of makeshift and patch- day at the -Miami High
work legislation that the School for Jewish boys and
most effective solution of our girls attending the High
school ills and problems is to School. Miss Jacobs of the
draft a comprehensive, intelli- Faculty is sponsor of the or-
gent and effective code of gantzation which has received
public schools laws for the 67 the approval of the principal,
counties of the state. Mr. Thomas. The club will
''The commission has. also'~^Ti~ e nce a week, every
created an Advisory Board for Thursday for forty minutes as
the purpose of obtaining the part of the school work. Sim-
benefit of different minds and ilar clubs of other faiths are
opinions upon any proposed now in operation.
legislative informative educa-
tional program. This Advisory Safer Torahs
Board will consist of the
Presidents of state organiza- Burned in Russia
tons such as Federation of
L tor, Parent-Teachers Asso- Seventy Safer Torahs (Holy
ciation, Educational Associa- Scrolls) were taken out of
tion, Bar Association, Cham- various synagogues in Bach-
ber of Commerce, Colleges; mut in the Ukraine district
heads of industry and men and burned in the market
and women from different place of the town by the So-
walks of life who are interest- viet authorities. Jews who
ed in establishing in the State witnessed these outrages wept
of Florida a uniform public bitterly and in true Orodox
school administrative and fin- fashion rent their clothes in
ancial system. mourning. In other Russian
In making this announce- towns many Jews were forced
ment to the press, Geo. H. to take their prayer shawls
Hilty, Secretary and Treasur- and "Tefillin" and destroyS
er of the Commission, stated and burn them under penalty
that the work of drafting of severe punishment if they
these laws will involve months refused. The Soviet press then
of special research and pain- published the fact that these
staking labor on the part of Jews had "Voluntarily" de-
the Code Committee. The filed these. Rabbis are being
Commission feels that in the compelled to join the "Bez-
appointment of this Commit- hoshniki" of atheistic societ-
tee, it has made a selection of ies and to write letters to
men who are eminently quali- newspapers condemning reli-
fied by reason of experience gion, under penalty of dire
and knowledge to draft this punishment if they refus.
code of public school laws.
They have gladly accepted B. Tippetts, vice-chairman, of
the responsibility, realizing as St. Petersburg; Mirs. A. F.
does the Commission the ab- Fanger, of Hialeah; A. A. Mc-
solute need of a uniform code Leod, of Bartow; and Geo. R.
of public school laws and the Hilty, secretary and treasur-
development of an educational er, of Miami. This Commis-
system that will equal, if not sion was created by an act of
excell, the average standard the 1927 Legislature for the
in the United States. The purpose of conducting a sur'
Committee has the power to vey of all public educational'
create as many subcommittees institutions receiving public
as it may deem necessary in funds, and was directed and
order to efficiently and gf- authorized to prepare such
fectively carry out its work. laws and legislative bills as it
The Educational Survey deemed essential for the effi-
Commission of the State of cent organization, adminis-
Florida is composed of Dr. I. tration and financing of the
E. Phillips, chairman, of public schools of the State


had decided to quit-not, as
he explained when he resign-
ed Iapl December, because he
want to purs.. musical.
"The ed. m i
(Conti
04. ..


_ ~ 1


Beach Rabbi to
Speak Here Friday
At the late Friday night
services at Congregation Beth
Jacob, Rabbi Samuel Yallow
will preach on "Remem-
brance." The usual congrega-
tional singing and responsive
reading will be nad. On Satur-
day morning Rabbi Yallow
will speak on the portion of
the week.

Five Are Hurt In
Auto Accident
Five persons were injured
two seriously, when the auto-
mobile in which they were re-
turning to Miami overturned
on a sharp curve in N. W. Sev-
enth avenue, three blocks
north of Fulford road, yester-
day.
The victims were Mr. and
Mrs. Julius Israel, 954 S. W.
Fourth street; Miss Minnie
Strauss, Miss Josephine
Strauss and Louis Strauss, of
979 S. W. Fourtn street. Mr.
Strauss was driving the motor
car.
Three ambulances, t w o
from the ComJ c ambulance
service, and a doctor respond-
ed to calls from Hollywood
and took the injured persons
to the hospital.
Mis. Israel and Mr. Scrauss
suffered injuries to their
heads, believed to be serious.
Mr. Israel suffered injury to,
his right shoulder; Miss Min-
nie Strauss, injury to her left
shoulder and hand and Miss
Josephine Strauss, injury to
her left leg. They were taken
to Jackson Memorial hospital.
Mr. and Mrs. Israel are vis-
itors from Buffalo, N. Y., and
the Misses Strauss visitors
from Rochester, N. Y.

Commercial Reli-
gion Makes Rabbi
Resign Position
NEW YORK, March 4.-
Five years as a rabbi have
convinced 28-year-old Abra-
ham L. Feinberg that organ-
ized religion has become futile
to the extent that "Clara Bow
has more to do with the
morals of young women than
Bishop Manning; Sigmund
Freud influences more lives-
than the saints in heaven; a
seat on the stock exchange is
worth more to a vast majority
of people than a. portion of
paradise an dthe collapse in
security values a few months
ago gave rise more hear
felt prayer than the liturgy."
Thus he bade farewell to
"the processional ministry,"
explaining to his congregation.
in Temple ,Bsrael, the large
Reformed temple where he.
was co-rabbi, why he had
quit his $12,000 job.
The salary, he declared, was
the on*Y reason he could seel
for staying in the ministry,
even tibugh he remains a be-
liever; and for this reason he


1




rl~~~~~-~~~i- ~ ----------- .-r--:,_.. ____ _~ I Jim -._~___~l~_ l-C--`I~.~~1.~~.-- .-~--~sa~a


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


Frid March 7 193


,, l111111 loll fll I 1u0n1 "n1I gi
SThe Shofar Saves
A Village

By Moses Levene
B


The Jews in the Diaspora
with greatest concern follow-
ed the August disturbances
in Eretz Israel. Horror-strick-
en and distressed, they per-
used the descriptions of the
massacres and saluted the
courage of those who, against
overwhelming odds, defended
the Yishub from destruction.
I was an eye-witness to the
Arab attack on Meah Shearim
and was thrilled to see how
Jews not two hundred yards
Distant from the savage mob,
stood without the slightest ex-
pression of fear. Fear for one-
self is non-existent in Eretz
Israel. The fear that prevails
is only for someone else's
safety, and the precautions
taken are always to guard the
S security of one's neighbor.
This courage was manifest in
all Jewish settlements, and
expressed itself in a most un-
S usual form in an incident that
occurred on August 24th and
which has not been recorded
in the descriptions published
concerning the attacks on the
Jewish settlements and vil-
lages. It is the story of how
Neve Jacob was saved by
means of blowing the shofar,
and not by firearms.
Neve Jacob is situated five
miles to the north of Jeru-
salem on the main road to
N ablus, and about one mile
and a half from Kalandieh.
This colony bears the name of
Rabbi Jacob Reines, the foun-
der of the Mizrahi movement,
and consists of about thirty
houses, half of which are un-
occupied. Fifteen families all
orthodox Jews, myself inclu-
ded, make up the inhabitants
of this village.
The tension and unrest
among the Arabs in the north
of Jerusalem was noticed as
early as Wednesday preceding
the Black Friday. Many cars
carrying Arabs to Jerusalem,
returned empty. Some of
these cars on their way to
Jerusalem stopped at Neve
Jacob, and their passengers
jokingly remarked that on
Friday they would pay us a
visit of great interest. On
Thursday my son, Mordecai,
was cycling down to Jerusa-
lem when he was stopped by
one of the elders of a neigh-
boring village. He tried to pick
a quarrel with him, but final-
ly let him go, saying "We
shall slaughter you tomor-
row." On Friday, hundreds of
cars proceeded to Jerusalem
from the North, carrying
Arabs armed with clubs,


DAILY AT 2:00 P. M.
BOAT LEAVES CITY YACHT
BASIN
N. E. Third St. and Bay
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Don't miss the opportunity of
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and enlarged double hulled
SE-BOT-M BOAT
For Particulars,
Phone 22073


swords and knives. Some Arab
chauffers who were driving
Jewish passengers at that
time, were afraid to take them
to Jerusalem, and dropped
them at our village.
The riots broke out about
one o'clock on Friday after-
noon, and quickly spread
throughout the country. Our
neighbor, Ataroth, was at-
tacked just after the evening
prayers, and we heard the fir-
ing as we were in the midst of
the zemiroth. We hastened to
finished our meal, knowing
that our turn would come
soon. All the men concentrat-
ed on the main Nablus road,
and the women and children
were kept indoors. We had no
arms except two pistols, so we
grasped whatever we could
lay hands on, axes, hatches
and sticks.
At two o'clock Saturday
morning, a band of about
three hundred Arabs that had
been repulsed by armored cars
fro their attack on Kalan-
dieh, tried to force themselves
into Neve Jacob, from the
roadside. A battle of sticks
and stones started. Fortunate-
ly, however, just then an arm-
ored car preceding north-
wards, dispersed the mob. The
men remained on guard, not
realizing the grave danger of
leaving the other side of the
colony unprotected.
At about four o'clock one
of my little girls (all the chil-
dren had been. dressed and in
notice) looked through the
readiness to flee at a moments
window just as dawn was
breaking over the hills of
Moab, when she exclaimed
"Mamma, Arabs are breaking
our neighbor's house."
I ran out of the verandah
and saw a group of about
thirty Arabs coming headlong
towards our house. One of the
boys was despatched to the
other side of the colony to
raise the alarm, when, lo, a
weak looking Jew of the old
type, but courageous as a
lion, rushed into his house,
grasped the shofar, and like
Gideon of old, rushed towards
the Arabs, blowing the trump-
et. The shrill tones of that
shofar sent a thrill through
us all. The attacking Arabs
were impressed. They thought
that a whole regiment of sol-


PI














i 11
11,


diers were upon them, and
they fled down one of the
ravines. The immediate dang-
er had passed. The shofar
had saved the village of Neve
Jacob. Of all the Jewish set-
tlements in and around Jeru-
salem, Neve Jacob is the most
dangerously situated, the
most distant and the least
populated, yet it came
through the August riots with
no personal injury and no loss
of property.
We realized the danger dur-
ing Saturday when the Gov-
ernment sent us a garison of
ten soldiers, who remained
stationed in the colony for six
weeks.
Whilst our other settle-
ments owed their rescue to
personal courage and the use
of firearms, Neve Jacob owed
its escape from harm to the
courage of its defenders, and
especially to the man who
blew the shofar.


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Midnight Show Sat.


I
/ II,
__ffEiic
t4-U*IY C REISC UACCI


COMMERCIAL RELIGION
MAKES RABBI RESIGN

( Continued from Page 1)
dren is more affected by mov-
ing picture magnates than by
ministers." He went on,
"'Amos 'n' Andy' reach
more hearts than the most
brilliant preachers in the
country. The lowliest chemist
in his laboratory wields more
sway over the affairs of men
than the high priest on his
alter groping for divine rev-
elation."
Mr. Feinberg ascribed the
decline of organized religion
to the fact that this is an age
of science, to the reluctance
of religious leaders to deal
with the vital problems of
policies, or sex of economics
and unemployment.
The professional minister of
today, Mr. Feinberg said, has
ceased to be a mystic and has
become "a seeker after popu-
larity, a clerk of pew-rentals
and a 'good fellow.' Just as
other men sell clothes or auto-
mobiles, so does he dispense
religion-for a price. In other
words, his is no longer a
priesthood it is a profes-
sion."
Making a sharp distinction
between t he "professional
minister" and the believer.
Mr. Feinberg affirmed his
own religious belief and stat-
ed that he believed he could
do more as a layman than as
a priest. He said the only rea-
son for his staying in the min-
istry was its monetary com-
pensation and he could not
bring himself to stay on those
terms.
In closing,' Mr. Feinberg
thanked the congregation of
Temple Israel for their friend-
liness to him. He said that he
went out into the world not
without regrets at leaving the
church but drawn by an "un-
deniable destiny."


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Friday, March, 7, 1930


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


PaD Q


A66X a e


THE JEWISH

FLORIDIAN
A weekly newspaper published at
Miami, Florida
by
The Jewish Floridian Publishing
Company
625 S. W. FIRST STREET
Phone 2-8745



EDITORIAL STAFF
J. LOUIS SHOCHET
A CHOCHOOM
BEN DOROM
A. N. ASHER

EDITORIAL


THE HINKAS CASE
All Palestine is perturbed
by the decision handed down
recently which condemns
Policeman Hinkas to death on
the charge that he was re-
sponsible for the death of a
number of Arabs. To say that
the sentence meted out to
Hinkas is a travesty-of jus-
tice is to dismiss the real sig-
nificance of the event with a
phrase. As a Jew, Hinkas took
a great deal more interest in
the pogroms than did his Arab
felow-policemen. It is quite
likely that he shot several
Arabs as part of his effort to
quell the riots, although even
this much rests upon purely
circumstantial and conflicting
evidence. Several weeks ago a
court dismissed the charges
against twelve Arabs accused
of slaughtering the Macleff
family in Motza. The ground
was insufficient testim=ny..ua_
rather testimony that did not
pr6ve beyond a reasonable
doubt the guilt of the defend-
ants. It seems hardly neces-
sary to contrast the two cases
that came before the court.
On the one hand, we have a
band of looters that had no
reason for being in the vicin-
ity of the Macleff house ex-
cept to kill.On the other hand,
we have a Jewish policeman
who shot people in the per-
formance of his duty. The
looters were Arabs and the
victims Jews. The policeman a
Jew and those killed Arabs.
One cannot but regard the in-
cident as but another evidence
of that vicious anti-Semitism
among government officials
that John Haynes Holmes so
drastically denounced upon
his return from Palestine last
spring; At that time it was
considered impolite to applaud
his views: it might injure the
sensibilities of the Palestine-
administration. To-day if one
should accuse these officials
of anti-Semitism it is regard-
ed as bad form and alibi.


RUSSIA TO THE FORE

The Soviets have perfected
the system for keeping inter-
national attention centered
upon them continuously. The
newest device, which cannot
but arouse widespread anxiety
among Jews, is the program-
me for collectivization. It has
been rumored that collectives
wil be on the basis of nation-
alities and not of groups. This
it is said, wil avoid that auto-
matic annihilation of Jewish
communities which would be
inevitable if collectives were
to consist of miscellaneous
elements. Observers of social
progress have had occasion


to- applaud Russia for the
manner in which it encourag-
ed the development of indiv-
idual groups within the
framework of the nation as a
whole. It cannot be denied,
however, that the patent ulti-
mate purpose of the govern-
ment is to create a uniform
mind and attitude among all
inhabitants of Russia. The
suppression of all religious in-
stitution, the censorship of
all art and literature that does
not promote the Soviet idea,
the prohibition of individual
initiative cannot but result in
a standardized people whose
outward harmony can only
conceal an inward drabiness.
Collectivization is another
method by which it is hoped
to achieve standardization. If
only on this ground liberals
will be unconvinced by Rus-
sia's latest social experiment.


"BRUNEH"


If you have kept up with
modern lingo, you know what
"brunch" is. If you haven't,
you have missed a delightful-
ly expressive word, and the
equally delightful function
which it entitles.
You know that satisfying
meal that you have when you
sleep late Sunday morning,
when your home-maker give
you grapefruit and eggs and
doughnuts and coffee and
tells you it is both breakfast
and lunch, and there will be
nothing more until dinner-
well, that's "brunch."
Nice?
I think it is. It's too nice to
be confined to Sunday alone.
I want to go brunching every
day.
Sometimes business and
professional folks whose
hours are not "sot," meet at
ten-thirty, or eleven o'clock in
the morning on their way to
work and have "brunch" to-
gether at a favorite tea-room
or restaurant. It's a fine way
to start the day right.
Sometimes when you are
vacationing at a hotel for the
sake of much-needed rest, and
time means nothing to you,
you do not get up for break-
fast, but you have an early
lunch instead, for your first
meal. Now you know what to
call it-"brunch." If you call
"Service" and ask to have it
sent to your room, it would
be wise to explain its mean-
ing to "Service" beforehand,
lest that mysterious impep--
sonal person who resides/in
every big hotel, might not be
as up-to-date in the English
of today as you are, and
trouble-and no brunch might
follow.
Snappy addition to the mod-
ern dictionary-"brunch."


The bachelor who says he
wouldn't marry is like a felow
panning a show he has never
seen.


Whatever is said about the
jackass it will have to be ad-
mitted that he "knows his
oats."

Speaking of nitrates, Dumb
Dora thinks they are cheaper
than day rates.

Everyone knows the differ-
ence between a boxing match
and a match box.
*
Dumb Dos thinks pasturiz-
ed milk is from cows that
graze in pastures.


THE


CHASER


The man who has a wealth
of happiness is the richest
man in the world.
*
A man never thinks serious-
ly of marriage until he gets
married.
*
When a cop takes after a
bootlegger he is in truth a
rum runner.
*
We wonder if the readers of
the modern newspapers real-
ize how difficult it is for
newspapers to be satisfactory.
Can you visualize yourself
presenting a veritable jungle
of news events during these
complex days, and editorial-
izing on them in an intelligent
way? Friends, that's some
job. Meanwhile, pardon us for
using the word "visualize."
Every blatant orator and
every writer of foolish theory
has made that word very
tiresome.


The Visitor-What are you
going to be when you grow
up?
Little Ethel-Oh, I expect I
shall be a flapper.
*
Irate Man You little
shrimp! You swore at my
wife! Give an apology now or
take a beating!
The Little Guy-W-w-will
you let me 'phone my wife
a-and ask her which I shall
choose?

The Host of the Graball
Inn-That's a new pennant I
had designed to hoist over the
inn What do you think of it?
The Guest Very pretty.
Captain Kidd flew the skull
and crossbones.


* *


The race for
makes marathon
of us all.


the dollar
runners out


It is cowardly to hit and
run unless you are at bat in
a ball game.
*
The form of fiction for
which a man seldom gets paid
is the hard luck story.

Rolling stones gather no
moss, but it is difficult with
rolling "bones"-sometimes.
*4
Between the life insurance
agents and the evangelists a
man ought to be in constant
preparation for death.

How much sweeter is the
music o fthe cheer-up chorus
than the discords of the anvil
chorus. '~e latter are the
ones whomput the harm in
harmony.

When you've sowed your oats
and had your fling
And the end is near and
you're through,
It's then you repent to ease
the sting
As Death hollers, "Come
here, you."
41


"Freddie, what is a spank-
ing team?"
"I gues pa and ma are a
fair sample."
"Did your summer girl give
"Did your summer girl give


you anything to -remember
her by?"
"Yes she gave me her
bathing suit-and I have worn
it in the back of my watch
ever since."
*
The ancient Egyptians wor-
shipped the cat. And 'their
poets were no doubt inspired
by the mews.
*
He-What would you think
if I put my arm around you?
She-What would I think if
you didn't?

"It says here it's hard to
live decently on $1,000 a
year."
"Well, it's easy to live in-
decently on $10.000"

Hearing that they had
started a campaign against
malagria. Dumb Dora wanted
to know what the Malarians
had done now.
'*,
We ought to honor the men
who invented the button and
safety pin. They made it pos-
sible for the world to keep
its clothes on.
*
Teacher (preaching on hon-
esty) Now, Fritz, if you
found a shilling, would you
keep it?
Fritz-No, sir.
Teacher-Good, what would
you do?
Fritz-Spend it.
*
Wife-I don't trust our new
housemaid a bit.
Husband-But you can't go
by appearances with these
girls.
Wife-I'm not; I'm going
by disappearances.
*


"Sam, do you solemnly
swear to tell the truth, the
whole truth, and nothing but.,
the truth ?"
:"Aj does, sah."
"Well, Sam, what have you
Sgot to say for yourself?"
"Jedge, with all dem limita-
tions you jes' put on me, ah
don't believe ah has anything
at all to say."
And a man whom the world
calls great may be very small
in the eyes of his wife.
,* *
A young attorney, taking
his first case, had been re-
tained by a farmer to prose-
cute a railway company for
killing 24 pigs.
1' He wanted to impress the
jury with the magnitude of
the injury. "Twenty-four pigs
gentlemen n. Twenty-four;
twice the number in the jury
box."
4*
Visitors were present.
."Daddy, may I have a
penny?" asked little Georgie.
"Daddy obliged, with a
smile.
"This time you won't make
me give it back after the com-
pany's gone, will you, daddy?"
was little Georgie's loud re-
mark.

The ushffL at a wedding,
are pretty much the same as
pall-bearers at a funeral.
*
Welkin's daughter had fal-
len in love. Every evening she


A b
r- P%


A young correspondent
asks the versatile Informa-
tion Editor how to construct
a boomerang. Perhaps if he
will call some morning, with
a pen and a blank check, we
can write him one.

He was showing his fourth
wife around the village. They
visited the churchyard. She
paused before an elaborate
tombstone which had been
erected by the bridegroom.
She read the inscription:
"Here lies Susan, beloved
wife of Thomas Johnson; also
Jane, beloved wife of Thomas
Johnson; also Mary, beloved
wife of Thomas Johnson-"
Leaning forward to see the
bottom line she read: "Be Ye
Also Ready."
*
Browne was gazing intent-
ly into a customer's shop win-
dow when Smythe, an old ac-
quaintance, accosted him.
"Just spotting a costume
for the wife, eh?" remarked
Smythe jocularly.
"Yes," admitted Browne.
"I'm looking for a banana
shade."
"Why that?" asked Smythe
in surprise.
"Beca u se," explained
Browne. "I think it will just
be the thing that she can slip
on quickly!"


TH JEWISHI FLORIDIAN-A MEDIUM OF ~~gR MAM-JWR!


~.... ..........


woulc invite the maln of her
choice to come round and see
her after dinner. And every
evening he would stay a little
later than before.
At last Welkin decided to
put a stop to it. As midnight
struck lW walked out of his
bedroo nand leant over the
banisters.
"Claudia," he shouted, "I
think you'd better get that
young man his coat."
For a moment silence reign-
ed. Then the ardent lover
spoke.
"Darling," he said, "your
father is a crank."
There came a snort from
the top of the stairs.
"Yes," growled Welkin.
"Perhaps I am. But a crank is
very necessary when there is
no self-starter."
*
A man was telling a girl
about an automobile trip from
which he had just returned
The trip was made during a
spell of very rainy weather
and high waters.
"I arrived about 4 o'clock
in the afternoon at a very
swolen fiver, and it was nec-
essary that I should cross,"
he said. "No bridge was with-
in miles. Night was approach-
ing, but I knew it would be
madness for me to drive my
car into the rushing stream."
"Well, what did you do?"
inquired the girl.
"Oh, I sat in my machine
and thought it over."
*
It is stated that women
barbers are driving many men
out of the business. He clips,
she clips, eclipse.

Chairman-Well, what had
we better do with that gar-
bage on the south side!
Member I move that we
put it all in tne hands of a
special committee.
*
S. Latitude Concentrate!
If you excel in any one thing
the world will soon make a
beaten path to your door.
N. Devver-That's nothing.
My creditors have already
made the beaten path.
4


!


- -- i ~ -- ~ I-- -I I I- ~









THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


S__________ -- ------ u ------ ------- --




SS O CIE TY E

II ,-n --- --i-L-l-n- --ln I IHY- --I- I ) ) -j )O O I --- +


We would appreciate your
forwarding all society and
organization items to the
Jewish Floridian, 652 S. W.
Irk 1st street, or phone 2-8745
not later than noon Wed-
nesday.

j Mrs. Herbert E. Kleiman
and sister, Mrs. A. L. Klein,
left yesterday to visit their
sister, Mrs. T. R. Ray, in Dal-
las, Texas. Mrs. Kleiman will
return April 1.
*
Mr. and Mrs. S. D. Bass,
836 S. W. Third Avenue, an-
nounce the birth of a daugh-
ter, Ellen Lucretta, March 1.
*
Miss Yetive Letaw has ar-
rived from Birmingham, Ala.,
to visit her uncle and aunt,
Mr. and Mrs. David Letaw,
1900 S. W. Ninth street.
Mrs. Charles Beall of New
York spent several days in
Miami following a trip to her
former home in Havana to vis-
it her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Harry J. Levin. Mrs. Beall
will be remembered to friends
in the city as Miss Edith
Levin.
*
A nominating committee
was nemed last week when
Temple Israel Sisterhood met,
composed of Mrs. H. I. Homa,
chairman, Mrs. A. B. Kanter,
Mrs. I. Levin, Mrs. Bert L.
Reisner and Mrs. Ben Watts.
Mrs. Louis J. Scheinman
was the principal speaker of
the afternoon. Mrs. I. L. Se-
ligman, president was in
charge.
Mrs. C. Myers of New York
is visiting her son and daugh-
ter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Stan-
ley C. Myers and will be the
guest of honor at a bridge in
her honor on Friday after-
noon.
Instrumental musical pro-
gram was presented at the
meeting of the Miami Music
club at 10:30. a. m. Thursday.
with Mrs. Daniel Cromer and
Miss Frances Druckerman in
charge, Mrs. Ralph Fuzzard,
president, presided.
Those appearing were Rob-
ert Kistler, violinist, Rose
Mary Gerson, soloist, Frances
Druckerman, pianist and Amy
Rice Davis, organist. Mrs.
Isaac Levin gave the current
events and Mrs. R. I. Jefford
and Mrs. L. D. Gates was in
charge of the decorations.
*
An outstanding event in the
musical activities in Miami
was the formal musical and
reception, sponsored by the
Junior Council of Jewish Wo-
men, Tuesday evening at the
Miami Biltmore Country club.
The following interesting
program was presented:
"Aria From Manon Lescaut"
(Puccini), "The South Wind"
(Mary Turner Salter), Mrs.
Ralph Fuzzard, soprano, ac-
companied by Mrs. Grace
Murray; "Songs My Mother
Taught Me" (Dvorak-Kreis-
ler). "Tarantelle" (Papini),


Marion Taylor, violin soloist,
Eleanor Clark at the piano;
"Scherzo in B Minor" (Chop-


in), Miss Frances Drukerman,
pianist; "the Romanza From
Cavalleria Rusticana" (Mas-
cagni), Miss Rosemary Ger-
son; lyric soprano, Miss Fran-
ces Druckerman at the piano;
"Polonaise" (Vieutemts), Ro-
bert Kistler, violinist, with
Miss Frances Druckerman at
the piano; "Song of the Open"
(Frank La Forge), "Rachem"
(Mercy) (Mana-Zucca), Miss
Dora Miller, dramatic soprano
Mrs. Murray at the piano;
"Nicharo" (M a n a-Z u c c a),
Percy Long, baritone, Ray-
mond Simons at the piano.
Quite a representative au-
dience of visitors and resi-
dents attended. Mrs. Dorothy
Mitchell was chairman of the
arrangements committee.
*
The tombstone over the
grave of the late Sam Cohen
will be unveiled at the ceme-
tery of the Beth David Syna-
gogue at the City Cemetery
grounds, next Sunday, March
9th, at 2. P. M. when Rabbi
Israel H. Weisfeld of Beth
David will officiate. The
friends of the late Mr. Cohen
are all requested to be pre-
sent.
*
A regular meeting of the
Sisterhood of Temple Israel
will be held at Kaplan Hall,
on March 12, at 2:15 P. M.
when important business will
be transacted.
t *
As we are going to press
Mrs. Sarah Baron is enter-
taining a number of friends
at a bridge luncheon in honor
of her mother Mrs. Samuel J.
Spector, whose silver wedding
anniversary will be celebrat-
ed next Monday night.
*
Last Sunday evening, Mi-
ami Jewry given one of the
finest educational treats that
it has been its privilege to
hear for quite a long time.
The Concert and Play pre-
sented by the children attend-
ing the Workmens Circle
School were featured in the
entertainment given at its
Third Annual Concert held at
the Womens Club. Dr. A. D.
Halpern who was chairman of
the evening in his opening ad-
dress directed the attention
of his audience to what he
called "crime of history"
pointing out the fact that it
was in great measure due to
the lack of interest shown by
the parents that the children
of today did not receive a
Jewish education, and that
the children were not the
fault in the least.
The pupils sang "the Kind-
er Ring," "Grezelech," "Jug-
ent Armay," "Fraylach" and
a number of other folk songs
which were received with
much applause. "Tzipele was
sung by Yetta Kopkin and a
choir, and Beriay Silverblatt,
and Shirley Kaler each de-
claimed, as did Adele Weis-
man, and Shirley Elkin who
told the story of "Berele Shli-
maszel." Rose Mary Gerson
sang and was accompanied at


the piano by Miss Frances
Druckerman, and a song of
Abraham Raisin was sung by
Miss Violet Rosehill. Ethel
Lazar recited the prologue of


the play the Birthday of the
Infanta, in which the part of
the Princess was played by
Shirley Elkin, the Duchess by
Sarah Dock, and Chamber-
lain by Isidor Kaler, the cou-
sin by Leonara Rose, the
dwarf by Ethel Lazar, and
the remaining companions of
the princess by Evelyn Slavi-


ter, Harriet Katzoff, Adele
Weisman, and Lillian Kaplan.
During the intermission an
address of congratulation was
delivered by Mr. Landay of
the Atlanta, Ga., and a brief
address on the need of Jewish
training and education by Mr..
Grhhman who is in charge of
the school. Quite a large audi-


Pa eA 4


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I I


Friday, March 7, 193(
ence attended and enjoyed the
splendid program presented.
Rabbi and Mrs. Israel H.
Weisfeld entertained Mr. Pet-
er Wiernik at dinner at their
home last Monday night. Mr.
Wiernik is Editor of the Jew-
ish Morning Journal and a co-
editor of the Jewish Encyclo-
pedia.
A regular meeting of the
Ladies Auxiliary of Beth Da-
vid Talmud Torah was held
at the Talmud Torah Auditor-
ium, last Tuesday night at
which time the final plans for
the Purim Ball being held at
Continued on Page 5


---- ------- --I--- ----- --- -- --... I---LI;YI1II


(






















e



e




0
i

C
C


*(


THlilNlrN; JEWS ALL SUBSCRIBE TO THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN! DO YOU?









'riday, March 7, 1930


Pare 5


SOCIETY

(Continued from Page 4)
e Womens Club, on March
th, were discussed and ar-
nged. A splendid program
entertainment has been ar-
nged and a real evening of
measurable entertainment has
een planned.

Mr. Peter Wiernick of New
ork was the guest at dinner
SMr. and Mrs. Louis Shochet
,st Sunday. Among those
resent were Rabbi and Mrs.
rael H. Weisfeld, Miss Sarah
hochet, and Mrs. M. Zucker
SNew York City. Following
inner the guest of honor was
iken on a tour of Miami and
irrounding territory.
*
Mr. Peter Wiernik of the
wish Morning Journal who
as a visitor at the Sea Breeze
hotel for the past 10 days left
Wednesdayy night for Wash-
gton, D. C., to attend the
)nference of the Joint Dis-
ibution Committee and the
onist Agency. Mr. Wiernik
one of the representatives
the Joint Distribution Com-
ittee.
*
The Sisterhood of Temple
rael will sponsor a card
rty on Sunday evening,
arch 23rd. The place will be
nounced in these columns
our next issue.
** *


Miami and the Capitol Thea-
ter for the world premiere of
"Show Boat."
The intermingling of Jew-
ish comedy, Scottish jokes
and Irish humor in "The Co-
hens and Kells in Scotland,"
as in previous pictures of Co-
hens and
hens and Kellys affords a
classic in its field.
Next Monday instead of the
usual continuous performance
there will be a late afternoon
performance followed by a
second performance at 8:15 p.
m. The usual performances at
usual prices will begin Tues-
day.
*
Classical dance rhythms
with Lolita Diaz, Spanish
dancer, as guest artist was
the theme of the program pre-
sented at the meeting of the
Mana-Zucca Music club at
4:30 p. m. Monday at the
Civic theatre. Mrs. L. B. Saf-
ford and Ruth Farrell sang
"Lullaby" by Mr. Urich. Dora
Miller also sang one of the
composer's songs entitled "0
Oceans Wings."
Piano solos, "Minuet" and
"Neila Waltz" (JDelibes Do-
hanyi) were played by Cor-
inne Ernst. Reba Aprea sang
"Waltz from Boheme" (Pu-
cini) with Francis Tarboux at
the piano. Inez Jones present-
ed a piano solo, "Wave of the
Waves" (Moskowski) and Su-
zanne Dickson and Wilma
Leach offered "Barcarolle"
(Offenbach).
Lolita Diaz presented span-
ish dances.


The Capitol Theatre, owned f *
' the well known Wolfs Mrs. Wiliam Silverberg,
mily, prominent in the ew- formerly Leslie Stone is visit-
h life of Miami for some ing her parents for the winter
ars, is again the scene of a season. Mrs. Silverberg is
orld's Mniers showing, well-known to the literary
is timeie the first exhibi- .world as a writer of scienti-
n of "The Cohenl and fic, and is the author of sev-
ellys in Scotland." i eral stories recently published
For the first time since the in a number of magazines.
oduction of the original *
ohens and Kelly" four years As we are going to press a
o, the four principals and Young Peoples League is be-
pporting cast appear to- ing formed at the Talmud To-
ther in a talking picture, rah Auxiliary. The organiza-
eorge Sidney as Mr. Cohen, tion which is being formed
arlie Murray as Mr. Kelly, through the efforts of Rabbi
era Gordon as Mrs. Cohen Israel H. Weisfeld is to be an
d Kate Price as Mrs. Kelly, organization where young
e the leading characters in married and unmarried folks
rle Cohens and Kellys in between the ages of 19 and 30
otland." may meet and in addition to
Universal Pictures Corpor- a social program will also do
ion chose Miami for the social and cultural work. The
world premiere of "The organization is to be city wide
hens and Kellys in Scot- and non-sectarian, in the sense
nd" because of the presence that it will not be confined to
re of thousands of visitors any particular Synagogue or
om all parts of the United Temple but will welcome all
ates giving the picture the of good standing.
vantage of advance public- *
Sin many different cities Invi have been is-
hen the visitors return to Invitations have been
ir homes. This was the de- sued- for a reception at the
ng factor last year when home of Mr. ana Mrs. Samuel
ie same producers selected J. Spector in celebration of
their fifth wedding anniver-


THE

FAIRWAY

DAIRY
SOLICITS YOUR
PATRONAGE


Phone Miami'
7105
FOR PROMPT
SERVICE


I


sary. Mr. Spector is President
of the Hebrew Free Loan As-
sociation, a Trustee of Con-
gregation Beth David, an of-
ficer of the Mens Club of Mi-
ami and very active in gener-
al, communal work here. He
was one of the City Commis-
sioners of Coral Gables when
that City was first founded
and incorporated, and was al-
so one of the founders of the
Taxpayers League of Coral
Gables.
The Weekly Meeting of the
Friendship League was held
in their club rooms on the
17th floor of the Congress
Building, March 5th 1930.
Miss Ann Kirchik is being


Committee by the following:
Miss Pauline Schoenfield,
Murry Grossman, Miss Minnie
Lesnoff, Irving Spector, Fred
Platt.
A report was made for the
coming dance to be held at the
Ambassador club, Sunday,
March 9th. Chairman of the
Entertainment reported that
six new acts will be presented,
with Charles Miller as Master
of Ceremonies. After the
Meeting dancing was enjoyed.
Board of Governors will
hold their meeting, Monday,
March 10th, at the home of
Miss Lesnoff, 1037 N. W. 1st
street.

Ruth Bryan Owen Orator-
ical club will meet at 2:30 p.
m. Friday at the home of Mrs.
S. H. Lutsky, Mrs. A. L. Kan-
ter will talk on the "Talkies"
and Mrs. A. E. Rosenthal will
speak on dentestry. At the
meeting Friday at the home
of Mrs. Henry Williams she
reviewed Eugene O'Neill's
"Anna Christie." Later each
member gave a current event
topic.
*
Sisterhood of Temple Israel
met at 10:30 a. m. Thursday,
at the temple for an all-day
sewing. The garments made
will be sent to the Atlanta or-
phanage. Those interested are
asked to meet in the vestry
room. Luncheon will be ser-
ved at noon. Mrs. Sam Katz,
Sewing chairman of the group
was in charge.
*
Mr. and Mrs. Chas.. Green-
berg, of 360 S. W. 3rd street,
announce the engagement of
their daughter Barbara to Mr.
Jack Greenberg of West
Palm Beach. The wedding will
take place the latter part of
this month.

Beth-El Activities at West
Palm Beach
The month of February
proved, .to be successful one
for Congregation Beth El of
West Pal mBeach. Activities
of the past month, which in-
cluded a benefit dinner at the
Community House for the
Talmud Torah, were well at-
tended. Rabbi S. Wrubel
states, that since the organiz-
ing of the Talmud Torah, the
Jewish fathers and mothers,
have shown a strong interest
in the welfare of the commun-
ity.
The Sisterhood is running aR
Purim Costume Dance, March
15, at the Community House
414 Seventh Street. The pro-
ceeds will go to the Talmud
Torah Fund. Officers invite
visitors to come to this affair,
as it will be the outstanding
event of the season.


UNITED GAS
UTILITIES, INC.
-OWNERS--
GAS COMPANY
of Miami Beach '


Assisted on the Membersnip w a_ _Z__w___ __w wo we Urm W

THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN-A MEDIUM OF AND FOR MIAMI JEWRY!


Her Husband-What's the
idea-hangin' an old tire on
the door of the garage?
Mrs. Speedup-For. luck.
Horseshoes are so awfully old
fashioned.
Upfiftfiffi^&fifi^&^^^^Q(


L. (Pop) PERSON
Buyer of All Kinds of Scrap Metal
We Sell Auto Parts
2141 N. W. SECOND AVE.
Phone 20621

BAGS and METALS
EAST COAST BAG & METAL CO.
(Inc.)
I. L. MINTZER
MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS
435-445 N. W. 8th Street
Phone 4485
PEPPER METAL CORP.
Scrap Metal and Machinery
N. W. Cor. 5th Ave. and 14th St.
Phone 22546

BUILDING SUPPLIES
J. SIMPSON
Building Materials,
Roofing Paper, Asphalt
423 N. W. N. River Drive
Phone 7251

DELICATESSEN
ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN
170 N. W. 5th St.
We Supply Your Every Want

FISH & SEA FOODS
STANDARD FISH CO.
629 W. Flagler St.
Phone 2-3362

FOUNTAINS
Cold Drinks
Candies and Lunches
HOME GROCERY
Corner 1st St. N. W. and 3rd Ave.


King
Undertaking Co.
29 N. W. THIRD AVENUE
Phone 23535-31624


DR. J. B. MARGOLIS
DENTIST
Third Floor Olympia Bldg.
Phone 2-4073


"I advertised that the poor
be welcome in this church,"
said the minister, "and after
inspecting the collection, I
see that they have come."
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I


INSURANCE
FLORIDA INSURANCE
AGENCY, Inc.


DADE


-General Insurance-
800 N. E. 2nd Ave. Phone 27589

PHARMACISTS
BRYAN PARK PHARMACY
Chas. Tannenbaum,
Pharmacist
(reg. pharmacist for 17 years)
Cor 22nd Ave. and 8th St. S. W.

CRYSTAL PHARMACY
Dr. A. D. Halpern, Ph. G. Ph. D.
Prescriptions Our Specialty
128 N. Miami Ave. Phone 29713

PIPE and STEEL

ADELMAN PIPE & STEEL CO.
58 N. E. 25th St.
Aat F. E. C. R. R. Phone 21420
A. & B. PIPE AND METAL CO.
Phone 31355
53 North East 25th Street
"-
PRINTE-RS
MIAMI PRINTING CO.
"Printing That Pays"
Phone 23261
107 South Miami Avenue
AUTO PARTS
BLOOM AUTO REPAIR
4 PARTS CO.
N. W. 17th Ave. at 23rd St.
Phone 23631
The Largest car wreckers in
Florida


AMBULANCE SERVICE
W. H. Combs Co., Estab. 1896
COMBS FUNERAL HOME
Phone Miami 32101
inA N. E. nad Aveaue
MIAMI BEACH FUNERAL HOME
Phone M. B. 5-2101
1236 WaMingto Ave


Dr. Albert E. Rosenthal
DENTIST
N. E. 2id Ave.
302 Professional Building
riiiiiNiiiu iiinhll l m gl l ggmn uiii Hiii n miiuluul iiiinlllmf l llsu llnulNitKI


BUSINESS DIRECTORY
I..


WHY WASTE MONEY
BY PAYING MORE FOR YOUR
AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE?
INVESTIGATE FOR YOURSELF!
Let Our Representative Show You How To Save From 30 Per
SCent to 40 Per Cent On Your Auto.
Dade Florida Insurance Agency,Inc
800 N. E. SECONI AVENUE
I Representing
HOOSIER CASUALTY CO.
_Ff .... ........... ........................ ....


.Fort Lauderdale Florida
Gas Co.
GAS SERVICE
Fort Lauderdale, Holly-
wood, Dania, Miami Shores
Miami Beach
-Offices-
1036 LINCOLN ROAD
MIAMI BEACH


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THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


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THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


BRR UglX L .&A0 wTV VA J.: AJ v.-W.--d


Friday, March 7, 194


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S.


BLAIN


CORPORATION

E. 1gt Ave., Miami, Fla.


See Yourself in the Movies!


FREE!


Every Night Except Sunday at 7:30 P. M.
onal Ledure on TUNG OIL (China Wood Oil Headquarters) By J. D. O'BRIEN
rE.-


OUR ADVERTISERS SAVE YOU MONEY AND GIVE YOU SERVICE!


t U.--.


--


i


THE finest drying oil and base for paints and var-
nishes known to modern industry; essential in the
manufacture of linoleum and oil cloth, etc.; without
which electricity and its component necessity, properly
insulated motors, dynamos, wire, etc. could not be.
Necessary in the manufacture of more than seven
hundred American industrial products; THE FOURTH
LARGEST CHEMICAL IMPORT to the United States;
raised in China for the past five thousand years; pro-
duced by crude and ancient coolie methods; WITHOUT
WHICH WE CANNOT DO; the available market less
than 25% supplied; DEMAND EVER INCREASING;
TUNG OIL
is now at your beck and call. No longer an experi-
ment. The Dupont companies, the American paint
and varnish industry have proven to themselves and
to the entire world that FLORIDA CAN AND DOES
PRODUCE TUNG OIL far superior to that of its
native home CHINA.
Will you profit by the example of Ancient China?
Will you profit by the example set you by the great
industrial companies in the Country? Will you help
protect American industries and thus guard your own
future?
Do you hear OPPORTUNITY WHEN IT KNOCKS
LOUDLY AT YOUR DOOR?
Tung Oil can, has been, and will be raised in ever
increasing amounts in Florida.
Two and a half acres with one hundred and sixteen
rUNG TREES all your own. A deed for this TUNG
OIL PLANTATION ALL YOUR OWN. The SEMI-
NOLE PLANTATION COMPANY taking care of
YOUR PLANTATION and seeing that YOUR TREES
THRIVE AND PRODUCE for only twenty-five per
cent of the OIL RETURNS. WITHIN YOUR MEANS
and EASY TERMS.
For the small down payment of only one hundred
dollars and monthly payments of only twenty-five dol-
lars per month, you GET your TUNG TREES, your
land and PROPER CARE OF YOUR'PLANTATION,
and receive seventy-five per cent of the OIL RETURNS
for thirty years time.
WILL YOU BE A MAN OF AFFAIRS with
MONEY SURE TO COME IN or will you in later years
say "I could have been."
FOR YOUR OWN GOOD INVESTIGATE ......


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