The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
February 28, 1930
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00053

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text











Vol. III-No. VIIII. Miami, Florida, Friday, February 28, 1930 Price 5 Cents
.A I I, e 1 U a ,i T


To My Way of
SThinking
by
Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld I

First he dilated heatedly
and lengthily upon the unpre-
cedented kindness shown the
war veterans by the grateful
Mr. Ford. Why even those who
had lost both legs were em-
ployed by the magnanimous
magnate in sedentary posi-
tions. The fortunate exhibits
were there on display. There
they sat, some shell-shocked,
a blank, and in the case of
some, a cynical or resentfully
defiant look in their eyes, be-
fore belts that carried on
their back an unending
stream of gadgets which were
methodically put into one
part of the automobile in the
making.
Lucky devils! This monoto-
us, dull work was theirs be-
use while they were having
members of their bodies shot
to frazzles, the so nof their
employer was thousands of
miles away from a battlefield,
in the good old U. S. A. ....
Presumably supporting his
parents .... You might say
whatever you wish about his
father. One failing he cannot
be accused of possessing. He
is not ungrateful! Poor fools.

Then there is the matter of
vings. All readers of bi-
graphy and bank advertise-
ents know the tremendous'
influence "putting something
side for a rainy day" has on
man's character. One who
oes not save is headed for a
terrible fall. It also is super-'
fluous to mention that this
automobile establishment was
not conceived solely for sor-
did gains and pecuniary prof-
its. Oh, od! It. aims to broad-
en character and instill highly
desirable traits in the- young
employees. So Henry Ford un-
eremoniously deducts a por-
ion of the salary (I cannot
tate with exactitude whether
this is practiced on all em-
ployees or merely on the
young and unguided. It has
been quite a while since my
visit. But that the practice
does obtain, of that I am cer-
tain) and it is placed to that
employee's account.
Whether or not the worker
can afford to save; whether
or not he can barely eke out
a livelihood on the pay envel-
ope that he receives; that is
no one's concern. Every em-
ployee must save! It must be
a wonderful sensation to know
that one has a bank account.
It encourages a man to go and
borrow ten dollars to buy a
half ton of coal, or pay the
doctor for having removed
the child's tonsils. O. Certain-
ly! the money is naturally de-
posited in the Ford Savings
Bank. Other banks are so un-
reliable and make such un-
wise investments.

How could any man be kind
and charitable and not spread


a protecting wing over the
timid harrowed orphans? Un-
thinkable! So our patron saint
takes a fatherly interest in
them too. They are permitted.
to come to work seven-thirty
each morning, receive a coin-



A9,:


Sisterhood Dele- "jizras Torah" Jewish Murder
gates Return from Committee Formed Investigation De-
Tflmna ilrnnn+in hn --- A f d ldA


.5. LU4AKJ.FU VAI V I ilVII


The delegates to the annual
convention of the Tri-State
Federation of Temple Sister-
hoods returned to Miami this
week after a very pleasant
and enjoyable Convention at
Tampa which began last Sun-
day morning and concluded
last Tuesday night. On Sun-
day the Convention began by
a reception to all the delegates
by the Council of Jewish Wo-
men of Tampa at the home of
Mrs. Ed Weiss. On Monday
the convention officially con-
vened in the vestry rooms of
Temple Shaarey" Zedek with'
an invocation by Rabbi Elliott
Grafman of Tampa. Luncheon
followed in the vestry rooms.
Monday night the delegates
were the guests of the Temple
Sisterhood of Tampa at a ban-
quet held at the Hillsborough
Hotel and a very pleasant
evening was spent. Tuesdayy
the business sessions of the
convention were concluded by
a benediction offered by Rab-
bi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan of
Miami. Luncheon was served
to the delegates at the Tampa
Bay Hotel and was followed
by a motorcade to St. Peters-
burg and vicinity.
On Tuesday evening a
Spanish dinner was served at
the vestry rooms of the Tam-
pa Temple and was followed
by a ridge. At each of the
four sessions the guests were
presented with corsages of
sweet peas. A number of im-
portant papers were read and
discussed during the Conven-
tion and Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan
of Miami took a very import-
ant part in a number of these
discussions. Mrs. I. L. Salig-
man was chosen on the Legis-
lative Committee. The next
convention will be held at Col-
umbus, Ga.
plete half hour for lunch and
ieave not later than full-
grown men at the regular
closing time. They may oegin
this comparatively light-hour
schedu e at the age of eleven
or twelve. For this weekly
"amusement" they receive the
magnificent sum of eight dol-
lars (from which the weekly
.savings are deducted). After
they have proven their ster-
ling worth for the six long
years, their salary is raised to
fifteen dollars a week. Sme
have been known to receive
sixteen at the end of that
time.
Now, I must confess to hav-
ing committed an unmitigat-
ed crime. As. the guide paused
to inhale deeply in order to
continue his eulogy, I rudely
interrupted to ask this undig-
nified question, "What pro-
vision is made for their edu-
cation, since they are here all
day?" The rapt look in his
eye dimmed for a moment.
Immediately, however, he was
his chipper self again, as he
blithely replied "Why, we
have a special arrangement
with the Board of Education
whereby our few hundred or-
phans receive a half-day in-
struction in the school twice


each week." Special arrange-
ment, how truiy spoken!
if


With the arrival of Rabbi
Marcus of Boston, Mass., in-
Miami 'Beach recently, a de-
cided impetus was given to
the movement to form a com-
mittee in support of the world
famous "Ezras Torah" Fund
in Miami Beach. As a result
of a number of conferences
Mr. D. W. Simon, well-known
communal worker of Detroit,
Mich., was chosen Treasurer
of the Committee which at
present is being headed by
Rabbi Marcus, one of the pro-
minent members of the Union
of Orthodox Rabbis of Amer-
ica. Quite a number of the
prominent men of affairs in
Jewish' life throughout the
Country have indicated their
willingness to assist in the
short campaign which this
committee will conduct here
for .the benefit of this fund.
Those who have watched the
reported Anti-religious activi-
ties in Russia were horrified
by the reported impending
execution of Rabbis in Russia,
and learned with relief of the
courageous action of Senator
Borah in demanding the with-
drawal of this outrage. The
Ezras Torah Fund was organ-
ized several years ago to help
Rabbis and members of the
Clergy who were amongst
those in the "Declassed" in
Russia. Some of the most
world famous Rabbis have
been saved as a result of the
activities of this Fund. At
this time the demands upon
the Fund are exceedingly
great and because of the im-
pending wholesale executions
which are bound to come as a
result of the Anti-religious
agitations in Russia, the de-
mands are becoming greater
every day.
The first appeal will be
made on Saturday morning at
the Congregation Beth Jacob
Miami Beach


When persons fall sick, un-
less they are persons of
means, they immediately are
placed in the hospital The
city of Detroit opasts ot' a
hospital that is equipped with
the most modern medical ap-
parati, that possesses a splen-
did medical staff, and that
can compare favorably with
any ether similar institution
i nany part of the country.
Not quite ... ............. ..-----
For the Ford Hospital, priv-
ately endowed and maintained
has one unyielding rule "He
who enters must pay." Every
patient must pay. And in one
more respect it is probably
unique. At the end- of each-
fiscal year the balance sheet
of the hospital shows a decid-
ed surplus. The apex of effi-
ciency. No appendix removed
or wound healed unless there
will be no deficit at the close
of the year.
And this man is sorely per-
plexed, at a loss what to do
with his immense wealth. He
has been so righteous in his'
own home that he is prepared
to set other homes aright.
Bosh! Sham and cheap notor-
iety! If Mr. Ford is sincere
let him discover his own heart
and Detroit, Michigan. A con-
siderable portion of salvation
seeking hualnity lies there.r -


RIliIUCU U1 0 IIIIUI11
Jules M. Crane, a prominent
new York attorney in a let-
ter addressed to Governor
Doyle Carlton of Florida, de-
manded that an investigation
be made regarding the mys-
terious circumstances sur-
rounding the death of Louis
Levin, a 19 year old boy at
C estview, Florida, in Decem-
ber of 1928. Despite attempts
on the part of the boy's par-
ents to obtain information re-
ga ding the aeath of the boy
very little has been learned
by them other than the indefi-
nite details appearing in the
Crestview paper. It appears
that the boy was shot by a
Mrs. T. H. Eany when the boy
was found in the woman's
home.Replies to telegrams and
letters from the parents indi-
cated that the boy continual-
ly improved in the hospital
where he had been taken im-
mediately after being shot,
and they were shocked when
they received a wire advising
them that the boy had died
suddenly. No reply has yet
been received from the Florr
ida governor.

Novel Swindle
Is Perpetrated

A fraud unusual in its per-
patration has been worked
successfully in New York City
the last few weeks and the
victims have been Jewish sex-
tons (Shamoshim) and Syna-
gogues. The swindler comes
into a Shul inquires for the
Shamos arid requests that
"Kaddish" be 'recited for his
departed father or mother.
After the "Kaddisn" is recit-
ed, he became very liberal and
gives the Shamosh five or ten
dollars for himself, and a like
or larger sum for the Shul.
His check, however, is ten to
twenty dollars larger than his
liberal donations and he re-
quests that he be given the
difference in cash, which of
course, the Shamosh very
willingly does. Several days
later the Shamosn learns that
the check is wprthless. in one
instance tne swindler even
purchased a liberal amount of
benefit tickets given for a
worthy cause.

Children's Concert
Will be Held Here

The Third Annual concert
to be given by the pupils of
the Workmens Circle Shule,
will be held at the Auditorium
of the Miami Womens club,
1737 N. Bayshore Drive this
coming Sunday evening, Mar.
2nd, at 8:30 P. M. The pupils
of the school Wvill present
"The Birthday .of the Infan-
ta" by Oscar Wilde, in addi-
tion to a large musical pro-
gram including vocal and in-
strumental selections, de-
clamations and monolouges.
Those interested inthe foster-


ing of the Yiddish language
will find an evening of rare
entertainment at their dis-
posarl- 1


Noted Jewish
Scholar to Speak


On Friday night Congrega-
tion Beth Jacob, Miami Beach,
will hear .Peter Wiernik, Edi-
tor ol the Jewish Morning
Journal, and faimos man of
letters, speak on "Jewish Life
of Today." Being an author-
ity on the subject his address
will be one well worth listen-
ing to.
On Saturday morning Rab-
bi Marcus of Boston, Mass,
will address the Congregation
on "Ezras Torah" and will de-
pict the condition of the Jews,
especially those of the Clergy,
in Russia. In view of the re-
,ported perilous condition of
the Jews in Rlssia, his ad-
dre:es will be father r timely
and should draw a warm re-
sponse on the part of the au-
d;ence.

Statistics Show
Immigrants Not
Charity Cases

Statist cs published this
week by the Cnarity organiza-
tion of New YorK show that
the proportion of immigrants
becoming charity patients are
far less than the average ex-
pected. Of the 13,319 families
aided by the' organization,
mo e than ninty-four per cent
were residents of America for
more than five years, and
nearly nine per cent were na-
tive born New York residents.
Of the 4,236 families receiv-
ing special care more than
thirty-eight per cent were na-
tive born Americans, and the
next largest group were Ital-
ians (19.9 per cent).

Chalutzim Leave
for Palestine

Warsaw-More than three
hundred and twenty chalut-
zim (pioneers) left Warsaw
for Palestine today to make
their home there and become
workers in the ranks of those
rebuilding Palestine. Twenty
of these Chalutzin came from
Riga.
Jewish Boy Wins
Signal Honors

In the finals of the contests
between the various High
Schools in D aae County,
Ralph Kirsch representing
the Ida M1 Fischer Higi
School of Miami Beach was
adjudged the winner by three
judges, all of wnom were rei-.
dents of Miami. The other
contestant representing the
Miami High School was also
runner, up at last year's con-
test which was also won by a
Miami Beach Jewish boy. As
a result of winning this con'-
test Ralph will go to Gaines-
ville the early part of iiext
week to take part in the Ora-
torical contest which will b1
held at the University of Flor-
ida between representatives
from the entire State. Ralph,
who is also rimed for his skill


as a Tennis player is the soti
of Dr. and Mrs. M. D. Kirach,
of Miami -ad. Miami Beak..

.; ,









Pare 2


CAPITAL
PUNISHMENT

r r' (Re David Katz Murder)
For the first time in the
annals of crime in Canada, a
Jew has been sentenced to
death for murder-in this in-
stance of a tellow-Jew. The
tragedy is too painful to deal
with at length, but we pray
that the steps now being tak-
en to have the sentence com-
muted will notbe in vain. May
God guide those now making
the last deliberations upon
the fate of a young life-that
they may see fit to temper
justice with mercy in review-
ing whatever extenuating cir-
cumstances there may be.
The very mention of mur-
der awakens horror in Jewish
hearts. Deeds of violence have
always been repugnant to He-
brew sentiment, whether they
are wrought by the individual
or by the group. The corollary
of necessity, is repudiation of
killing in revenge or as a legal
.penalty. Capital punishment
even if permitted by old He-
brew law, was rarely resorted
to, and even if imposed, was
circumvented by every sort
of humane device such as
delays and investigation as to
the culprit's good deeds, if
any. The Sanhedrin, which in
one solitary instance allowed
the death sentence to be exe-
cuted, is stigmatized in the
Talmud as the "Sanhedrin of
.Murder"! What a testimony to
the humanity of the ancient
Hebrew legal code! What a
lesson for modern legislators!
We cannot too strongly em-
phasize this aspect of Israel's
ancient Justice.
The strangest of all accu-
sations, one persistently
brought against our Law,
relates to the Biblical "Lex
Talionis" "An Eye for an
Eye, a Tooth for a Tooth."
This has actually been given
a literal interpretation. How
nonsensical! For the very
next verses distinctly declare
it to mean simply compensa-
tion equally as far as possible
the value of the missing mem-
ber to the injured person. Our
enemies never weary of seiz-
ing on such passages to "de-
monstrateHebraic cruelty and
vengefulness" ignoring or
suppressing the context in
their slanderous allegations.
In the same diabolical spirit
of Jew-hatred, the charge is
made that the God of Israel
was a "God of Vengeance," "a
tribal God", etc. True, the
Bible says, "Mine is Vengence
and Recompense" but the
implication here is merely
that God, not man, is the final
Arbiter as to human inequity
and its punishment.
It is strange that the All-


DAILY AT 2:00 P. M.
BOAT LEAVES CITY YACHT
BASIN
N. E. Third St. and Bay
--o---
Fare Only $2.00
--0--
Don't miss the opportunity of
seeing the beautiful sub-mar-
ine gardens on the remodeled
and enlarged double hulled
SE-BOT-M BOAT
For Particulars,
Phone 22073


Merciful Father of all the
"families of man," as the Old
Testament describes God,
should be so perversely trav-
estied in "intellectual" anti-
Semitic screens. The old He-
braic literature is nothing if
not poetical. The device of
"parallelism" is familiar to
students of Biblical poverty;
but, if we may venture into
the realm of Biblical Exegesis
there is another poetical arti-
fice, primitive but exceeding-
ly beautiful, which we may
call "rhetorical contrast." We
offer the following example
to Biblical students, and our-
selves assume responsibility
for the interpretation:
"The Lord, the Lord God,
All-Merciful and abounding in
beneficence and truth,
"Visiting the sins of the
fathers upon the children un-
to the 1000th generation."
We attach this significance
alone to the mention of "third
and fourth generations" in
quick contrast with "1000th
gene ation"-that it is only
a primitive but forceful way
of expounding God's everlast-
ing love. The ciphers in them-
selves can have no other im-
port! God's momentary wrath
is contrasted with His infinite
compassion. His mercy is unto
the thousandth generation;
his anger unto the third or
fourth--it passeth like a
cloud."
We have digressed some-
what in order to stress the
unrivalled humanity pervad-
ing the Old Testament, and
to demonstrate how the Jus-
tice of Israel reflected God's
own attribute of Mercy. It is
our view that except in the
case of hardened and incor-
rigible criminals and then
only if there were actual eye-
witnesses of the crime!-
could the Mosaic Code have
inflicted the extreme penalty.
In the present instance, where
a mere boy languishes in the
shadow of the gallows,. our
fervent prayer goes up that
the quality of mercy "the
attribute of God himself"-
may have tul sway with lDes-
sings on "them that give and
them that take!" -H. E.






IUN




Preferred as to divider
Redeemable


NI'
of
Fort
factui
iFort ]


SP1



1140-1141 Ingraham B


No matter what the other
crops,
The "if" crop never wanes;
It dots the pleasant meadows
And ekes the shady lanes.

And should you pass unnotic-
ing
Some pollen "if" would rise
With a gust of wind to tickle
your nose
Or slam you in the eyes.

If I had sold my stock before
It got to oe an "ex",
I'd now be writing autographs
On fifty-dollar checks.

Now if the weather man
would let
The snow get off the
ground,
The bushel oi coal I have
might .ast
Till pay-day comes around.

If I got all earn! I'll say
I'd make the money talk
To the auto cash-and-carry
man,
For a car that wouldn't
balk!

If I knew all the fellas know
Who write for the maga-
zines,
I wouldn't even fly-I'd walk
Oh air! Please pass the
beans!

I'm tired o' wishin' and I wish
You wouldn't bother me,
The things that ain't all the
wise
wise guys know,
Are the things that ought
to be.


GAS


NOW PLAYING

Matinee Sat & Sun.
Midnight Show Sat.



,.


E. S. Johnson Coal Co.
COAT. COKE AND
CHARCOAL
We Deliver
CITY DOC KS
2-5707

JOSEPH M. LIPNITZ
Insurance Advisor and
Underwriter
LAWYERS' BLDG.
37 N. E. First Avenue
Phones 2-1522, 2-0317


UTILITIES, Inci


Dollars Above
Health Brings
Poor Dividends

Blumer's Clinical Cases Amaze
Miamians and Visitors
Lectures and Demonstrations to
Be Continued
Monday, March 3, 2 P. M.
"I have combined and classified
the three methods in which you
folks are so eagerly interested;
that are based upon actual results
and specific applications, and not
on idle theories or premature con.
clusions. Schools have sprung up
imitating methods, therefore it is
of essential benefit to you," said
Prof. Blumer, "that we demons.
trate in open clinics and give you
the inkling to the truer method
that gained a national and inter.
national reputation."
Actual FACTS before your eyes.
You saw at the Cinderella the case
of --- N. W. 8th St.,
treated for paralysis; you know
the wonderful improvement; you
applauded Prof. Blumer on his sue.
cess. Does that compare to some
of his imitators' work? You know
it does not;
Case of E. J. D. W., E. 3rd St.
-Goiter and heart trouble; the re-
lief he gave her. You heard it
from her own lips; the goiter dis-
appeared "she told you how pleas-
ed she was; you applauded to your
heart's content.
Prof. Blumer -is the original
founder of Natureopathy. The tri-
plicity of Science deserves yo
pra se and draws such largo
crowds daily and did so for three
years previously.
Women's Abnormalities. You
heard that he saved thousands of
women from operations and you
know the real value of genuine
natureopathy. Why? Because this
science is a blessing to womanhood
and produces admirable results in
all cases. So why experiment with
imitators who claim they use his
system ?
Attend His Lectures and learn
for yourself--see with your own
eyes the genuine Natureopathic
work by the sole founder.
....Natureopathic office, where
Prof. Louis Blumer is located:
Rooms 707-8-9, CITY NATIONAL
BANK BLDG., 121 S. E. FIRST
STREET, MIAMI, FLORIDA.


BRING BOOK COUPON WITH YOU
N am e ..............................................................................................
Address
City......
C ity ......... ....................................................... .. .. ................................
In order to receive the highly valuable book, entitled "Live and
O Learn" or "The Scientific Natureopath," fill out the Coupon in ink
and bring it in. Permanent Address-if a non-resident or visitor-
must begiven. J. F.


IITED


7% CUMULATIVE PREFERRED STOCK
Par Value $100 per Share


ids and assets. Dividens payable quarterly: January
as a whole, or in part, at the option of the Company,
lished notice at 105 and accrued dividends.


1, April 1, July 1, October 1,
on thirty days' pub-


TED Gas Utilities, Inc., through its subsidiaries, the Gas Company
Miami Beach, Inc., Dade & Broward County Gas Company, and the
Lauderdale Florida Gas Company, own and operate the gas manu-
ring and distributing systems now serving the cities of Miami Beach,
Lauderdale, Hollywood, Fulford, Dania and Miami Shores, Florida.

RICE $100 PER SHARE AND ACCRUED DIVIDEND


building


Phone 2-1150


THINKING JEWS ALL SUBSCRIBE TO THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN! DO YOU?


3*;
di


$1,200,000


W. CARSON- DICK


INVESTMENT BONDS
MIAMI, FLORIDA


----~--


*jiiP~i~S~IY~Y~)~i~c~S~~i*~igg~jg~QS~G6 ^ ^ hQLE~C~AI-I-~-le 41*C 4~L~LIL~ ~


~~~A~~~~~------


Friday, February 28,1930


Y-~~V~


THE JEWISIHFLORIDIAN










Friday, February 28, 1930


THE JE WISH FLORIDIAN


THE JEWISH

FLORIDIAN
A weekly newspaper published at
Miami, Florida
by
The Jewish Floridian Publishing
Company
625 S. W. FIRST STREET
Phone 2-8745



EDITORIAL STAFF
J. LOUIS SHOCHET
A CHOCHOM
BEN DOROM.
A. N. ASHER

EDITORIAL

IDENTICAL YEARNINGS
Instead of sitting in an of-
fice, trying to figure out
what's on the mind of the
workingman, Whiting Wil-
liams got a "bowl" haircut
and took a job in a steel plant.
He worked in mines, in fac-
tories, and on railroads in this
country and abroad.
In his "Mainsprings oA
Men" he presents some of his
reflections.
It seems that men, whether
they work with their hands
or their heads, in white col-
lars or overalls, have identi-
cal yearnings. Among these
is the desire to amount to
something, to do work that is
worthwhile, and to feel a
sense of importance.
These yearnings are as
common to the humblest
worker as to the president of
the largest corporation.
Men do not work for wages
alone. The desire for self-ex-
pression is not confined to
the graduates of art schools.
The man with a shovel is a
victim of the same itch. The
expression of his character
and temperament may take a
crude form, possibly the
straightness of the line and
the plumbness of the trench
walls. A good ditch digger is
extremely particular about his
tools. He chooses his shovel
for its balance and the quality
of the .steel. Williams says
that one of the most violent
fights he ever witnessed was
for the'possession of a shovel
-that is, the use of it, for the
tool, of course, belonged to
the employer.
Few of us properly apprec-
iate how deep the instinct is
in every human breast to do
worthwhile work.
"D.eeg, here, deeg dere All-
time for not'ing--like dam-
fool! We quit So exclaimed
a group of angry laborers who
threw down their shovels-to
take them up again only after
the boss had explained that
he was looking for a lost wat-
er-pipe, and felt as hopeless
about it as they did.
"Yes, m'sieu," a Belgian
scrub-woman explained asithe
looked up from wringing out
her cloth, wheni my floor
smiles at me like that over
there-then it is easy to smile
back at it. Then both of us are


well content, is it not so?"
Williams refers to a para-
graph by Dostoyevsky in The
House of the Dead: "If it were
desired to reduce a man to
nothing-to punish him atro-
ciously, to crush him in such
a manner that the most hard-
ened 'murderer would tremble
before such punishment it
would be necessary only to
give his work a character of

THE J


complete uselessness Let
him be constrained to pour
water from one vessel into
another, or to carry earth
from one place to another and
back again then I am persuad-
ed that at the end of a few
days the prisoner would
strangle himself or commit a
thousand crimes punishable
with death, rather than live in
such an abject condition and
endure such torments."
To give a job-every job-
significance, to recognize good
craftsmanship, and to estab-
lish working environment that
instills a sense of dignity-
these are the aim of every
able employer.
I was explaining this view-
point to a woman and she told
me she made a practice of in-
forming her servants about
distinguished guests enter-
tained in her home.
The consequence was that
the servants felt themselves
honored, and boasted to their
friends that they had served
a famous man or woman.
It is obvious to everyone
that duties which bring work-
ers into touch with noted peo-
ple are very agreeable. Like-
wise, to have contributed in
the smallest way to a beauti-
ful structure like the Tribune
Building in Chicago gives
every worker a sense of pride.
"You know the Chrysler
Building in New York," says
a structural iron worker.
"Well, I was on that job."
That's the way we all like
to describe our work.
Within crafts are many so-
cial gradations of which the
laymen and even employers
are totally ignorant.
"Where are you working?"
one printer will say to anoth-
er.
"Oh, out at the United."
If the "United" is known as
a low-quality shop, where a
"ham" compositor can get by,
the man is instantly labeled,
and he knows it. He may get
exactly the same pay as his
questioner, who is employed
at the "National," where only
fine work is produced, but
when he meets the members
of his trade he must suffer
the stigma attached to his in-
ferior association.
It's the old story. Like at-
tracts like. Good employers
get good workmen. Clean
work is done'in clean shops.
Everywhere Human nature is
the same.
Whiting Williams has made
a signal contribution to hu-
man welfare by this study of
men at work. No one can read
"Mainsprings of Men" with-
out a sense of sorrow that
self-interest, if not humanity,
has not led more employers
to see that, with a few excep-
tions, men can be so handled
that they will love their jobs
almost more than anything
else in the world.
If that statement seems too
idealistic it is due to tne glow
in which Williams' book has
left me.
Anyway, peace is worth
fighting for.
*


Any man can give advice,
but not every man can guar-
antee its value.

No man has as much sense
as the woman he is engaged
to thinks he has.

It's awfuly hard for a learn-
ed man to learn to love a
land woman.


CHASER
cn lr ~


A man would rather be held
up by a stranger than thrown
down by a friend.

The man who knows all
about women should forget it
if he values his own peace of
mind.

White-My wife and I have
been married 10 years and for
the last few years we have
had no cross words.
Darke-How long have you
been separated ?
*
The Customer See here,
you, I found this brass button
in my hot dog sandwich.
The Chef That thing?
That's no button. That's the
license tag.
*
"Why did you change doc-
tors, Mr. Betfast? I thought
Dr. Blim was one of the best
in the city."
"He said I had six chances
in 10 to recover," said the
race track addict, "and I went
to a doctor that offered bet-
ter odds."
*
Visitor-I hear you've lost
your parrot that used to
swear so terribly.
Host Yes, he died of
shock.
Visitor-Really, how did it
happen ?
Host-He escaped from his
cage and wandered on to the
golf links.
Mistress: "Why did you
leave your last place, Mary?"
Maid: "Because I did not
know what this one was like."
*
Marjorie-From whom does
Louise get her good looks-
her father or her mother?"
Brenda-From her father.
He is a manufacturer of cos-
metics.
*
Meat packers, we read, are
prepared to furnish the mark-
et with sausages of varied
complexion, ranging from
blond to brunet, to suit every
taste. But little we mind the
color if the size and shape are
right. It ain't the face, it's
the bigger.
a *a *
Jim-I saw an old man yes-
terday that said he used a
telephone for the first time
in 20 years.
Jen-He must have been on
a party line.
*
Doctor-For greater secur-
ity, madam, do you wish to
have your husband X-rayed?
"Thank you! For some time
past I've seen through him
without much difficulty."

Willie-Mum, do men have
a style show the same as
women do.?
Teacher-What a question!
Not that I know of, child.
Why do you ask ?
Willie Well, papa asked
mamma this noon where the
ticket for his Sunday suit was
at.
*
The safe blower is never
safe.
*


The early bird who monk-
eys with the early bee is like-
ly to get stung.


Be sure you are right, but
don't be too sure that every-
Lody is wrong.
*
A wise wife is one who pre-
tends to believe everything
her husband tells her.

There is no charity equal to
that of showing people how to
help themselves.
*
Probably the Lord never had
a chance to love the cheerful
giver of wedding presents.
*
Whisky is the key that has
enabled many a man to un-
lock the door of a Jail from the
outside.
*
She: "Im putting up a bet-
ter light. When the light is
dim the gentlemen are apt to
get rather bold."
He: "But that light is worn
out. It won't light at all."
She: "So much the better."

"I'm sorry Reggie's so late
in bringing me home, mother.
There was a dense fog, and his
car was held up."
"Why, it's a clear, moon-
light night, child!"
"So it is. I must have been
thinking of some other night!

"Little pictures leave me
cold: it's the big canvass I
appreciate."
"You're an art critic '
"No-a frame-maker."
*
"Look at the lovely radio I
got today. It's marvelous, and
so cheap only five dollars
a month."
"For how many months ?"
"Oh, I forgot to ask "
w


Flim-Every do
day, you know.
Flamm-Yes, an(
has his night.
*


)g has his

d every cat


Mistress: "But when you
left your last place was there
no-er difficulty ?"
Ne w Maid: "No, ma'am.
None whatever! I just locked
the mistress in the bathroom,
took my trunk and came away
without any tuss."

Lady (to applicant for post
of French governess): "You
are, of course, unmarried-er,
mam'-zelle ?"
Applicant: "Ah, but not
yet. Ze action is how you
call ?-pending."

Many a man lends a hand
on ly when it is empty.
Crumbs ot comfort do not
come from eating crackers in
bed.

He jests at family jars who
never had a mother-in-law to
pry the lid off.

There is hardly anything
less interesting to a girl than
being kissed by another girl.
*
Unless you take advantage
of your opportunities some
other chap is apt to take ad-
vantage of you.
*
Mrs. Judd--Science tells us
now that we hear much better
with our eyes closed.
Mr. Judd Yes. I noticed


quite a number trying the ex-
periment last Sunday evening
in church.
*
The Old-Timer Yes, I've
wandered over a good bit of
the world, but I finally come
back here, to my little old
home town, 'cause I want to
die here.
The Stranger-So would I,
rather than live here.
*
The Father-My boy, when
I was young I often worked
for $5 a month on the farm.
The Son-Well, dad, I don't
suppose you were worth more.
I say, can I have a ten spot
tonight? I want go to a swell
hop.
*
Miss Vane: "Someone told
me today that I was the hand-
somest girl in our street."
Miss Cute: "Oh, that's not
incurable !"
"What do you mean?"
"Your habit of talking to
yourself."


*.
Bloney
As commissioner-if I'm elec-
ted-
The taxpayers, now dejected,
Will bid farewell to grief,
I'll make their sorrows, bub-
bles;
To all their tears and troubles
I'll quickly bring relief.

The taxpayer-ah, the groan-
ing!
ForJUSTICE he is honing-
And hopes for it in vain.
Assuredly-if elected-
An end may be expected
To every stress and strain!

Oh, how the tax collectors
Doth trim the poor electors!
What feet are on his neck!
But-if I am eleced-
Poor folks will be respected,
Or we'll know why, by
heck!
*
The officials ride in motors
But on foot you go-O Voters!
Your feet are seamed with
scars. But-when I am
elected-
This sin will be corrected-
You'll all have choo-choo
cars.

Alas! My friends and neigh-
bors,
You're wearied by your
labors;

Your strivings gall and irk,
But when-and if-elected,
A change may be expected;
No man will have to work.

Pretty Lady!
Pretty Lady, drop your mask!
What is there behind it?
Something real is all I ask!
Tell me, would I find it?
You have smiles for me, I
know.
Pretty Lady, tell me so,
Do you smile sincerely ?
For I love you dearly! '


Pretty Lady, drop your
mask;
To yourself surrender.
It would be a gracious task.
There may be a tender,
Lovely friend who waits for
me
Under your pretending!
Pretty Lady, let me see!
Ah, my neart needs mend-
ingI
S *
April Is your band .
clever?
June-Yes, very. He $ *-~
members my birthddays M"*
forgets imy age. .I


z -P


IEWISH FIIIDIAN-A MWIUM OF AND FOR MAMJEWRY!

.: ,- ,. ~~b~ .. i ,: s. ._ e


Pale 8.


41-46 d % 46 V A A 6 J a.W AV AJ6 -L A.l d


-(r









THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


Pag--E4 1 .L A l TV0 VY jjA A --


Fri:lay, February 28, 1930


ve would appreciate your
forwarding all society and
organization items to the
Jewish Floridian, 652 S. W.
1st street, or phone 2-8745
not later than noon Wed-
nesday.
Arriving here the latter
part of last week, Mr. Peter
Wie nik, is now a guest of the
Sea Breeze Hotel, at Miami
Beach. Mr. Wiernik is one of
the outstanding men of let-
ters in the United States, and
known internationally for his
work in Jewish affairs. He is
the author of the History of
the Jews in the United States,
and for the past thirty-eight
years has been the Editdr of
the Jewish Morning Journal,
with which the Jewisn Daily
News recently merged, mak-
ing it the largest Yiddish
daily in the world. Prior to
that he was Editor of the Jew-
ish Courier of Chicago. He is
a director in the leading Jew-
ish institutions in the country
and particularly active in
matters of general communal
interest. He will remain here
but a very short time.

The first of a series of card
parties given for the benefit
of Beth Talmud Torah Lib-
rary fund was that held last
Sunday night at the home of
Dr. and Mrs. IM. D. Kirsch, at
Miami Beach when Mesdames
Morris Rubin, and -Sam Sim-
onhoff were the hostesses.
Quite a nice sum was realized
towards the amount to estab-
lish the library. Bridge was
played and prizes were award-
ed. At a late hour refresh-
ments were served.
*
Among the distinguished
guests arriving here last week
were Mr. and Mrs. I. Magidov
of New York City. Mr. Magi-
dov has been the City Editor
of the Jewish Morning Jour-
nal for a number of years and
is well known in the Yiddish
world.
The second of a series of
card parties for the. benefit of
the Library Fund of Beth
David Talmud Torah was that
held at the home of Mrs. C.
Rosengarten, 2140 S. W. 5th
street, when Mesdames Chas.
Rosengarten and Milton Wei-
ner were the hostesses. Quite
a number of guests were pre-
sent and a nice sum was real-
ized. Prizes were awarded to
the highest scores and at a
late hour refreshments were
served.
*
Last Tuesday night the
Ladies Auxiliary of Beth Da-
vid Talmud Torah was host-
ess to a large number of
guests at the regular bi-week-
ly bridge party given for the
benefit of the Talmud Torah.
Prizes were awarded to the
highest scores and refresh-
meats were served. The min-
stallation of officers which
had been scheduled for Tues-
day evening, was temporarily
postponed because of the sud-
den illness of Mrs. S. Tannen-


baum, the corresponding sec-
retary, but win be held im-
mediately upon her recovery.


Maxwell J. Rice was guest
speaker at the Ruth Bryan
Owen Oratorical club, which
met Friday afternoon at Bur-
dine's roof. Mr. Rice is oper-
ations manager of Pan-Amer-
ican Airways, Incorporated,
and outlined the progress of
aviation, describing new air
lines now established. He also
showed moving pictures of
Pan-American routes.
Other speakers were Mrs.
Herbert E. Scher, Mrs. Isador
M. Weinstein, Miss Rosemary
Gerson and Mrs. Joseph Wil-
liams, who served as chair-
man. Sonya bnowe sang, ac-
companied by Miss Florence
Snowe. A social hour followed.
*
Out-of-toWn guest were en-
tertained by Mr. and Mrs.
Morris Dubler at a bridge
party given at their home.
Assisting in entertaining were
Mrs. A. F. Friedman and Mrs.
C. Berrenkuaf.
Guests included Dr. and
Mrs. S. Aronovitz, Mr. and
Mrs. M. Scheinberg, Dr. and
Mrs. Friedman, Mr. and Mrs.
Lewis Brown, Mr. and Mrs.
Aaron Farr, Dr. and Ms. S.
Snowe, Mr. and Mrs. C. Green-
field.
Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Frank,
Mr. and Mrs. R. Wolpert, Mr.
and Mrs. I. Cohen, Mr. and
Mrs. A.Wallerstein, Mr. Kirch
of New York, Mrs. Bucholtz
of Jacksonville, Mrs. M. Cohen
ot New York, Mrs. Nat Bern-
stein of Gary, Ind., and Mrs.
Thiel of Philadelphia.
Jessica Requa Cole ue-
lighted members and guests
of the Mana-Zucca Music club
Monday afternoon at the Civ-
ic Theater with soprano solos.
A feature of the occasion was
the duet, "Barcarolle" from
"Tales of Hoffman," sung by
Mrs. Cole and her sister, Miss
Sara Requa. Jane French
played the violin obbligato
and Eleanor Clark was the
accompaniment at the piano.
A number of prominent
visitors were present, includ-
ing Cameron McLeon, bari-
tone soloists; Mrs. Mabel Ma-
belle, accompanist to Mr. Mc-
Leon; Mrs. Orah Ashley
Lainke of St. Louis, who is
national president of the Mu
Phi Epsilon honorary musical
fraternity; Miss Norma Mil-
ler, also of the St. Louis chap-
ter. Twenty new members
were introduced.
$
Garden flowers decorated
the home of Mrs. H. H. Farr,
last Thursday afternoon for
the bridge party given in hon-
or of Mrs. Aaron Farr, Mrs.
J. J. Thiel, Mrs. N. N. Bern-
stein and Miss Helen Wolpert.
Other guests were: Mrs. L.
Brown, Mrs. Tillie Farkas,
Miss Helen Farkas, Mrs. D.
Goldberger, Mrs. Laura Gold-
berger, Mrs. S. Snowe, Mrs.
I. Cohn, Mrs. Jetty Cohn, Mrs.
Charles Greenfield, Miss Bet-
ty Garfinkel, Mrs. Grace Sei-
den, Mrs. B. Rosenstock, Mrs.
M. Ghertler, Mrs. Rae Wol-
pert, Mrs. M. Dubler, Mrs. A.


Wallerstein, Mrs. M. Arono-
vitz, Mrs. J. Miller, Mrs. Ma-
bel Bernstein, Miss Irene Farr
Miss Sylvia Farr and Miss E.
Rosenfield.


Mrs. Sidney Meyer and two
children arrived last week
fiom Chicago, Ill.,,o visit her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis
Wolfson, at the Granada
apartments. Mr. and Mrs.
Wolfson will be guests at the
Granada until early in April.
h interest is evinced in
Mnuh interest is evinced in


-I


thi musical and reception to
be given by the Miami Chap-
ter of the Junior Council,
March 4, at the Biltmore
CountIy club, for philanthro-
pic purposes. Mrs. Dorothy
Mitchell is chairman of the
event.
Artists who will appear in-
cluae Miss Dora Miller, Miss


..CT)CIIIII) C) ~HU~B~~
~g~)~.r~)~~Cj~(~)tCLI-~I~WI~L-~*~ -.-. --C C I


I AI,


- Cotton
aa
---



Mather-
I -
-- I -
Keeper of the Puritan Conscience
----

Sayeth


WE OWN AND OPERATE 20 STORES AND 2 FACTORIES AND
SARE MANUFACTURERS AND WHOLESALE S AS WELL AS RE-
TAILERS THEREFORE WE ARE ABLE TO UNDEI SELL ALL
COMPETITORS. WE INVITE COMPARISON.
-F7





of finishes and upholds
-=-















NORTHFIELD BED *50

DAVENPORT SUITES $1 14- i


i GUARANTEED Mather Finance Plan
PRICES The World's Most Liberal
CrediTwo-tone woven fibre,
We guarantee every price the lowest ever PER WEEK PAYS FOR
before offered by us and we also guaran- $. WORTH









te the prices as low or lower than offered d PER WEEK PAYS FOR
by any dealer..-..We positively will not sell $40 0 0WRTH
any advertised merchandise to dealers $400.00 WORTH
here or elsewhere. )fo A PER WEEK PAYS FOR
d i tered in tapestry and
Bad Ncretonne. A

--



NORTHFIEL BEDMFRTs
-ll UII II IIlDAVENPORT SUITESi --
-.~%



RTEED M er nance lan -


PRICES! The World's Most Liberal,-
- Credit Terms
- We guarantee every price the lowest ever $] 0 PER WEEK PAYS FOR
-- before offered by us and we also guaran- $80.00 WORTH
g te the prices as low Or lower than offered PER WEEK PAYS FOR
by any dealer.....We positively will not sell $5.0 $400.00 WORTH
Sany advertised merchandise to dealers _
here or elsewhere. $25.00 PE W0EEW TAYS FOR _

Go-_ ,Look for the Big Signs at


_ and Vlaml andather -

Bad An
= NORTH MIAMI AT FOURTH ST.
mI H H M HIiMHI Hq


', THINKING JEWS ALL SUBSCRIBE TO THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN! DO YOU?


~~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ i .., ... ,- ..' .-. '


II -_ ---- -------- _------ -~ --- .~--~I-- ~ -.--- --Fll--*g __~~I---_7


0erA A


SOCIETY


'I I_____,_._. _.. __ _-__r____
.....~ Y ~..... .. .... ..........L. .~II ---H ~- ~IIII --- UY O ly-- --U I~U L -N I -


Rosemary Gerson, Miss Mar-
ion Taylor, Percy Long,
Frances Druckerman, Robert
Kistler, Mrs. Ralph Fuzzard,
Mrs. Grace Murray and
Eleanor Clark.
Among visitors and Miami-
ans who have been requested
to attend as guests of honor
are Mr. and Mrs. John Gold-
en, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard
Gimbel, Mr. and Mrs. John
Oliver LaGorce, Mrs. James
Waller, Mayor and Mrs. C. H.
Reeder, Mr. and Mrs. Arnold
'Vo!p, Senor and Senora Os-
car Morales, George Gersiine,
and Miss Rita Bell. An inter-
Continued on Page 5


II








Friday, February 28, 1930


THE JEWISH FIA)EIDIAN


SOCIETY

(Continued from Page 4)
testing patroness list has been
announced.
Tickets will be placed on
sale today and Saturday at
Burdine's with Mrs. Stanley
C. Myers and Mrs. George S.
Stone in charge. Miss Flor-
ence Alpert is chairman of
the musical.
*
Mrs. L. Kutz and daughter,
Miss Ethel Kutz of Bridge-
port, Conn., are the guests of
Mr. and Mrs. Casper Pallot,
at their home 221 S. W. 11th
avenue.
.
Mrs. I. Lappin of St.Louis,
Mo., arrived this week to
spend several weeks here as
the house guest of her daugh-
ter and son-in-law Mr. and
Mrs. S. Rohald.

The Sisterhood of Temple
Israel will hold a regular
meeting of its membership on
Monday afternoon, March 3,
at 2:30, preceded by a board
meeting at 1 p. m. A special
program has been arranged
through Mrs. I. L. Rosendorf,
chairman, for the entertain.
ment of those present. A song
by Mrs. Mitchell Wolfson will
open the meeting and will be
followed by a prayer by Mrs.
D. J. Apte. A series of three
minute talks, "The Plagues"
by Mrs. Si Mendelson, "The
Song of Miriam" by Mrs.
Isaac Levin, "Israel's Eman-
cipation and American Inde-
pendence" by Mrs. Ben Watts
have been scheduled as well
as a solo by Mrs. A. Raff, and
an address on "The Jewish
Women in the Jewish Home-
land" by Mrs. Louis J. Schein-
man of New York City.
Mrs. Scheinman is one of
the Regional Directors of Ha.
dassah, professor of Modern
Literature, and very active in
cultural work in New York
State. All members of Sister-
hoods are invited to attend
and enjoy the program as
well as the social hour which
will follow.

Mrs. Carl Weinkle was the
hostess at the third of a series
of card parties being given for
the benefit of the Beth David
Talmud Torah Library Fund
at her home last Wednesday
night. Prizes were awarded
for the highest scores and at
at late hour refreshments
were served. As a result a
tidy sum was realized.,
*


The Sisterhood of
Israel will be hosts at
fit card party for the


Temple
a bene-
Dormi-


tory Fund of the Hebrew
Union College, to which the'
Sisterhood is an annual con-
tributor, at the Miami Beach
Golf and Country Club on the
afternoon of March 5th at
2:30. Prizes will be given for
the highest scores and re-
freshments will be served. A
very splendid time is promis-
ed all who will attend.

Mr. Nathan Wroobel has
been confined to his home dur-
ing the last week as a result
of illness. Mr. Wroobel was
for a long time acting cantor
of Beth Dayid Congregation,
and fs now-a shockedd" in
Miami.
,*
The local chapter of Hadas-
sah will be hosts at a card
party at the Helene Hotel, on
15th street, Miami Beach next
Wednesday afternoon, March
5th, at 2:30 p. m. when prizes
will be given for the highest
scores and refreshments will
be served.
*
Sunday, Mach 2nd, will be
the scene of a joint affair giv-
en under the joint auspices of
the Senior and Junior chap-
ters of Hadassah of Miami, at
the Frolics on 13th street and
the causeway. The proceeds
will be used towards Hadas-
sah work in Palestine.
*
As we are going to press
Emunah Chapter, 0. E. S. is
entertaining a large number
of members and friends at an
informal dance and supper at
the Beverly Terrace Hotel in
,honor of the Grand Worthy
Matron of Florida,Mrs. Mamie
Lander is now visiting Miami.

Miss Lena Weinkle is in
charge of "Kiddies Karnival"
which will be held in the Audi-
torium of Beth David Talmud
Torah next Sunday afternoon
at 2:30 p. m, for the benefit
of the Library Fund of the
Talmud Torah. An elaborate
program for the entertain-
ment of all children who will
attend has been arranged and
a very nominal entrance fee
will be charged. All children
attending the Sunday Schools
of the City are invited to at-
tend.


NEXT WEEK
34th Annual


Dade County


FAIR
A Complete Exhibit
of
The Resources of Dade
County.
Livestock
Poultry, Pigeons
Woman's Work
Rabbits


Mr. and Mrs. William- C.
Rippner and son, Lewis Alan,
who have been in Miami more
than two months, will return
to their home in Cleveland.
They were the guests of their
aunt, Mrs. R. Vince Rose at
her home in Coral Gables.
*
Profusion of sweet peas,
jonquils, gladioli and ferns
was used in the decorations
at the dinner party given by
Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Field at
their home in Holeman Park
in honor of out of town
guests. Bridge was played fol-
lowing the dinner with Mrs.
Lee Schloss and Mrs. Sam
Lippman winning high scores.
Irving Fredman was award-
ed the prize for pinochle.
Guests included Mr. and
Mrs. Schloss, Mrs. Sam Lipp-
man, all from New York, Mr.
and Mrs. Fredman, Mrs. Sam
Samuels, also of New York,
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Dansk,
Louis Soble of Chicago, Jack-
son V. Anderson of Atlanta,
Ga., Stanton Field and Joseph
Field.
*
The raffle for the Boudoir
Pillow, held for the benefit of
the Sisterhood ot Chesed Shel
Emes, resulted in Number 309
ticket winning. The individual
who is the holder of tnis tick-
et is requested to get in touch
with Mrs. Manual Rippa and
upon proper identification the
pilow will oe delivered to him.
*
In order to be present at
her golden wedding anniver-
sary a woman is willing to ad-
mit that she isn't as young as
she used to be.

UNITED GAS
UTILITIES, INC.
-OWNERS-
GAS COMPANY
of Miami Beach
Fort Lauderdale Florida
Gas Co.
GAS SERVICE
Fort Lauderdale, Holly-
wood, Dania, Miami Shores
Miami Beach
-Offices-
1036 LINCOLN ROAD
MIAMI BEACH


JAMES H. GILMAN,
President


U.


BUSINESS DIRECTORY


gao^oiflozesaosassssssoa~eeetoaaosssem asssu


L. (Pop) GERSON
Buyer of All Kinds of Scrap Metal
We Sell Auto Parts
2141 N. W. SECOND AVE.
Phone 20621

BAGS and METALS
EAST COAST BAG & METAL CO.
(Inc.)
I. L. MINTZER
MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS
435-445 N. W. 8th Street
Phone 4485
PEPPER METAL CORP.
Scrap Metal and Machinery
N. W. Cor. 5th Ave. and 14th St.
Phone 22546

BUILDING SUPPLIES
J. SIMPSON
Building Materials,
Roofing Paper, Asphalt
423 N. W. N. River Drive
Phone 7251

DELICATESSEN
ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN
170 N. W. 5th St.
We Supply Your Every Want
a-
FISH & SEA FOODS
STANDARD FISH CO.
629 W. Flagler St.
Phone 2-3362

FOUNTAINS
Cold Drinks
Candies and Lunches
HOME GROCERY
Corner 1st St. N. W. and 3rd Ave.


King
Undertaking Co.
29 N. W. THIRD AVENUE
Phones 23535-31624


DR. J. B. MARGOLIS
DENTIST
Third Floor Olympia Bldg.
Phone 2-4073


INSURANCE
DADE FLORIDA INSURANCE
AGENCY, Inc.
-General Insurance-
80 N. E. 2nd Ave. Phone 275S8

PHARMACISTS
BRYAN PARK PHARMACY
Chas. Tannenbaum,
Pharmacist
(reg. pharmacist for 17 years)
Cor 22nd Ave. and 8th St. S. W.


CRYSTAL PHARMACY
Dr. A. D. Halpern, Ph. G. Ph. D.
Prescriptions Our Specialty
128 N. Miami Ave. Phone 29718

PIPE and STEEL

ADELMAN PIPE & STEEL CO.
58 N. E. 25th St.
Aat F. E. C. R. R. Phone 21420
A. & B. PIPE AND METAL CO.
Phone 81855
53 North East 25th Street

PRINTERS
MIAMI PRINTING CO.
"Printing That Pays"
Phone 23261
107 South Miami Avenue
AUTO PARTS,
BLOOM AUTO REPTIF
& PARTS CO.
N. W. 17th Ave. at 23rd St.
Phone 23631
The Largest car wreckers in
Florida


AMBULANCE SERVICE
W.H.. Combs Coq Etab. 1898
COMis FUNERAL BOM
Phone Miami 32101
IU5 N.. Ind Avle
MIAMI BEACH FUNBRAL NOMB
Phone M. B. 5-2101
n" WaMddngt Ave
mum -nunm iiunarn iiiiiiiiin iiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiin


Dr.


Albert E. Rosenthal
DENTIST
N. E. 2nd Ave.


302 Professional Building


1 ImanuIganunamanlllll anI~IlUnnuumrmnunnanlmlulnuum u~nnunntlullr#nnllllumrrnmfuawugaub- uu~' vuul,,. 5-~'
-57& 27d- ., JJJJ Jz =IrJJ-p


VISITORS WELCOME


MIAMI Beach Bank and Trust Co. welcomes the opportunity
of serving Miami Beach's visitors. Come in during your


stay in the World's Greatest Play Ground.
you will find our service helpful.


Get acquainted and


C. L. CLEMENTS,
1st Vice Pres. and Cashier


EDWIN STERN
Vice President


ERNEST J. C. DOLL, Assistant Cashier


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN-A AM OF A ND I kAM EW
..
A 1. ." ** 1 ,


A.


. '**-*- L-..- ."'*', *' -r-S i
1 4'.
4'-.;


Page 5
032nyepea


THE

FARWAY

DAIRY
SOLICITS YOUR
PATRONAGE


Phone Miami
7105
FOR PROMPT
SERVICE


Vegetables
Fruits

Starting, March 3
DAY AND NIGHT
At The
FAIR GROUNDS
N. W. 7th Ave. and 28th St.


Miami. Beach Bank & Trust Co.


Collins Avenue at Sixth Street


o % T &


----------------**------------------------


5


"i


1


AA-
'l-:^ .IT- *: -






Friday, February 28, 1*0


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


A6 AA -L. %
I~PI~~r~llllslarrA/AaRMinI1


Ponder


ACt


arefully!


Wisely!


THE finest drying oil and base for paints and var-
nishes known to modern industry; essential in the
manufacture of linoleum and oil cloth, etc.; without
which electricity and its component necessity, properly
insulated motors, dynamos, wire, etc. could not be.
Necessary in the manufacture of more than seven
hundred American industrial products; THE FOURTH
LARGEST CHEMICAL IMPORT to the United States;
raised in China for the past five thousand years; pro-
duced by crude and ancient coolie methods; WITHOUT
WHICH WE CANNOT DO; the available market less
han 25' supplied; DEMAND EVER INCREASING;
TUNG OIL
is now at your beck and call. No longer an experi-
ment. The Dupont companies, the American paint
and varnish industry have proven to themselves and
to the entire world that FLORIDA CAN AND DOES
PRODUCE TUNG OIL far superior to that of its
native home CHINA.
Will you profit by the example of Ancient China?
Will you profit by the example set you by the great
industrial companies in the Country? Will you help
protect American industries and thus guard your own
future?
Do you hear OPPORTUNITY WHEN IT KNOCKS
LOUDLY AT YOUR DOOR?
Tung Oil can, has been, and wilt be raised in ever
increasing amounts in Florida.
Two and a half acres with one hundred and sixteen
TUNG TREES all your own. A deed for this TUNG
OIL PLANTATION ALL YOUR OWN. The SEMI-
NOLE PLANTATION COMPANY taking care of
YOUR PLANTATION and seeing that YOUR TREES
THRIVE AND PRODUCE for only twenty-five per
cent of the OIL RETURNS. WITHIN YOUR MEANS
and EASY TERMS.
For the small down payment of only one hundred
dollars and monthly payments of only twenty-five dol-
lars per month, you GET your TUNG TREES, your
land and PROPER CARE OF YOUR PLANTATION,
and receive seventy-five per cent of the OIL RETURNS
for thirty years time.
WILL YOU BE A MAN OF AFFAIRS with
MONEY SURE TO COME IN or will you in later years
say "I could have been."
FOR YOUR OWN GOOD INVESTIGATE ......


J. S.


SALES
215 N.


BLAIN


CORPORATION

E. 1it Ave., Miami, Fla.


FREE


See Yourself in the Movies!


FREE


0' Every Night Except Sunday at 7:30 P, M.
Hear the Marvelous Educational Ledture on TUNG OIL (China Wood Oil Headquarters) By J. D. O'BRIEN


~.~B/B/~-/~a/3arI-F-e


"OUR ADVERTISERS SAVE YOU MONEY AND. GIVE YOU SERVICE!


Pacra Siv


..Nw-


j. c


I

1



i I

r'
,;


-ib =.--r if'u= ] i i 'l .... ......


,_ _; ii -~------------.------


lI I IJ^ / / /


r/lgYII~/IIa~le;u~55J~I


-"ol!p