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The Jewish Floridian ( February 21, 1930 )

UFJUD
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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
February 21, 1930
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00052

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
February 21, 1930
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00052

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text



















I


VOL. I-N. VMIAMILORDA FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1930 Price 5 Cents
VOL. III-NO. VInI. MIAMI, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1930 Price 5 Cents


So Henry Ford, too, is be-
ginning to ponder seriously
over what he shall do with his
immense wealth. Already past
the prime of life, sated with
the temporary .wordly things
he aspires to noble achieve-
ments. How shall he become: a
benefactor to the American
people? How shall he perpet-
uate his name? Having toyed
with many possible solutions
he has finally arrived at THE
solution--education!
But not education as we un-
derstand it. The modern sys-
tem of public education, view-
ed from Ford's highly spec-
ialized mass-production plane
is non-prodictive and lacks
, many highly desirable qual-
ities. According to the latter
it does not properly fit the
child for. life-in the commun-
ity. Perhaps so. It may well
be that this self-educated,
comparatively ignorant me-
chanical wizard has discover-
ed, quite casually, that elusive
weak spot, noted erudite
educators have been valiantly
but vainly seeking these
many years. However, be the
case as it may, the fact re-
mdins -that the Detroit auto-
mobile magnate is about to
establish an one hundredjuil-
lion dollars fund for the edtab-
lishment and maintenance of
a national chain of schools,
whose low grades will teach
the standard curriculum but
in whose higher grades the
pupil will receive a thorough
industrial training to prepare
him to find himself a comfor-
table berth in this industrial
age.
Quite so. It is but natural
that one who has amassed a
fortune and obtained for him-
self international repute in
the exploitation of industrial:
findings and improvements
should sincerely believe that
the world turns on a motor
car axle. In fact, it is more
than poetic justice that the
man who in the memorable
trial of a few years ago brand-
ed history as "bunk" should
think rather disparagingly of
pure learning that cannot dis-
play a new model or at least
an improved feature at each
annual show.
It may all have been
prompted by very sincere mo-
tives but I cannot help feeling
that he has travelled an un-
necessarily long journey to
find something that had been
growing in his own back
yard for the longest time. A
,few years ago I spent some
time in Detroit. In New York
the visitor is advised to see
the Woolworth .Tower, the
Statue of Liberty and the
Museum. In Detroit I went to
Ford's Highland Park plant.
Together with some other
visitors, I followed the garru-
lous guide on an inspection
tour thru this factory.

Popeyed awr pmeokly folUw-
ed the guide, whoi, with a
(Continued on P~ie,2)


To My Way of
Thinking
S by
Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld
-I k ---


Dr. A. D. Halpern, 1 dunam
$20.00.
Pineus Pushkoff and Sar,
off, Brooklyn ind Mipmi
Beach half dunam $10.00.
Leonard Barr, Miami, Fla.,
half dunam $10.00.


Miami Reports on
National Fund
In a detailed report sub-
mitted to the National Fund
Headquarters at New York
City, the local ionist District
through its chairman Mr.
Harry I. Lipnitz covered the
results of the activities and
efforts of the local Zionists
aided by the presence of Mr.
Max Rsdensky, National re-
presentative.
We regret that lack of
space does not permit the
publication of the entire re-
port, which points out the fact
that so many different inst-
tutions are now canvassing
Miami for Charitable and Ed-
ucational institutions as well
as the lack of local financial
stability. The report points
out that prominent visitors
from various parts of the
country aided in the brief lo-
cal campaign, among them be-
ing Dr. Norman I. Salit, Mrs.
Moses I. Krieger, Louis Top-
kis, Dr. A. Wolfson, and Mi-
amians among when were
Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld of
Miami, Rabbi Samuel Yallow
of Miami Beach, and Harry I.
Lipnitz of Miami, in addition
to the very able national re-
presentative Mr. Max Ruden-
sky of New York. Among
those who contributed were:
Beth Jacob Congregation,
Miami Beach, 5 dunams $100.
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Topkis,
Wilmington, Del., 5 dunams,-
$100.00.
Mr. and Mrs. David W. Si-
mon, Detroit, Mich., 5 dunams
$100.00.
Dr. and Mrs. A. Wolfson,
Flushing, N. Y., 5 dunams,
$100.00.
Mr. and Mrs. L. Weinkle,
Miami, Fla., 5 dunams $100.00
Harry I Lipnitz and Baron
De Hirsch Meyer, Miami, Fla.
5 dunams $100.00.
Samuel Kantor, Miami, Fla.
5 dunams $100.00.
J. Rubin and Sons, Miami,
Fla, 5 dunams $100.00.
Michael Salit, Brooklyn, N.
Y., 2 dunams. $40.00.
Mr. and Mrs. I. J. Kolinsky,
South Bend, Ind., 2 dunams
$40.00.
J. M. Rosenkrantz, Miami,
Fla., 1 dunam $20.00.
Samuel Simonhoff, Miami,
Fla., 1 dunam $20.00.
John Meyer, Miami Beach,
Fla., 1 dunam $2( 00.
Samuel Levine, Miami, Fla.,
1 dunam $20.00.
Wolfe Cohen, Miami, Fla.,
1 dunam $20.00.
L. Adelpaan,, 1 4unam, $40.
P. M. Rosengarten, i1 dun-
am $20.00.
R. Solomon, Toronto, Cana-
da, 1 dunam $20.00.
Abraham Schochet; Boston,
Mass., 1 dunam $20.00.
Mrs. Cellis, 4611 N. Spauld-
ing Ave., Chicago, Ill 1 dun-
am $20.00.
I. Wqlkosky, Miami, Fla., 1
dunam $20.00.
L. Rosenbaum, Caldwell, N.
J., 1 dunam $20.00.
Beth Jacob Sisterhood, Mi-
ami Beach, 1 dunam $20.00.


Yiddish Art Com-
mittee Presents
Drama Here

The Yiddish 'Art Commit-
tee composed of a number of
Jewish communal workers of
Miami interested in the pre-
sentation of the Yiddish play
will present a number of both
New York and Miami profes-
sionals in a Yiddish play call-
ed "Jew and Gentile" at the
Temple Theater, next Sunday
evening, February 23rd, at
8:00 p. m. Special music has
been arranged by a New York
composer Mr. Sam Cohen. Re-
hearsals of both the words
and score are being held daily
at the Talmud Torah and the
net proceeds of the play will
be given tothe Talmud Torah.
Because of the fact that Mi-
ami has not had the benefit
of Yiddish plays by profes-
sionals in a number of years,
a good many of the tourists
as well as residents are taking
advantage and tickets are be-
ing purchased in large num-
bers. Many theatre parties
are being arranged for Sun-
day evening. During the in-
te mission a number of Mi-
ami's most noted tourists will
be introduced among them
Mr. George Gershwin, the
noted composer who is inter-
nationally known, and who is
now writing an operetta for
the Metropolitan Opera Com-
pany.
The patrons apd patroness-
es of the affair will be given
mementoes of the event in the
foim of a very novel souvenir.
Tickets may be purchased
from any member of the com-
mitt3ep hQrod1 hh v M0epsrs S.


111C 1 c UJ I o,,,,1y. Mrs. Morris Rubin and sis-
J. Spector and Max- Kupfer- Mrs. Morris Rubin and sis-
stein, or at the Box office of ter Mrs. Sam Simonhoff will
the Temple Theatre on Sun- be the hosts on Sunday night
day. at the home of Dr. and Mrs.
S _M. D. Kirsch, of 327 Wash-
Party Arranged ington Avenue, Miami Beach
Party Arranged at a bridge for the benefit of
Beth David Talmud Torah Li-
Plans are being made for a brary fund. Prizes will be giv-
second tourist card party on en and refreshments will be
the Beach in the interests of served. This is the first of a
the Beth David Talmud Torah series of bridges, and other
and due announcement will be entertainments which will be
made shortly in these col- conducted for the benefit of
umns. the Library Fund.
Max Rappaport, Miami, Fla. Store, Miami, Florida, repre-
half dunam $10.00. senting a transfer of land
Henry Seitli" Miami, Fla., that Dr. Kaplan and Mr. Ru-
half dunam $10. 0. bin purchased in Palestine, as
Mrs. A. Turetc', Dover, their contribution to the na-
N. J. half dunam $1 .00. tional fund. The National
Mrs.' Isadore Ohen, half Fund will inscribe in the Gold-
dunam $10.00. en Book the names of Mr.
Sunday School Iteth Jacob Morris Rubin and Bessie Ru-
Congregation, Mia i Beach, bin, his wife, and the names
quarter dunam $5.00. of the parents of Dr. Jacob
Harry Teller, Chicago, half H. Kaplan.
dunam $10.00. A pledge to pay for the
Hannah Goldsten, quarter planting of ten acres by the
dunam $5.00. Bar Mitzva club of Beth Dav-
George Shapiro, Boston, id Congregation of Miami,
quarter dunam $5.00. Florida.
Mrs. Samuel Levine, Miami .
Beach, quarter dunam $5.00. Mr. Pincus Pushkoff of
Mr. Jacob Kaplan, am Mi Brooklyn who now resides at
Beach, quarter dunam $5.00. Miami Beach, Florida, ran two
Leon Simon, Passaic, N. J., card parties for the benefit of
quarter dunam $5.00. the National Fund, raising at
.. Miscellaneous small money one time $113.00 and the sec-
$86.00. ond time $80.00.
I. Mintzer, 1 dunam, Miami The local Chapter of the
Beach $20.00. Junior Hadassah under the
Two transfers to the Nation- presidency of Mrs. Lutsky
al Fund of five dunams each has promised to have a spec-
from Dr. Jacoo H. Kaplan, ial benefit affair for the Na-
Rabbi of Temple Israel, Mi- tional Fund sometime in
ami, Florida, and Mr. and Mrs. March and should add addll
Morris Rubin of the .Hub tifnal funds from this city.
'* :% -. .. ,


Charity Ball is
Gala Affair

One of the pleasant sur-
prises of the season was the
Annual Charity Ball held by
the Jewish Welfare Bureau,
last Tuesday evening at the
Biami Beach Golf and Country
Club. The Country Club own-
ed by the City of Miami Beach
was donated free of any ex-
pense to the Welfare Bureau
as an indication of the City's
feeling towards such an insti-
tution. A gathering represen-
tative of the best tourists and
resident of Miami, number-
ing about five hundred in
number were present and en-
joyed a number of star acts
that were also donated by the
various night clubs in Great-
er Miami. The music furnish-
ed by "Aye" Farr's Orchestra
kept all the folks moving until
the wee hours of the morning.
The committee headed by
Stanly C. Myers deserved
credit for the manner in
which the Ball was conducted
and on all sides praise was
heard for the arrangements
and the committee in charge.
While a much larger sum
have been raised for such a
worthy cause, never the less
about Fifteen hundred dollars
was raised which will be used
in the work of. the Jewish
Welfare Bureau to alleviate
conditions f-the aeeedy.

Bridge to be Given
for Library Fund


silent feature pictures, come-
dies and weeklies at very pop.
ular prices. The theatre ea
been redecorated, and s. j
ventilated, with plenty '
parking space provided.


Miami Beach to
Hear Rabbis
At the Friday night ser-
vices at Congregation Beth
Jacob, Miami Beach, Rabbi
Samuel Yallow will preach a
sermon on "The Significance
of Names" and Saturday
morning the sermon on the
portion of the week will be
preached by Rabbi Marcus of
Boston, Mass, the father-in-
law of Rabbi Yallow. Satur-
day morning Rabbi Yallow
will preach a sermon on the
"Portion of the Week" at the
Minyan in the Hotel Helene
at Miami Beach at request of
the guests there.

New Theater
Opened in Miami

Jimmie Hodges, who gained
a name as a gre-'t mir-h fun-
ster hereabouts with his Jim-
mie Hodges Foll'es of yester-
year and who brought the
first musicA comedies to Mi-
ami, playing in the old Park
Theatre until that structure
wvas blowr away, has come
Lack to Miami after an
months sojourn in Lbs Ang-
eles, and leased the Flagler
Theatre,, located on Flagler
Street and 3rd Avenue N'.W.
where he will present all the
latest musical comedies and
revues. The premier of the
popular Jimmie's reappear-
ance here will take place with
a matinee Saturday afternoon
in which he will present a vair-
ied extravaganza of girls and
musical offerings. The policy
of the theatre, according: to
To mWilliani manager of the
establishmenywill be, Mat-
inee's on Saturday's and Sun-
day's and one show each night
with the exception of Satur-
day and Sunday when two
shows will be presented on
those nights. A special 'mid-
night show will be presented
Saturday night. Jimmie
Hodges has 14 beautiful girls
in th echorus wearing a dazz-
ling array of costumes. The
Hodges Harmony four we'll
make melody of a pleasing a
popular variety. Ollie Hodgs,
Lew Hampton, Irma Dane,
Ann Allison, Jack Ulmer,
Ralph Cameron, Margie
O'Neil, Evelyn Napier, and
several other old favorites, of
the Hodges company will be
back with the company at the
Flagler Theatre, Howard
Rossman and his Atlantic city
melody boys, consisting of
seven musicians, will dispense
the music in the orchestra.
For the opening show at 2 p.
m. Saturday. Mr. Hodges has
selected a jazzy musical revue,
"Bad Babies," a laugh a min.
ute without a single lush.
There will be a change of
shows every Saturday with


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........I. L Frday, F.--J ---------r- 21 1 90---


(Continued from Page 1)
gracious, benevolent smile and
a proprietory manner, pointed
to the innumerable mechani-
cal marvel devices and deliv-
ered his oft-repeated mono-
logue. Twenty thousand (if
my memory serves me aright)
men employed all satis-
fied complete car turned
out every single minute .
occasionally work in three
eight hour shifts not a
single piece of material wast-
ed . cast-off upholstery
remnants made into shopping
bags which are sold in the
company grocery store ....
company has its own forest,


coal-mines, shipyards, rail-
road lines And then there
is the River Rouge plant .
a colossal institution .....
enough employees to build a
City ....


All went well un
reached the fourth
where the guide, not c
with eulogizing cold,
mate beings like coal
and automobiles launch
the chanting of pac
praise to the goodnes
mercifully-kind virtues
Ford.
(Continued next wec


Meanderings About Town
By A. F. Remder i
' l<^a^aa^< l^^ n>$s ,^^<^in^ .<^


Just as an introduction,..
I come from a small town
where there have been but
few Jews ... The idea of mov-
ing to a place where there was
a Jewish community, Jewish
life, Jewish butchers, Jewish
Rabbis that was a dream
... I hoped some day to real-
ize it Fortunately, per-
haps ..unfortunately,) ..my
health gave way and I was or-
dered to go to Miami. At last
my dream had come true. Mi-
ami ... a City with Jews ...
A City of Jews ... Jewish in-
stitutions .. Rabbis ...

I meander through the Jew-
ish shopping section. Butcher
stores, delicatessens mur-
murings "You know that
man can't be trusted!" And
then a splendid bit of gossip
is wafted into my ears ...
I can't believe it. I look in vain
for the "Kosher" signs upon
the windows of the delicates-
sen stores. Can it be possible?
There are none.
To the Beach. There, there
are real tourists who insist
that everything be done prop-
erly. An old time Rabbi is in
charge. He will insist that
everything be done properly.
At his insistence a "Kosher"
law is passed. God bless him
for that. And then. "Sol Gott
Behitten." ..A .butcher ..is
caught trying to bring "Trei-
fah" meat into his store in
the middle of the night.
Another butcher confesses to
the substitution of fraudulent
tags, forged signatures of
supposedly active "Mash-
gichim," and placing these
safeguards, (supposed) on
treifah meat, and then .
lo and behold ... the miracle
has happened ... the treifah
is "Kosher". Punishment ...
Certainly not! Doesn't the
butcher now carry about him
the halo of righteousness?"
Has he not become a "B'aal
Tshuvah"?
We go to some splendid
Hotels. We interview men of
affairs, of wealth. Talk of
thousands, of millions, of
Yeshivas, Orphan Asylums,
Hospitals And then from
the subime to the ridiculous.
Irb- .M.. a ninnl fcram


"L W aUout a pillullr i


for tonight, the deuce with in-
stitutions ?"
We are told to see a treas-
urer of a certain Yeshiva in
New York. That man is in-
terested in Talmud Torahs, in
every institution of learning
throughout the country .
He is a man extreme wealth
... He will help you and give
you liberally .. We call upon
him. We are forced to listen
to an hour's talk of the vir-
tues of this paragon of learn-
ing before us. He carefully
steers the conversation away
from the talk of money. At
last we tell what we came for.
Deliberate silence for a few
moments . At last the
wealthy advocate of Jewish
learning rises from his seat,
takes his check book from his
pocket and proceeds to make
out a check. We wait with
bated breath. He tells us that
were it not for us he would
never have thought of con-
tributing. We listen to anoth-
er lengthy oration. We whis-
per to each other, "at least a
thousand dollars." We feel
happy. The check is handed
us. "Ten Dollars."
We go to another "Klall
Versorger." This one is sup-
posed to be internationally
known. We talk to him. Lis-
ten to him. What a man of
wonders we are privileged to
talk to. Gently we remind him
of an unpaid pledge due for
more than a year. "Oh, that."
"I'll send you a check shortly."
We are compelled to listen to



THE

FARWAY

DAIRY
SOLICITS YOUR
PATRONAGE


Phone Miami
7105
FOR PROMPT
SERVICE


til we
floor,
content
inani-
I-mines
Ad intn


To My Way of Thinking
By Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld
%^^A^^^y^^^^^~s~sii~s^^^^?<^


Vns of "Rabbi, I want you to know
s, and that the Shul is not respon-
of Mr. sible, for nothing, you want toi
get wages, go out and collect,
S and you'll have it."' to spoke
ek). the president of a Shul which
I was privileged to visit dur-
iiag a rnTing 11 iaguriii4


ing a maeeinig. in uisgust i
walked out.
"I tink we better have it a
Board meeting, isn't ?" No use
arguing that the matter in-
volved is so small, that the
members of the Board are all
busy men of affairs. The se-
cret is then told me. The pres-
ident will be back in a few
days and the honorable gen-
tlemen will not have the op-
portunity of presiding.
"Vat, gib him an Aliyoh,
that treifniak?" "I'll make it
a scandal right here in shul,
now, right now!" I inquire as
to the splendid stand taken
by the gentlemen and think
it pretty courageous of him.
He feels that a man against
whom any reflections as to
character have been cast
should not be permitted to ap-
proach the Holy Scroll. ..
. I go home after Shul. I
I look at a store Gentile
meats are sold there .. I
notice that the side wall in
large letters bears a sign "--
delicatessen." I look closer
and find that the letters "kos"
before the "her" have been


the shortcomings (as told to
us) of Rabbis' generally. His
Rabbi at home is not better
than the rest. If they had lis-
tened to him, Judaism would
have been saved long ago. "A
dank Gott" some relatives
come in, and we make our
escape.
"What's the use of fool-
ing?" "We need a Talmud
Torah building like a 'loch in
kop," but now are you going
to get the tourist to give you
money?" "For a Talmud To-
rah he gives, but for Shul, (a
shrug of the shoulder) not-
ting."


painted over. I'm told that the
honorable gentleman who was
so righteous in Shul was the
proprietor of this store and
was forced to paint out the
"Kos" because of a threat to
take him to Court. And so my
. well what's the use?

I'm wondering Is this
Jewish life? Are these Jew-
ish welfare workers? Are
these the men of whom I've
heard so much about? Per-
haps perhaps "A city
without SUCH Jews" would
be good. Who knows? I'm
wondering .....

A Boy Pleads for His Dog

Aw Gee Whiz, Mr. Keeper,
Don't take him to the
pound-
Why he's my speckled buddy,
My future rabbit hound.
He's not an idle mongrel
That lives on alley fare,
My dog is self supporting-
A hound pup millionaire!
A shank bone's in the alley
And two dried chicken feet
With one whole rabbit car-
cass,
He's buried for a treat.


Why he's a poet, Mister,
Sings love songs to the
moon
With strains that near re-
semble
A sweet bass viol's tune.
You say'it's for his taxes
-You have to pick him up?
Aw-take my chalk and .
marbles
But hand me back that
pup!

b i&Tt^g s ^ f &


The Yiddish Art Committee


Presents
THE FAMOUS YIDDISH DRAMA


"JEW


AND GENTILE"


Replete with heart thrills and gripping episodes
at the

TEMPLE THEATRE
N. W. RIVER DRIVE and THIRD ST.


SUNDAY EVENING, FEB. 23rd.


at 8:00 P. M.
(Orchestral Accompaniment)
FOR THE BENEFIT OF MIAMI TALMUD TORAH
Tickets from 50c to $2.00

S Phone 26901, 20609 or 24700 Box Office on Sunday.


NOW PLAYING

Matinee Sat & Sun.
Midnight Show Sat.


THeOpX J A r D F
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN-A MEDIUM OF AND FOR MIAMI JEWRY!


JIMMIE HODGES
At FLAGLER THEATRE
Took a Back Seat The
man who married a perfect
picture, only to find she was
an all-talkie.


I~


Friday, Oebruary 21, 1930


-~--,


Paoqo 2


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i


I


4


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s
k7


THE JEWISg FLORIDIAN




. p


Friday, February 21, 1930


THE JE WISH FLORIDIAN


ntrA.f 0


I:_-- V I I- ti LOLLIs l v. I d jLPLe 3l


TH E JEWISH

FLO RIDIAN
A weekly newspaper published at
Miami, Florida
by
The Jewish Floridian Publishing
Company
625 S. W. FIRST STREET
Phone 2-8745


EDITORIAL STAFF
J. LOUIS SHOCHET
A CHOCHOM
BEN DOROM
A. N. ASHER

EDITORIAL

THIS THING CALLED
LIFE

Conscientiously kept diaries
sometimes afford illuminating
information, not only about
the life of the writer, but also
about life in general. An 80-
year-old man in Berlin kept a
careful diary, so careful that
he must have spent his life
with a stop-watch in one hand
and pencil and notebook in the
other.
Summarizing his notes we
find most of his life made up
of the following: Sleep, 27
years; Work 21 years; Eating
and Drinking, 6 years; Wor-
ry, years; Love, 4 years;
Holidays and Vacations, 4
years; Traveling, 4 years;
Reading Newspapers, 2 years;
and on down.
What'all may be included in
theft on.down" canaJe.ather-
ed from a sample period in his
diary covering about nine
hours. "Slept seven hours,
fifty-eight minutes and six-
teen seconds; looked for slip-
pers one minute and. twelve
seconds; shaved seventeen
minutes and forty-eight sec-
onds; tied necktie two min-
utes and forty-three seconds;
dressed twelve. minutes and
twenty-six seconds; waited
for breakfast three minutes
and fifty-two seconds; break-
fasted twelve minutes and
twenty-six seconds; tried to
get telephone operator fifty-
seven seconds; telephoned
two minutes and thirteen sec-
onds; yawned seven seconds;
looked at watch four seconds;
lit cigar ten seconds; unlocked
front door ten seconds; flirted
with pretty girl four minutes.
Considering that this quo-
tation covers only about nine
hours, of which practically
eight were spent in sleep, a
reading of the entries for the
remainder of that day alone
would require considerable
time. One thing is certainly
.apparent, which is, that the
average man's life, if this
diary is representative, is
made up of a mass of minor
acts. In them, a man must
find happiness. A similar idea
was expressed by Coleridge
when he wrote:
'"The happiness of life is
made up of minute fractions
-the little soon forgotten
charities of a kiss, a smile, a
kind look, a heartfelt compli-
ment in the disguise of a play-
ful raillery, and the countless
other infinitesimals of pleas-
ant thought and feeling."


SPECKLED APPLES
Once there was a penurious
farmer who had his own ideas
regarding the science of eco-
nomics-which can be illus-
trated perfectly by a single
example. His little son asked
him if he might go to the cel-
lar to get an apple.
"Yes," said his father, "but


pick out a speckled 'one."
"Suppose there aren't any
speckled ones, daddy?"
"Well, then, don't take any.
You'll have to wait till some
of 'em get speckled."
That's one view of econ-
omy.


It was observed among a
gang of negro laborers that
at lunch time one of them al-
ways ate his dessert first. Af-
ter devouring the apples,
oranges and cake in his lunch
pail, he ate the meat, and fin-
ally, if his hunger was not
appeased, he applied himself
to the bread and potatoes,
His boss asked him why he
did not eat. his dessert last,
like other people did.
"Man," he exclaimed, "I
might die 'for' I got to de
cake!"
That's another way of look-
ing at the thing.
All of us have one philoso-
phy or other or else try to be
sensible and maintain a happy
middle course. But in the lat-
ter few of us are particularly
successful. Despite plain rea-
soning to the contrary, we are
apt to feel that we are extra-
vagant if we eat our apples
before they are specked, or
our cake before the bread and
meat. Yet we have a sneaking
envy of'the people who always
take the best for themselves,
fearing that what is not en-
joyed today may vanish to-
'morrow.
Thdre are well-meaning
folks who decry the install-
ment plan of buying automo-
biles, furniture, pianos, ra-
di o s, washing machines,
clothing, jewelry, etc. "Think
of the extra price these peo-
ple pay for credit in lieu of
cash!" they say.
Yes, but think also of the
fun they get out of the things
they buy now while they
most want them and while
they are able to enjoy the use
of them. Perhaps within a
year the desire may have
passed, and with it would go
the capacity for the enjoy-
ment of the coveted article.
All the pleasure any of us get
out of life is in the gratifica-
tion of the desires we have,
of one kind or another. To the
extent that we stifle our nat-
ural and reasonable desires,
to that degree we cease really
to live, and merely exist.

Signs in a Restaurant
"Don't laugh at the coffee.
You'll be old and weak your-
self some day."
"Free eats to all persons
over 70, if accompanied by
their parents."
"Yes, we serve stews. Sit
right down please."
"Don't say 'Charge it.'
This is no battery service."
"Our sandwiches are like
the weather-unusual,"
"Not eating here for seven
days makes one week."
* *
Photographer: "And now,
sir, would you mind Shutting
your mouth, please? My plate
is only three inches by four."


Feminine complexions often
resemble small boys, they
won't wash.
*


It is "said
will change
quicker than


that marriage
a man's views
anything else.


*
Men fight wit their
.and lose. Women fight
theirs tears and win.
*


fists
with


Women are always ready to
kiss and make up-but they
usually make up before they
kiss.
*
If you happen to hear a wo-
man praising a mans wisdom
it's a sure sign that he is not
her husband.
*
A man never knows what
fool ideas he has until after
he builds a house according to
his own plans.

It is easier for the average
man to fall in love with a wo-
man than it is for him to stay
in love with her.

Brown-It is said that they
who have the most to say use
the fewest words.
White-Then my wife nev-
er has anything to say.

He-Ha, ha! I have a good
joke I was going to tell you,
but I guess I won't
She-Why?
He-Because if your face
lights up the powder will ex-
plode.
*


The Policeman-You folks
can't stay in the park all
night. You'll have to go home.
Mr. Doubleup-But it's not
our turn, officer. We share
our flat with another family
and they occupy it at night.
*
When I told father we mod-
ern girls were airminded he
said he'd agree we were
flighty at that."
*
Tom-That's an expensive
car. It will run into five fig-
ures.
Joe Well, I don't know
how many it will run into,
but I'd have been one of them
just now if I had not jumped
out of the way.
*
"Well," said the master of
the house impatiently, -"did
you tell Cook that I wanted
my breakfast immediately?"
"I did," replied his wife.
"And what did she say ?"
"That we all have our dis-
appointments."
*
Artist-I am out here to
make a number of sketches. I
love to get local color
Rustic- "You're gittin' it,
mister. I jus' painted that
bench you're sitting' on this
morning.
*
An income tax means an
outgo check.

A male gossip spends a lot
of his time looking for a job.
*
Look for happiness; trouble
will come without being look-
ed for.
Experience teaches us that
Experience teaches us that


a lot of it doesn't teach us
anything.
*


We wonder if the
loves a cheeful giver as
as the cheerful giver
himself.
*I


Lord
much
loves


When things fail to come
your way it's up to you to
turn around and go in the way
they are going.
*
Chumm Citron-Was the
old man violent when you told
hi myou wanted to marry his
daughter ?
Sam Speck Violent? I
should say so. Why, he nearly
shook my hand off.
*
Junior Clerk-I'm sorry I'm
late, sir, but I was found un-
conscious at 9 this morning.
Employer-Good Gracious!
How did that happen ?
Junior Clerk Well, sir I
forgot to set the alarm.

A Columbus, Ohio, paper
defines a brave man as one
who eats chestnuts in the
dark. Brave, perhaps, but no
vegetarian.
*
Simile: As perfunctory as
the three-handed bridge game
at midnight, while the host-
ess is digging up a lunch.
*


Poore-Has your wife been
showing her face in those
new-fashioned gowns from
Paris?
Fishie-Yes, and that ain't
all.
*
A-I've always noticed that
a woman always lowers her
voice when she begs for
something!
B-Yes-And raises it sky
high if her desire is not grat-
ified!
Beach of Proise
Beach of Promise
Pach of Promise.
Breach of Promise.
Breach of Promise.
*
Young man: "Sir, I'm in
love with your wife and I
would like to marry her if
you'll get a divorce. Are you
going to shoot me?"
The Other Man: "Yes. If
you change your mind."
*
Stanley-Do you love me ?
Violet-Can't you read it in
my eyes?
Stanley-No, I am illiterate.
*
In Utopia, there will be no
cynics who predict conditions
in Utopia.
*
Statistics prove that the
letter "X" is the one most
used-on the typewriter.
*
Aunt Minnie wonders why
you can't get your income tax
returns over the radio.
*
Spinach is the bravest of
all vegetables. It has the most
sand.
*
When the banns are pub-
lished, censorship of the male
begins.
*
Uncle Jake has been read-
ing the humor magazine. The
other night when Aunt Min-
nie asked him to take Fifi out


THE



CHASER
r "lf

;i!~9* GU)-


As long as a man is
giving disposition a
doesn't care whether
his debts or not.
*


of a for-
woman
he pays


If a man has a nagging
wife he is sure to realize that
silence is golden.
*
There are now over 5,00 vo-
cations open to women. One
or them is marriage the
others are of minor import-
ance.
*
The Catch In It-the most
economical of wives frequent-
ly is the one who has been
married for her money.
$ *


A Problem
showing-The
r-100 per cent


Play: "Now
Silent Womanu
talkie."


THINKING JEWS ALL SUBSCRIBE TO THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN! DO YOU?


for a walk, he said, "I'd just
as leash not do it."
I
Even today a good mixer
must be able to crack the ice.
*
Judge-Why does this pris-
oner's face look so pasty.
Policeman-I pasted him
there, your honor.

Mrs. Borden-Lodge Did
you change the table napkins
as I told you?
Annee (the maid)-Yes'm,
I shuffled 'em up an' dealt
'em out so no one gets their
same as he had at breakfasts:
*
Rustic Teacher-What was
that you said? "I ain't gwine
thar." That's no way to talk;
listen: "I am not going there."
"You are not going there."
"They are not going there."
Get the idea?
Scholar Yep; I git's it.
They ain't nobody gwine.

Jones-One may study wo-
man for a hundred years be-
for one understands her!
Mrs. Smythe-Yes! and
then it's too late!

Judge-You say you car-
ried a loaded revolver and you
let the thief take everything
off you ?
Mr. Pin. Yes, he took
everything but the revolver.
He didn't find that.
*
Leave It to Her.
Suitor-I will admit I hav-
en't always lived as I should,
but I do' love your daughter
sincerely, and if ever I should
make her unhappy I hope I
will be made to suffer for it.
Father-Don't let that wor-
ry you; She'll attend to that.

Society weddings come un-
der the heading of fashion-
able ties.
*
The man who lacks push is
willing to take things as they
come.

The weather is as uncertain
as the age of a woman be-
tween 25 and 50.

A girl sees in every single
man of her acquaintance a
possible husband.
*
It takes a double supply of
love to make a happy home
if the wife can't cook.
*
There is much to be said
on both sides when two wo-
men are talking over the
fence.
*
A woman knows her hus-
band's faults, but she never
acknowledges them to anoth-
er woman.
*


4.


....* ., :


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Pare 4 fil JEWIS FLRDA Frdy Fbar 21 W.9J"30


We would appreciate your
forwarding all society and
organization items to the
Jewish Floridian, 652 S. W.
1st street, or phone 2-8745
not later than noon Wed-
nesday.

Mrs. Simon E. Altschull and
Mrs. Irwin L. Siegel of Fall
River, Mass., were hostesses
at luncheon last week in the
Granada gardens, in honor of
Miss Rose and Miss Esther
Wexler of Fall River. Those
present were Mrs. Ed. Wex-
ler, Mrs. Edward Belage, Mts.
William Hirsch and Miss Per-
ry Riesman.
*
Last Sunday evening Mr.
and Mrs. Louis Gerson enter-
tained a number of friends at
an informal gathering. Among
those present were Dr. M.
Hillerson and daughter Eve-
lyn of Philadelphia, Pa., Mr.
David Brodsky of Trenton, N.
J., Mr. and Mrs. Harry Topkis
of Wilmington, Del., Mr. and
Mrs. I. Robin of Atlantic City,
Miss Luba Schachter of Chi-
cago, Ill., Jack Waldman,
Frances Druckerman, Rose
Mary Gerson, Mr. and Mrs.
Wm. Gerson.
Singing and instrumental
numbers were enjoyed by the
guests and at a late hour re-
freshments were served.
*
Dr. M. Hillerson and daugh-
ter Evelyn of Phila., have
gone to Havana for a short
stay and upon their return to
Miami will be the house
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Louis
Gerson for several weeks.
*
Mrs. J. Weisfeld, the moth-
er of Rabbi I. H. Weisfeld
who was visiting here for the
past'several months returned
to her home in Brooklyn, N.
Y., last Tuesday. She will stay
there several days after which
she will go for a month's stay
to Toronto, Canada, her for-
mer home.
*
We regret that the name of
Mrs. Wm. Friedman as one of
the hostesses for the Tourist
card party given at the Nemo
hotel about a week ago for
the benefit of the Beth David
Talmud Torah was inadvert-
ently omitted.
*
The Boys of the Bar Mitz-
va Club of Beth David were
the guests of Mrs. J. Weis-
feld at breakfast last Sunday
morning as were also a num-
ber of the workers of the Tal-
mud Torah.
*
A short business meeting
of .the Ladies Auxiliary of
Beth David Talmud Torah
was held last week at which
time the plans for the annual
Purim Ball which will be held
at the Womens Club in March
were discussed and tickets dis-
tributed.
*
,Miss Fminy Graber of New
York city was the guest of
honor at a bridge supper, giv-
eni y he,1cousin, Miss Sally
Kt.maiti, in the palm room of


'the Granada.
The first prize for bridge
was won by Miss Sari Levine
second by Mrs. Louis Rosen,'


and consolation prize was
vawarded to Miss Francis
Gross. An attractive guest
rize was presented to Miss
Graber.
Dainty refreshments were
s,_ive.l, and following ,the
game supper was served. De-
corations were carried out in
valentine colors.
Invited guests were: Mrs.
A Kurnan, Mrs. William
Weintraub, Miss Toots Gross,
Miss Frances Gross, Miss
Sari Levine, Miss Flora Al-
1.ert, Miss Lila Tobin, Miss
Norman Wolfe, Miss Ida
Weingartfn, Miss Harriet
Salzberg, Mrs Arthur H.
Goldman, Mrs. Louis Rosen,
Mrs. J. A.'Richter, Mrs. Joe
Bass, Mrs. Irvin Seigel and
Mis. S. Altschull.
Miss Graber is spending a
vacation here and will take a
trip to Cuba before leaving
for the north. A number of
events are being arranged for
the visitor, who is the niece
of Judge and Mrs. Otto A.
Rosalsky of New York city.
*
Mme. M. D. Beldner, who
has been seriously ill at the
Battle Creek South hospital, is
reported much improved.
*
Evening party was given
by Mr. and Mrs. Sam Kantor
at the Mayflower hotel at Mi-
ami Beach with H. U. Feible-
man as master of ceremonies
and Miss Rose Mary Gerson
as soloist. Miss Frances
D r u c k e rman accompanied
Miss Gerson at the piano. A
large number attended.
*
Felicia Rybier, widely
known Miami musician, who
has appeared in concert in
various cities in the north the
past summer, will leave this
week for St. Petersburg,
where she will appear in con-
cert with Miss Francis Tar-
boux as assisting artist.
*
Aaron Hollander of Hart-
ford, Conn., George Toplitz of
New York City and Dr. S.
William Hoffs of New London
Conn., are guests at the Mi-
ami Biltmore Hotel in Coral
Gables.
*
Mr. and Mrs. Milton C.
Stern, Dayton, Ohio, are at
the Floridian for a vacation.
*
Mrs. M. Fineberg will be
chairman of the benefit bridge
party being sponsored by the
Council of Jewish Women at
Burdine's roof garden, Friday,
February 28. Her committee
consists of Mrs. Meyer Rau-
zin, Mrs. Joe Morris, Mrs.
Harry Oliphant and Mrs. Mor-
ris Dubler.
*
The following operatic pro-
gram was given by members
of the Mana-Zucca Music club
at the Civic Theater at 4:30
p. m. last week.
Trio, No. 4, first movement
(Beethoven), by Helen Gibbs,
Estelle Cromer and Walter
Grossman; piano solo "Romeo
and Julet Waltz" (Gounod-
Raff), by Brownie Haston;
soprano solo, aria from "Fra
Diavalo," by Ruth Farrell,


Francis Tarbopx at the piano;
soprano solo, aria from "Joan
d'Arc" (Tschaikowsky), by


-Mrs. Herbert Feibleman;
Hannah Spiro Asher at the
piano; two arias from "Faust"
(Gounod), Frances Tarboux
at the piano; and by request,
"Lies" (Mana-Zucca), com-
poser at the piano, by Percy
Long.
Among those who will ap-
Among those who will ap-


i

i
i
i
I
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i


Spear for the benefit of the Ha-
dassah Charity program at
their affair 'in the Miami
Biltmore Country club on
March 4th, next will be Fran-
ces Druckerman and Miss
Rose Mary Gerson.
'* ;
Last Sunday- night, Mr.
Landau former secretary of


SOCIETY


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Keeper of the Puritan Conscience





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fHE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


I


Friday, February 21, 1930


Pace 4


i


--- --- ---R--- ----- --------- ---


the Southern District of the
Workmen's Circle delivered a
very interesting talk before
the members of the Arbeiter
Ring at the Workmens Circle
Hall when he told of the pro-
ceedings at the Chicago Con-
vention and stressed the rea-
sons for the rejection of the
so-called Left Wing from
membership in the organiza-
tion because of the reflections,
canards and the willful dis-
semination of untrue propa-
ganda designed to hurt the
organization. After the ad-
dress, a number of folk songs
Continued on Page 5


~.- LYIH~O~II~O


1=IIIII


s5
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Friday, February 21,1930.


SOCIETY

(Continued from Page 4)
were sung and refreshments
were served.
*
An event of importance to
Miami Beach will be the pre-
sentation of a Holy Scroll by
Mr. and Mrs. J. Goldberg of
the Nemo Hotel to Congrega-
tion Beth Jacob on Sunday af-
ternoon, March 2nd, when a
very elaborate ceremony, will
be carried out in which a num-
ber of prominent speakers and
Rabbis will participate. In the
evening a banquet will be ser-
ved to a number of guests in
celebration of the event.
*
Great preparations are now
being made by the Arrange-
mCnts Committee in charge
of Mrs. Louis Elkin, for the
S3rd annual concert of the
Workmens Circle featuring
the children attending the
Workmens Circle School. A
drama of Oscar Wilde's will be
presented in the Yiddish and
individual numbers as well as
, group numbers will be sung in
the Yiddish by the Children.
The program includes folk
dancing among other interest-
ing entertainment to be pre-
sented.

Despite bad weather last
Monday more than 100 ladies
attended the benefit Bridge
party last Monday afternoon
given by the Sisterhood of
Temple Israel at the Vill Ve-
nice, Miami Beach. The grand
prize was won by Mrs. Mit-,
chell Wolfson. Because of the
inclemency of the weather
another bridge party will be
held the afternoon of March
5th, at 2:30 p. m. at the Mi-
ami Beach Golf and Country
club for which arrangements
are being made by a commit-
tee consisting of Mrs. Si Men-
delson, chairman; Mesdames
Tobias Simon, Larry Fay,
Herman Klein, Francis Rosen-
baum, Henry Williams, H. U.
Feibleman. They will be asist-
ed by Mrs. I. L. Seligman,
president and Mrs. Herbert E.
Kleiman, chairman of Enter-
tainment of the Sisterhood.
Prizes will be awarded for
high scores and refreshments
will be served.
*
The Council of Jewish Wo-
men will have meeting of its
Executive Board, on Wednes-
day afternoon, February 26th,
at Kaplan Hall of Temple Is-
rael. Plans have been complet-
ed for the benefit bridge
which will be held at Bur-
dine's Roof Garden on Friday
afternoon, February 28th, for
which affair the committee in
charge consists of Mrs. M.
Fineberg, chairman who is be-
ing assisted by Mesdames
Myer Rauzin, Joe Morris, Har-
ry Oliphant, and Morris Dub-
ler. Prizes for high scores
will be awarded and refresh-
ments will be served.
*


Delegates to the annual
Tri-State Convention of. the
Federation of Temple Sister-
hoods will leave Miami on Sun-
day morning next to arrive in
Tampa in time to attend the
reception Sunday evening
which will formally inaugu-
rate the convention. The dele-
gates from the Sisterhood of
Temple Israel consist of Mrs.
I. L. Seligman, president of
the Sisterhood, and Mesdames


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


Jacob H. Kaplan, Herbert E.
Kleiman, Si Mendelson, and
Harry I. Homa. They will be
the guests of the Temple
Guild Sisterhood of Tampa
during' their stay at the con-
vention.
*
Mrs. S. (Cecil) Tannenbaum
was ill at home since last Sat-
urday and was taken to Jack-
son Memorial Hospital Thurs-
day. Her many friends wish
her a speedy recovery.
*0
On next Tuesday evening
the newly chosen officers of
the Ladies Auxiliary of Beth
David Talmud Torah will be
formally installed iilto office
at a special meeting called for
the purpose. Rabbi I. H. Weis-
feld will speak as will a few
prominent speakers in brief
talks. Immediately afterwards
there will be an informal
bridge and entertainment fol-
lowed by refreshments. There
will be no charge of any kind
the cost being defrayed by
the new officers.

Mrs. Morris Rubin was the
host to number of friends at
her home last Wednesday
when they gathered to devise
ways and means for the rais-
ing of funds for the purchase
of books for the Talmud To-
rah library. From the enthus-
iasm shown it will not be very
long before all the desired
funds will be on hand. Sever-
al bridge parties, and theatri-
cal entertainments will be run
to raise these funds and an-
nouncements will be made
shortly of the full details of
the various events. Among
those present were: Mes-
dames Morris Solomon, Her-
bert E. Scher, Louis Van Gil-
der, Chas. Rosengarten, Barn-
ey Weinkle, Carl Weinkle,
Phil Dick, S. Simonhoff, M. I.
Zucker, I. H. Weisfeld, Louis
Baron, J. Simison, J. L.
Shochet and Miss Lena Wein-
kle. Refreshments were ser-
ved after the meeting.
*
Si Goodfriend who came to
Miami to aid in putting on the
Friars Frolic, and one of the
original members of that or-
ganization, will spend a vaca-
tion in Havana and on return-
ing will be at the Blackstone,
Miami Beach.
*
Miss Goldie Wexler of New
York City is visiting Mr. and
Mrs. Rappaport at their home
636 N. W. 5th avenue and will
spend the balance of the win-
ter season with them.
*
Mrs. Leo A. Kaiser has as
her house guest Mrs. Alfred
Markus and niece Louise Mar-
kus of New Yorkk City.
*
Mr. and Mrs. Harry W.
Weinberg were guests of hon-
or at their tenth wedding an-
niversary recently. Present
were Mr. and Mrs. I. A. Russ-
col, Mrs. Rose Vince Rose,
Mrs. Nat Sharaf, Mrs. S. H.
Rost of Canada, Mrs. Adele
V. Rose and Mr.o and Mrs.
Alex Goldstein.
*


Plans for the huge Masonic
Charity Ball at the Cinderella
Ballroom for the evening of
March 5th, are being finally
completed and promises to be
one of the finest events of the
social season thus far held. A
very splendid response on the
part of Miamians and tourists
have indicated that a large
sum of money will in all prob-
ability be raised towards the


Charity fund. The Ball is be-
ing held under the auspices
of the Biscayne Bay Lodge,
the oldest Masonic Lodge in
Dade Country.

The Regular Meeting of the
Friendship League was held
Wednesday, February 19,
1930.
Ben Atkins was voted upon
as a new member of the.
League.
The Friendship League an-
nounces their annual Dance at
the Ambassador Club, Sun-
day, March 9th, featuring the
Ambassador Review. There
will be surprises, dances, and
novelties. Fred Platt is in
charge eof the entertainment
committee.

Board of Governor's Meet-
ing will be held at Miss Jean
Mohilner's home, 1037 N. W.
1st Street, Tuesday, February
25th, 1930 at 8:30' p. m. Old
and New members are cor-
dially invited to attend.
*
Misses Sara and Mayme
Goodman of Indianapolis, have
joined friends at the Flori-
dian, where tney will remain
for the rest of the season.


High Lights on
Professor
Louis Blumer
Founder of
NATUREOPATHY
Daily Lectures at Cinderella
Ballroom, 2 P. M., Beginning
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21

No Admission Charge-No Col-
lection-All Free!
YOU DON'T HAVE TO BE
SICK TO GO THERE
You Will Enjoy Every Moment
As It Was Done By Thousands
of Others.
There is no idle moment, no
meaningless topics in Dr. Blum-
er's Lectures. Every word is of
absorbing interest for the young
the old, the business man and
prosperity seeker and for all
who seek progress, harmony
and peace of mind an body in
everyday life. /'
Hear the pioneer of Nature-
opathy in his lecture and see
the demonstration.
This will positively be the
best of, a series of the famous
Blumer's clinics and lectures.
Great subjects of interest to
-all. Don't miss it!
MILLIONAIRES ARE POOR
WHEN THEIR HEALTH
FAILS THEM.
FIGHTING BLOOD
LIFE is but one battle after another
and if you haven't the right kind of
fighting Mood in your blood essels
YOU ARE LOST-no matter how rleh
you are. Don't sheer at health lec-
tures, but attend them all, young or
old, business or professional men.
Infinitly more powerful in healing
potency than .all other systems com-
bined, embracing the grandest philoe-
ophical principles of any age. There is
scarcely a form of disease humanity
is heir to that these successful meth-
ods 'cannot benefit. Come in,, watch
the founder of Natureopathy alleviate
human suffering, giving relief while
you wait without drugs, dope or pills,
and upon local people.
He is known far and wide for his
free health lectures and demonstrations
on the sick and crippled, and for his
inspirational and educational editorials
in Live and Learn Magazine and "The
Scientific Natureopath."
He gained an international reputa-
tion, something that can't be taken
from him.
Go hear him, his demoun-tmtMi.
Bring your afflicted friends, and let
them rpelvo a public Free treatment
o- Feb. r s, 22, s2 end fr f
we* -Advwmrsment.


-I


Page 5
aaaauaaeaaaaamaaasalauafef a mfoa


BUSINESS DIRECTORY


AUTO PARTS
BLOOM AUTO REPAIR
& PARTS CO.
N. W. 17th Ave. at 23rd St.
Phone 23631
The Largest car wreckers in
Florida
L. (Pop) GERSON
Buyer of All Kindi f Scrap Metal
We Sell Auto Parts
2141 N. W. SECOND AVE.
Phone 20621

BAGS and METALS
EAST COAST BAG & METAL CO.
(Inc.)
I. L. MINTZER
MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS
435-445 N. W. 8th Street
Phone 4485
PEPPER METAL CORP.
Scrap Metal and Machinery
N. W. Cor. 5th Ave. and 14th St.
Phone 22546

BUILDING SUPPLIES
J. SIMPSON
Building Materials,
Roofing Paper, Asphalt
423 N. W. N. River Drive
Phone 7251
.. .


DELICATESSEN
ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN
170 N. W. 5th St.
We Supply Your Every Want

FISH & SEA FOODS
STANDARD FISH CO.
629 W. Flagler St.
Phone 2-3362

FOUNTAINS
Cold Drinks


Candies and Lunches
HOME GROCERY
Corner 1st St. N. W. and 3rd


Ave.


King
Undertaking Co.

29 N. W. THIRD AVENUE
Phones 23535-31624


HIinIIuiInIrnII


I Dr. Albert E. Rosenthal
DENTIST
N. E. 2nd Ave.
S302 *Professional Building


E. S. Johnson Coal Co.
COAL, COKE AND
CHARCOAL
We Deliver
-0---o-
CITY DOCKS
2-5707


THINKING JEWS ALL SUBSCRIBE TO THE JEWISH FLORIDIANI


INSURANCE
DADE FLORIDA INSURANCE
AGENCY, Inc.
--General Insurance-
8S N. E. 2nd Avq. Phone 27589
Life Fire Casualty Bonds
RAUZIN INSURANCE
AGENCY, Inc.
Phones 22565 32452
137 N. E. First St.
Miami, Fla.
LEON ELKIN
Is now Local Representative of the
Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.
and is ready to serve his friends.
Residence
1620 N. W. 30th STREET
Phone 26085

PHARMACISTS
BRYAN PARK PHARMACY
Chas. Tannenabsm,
Pharnacist
(reg. pharmacist for 17 years)
Cor 22nd Ave. and 8t 8t. S. W.
CRYSTAL PHARMACY
-DDr.A. D. Halper, Ph. G. Ph. D.
Prescriptions Our Specialty
128 N. Miami Ave. Phone 2071.

PIPE and STEEL

ADELMAN PIPE & STEEL CO.
58 N. E. 25th St.
Aat F. E. C. R. R. Phone 21420

A. & B. PIPE AND METAL CO.
Phone 31855
53 North East 25th Street

PRINTERS
MIAMI PRINTING CO.
"Printing That Pays"
Phone 28261
107 South Miami Avenue


AMBULANCE SERVICE
W. H. Combs Co., Estab. 189
COMBS FIUNEAL HONM
Phone Miami 32101
1539 N. E. lad Avenue
MIAMI BEACH FUNERAL HOME
Phone M. B. 5-2101
120M Wasinlagt A"e


JOSEPH M. LIPNITZ
Insurance Advisor and
Underwriter
LAWYERS' BLDG.
37 N. E. First Avenue
Phones 2-1522, 2-0317


DR. J. B. MARGOLIS
DENTIST
Third Floor Olympia Bldg.
Phone 2-4073


DAILY AT 2:00 P. M.
BOAT LEAVES CITY YACHT
BASIN
N. E. Third St. and Bay
-----
Fare Only $2.00
---
Don't miss the opportunity of
seeing the beautiful sub-mar-
ine gardens on the remodeled
and enlarged double huted ,
SE-BOT-M. BOA
For Particulars,
Phone 22073


D0 YOU?


ri i1 *fcl -, ..-IL; ,^ 4 1 .
,....*.. '
I.


UNITED GAS
UTILITIES, INC.
-OWNERS-
GAS COMPANY
of Miami Beach
Fort Lauderdale Florida
Gas Co.

GAS SERVICE
Fort Lauderdale, Holly-
wood, Dania, Miami Shores
Miami Beach
-Offices--
1036 LINCOLN ROAD
MIAMI BEACH


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THE JEWISH ILORIDIAN


Friday, February 2!, 1930


Don't


Let


SChi na s



T ,f Dream


.Come

rwA
the fi True !



JUST THINK FOR YOURSELF!
1* Just think a few years back and you will recall the panic
created in our Country because Germany controlled thp supply
_. E of potash that was so needed in our agricultural and industrial
pursuits. Think of the German dycs tat f.Irced our captains
of industry to develop our own natural resources and provide
Sdyes independent of any foreign countries Think today i f the
S, British control of the rubber industry, and the years of experi-
Sminentation of that great wizard, Thomas Edison, to find some
Slant that would prevent foreign :lominaTioRn and control of a
'i.al essential to our well being. AND THEN ...... just
Glance around the office. Do you see the linoleum on the floor ?
;44 The well kept and serviceable desk, chairs, files, and other
pieces of furniture? Do you notice the clean painted doors,
S windows, and walls ? And how about that little instrument on
'-"-.. % your desk without which you couldn't get along, the telephone?
.... And just alongside of your desk, that little handle with which
you call the telegraph boy? And the ink with which you fill- -
S .... your ever ready fountain pen? Did you ever think that in
all of these TUNG OIL was that which kept and madre all these
serviceable and possible for you?
And when you got home and saw the painted screens, the
beautifully lacquered lamps, tables and other articles of furni-
-A ture without which your home, would not be that which it is,
your haven bf refuge and rest, did you ever think that it was
TUNG OIL which made all this beauty and comfort possible?
And when you jumped into your auto and traveled out opon
the long winding roads and enjoyed the growing crops, did
you realize that it was TUNG OIL once again which made the
beautiful and durable enamel possible on your machine, and
the fertilizer which made the crops grow?
Today China which has for the past five thousand years controlled and DOMINATED THE PRODUCTION OF TUNG OIL and its distribution to the industries of the
world and particularly our own United States, is beginning to realize that its own Tang Tree thrives better on the soil of Florida and produces a grade of oil far superior
to that which China has ever produced. TODAY China looks carefully and appraisinglyat the FLORIDA TUNG NUT but still dreams on ..... the dream of a con-
tinued world domination ...... of the Chinese dragons forever dominating American Industry. WILL YOU.LET THAT DREAM COME TRUE? CAN YOU AFFORD
TO LET THE CHINESE DREAM keep you from helping our own essential industries without which YOU CANNOT GET ALONG?
TODAY you have the opportunity of assuring to our own essential well being and industries a supply of TUNG OIL independent of China and Chinese domination,
by the planting of TUNG OIL TREES in Florida where it has been proven that TUNG TREES will prosper.
WHAT DOES THIS MEAN TO FLORIDA AND TO YOU? It means an opportunity that is unsurpassed in money-making possibilities for you and the freeing of
American industry from Chinese control. America uses millions of dollars worth of CHINESE TUNG OIL annually. These same millions can easily be diverted to the
sunny fields of Florida, and to you!
We have the land, we have the TUNG TREES and we have a contract with one of the greatest development companies in the South to manage our grove. AND .
best of all .we have a plan that will bring you profits on your investment immediately. NO WAITING FOR THE TUNG TREES TO MATURE AND BEAR NUTS.
Our profit sharing plan (the production of a side line on the same land) works! By the time your TUNG TREES are fully matured our "sideline" plan will have paid
your back a large part of your original investment. With potential millions to be made in TUNG OIL and with a plan that shows immediate profits .. why not investi-
Sgate .... TODAY.


I J. S. BLAIN


SALES CORPORATION
215 N. E. FIRST AVENUE. MIAMI, FLORIbA


FREE! MOVING PICTURES FREEt
Every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, 7:30 P. M.
Hear the Marvelous Educational Lecture on TUNG OIL (at this office)
F By D. O'BRIEN
ADVERTISERS SAVE YOU MONEY AND GIVE YOU SERVICE!
SOURADVERTIsERS SAVE YOU MONEY AND GIVE YOU SER IE
ND GIV Y~ ..


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