The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
January 17, 1930
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00047

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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I II F I J 7 1 Pric n

VOL. Ill.-No. III. MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 17, 1930 Price 5 Cents


Ladies Auxiliary
Ball Is Success
More than two thousand
dollars will be realized as the
result of the annual Ball and
Bazaar held at the Cinderella
Ballroom, last Tuesday even-
ing under the auspices of the
Ladies Auxiliary of Beth Da-
vid Talmud Torah, the entire
net proceeds of which will be
used towards the upkeep of
the Talmud Torah, and its
building.
The Ballroom contained a
number of booths, such as the
refreshments booth, sand-
wich, art, cake, groceries,
cigars and candies, flowers
etc. Workers of the Ladies
Auxiliary were in charge of
the various oooths and on the
floor to attend to the wants
of the more than seven hun-
dred guests attending the af-
fair. Quite a number of tour-
ists from all over the country
Were present. Frank Novak's
Sr--band furnished the music and
a number of professional en-
tertainers, prominent among
whom were, the Hawaiian
team of Lopez and Trojo who
had donated their services for
the Talmud Torah, were on
hand to entertain the large
number present.
In the audience could be
seen representatives of Ha-
dassah, The Sisterhood of
Temple Israel, the Council of
Jewish Women and other Jew-
ish organizations who came
to show their synfriithy and
cooperation with the cause of
Talmud Torah.
Quite a large number of
non-Jews were present as a
result of a raoio address de-
livered ivionday evening over
Station WIOa' by Rabbi Is-
rael H Weisfeld on the sub-
ject of Jewish Education.
During the address an invita-
tion to all to attend tne Ball,
was extended by Rabbi Weis-
feld on behair of the Ladies
Auxiliary.
Those assisting the Ladies
during the evening were:
Samuel J. Spector, Herbert E.
Scher, Mkx Kupferstein, Dave
Kahn and others.
A complete financial report
will be furnished to ever
member of the Ladies Auxil
iary at the next meeting oe
the organization which will be
held next Tuesday evening at
tne Talmud Torah Auditor-
ium.

Election Held by
Chesed Shel Emes

thAt the annual meeting of
the Chesed Shel Emes Sister-
hood held last Thursday
evening at the Talmud Torah
Hall, the following officers
were chosen: Mrs. Manuel
Rippa, president; Mrs. Sol
Schwartz, vice-president; Mr.
Manuel Rippa representing
the Brotherhood, treasurer;
and Mrs. Sarah Hornstein as
secretary. Tne Sistehood of
the Chesed Shel Emes has for


its purpose the preparation of
burial shrouds and all expens-
es for the burial of needy
Jewish cases, and is the or-
ganization which is instru-
mental in the ownership of
the Jewish plot in the Wood-
lawn cemetery.


Jewish Journalist
to Speak Here


Emil Ludwig, Jews Jewish Women
and Judaism Forsake Benshen


Mr. Morris Freilicoff the A brief statement recently
Southern Representative of told of Emil Ludwig's position
"The Day" one of America's toward Jews and Judaism.
foremost Jewish dailies, and From that declaration it ap-
a journalist of note and con- peared that the biographer
tributor to a number of Eng- had little concern with either.
lish magazines as well arrived The Greek journalists who
in Miami this week on a brief interviewed Ludwig in Salon-
business trip but was induced ika, now tell us what he did
to stay over and he will on sky. It was as follows:
Sunday evening, January 19th "I think," Ludwig said,
be one of the speakers at a "Zionism is a movement that
meeting at the Workmens we ought to follow with sym-
Circle Hall, when together pathy. I am Jewish and so
with Dr. A. D. HIlpern he will my opinion is worth some-
deliver an address on "The thing. One knows quite well
Working Class and events in that this movement should
Palestine." not be considered as having
Mr. Freilicoff whose home as its objective the concen-
is in Washington, D. C. has tration in Palestine of all
been one of its most promi- Jews. My co-religionists of
nent Zionist workers and es. the civilized States of Europe
pecially active in the Poalei -are already acclimatized in
Zion organization. Because of their new countries and would
his knowledge of Palestinian not agre to being sent to Pal-
affairs through years of Zion- estine. I, for example, am one
ist activity his address should hunderd per cent. German.
be one well worth while SIs- But the Jews, for instance, of
tening to. N Roumania, of Turkey and of
In addition to the speakers Poland have never succeeded
there will be a short musical in settling down. It would be
program. This meeting is one a good thing for them to es-
of a series of concerts and lit- tablish themselves I Pales-
erary evenings planned under tine. I have visited Palestine
the auspices of the Local several times, and I have no-
branch of the Workmens cir- ticed that immigration is
cle. small.
"Youdare a Jew, aren't you,
February to Wit- Dr. Ludwig?" I asked him.
Yes. In my childhood I was
-ness Gail Ball converted to Christianity. It
____ was a youthful errorr"
Now that the big affairs "And you have come back
Nw that the big affairs to Judaism ?" \
of the season are over for ri unity, first of
Beth David, and Temple Is-all because I could find no dif-
rael, and the Council of Jew- all be e I could find no dif-
ish Women affair is to be lerence abeteeond because
held next week, the commit- lig:o's, and secondly, because
htee ofnext workers for the large I did not want to be on the
tee of workers for the large side of the anti-Semites."
Charity Ball being sponsored "You were re-converted."
for the benefit of the Jewish No. I didn't want to make
WeJfare Bureau at the Miami anther mistake. I am an un-
Beach: Country Club, Febru- believer. Iam a Jew by race
ary 18th, are redoubling their and a Gerrhan."
efforts in the sale of tickets "hat religion do y pro-
as well as in the obtaining of fess*?"
advertisements for the sou- "None. When it is neces-
venir program. Spurred on by ary I declare myself as hav-
the urgent need for funds and
the inevitable stoppage of re- ing no religion."
lief for poor and needy cases "But at least when you are
unless the Ball is made afin- dead the ministers or some
ancial success, the workers religion will have to look af-
have an added incentive in ter you. Which will you
the winning of the prize lov- have"Luckiy we hav civil fun-
ing cup donated by Julius Da- luckily we have civil fun-
men -" -. 4,n.....-. .- ... 1 erals."


mensteln ior the worker pro-
ducing the most money for
the Charity Ball. Entertain-
ers ranking amongst the best
in this section of the Coun-
try will be on hand to keep
the guests and patronibers
amused every'minute of the
affair. Mr. Stanley U. Myers
is chairman of the Ball Com-
mittee.

Beth David to
Feature Forum

The usual late Friday night
services will begin at.8:15 p.
m. and will be featured by
an Open Forum at which
Harry I. Lipnitz, president of
the local Zionist District and
well known attorney of Mi-
ami will speak on "Anti-Sem-
itism"; Mr. P. Lieberman,
well known communal worker
of New York City and regu-
lar winter visitor to Miami
-will also speak..


Manager Plan
Given Approval

The city manager form of
government of Miami Beach
was commended by the Miami
Beach Chamber of Commerce
in a questionnaire returned
yesterday to the bureau of
research in municipal govern-
ment of Harvard university.
The Harvard bureau is
making a study of city gov-
ernments throughout the
country.
The chamber of commerce
pointed out that the city man-
ager plan was effective and
entirely satisfactory to the
best interests of the commun-
ity. The report added that the
city manager favored no pol-
itical party and was not sub-
servient to any political boss.
Claude A. Renshaw -s Miami
Beach city manatdier.
r


Moscow-Submit your Sab-
bath candlesticks for Soviet
industrialization, is the latest
appeal of the Jewish Com-
munists in their war on reli-
gion. Reports from White
Russia state that many Jew-
ish women are voluntarily
birning in their candlesticks
and marriage rings for the in-
dustrialization fund.
At a meeting of the Jewish
women of Kapulie, a resolu-
tion was adopted declaring
that "we resign from the
ceremony of candle blessings
and we donate our candle-
sticks for Soviet industrial
upbuilding." In yesterday's
"Oktiabre" a full page was
devoted to the anti-religious
campaign. It is declared that
the synagogues in Likolm
have been used for illegal
meetings and that from the
Slutsk synagogues anti-Soviet
rumors emanate and that
therefore they should be con-
verted.

Opening of Beach
Bridge Saturday
Miami Beach's new $97,000
bridge-and approaches at 41st
street and Indian creek will
be opened officially to traffic
at noon Saturday. Claude A.
Renshaw, city manager, said
yesterday.
Mayor Louis F. Snedigar,
city and chamber of com-
merce officials will drive the
first motor cars across the
span.
The bridge is expected to
be of much convenience be-
cause at present there is no
way for motor traffic to cross
Indian creek between 23rd St.
and Allison island.

Miami Attorney
Addresses Beth
Jacob Service

The Open Forum at Beth
Jacob Congregation, Miami
Beach will be addressed by
Mr. Abe Aronowitz, promi-
nent attorney of Miami, at 8
p. m., Friday evening. The
usual congregational singing
and responsive reading will
he had. Rabbi Samuel Yallow
will be in charge of the ser-
vices.

Miami Girl Wins
National Award

Miss Cecile Wolkowsky,
daughter of Herman Wolkow-
sky, 2627 N. Biscayne boule-
vard, was awarded the medal
for musical and artistic pro-
ficiency in the senior camp
awards of Highland Nature
camps at the twentieth an-
nuual reception and reunion in
New York City recently. The


Miami girl also was awarded
an influence band and the
Hauser cup for the ideal Hlign-
lad 'Nature camp girl.'


To My Way of
Thinking
by
Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld
-----tw.------oHHQ
(Continued from last Week)
Ah, how tragically they de-
luded themselves! How soon
the lining lost its silver! How
quickly they learned that the
pot contained not bright glit-
tering gold but cheap ugly
clay. Sad days began to come
upon them. Days of despair
and suspense, when the un-
certain smile of a nobleman
might spell death or horrible
torture. Days when Jewish in-
fuence availed naught, when
the last fond hopes vanished
into thin air. Jews were di-
vested of public office, all
their actions were looked up-
on askance. Deeply rooted dor-
mant anti-Jewish venom crop-
ped to the foreground and
played havoc. The very air
became foul when the accurs-
ed Jews inhaled or exhaled.
Talk began circulating about
compulsory conversion to the
Christian faith. Some took it
rather nicely. Since they were
already true Spaniards, why
not go just one step further
and become true Christians?
So smilingly they passed into
the portals of conversion.
Others said since the timp
demand compromise why not
profess Christianity while in-
wardly remaining
Thus the birth of the Neo-
Christians. A third group
there was that said its met-
bers were born Jews
would be happy and
offer up their lives
religion. This was in
1391.
But this was merely
ginning. Ninety ye
witnessed the inception and
existence of the most inhu-
manly barbaric institution
the world has ever witnessed
. .,. the Inquisition. Headed
by that gracious and merci-
ful clergyman Torquemada,its
functions embraced not only
those of investigating and
questioning the actual Chris'
tianity of the "Conversos"
.bu't torturing every Jew ob-
tainable, altho' let it be stat-
ed in fairness that the Jews
professing and practicing
Judaism were treated with
far greater consideration
than those who had been op-
enly baptized or professed
Christianity. However, the
worst was yet to come. Like
a thunderbolt out of a clear
sky came the edict of expul-
sion issued by Ferdinand and
Isabella in March 1492.

By the last day in July the
Country was to be rid of all
Jews. However, let not the
world say that the rulers
were heartless. The Jews
were permitted to take with
them all their property-pro-
vided it was not in GOLD,
SILVER or MONEY. ....


The story is familiar abort
the great wish statesman
of that time, Don Isaac Abar-
banel offering the king 600,-
000 crowns for the revocation
of the edict. When Ferdinand
* (Continued on Page Two)








THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


Friday, January 17. 1930


To My Way of Thinking
By Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld
&^^^^<<^$^^^^i^^^$^^$^.^^^^^6^&^^


Continued from Page 1)
Hesitated, as if seriously con-
sidering the proposition the
aforementioned Torqumada
rushd into the royal presence,
threw a crucifix down before
the king and queen, and ask-
ed them, whether they too,
like Judas, would betray their
Saviour for money. The Jews
were expelled.
Tearfully they parted from
their beloved ones who lay in
the Jewish cemeteries, and
with hatred mixed with long-
ing they left their adopted
land. Like cattle they were
driven from land to land.
S Twenty thousand died on the
journey. Loud and long was
the curse they uttered; fer-
vent and fiery was the self-
administered oath to obliter-
ate the memory of treacher-
ous Spain from their minds
and hearts. Henceforth they
would spew at the mention
of its name. Huddled, they re-
ceived consolation one from
the other. They settled in new
countries. But the Golden Era
of Spain never returned. In-
cidentally the year that wit-
nessed the expulsion of the
Jews from Spain witnessed
the discovery of America.
And Ferdinana and Isabella
who made the Jews homeless,
were instrumental in finding
them a new home.
It is because of this hatred
hat the Jew has never un-
Wlat in his attitude towards
the land that raised him to
dfzying heights only to dash
him to the most humiliating
depths. It is because of this
that his oath never to set
foot on Spanish soil has re-
mained inviolate. Oh, yes, a
he edict of expul-
a g ured upon Spain's
g a republic in 1858.
re once more permit-
live in Spain. But so
led themselves of
this precdoqs privilege that
the exertion expended in re-
4pealing the edict was hardly
justified.

It is a terrible thing for an
entire nation to pronounce a
curse. Particularly when that
curse happens to be realized.
Contrary to common belief
Spain did not IMMEDIATE-
LY lose its great power and
prestige after the expulsion
of the Jews. As a matter of
fact it rose and grew after
the Jews had left. But it was
not for long. It was the last
bright flicker before the can-
dle dies down. Gradually but
fatally it began dwindling. Ac-
cording to Jacobs, the year or
two following the expulsion
of the Jews saw Spain soaring


to unprecedented heights and
enjoying great wealth and
power. Suddenly, however,
matters began to take a turn
for the worse and the country
began slipping, until it finally
sank into obscurity.

Strange as it may seem,
the first symptoms of Spains
decline became evident in the
field of art and literature
rather than in finance and in-
dustry. The erstwhile dictator
of literary tastes and tend-
encies, that had been so high-
ly productive in authors, po-
ets, painters and composers,
now found itself disgraced in
its sterility. Gone were the
golden-voiced poets with their
colorful imagination and vivid
language. For out of Spain no
longer went forth culture and
learning. And the Jews would
truly have been less than hu-
man if, from their safe or
somewhat precarious retreats,
they did not gloat as they
observed the poverty stricKen
Spain. "We are the yeast in
the dough" they prided them-
selves, and it was no wonder
to them that the country
stopped rising after their de-
parture.

Soon, however, they de-
cided to forget, but not
to forgive. Too great would
be the pain if they re-
membered but too great the
hurt and shame for them to
forgive. With that intensity
with which they had helped
Spain grow commercially and
culturally they now began
laying the foundation in the
various countries whither
they had been dispersed for
new structures to rise anl vie
with each other in beauty and
splendor.

Generations have come and
gone, but as if premeditated,
hatred or scorn for Spain has
been imperceptibly passed
down from father to son. De-
spite the lapse of centuries
the barbaric cruelties of the
Spanish inquisition have not
lost any of their gruesome
horror for an enlightened civ-
ilization. If any change has
come it has rather been to
emphasize and stress the
great injustice committed
against the Jews. It is&6r this
reason that a natioqjghindful
of its Sages' Injunction "Let
a man be as soft and yield-
ing as a reed and not as hard
and unbending as an oak" has
nevertheless, not changed its
feelings for the country that
had dealt with it so treacher-
ously.


AMBULANCE SERVICE uuus amete, nc.
W. H. Combs Co, Estab. 1896 JEWELER
COMBS FUNERAL HOME
Phone Miami 32101 The Store With a Reputation
159 N. E. 2nd Avenue
MIAMI BEACH FUNERAL HOME 10 W. Flagler St. Phone 4701
Phone M. B, 5-2101 MIAMI, FLORIDA
139 Wasslns'ton Aie



F Fu n I ra l l',m e[l


1 4 t h
I i P C) _


Open armed welcome to re-
turn? Thank you! But, just
how long will those arms re-
main open? Until you have
obtained thru us a sufficient
loans? Just how soon there-
after will these open arms
close about our necks in a
death-grip? Return to the
land of Torquemada? "A
SHAINEM DANK!" We'd
rather remain "FREINT
FOON DER VEITENS!"

THE HONEST
TOASTMASTER
By Kirt Baskett
"Now, the next speaker of
the evening is a gentleman
wh9m none of you know; and
let he add that that's a break
for you. I say he's a gentle-
man, but that, you under-
stand, is a courteous gesture.
He really, is not a gentleman
at-M1, but a no-account bum
of he.first water. This guy
needs an introduction, and I
don't mean perhaps, but it's
tough on the rest of you as-
sembled here. Well, his name
is J. Mortimer Fleep. The 'J'
stands for Jake; that's what
his cellmates used to call him.
"Mr. Fleep is a citizen, but
so is the garbage man. He's
not a worthy citizen or, if you
ask me, an upright one. I
know too much about him. If
he's ever done anything be-
sides dodge bill collectors, I
don't know it. Anyway, some-
how or other Mr. Fleep got
on the program tonight and
I have to introduce him, but
remember, I'm not respons-
ible for anything he says or
does. By the way, the chances
are he'll get chummy and hit
somebody here for a ten-spot
before the evening's over-so
remember I warned you.
"Mr. Fleep is active in civic
affairs. The force has a com-
plete record of him, with
thumb-prints and both side
and full face photographs.
His hobbies are wife beating,
widow swindling and cheat-
ing at bridge. It's a darn' good
idea to watch closely if
you're on the link -with him
too; he's very forgetful about
marking down his strokes.
"His message to you to-


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Own Country, we have de-
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purest
MILK
For the Baby and the Adult
Our own old Fashioned
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IVES

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night is the same line of
hooey he's been putting out
for the last twenty years.
Take my advice and clear out


before he starts. He 1
one speech when he
high school and has
(Contiued on Page


p
$






$


I Let Your Own "Sam" Wiesse


il Show You

^^$$>^I I&s^


HOTEL LEONARD DINING ROOM
S54-56 OCEAN DRIVE
I NOW AT YOUR SERVICE
I "Strictly Kosher"-NOT MAYBE!
FOR A REAL HOME COOKED MEAL VISIT US.
Phone 5-1955


When on the TnmiaM Trail, we shdal be ple d to have you inspect
our ew Jewih mion, operated ccordng to the Jewish ritual


THE JEWISH FLORIDIANi- MEDIUM OF AND FOR MIAMI JEWRY!


earned
was in
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6)


For Service and Satisfaction

DRIVE TO OR PHONE


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INC.

MIAMI STATIONS

Biscayne Blvd. at 7th St., Phone 20300
2001 S. W. Third Ave., Phone 32789

MIAMI BEACH
5th Street and Ocean Drive

CORAL GABLES
2242 Ponce De Leon Blvd.


Page 2


I I II II rl I I


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17I


Fri Jauary 17,1 ig


THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
A weekly newspaper published at
Miami, Florida
by
The Jewish Floridian Publishing
Company
652 S. W. FIRST AVENUt
Phone 2-8745


EDITORIAL STAFF
J. LOUIS JHOCHET
A CHOCHOM
BEN DOROM
A. N. ASHER

EDITORIAL

Budapest Hungary is a
country of contrasts. In it,


THE~ JE1WISHT FLOIDI~flAN


ten by a young lady who
claims to speak for a group
of her type.
In her communication the
young lady describes the lone-
someness of her group and
asks the boys to state their
side of the case.
Her letter, follows repro-
duced as written:
"A number of Jewish girls
were at a bridge party last
week and their topic~of con-
versation was "Fellows of
course. "Where can you meet
fellows and make friends,"
one of the girls happened to
ask the other girls. None of
the girls could answer this
question which seems so very
easy yet so terribly hard to


next to the Jewish ultra-or- answer.
thodox, the most scrupulous "Now the girls at this party
observers of the Jewish trad- were all very cute and most
ition, one finds rabid assim- of them you could call pret-
ilationists to whom baptism ty. They were very well dres-
is the logical "next step."
And the other day at the sed young, modern, full of pep
Jewish cemetery during the intelligent, and no gold dig-
interment of a prominent gers. In other words they
member of the Jewish Com- were all any fellow could ask
munity, there occurred a clash for.
between two representatives "All these girls do is go out
of the above groups, wnen the skating, and all they meet on
Rabbi officiating at the fun- the ice is a number of Gen-
eral forbade speech to a Mes- tile boys. It seems that none
hummad a friend of the of the Jewish boys ice skate.
dead man. They, also go swimming in-
It was a 'Iigh-class' bur- doors, just for sport, gym,
ial with the elite of the town and a bridge party for girls
present, both the Jewish and now and then. All this is just
Christian best Society attend- fie for the middle of the
ing in full. Just as the Rabbi k but when the week-end
concluded his memorial ad- comes around you want to go
dress, one of the mournis, out with fellows. Now where
a dashing, monocled, and most do you meet them? Of course
elegant gentleman, approach- none of the girls wanted to
ing hit requntin, to be al- admit at first that they sit
lowed to ~s~ ~e i name of home .dtwiung -the -week-ends
the loca l Casino. The Rabbi but as the discussion went on
gave him a long look and they all admitted the truth
shaking his head said polite- about the matter.
ly, but firmly: "I cannot per- "Some fellows think that it
mit yogito speak." The very takes quite a bit to take out
elegant getleman looked sur- a girl but sometimes just a
prised and_. wanted to know ride is enough if the fellow is
the reason why. good company.
S"You often hear a Jewish
"Because," answered the fellow remark that there
Rabbi, "this is a Jewish re- aren't any nice Jewis girls to
hgious ceremony and we are take out and that is why he
performing it oi ground takes out a Gentile girl. Well,
which is holy to us. Here, all I can say is that there are
there is no room for rene- oodles of Jewish girls, who
gades. Were you a Jew hold very nice positions and
"Yes." can make better company for
"And now, you are a Jew no nice fellows than any Gentile
longer?" girl. Right now there are
"That s so." plenty of girls who are wait-
"Then you will not be suf' ing for a date for New Years
Sfered to speak here." when everybody likes to make
And the elegant gentleman whoopee.
left the burial ground. "This is written by the
The above rather interest- girls at the bridge and we
ing news item appeared in would like to hear what the.
many Jewish and English fellows have to say on this
. dailies last week. We wonder topic.
what Miami Jewry's reactions "Will you please write an
would have been had this hap- editorial on this topic with a
opened here. large headline so that every-
We shall have a number of body is sure to read it.
comments to make this next "Please try to publish this
Week. But for the present article in this week's Chron-
Obd reader, just think it icle as we will be looking for
over. it.


HAVE JEWISH BOYS
PREJUDICE qAINST
THE JEWISH GIRLS?
--
Are the Jewish boys preju-
diced against the Jewish
Do they prefer to "take
out" Genti e girls
Do the boy .fel that there
aren' mua ie .lJewish girls?
,Th d ad a sms of other
a e-f" Te i-n, a
tt to edEr oThe I)e-


"If you publish this you
might solve a problem for
hundreds of nice girls."
We reproduce the above
from the Detroit Jewish
Chronicle because of what we
saw the other night at a Ball
As nice a gathering of Jew-
ish girls 4 one wanted to
see anywhere were present
and yet, we noted to our sur-
prise that the Jewish girls
were rather neglected because
of the presence of a small
group of Gentile girls in the
Ballroom.
W1 wonder why ?


v WI JmV W LPA"L_ i l r age a


THE



CHASER
sq '* & n


r lll I .I III I I II a


Today the hills appear more
green,
The skies take on a bluer
sheen;
I notice flowers here and
there
A-bloom in fields that once
were bare,
Such new delights I now
behold
As in the blinded days of old
I missed for seeing only you.
Elysian vistas come to view,
My spirits soar to heights
above
Because I've fallen nut of
love

My Pencil
I know not where thou art,
I only know
That thou wert on my desk,
Beautiful and contented
A moment back,
And as I turned my head
To view the clock,
Some heartless wretch,
Went West with thee.
I know not who he was
Nor shall I ask.
Perchance,
It may have been
The guy I stole it from.
*
Even one of these breezy,
emancipated, modern women
finds it hard to affect philos-
ophic calm when her man
smiles sweetly at another wo-
man, however tolerant she
may appear to be tf what
for want of a better term we
may call the literature of in-
fidelity. The Lord made wo-
men that way, and philoso-
phy cannot change them. Dit-
to men.
Many college girls are said
to be joining the chorus, but
you'd think a girl with a col-
lege education wouldn't be
satisfied with a bare living.
S *
"I am not against marriage
only up against it," was the
remark of some one whose
identity has long since been
lost to us
S
"Why do you want stock-
ings for that hot mama actY"
"Did you ever go to a fire
and see pumps without
hose ?"
*
Millie is as big as a ferry
boat and has just as nard a
time getting into a slip.
*
I thought I had broken my
nose7-but it's still running.
a a
"Iceland," said the teacher,
"is about as large as Siam."
"Iceland," wrote Willie, af-
terward, "is about as large as
teacher."

"You'll find rent in your
pants," saia the tenant as he
sicked Fido on the landlord.
S


"Why
guesser,
trapped
er?"


are a bum charade
a seasick man and a
crook like each oth-


"I give up."
"Yeh, they all do, too."
S
When founa robbing the
cash box -i the flis store, be
nonchalk4-m ke a herring.
*


0 I heard your party
all wt.


Kay: Yeah, the music got
so hot that it started the auto-
matic sprinkler system

Mary: You had to press
him for cash again, yet you
love him?
Jane: Yes, he's my repress-
ed desire.

They call this little girl
Temperance-she can't keep
liquor down.
Some kiss hot,
Some kiss cold,
Some don't kiss
Until they're told.
Some kiss fast,
Some kiss slow;
Those that don't kiss
I don't know.

The Last Dance
My adoration of you cannot
die,
And yet-forgive me if I
chance to yawn-
I'd hate to dance with you
from now till dawn
Though till the end of time
my love endures,
At three o'clock, my own be-
loved, I
Prefer the arms of Morpheus
to yours.
$ $
Parade: Does this wind
bother you?
Rest: No, talk as much as
you please.
*
In this period of domestic
scarcity, the oid axiom, "No
man can serve two masters,"
may be changed to read, "No
man can master two ser-
vants."

She: Naw. I've got scruples.
He: That's all right, I've
had them twice.

"What are you doing to
my daughter, young man?"
"I'm hugging her, sir."
"What do you mean by tak-
ing such liberties?"
"Oh, ahemi! I'm a report-
er."
"What's that got to with
it ?"
"Well, you see, I have a
press pass."
Sheiky Al: I have an at-
tachment for your daughter
sir.
Father: Young man, when
my daughter needs access-
ories, I'll buy them for her
myself !

A woman may be outspok-
en, but not by a man.
S
"Have you read my new
play?"
"Yes, but there's only two
sheets to it."
'"That's all it needs-it's a
bedroom farce."

The jackass, he are a lovely

He hair are long and thick.
He aw mostlypars and ead,
But a lot of he are kick.'
*. S .. .
'


3" a


The boy was burning, not the
deck.
*
"I have faith in this watch"
said the Bishop of New York,
although he had just missed
a train on account of its in-
accuracy.
"Yes," answered the Bishop
of Chicago, "but what is faith
without good works?"
*
Solid Comfort
Fire a-burning brightly
throwing shadows on the
wall
House cat curled up on the
rug-contented furry ball.
Shaded lamplight falling on
my Pickwick as I read.
My faithful pipe a-drawing
good, say what more do I
need?
Outside the cold winds
whistle, but inside it's
warm and bright.
And there is naught to call
me to go out into the night.
I wouldn't swap this comfort
for the palace of a king,
For kinging is uncertain-
doesn't always joy bring.
The bright flames leap so
cheerful and within them I
can see
The laughing eyes of sweet-
heart's looking right
straight out at me.
The eyes of different maidens
whom I've loved at differ-
ent times.
Who're always, popping up
again, the subject of my *
rymes.
But Fate, it is a curious thing
-it makes hearts loop the .4
loop.
And leap the track to mar-
raige and then never give
a whoop.
But on a winter's eveqing---,
when the fire is burning
good
And an old man sits a-dream-
ing (as an old man, aWays&,'*
would)"
He's mighty apt to think
about the dear days gone
and dead ..
And sigh for old forgotfon
loves before his hopes had I
fled. .
But what's the use to worry
sitting in a comfy nook
When he's got his fire, his
chair, his pipe and his old
Pickwick oook.

Contrast
Snow-and a world of still-
ness.
Hills-and a few bare trees.,,
With gaunt, black arms
Outflung againstt a cold gray
sky.
A flap of wings-a hoarse
cawing cry.
These are the winter charms.
A bit of green-brave, and
bold
Peeping up through the snow.
Cold--and whiteness, every-
where.
This is the North, and winter
you know
Roses-that fragrant petals
unfold.
Tall old oaks-with long
beards of moss.


Sunset-soft rose, and flam-
ing gold.
A sea-with waves that roll
and bses.
A v grant breeze-caressing
yopr cheek.
.f aKU~i~ht siand whis-


w Wn he, Iokedifb i 4 i.

IP~I~ES~S~7UVUY


aid 906-


1' -z"


7"t.


5


-tf


I`'~.. -~~rrt-~~~. ;~-








- 7 & V ii i 4 i i iilI- -4-.I,-- 1I4 1


SOCIETY


We would appreciate your
forwarding all society and
organization items to the
Jewish Floridian, 302 S. W.
4th Ave., or phone 2-8745
not later than noon Wed-
nesday.
The annual installation ol
officers for the Sholem lodge
of Bnai Brith, will be held at
Kaplan Hall, in Temple Israel
next Sunday evening, January
19th, at 8 p. m. o'clock, when
officers of the Grand lodge
District no. 5, will be on hand
to conduct the installation
ceremonies. A program num-
bering some of the finest tal-
ent has been arranged for by
the committee on arrange-
ments. Refreshments will be
served. Members and their
families are invited to oe pre-
sent.
Mr. and Mrs. Max Halpern
tendered a surprise party to
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Marcus,
last Sunday night, at their
home in honor of the tenth
wedding anniversary of the
SMarcus'. Bridge was played
and refreshments were ser-
ved at a late hour. Among
Those present were Mr. and
Mrs. M. Shonfield, Mr. and
Mrs. Adolph Haimes and
daughter Shirley, Mr. and
Mrs. Wm. hack, Miss Han-
ck, Mr. and Mrs. Ed
mother, Mr. and
prison and sister of
1rk City, and Mrs.
and daughter Sylvia
of New York City.

The Council of Jewish Wo-
men will hold a meeting of its
Executive board, next Wed-
nesday, at 1 p. m., at Kaplan
Hall, where very important
business will be transacted.
Next Tuesday evening will
be the scene of the annual
Ball of the Council of Jewish
Women at the Woman's Club
on N E. 17th Terrace and
from the information receiv-
ed from the arrangements
committee, this affair will be
one of the most enjoyable of
the winter season. Five acts
of vaudeville will entertain
the guests and "Farr's Or-
chestra" wiil furnish the mus-
ic for the dancing. Members
of the Junior Council of Jew-
ish Women will serve the re-
freshments and otherwise as-
sist in providing the enter-
tainment for the guests.
*
The Frolics was the scene
of the big affair of the sea-
son for Temple Israel, last
Sunday night when more than
eight hundred residents and
tourists attended. In addition
to the entertainment provid-
ed by the management of the
Frolics, an impromptu sketch
was staged by Dave Roth at
the piano which elicited tre-
mendous applause from the
guests attending. Quite a sub-


stantial sum was realized fo
the Organ Fund of the Ter
pie.
*
On next Monday, Templ
Israel Sisterhood will be th(
hosts at a bridge luncheon a
the Granada Tea Gardens, a
1 p. m. when a rather elab
Sorate affair will be given
Mrs. Bert Riesner is chairman
and she is being assisted by
Mrs. H. I. WolkowsKy, Mrs
J. L. Davis, Mrs. David L
Slann, Mrs. Adolph Werth-
eimer and Mrs. Al. Jacoby. In
the event of inclement weath-
er the affair will be held in
the hotel
*4
The local chapter of hadas-
sah will sponsor a benefit
bridge at the home of its
President Mrs. M. D. Kirsch,
327 Washington Ave., Miami
Beach, on Sunday night, Jan-
uary 19th, at 8 p. m. The pub-
lic is cordially invited to at-
tend.
The big affair of the win-
ter season for Hadassah will
be the Tropical Ball to be held
on January 29th, at the Gra-
nada Hotel when a large and
representative attendance of
Miamians and tourists are ex-
pected to attend. The pro-
ceeds will oe used to further
the splendid work being done
daily by Hadassah in Pales-
tine.
*
Congratulations are being
received by Mr. and Mrs. Al-
bert Seiden upon the birth of
a baby girl last Sunday at the
Victoria Hospital. Mother and
baby are doing splendidly.
** *
Mr. and Mrs. Wolf Cohen
have moved to the Vedado
Apartments this past week
from their former home on
Southwest Third street.
Mr. Max Kupferstein who
was ill at home last week and
confined to his bed is now
convalescing from his illness
which for a time threatened
to become very serious.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Louis
Shochet have moved their
home to 652 Southwest First
street where they will be at
home to their friends.

Quite a number of the pro-
minent citizens of Miami
were the guests of the Capi-
tol Theatre, last Monday night
beginning at 11:30 p. m. when
a preview of "Sunny Side Up"
was shown featuring Janet
Gaynor and Charlie Farrell.
Though the Capitol has been
the scene of a number of
splendid pictures recently,
yet this new picture undoubt-
edly is one that must rank
high in comparison with any
and all. The opening showing
the tenement section of New
York on the Fourtli of July,
with a number of amusing
sidelights, serve to introduce


r
l-

e
e
t
t

i


I


Miss Gaynor and then give
you an inkling of the story.
The contrast shortly after-
wards presented when one is
transposed to Southampton,
the scene of the "four hun-
dred" on the same night,
serves but to enhance the val-
ue of the picture. The scenic
effects, the number of dances,
the splendid singing, the
chorus ensembles, and espec-
ially the two songs, "Dream-
ing," and "Sanny Side Up,
the theme song, cannot help
but create the desire to see
the picture over and over


again.
Watching the audience one
could hear the gales of laugh-
ter and the next minute see
the tears coursing down one's
cheeks. In the picture besides
Janet Gaynor and Charles
Farrell who play major roles
in "Sunny Side Up" appear a
cast that include: Sharon
Lynn, Majorie White, Frank
Richardson and Eli Brendel,
as well as a chorus of 100.
David Butler, who wrote and
directed the story for "Fox
Movietone Follies," directed
this production. Seymour Fel-


ix, noted dance director, stag-
ed the ensembVes and song
numbers.
Continued on Page 5


THE

FAIRWAY

DAIRY
SOLICITS YOUR
PATRONAGE

Phone Miami
7105
FOR PROMPT
SERVICE


Cotton Mather

Keeper of the Puritan Conscience Sayeth
-- You Can Buy Good and Bad Furniture


- WITH IMPUNITY

YOU ARE INSURED AGAINST LOSS.
- ASK FOR OUR GUARANTEE


STICK

AND


WOVEN

*
Fiber and Reed _

S Furniture New and Asis

IN THE LATEST DESIGNS AND COVERINGS

WE ARE DISPLAYING WHICH WE BELIEVE TO BE THE LARG-
SEST SELECTION OF FIBRE FURNITURE IN MIAMI. OVER (50)
COMPLETE SUITES ON OUR FLOOR.

3-PIECE SUITES FROM


= $22.50 to $300

SPER WEEK PER WEEK PER WEEK
I PAYS FOR PAYS FOR PAYS FOR
S$80 WORTH $166 WORTH $400 WORTH


Good Look for the Big Signs at N

and Miami father a

a Bad Asis
Bad NORTH MIAMI AT FOURTH ST.


CHARITY:
A JOY TO THE
_ GIVER


- Annu


ial Charity Ball CTALKOT
FEBRUARY 18, 1930 GIVE!
- r.,:= IDC> 17


OUR ADVERTISERS SAVE YOU MONEY A


JD GIVE YOU SERVICE!


l i


. .


---------------------- -


- -


I ...........


~L~-~-rrr ~F Z ~ ~ T ~rr~X~


Sp


friday, January 17, 1980


PaPe 4


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


-- -- -
.....


I









Frdy Jna 1 93T E H R Parel


SOCIETY

(Continued from Page 4)

Mrs. Sadie Bandler and
Miss Cecil Bandler of New
York City arrived in Miami
Tuesday aboard the SS. Iro-
quois of the Clyde Line to
spend part of the winter sea-
son with their son and broth-
er, rescectively, M. S. Band-
ler, at the'latter's home, 2517
Andres avenue, Miami. Mrs.
Bandler visited Miami two
seasons ago, spending most of
the winter season with her
son, who is manager of June
Dairy Products Company, the
Miami Branch, and an official
of the parent company. Miss
Bandler is secretary to the
president of the June Dairy
Products Company, in the
main office, New York City.
This is her iirst visit to Mi-
ami.
Miss Bandler is a graduate
of Hunter College, New York
City, and is a member of the
Lambda )amma Phi sorority
of that institution.
.. *
Dr. S. J. Meyer and Dr. H.
F. Binswanger of the Beach
,. View club, Chicago, and Mor-
ton A. Livingston of the Chi-
cago Beach hotel, have arriv-
ed in Miami Beach for the
winter and are at the Flori-
dian hotel.
*
It was announced that 20
new members had been add-
ed to the Mana- Zucca Music
club Monday afternoon at the
meeting held at Mazica hall.
The program was presented
by the members of the Phi
Alpha chlater of Mu g.i Ep-
silon honorary musical soror-
ity before an audience of 175
members and friends.
Appearing on the program
were Myrtle Ashworth, Con-
stance Dooly, Catherine
Christie, Hannah Spiro Ash-
er, Pearl Van Orsdel, Kather-
ine Michelson, Celeste Moon
and Walter Grossman.
The first concert of a ser-
ies was announced for Feb. 11
at the Miami OCvic theater.

Mrs. Israel Schwartz and
Mrs. Sam Schwartz of Char-
lotte, N. C., the mother and
sister in law of Mr., Meyer
Schwartz are here visiting
the MVeyer Schwartz's and will
probably remain here during
the winter.
S *
Mrs. George Oliphant of
New York City is visiting
her daughter and son-in-law
Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Schwartz
j and will spend the winter
, season with them.
*


Mr. Nathan Adelman is out
of the City on a short business
trip to the North. He is ex-
pected to return the latter
part of the week.
*I* *
Mr. M. H. Rosenhouse
prominent attorney of Miami
and president of Beth David
Synagogue is on a brief busi-
ness trip to Philadelphia and
is expected to return to Mi-
ami the latter part of next
week.

Mr. S. Rothblatt. promi-
nent communal worker of
New York City arrived here
last week to spend the winter
season in Miami.
*
Engagement of Miss Mar-
tha Jean Weintraub to David
Goldstein of Paterson, N. J.,
will be announce Sunday af-
ternoon at an "at home" given
by Mr. and Mrs. Maurice
Weintraub, parents of .he
bride-elect, at 401 N. E. 26th
terrace.
Miss Weintraub attended
the Mary Immaculate convent
in Key West and was grad-
uated from the Miami High
school. She later received her
degree from the Barnard col-
lege at New York. Mr. Gold-
stein was graduated from the
New York university and is
associated with Burnham
Asch association of account-
ancy.

The Temple Israel Sister-
hood, Miami, will have its
seventh birthday luncheon jn
the Floridian hotel, February
3, Mrs. I. L. Seligman, presi-
dent of, tne sisterhood made
arrangements with Arthur
Childers, managing director
of the Iloriaoan, for the en-
tertainment o0 more tnan 300.
The luncheon is given tor the
organ fund of the congrega-
tion.
*
L. C. Rose and R. L. Char-
ney of Chicago, Abe Haber
and Benjamin Silverman are
stopping at the Miami Bilt-
more during their sojourn in
Miami.

S. M. Dock has returned
from a trip to Chicago.
*
Junior Council of Jewish
Women will have a benefit
bridge at 8 p. m. Sunday at
the home of Mrs. Laurette Si-
mons, 1560 S. W. First. Pub-
lic invited.
a *
Herbert Marks has return-
ed from New York where he
went on a business trip.

Mr. Morris Freilicoff of
Washington, D. C., traveling
representative of "The Day"
one of the foremost Yiddish
newspapers oI the Country is


on a short business trip to
Miami as part of his tour of
the Southern States at this
season of the year. Mr. Freil-
i coff is a well known writer
both in the Yiddish and Eng-
lish languages, having con-
tributed to the Vanguard and
other well known magazines.
He is a prominent worker in
the Poalei Zion movement in
Washington where he has re-
sided for a long number of
years. He is a brother of Rab-
bi S. B. Freehoff of Chicago
one of the leaders in tne Re-
form Jewish Movement of to-
day.

Mrs. Weilin of Baltimore,
Md., is visiting her relatives
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Rose of
this City and will remain here
for the balance of the winter
season. This is her second
season in Miami.
*
Mr. S. Silverstein of Hart-
ford, Conn., is visiting Miami
for the winter season.
,,. .*
Mr. A. Kantor, of Chicago,
Ill., accompanied by Mrs.
Kantor arrived here the lat-
ter part of last week to spend
the winter season here.
*
Next Sunday morning, Jan-
uary 19th, at 11 A. M. will
see the beginning of a series
of athletic contests sponsored
by the Yeddidum Clum and
limited to members of the or-
ganization. The event will be
held at the athletic tield of
the Lemon City High School
and will consist of standing
broad jump, fifty yard dash,
shot put, broad jump and
eight-eighty yard run. Lewis
Stein in charge of the athletic
events for tne Club announces
that the officials who are
non-members have been cho-
ser as follows: Al Grossman,
welbknown basket ball player,
Charles Cromer and C. Winer,
all well known in Jewish ath-
letic circles. The prizes offer-
ed are white sweater, white
sweat shirt and one month's
dues to the Club. The public
is cordially invited to attend
and no charges of any kind
will be made.
*
Mrs. Henry Rudich is ser-
iously ill at the Jackson Mem-
orial Hospital for the past
week or so. Coming back from
New York.City where she at-
tended the funeral of her hus-
ban(d she contracted pneu-
moria and has been ill since
jhen.

Miss Minnie Blanck enter-
tained a number of friends at
bridge last Thursday night at
her home in Shenandoah. Re-
freshments were served at a
late hour. Among those pre-
(Continued on Page Six)


BUSINESS DIRECTORY
Eir i


AUTO PARTS
MIAMI AUTO WRECKING CO.,
-Incorporated-
Has Parts For Your Car
606-608 North West Fifth Street
Phone 5050 (fifty-fifty)
BLOOM AUTO REPAIR
& PARTS CO.
N. W. 17th Ave. at 23rd St.
Phone 23631
The Largest car wreckers in
Florida
L. (Pop) GERSON
Buyer of All Kinds of Scrap Metal
We Sell Auto Parts
2141 N. W. SECOND AVE.
Phone 20621

BAKERIES
GOLDSTROM BAKING CO., Inc.
1349 Washington Ave.
Phone 2836 Miami Beach
The finest in Bread and Cakes
Obtainable at the
Rosedale Delicatessen, Nwe York
Delicatessen and Empire
Delicatessen

BAGS and METALS
AMERICAN BAG & METAL CO.
Phone 21147
610 North West Fifth Street
EAST COAST BAG & METAL CO.
(Inc.)
I. L. MINTZER
MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS
435-445 N. W. 8th Street
Phone 4485
PEPPER METAL CORP.
Scrap Metal and Machinery
N. W. Cor. 5th Ave. and 14th St.
Phone 22546

BUILDING SUPPLIES
J. SIMPSON
Building Materials,
Roofing Paper, Asphalt
423 N. W. N. River Drive
Phone 7251

DELICATESSEN
ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN
170 N. W. 5th St.
We Supply Your Every Want

FISH & SEA FOODS
STANDARD FISH CO.
629 W. Flagler St.
Phone 2-8362
EAST COAST FISH CO.
"The Best in Fish and Sea Food"
Curb Market S. W. 2nd Ave.
Phone 22736

FOUNTAINS
Cold Drinks
Candies and Lunches
HOME GROCERY
Corner 1st St. N. W. and 3rd Ave.


FURNITURE
FURNITURE EXCHANGE,
INC.
321 N. Miami Ave.
We Buy and Sell Furniture

INSURANCE
Life Fire Casualty Bonds
RAUZIN INSURANCE
AGENCY, Inc.
Phones 22565 32452
137 N. E. First St.
Miami, Fla.

JOSEPH M. LIPNITZ
"Service That Makes Friends
and Keep Them"
Insurance Underwriter
Lawyer's Bldg. Phone 2-0317 2-1522
LEON ELKIN
Is now Local Representative of the
Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.
and is ready to serve his friends.
Residence
1620 N. W. 30th STREET
Phone 26085

LAUNDRIES
NATIONAL LAUNDRIES, INC.
"Trustworthy Service"
1048 N. W. 5th Ave.
Phone 8131

PHARMACISTS
BRYAN PARK PHARMACY
Chas. Tannenbaum,
Pharmacist
(reg. pharmacist for 17 years)
Cor 22nd Ave. and 8th St. S. W.
CRYSTAL PHARMACY
Dr. A. D. Halpern, Ph. G. Ph. D.
Prescriptions Our Specialty
128 N. Miami Ave. Phone 29713

PIPE and STEEL
ADELMAN PIPE & STEEL CO.
68 N. E. 25th St.
Aat F. E. C. R. R. Phone 21420

A. & B. PIPE AND METAL CO.
Phone 81355
53 North East 25th Street

PRINTERS
MIAMI PRINTING CO.
"Printing That Pays"
Phone 28261
107 South Miami Avenue

TIRES

MOHAWK TIRES
JOHNSON TIRE COMPANY
1361 N. E. 1st Ave. .
Phones: 4114-4115


mnlulmlfllllllumIllN umflmullu NuUUtlmm lllln IIIIIIIIIinuu.
Dr. Albert E. Rosenthal
DENTIST BEDDING UPHOLSTERING
302 Professional Building 'i
S N. E. 2nd Ave. DRAPES
llliL IGH T DRAPven S


SNEW YORK CO.SANITARY
I BAKING cO.I tttilt latil, -
The Home of MATTRESS WO]
Bake-Rite Pastries M REWO
and the Finest of INC.
ROLLS AND BREADS
The. Only Bedding Sterilizer in Miami
471 S. W. 8th ST.
310 N. MIAMI AVE. 4701 S. W. 8th STREET
TPhone 241773-

THINKING JEWS ALL SUBSCRIBE TO THE EWISH FLORIDIAN! DO YOU?


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Friday, January 17, 1930


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


Page 5


[_ ,-i.









THE JEWISR FLORIDIAN


Friday, January 17, 1930


SOCIETY

(Continued from Page 5)
sent were: Sadie Silverstein,
Hannah Mack, Lillie Jackson,
Mary Bandell, Sylvia Phillips,
Rose Schwartz, Belle Wesson
and Harriet Korn.

The Junior Hadassah will
hold a regular meeting next
Monday evening at 8 p. m.
o'clock at the Granada hotel
and apartments. Immediately
after the business meeting
those present will listen to a
splendid program of enter-
tainment which has been ar-
ranged for the entertainment
of the members and visitors.

A human drama, of unusual
power, is the attraction pro-
mised at the Capitol Theatre,
beginning with the Saturday
midnite showing.
It'is "Seven Faces" an all
talking Movietone masterpiece
featuring Paul Muni, late of
the Jewish Theatre of New
York City. Muni hailed as
America's greatest character
actor, essays seven roles in
this picture, and is said to
establish himself among the
leading stars of all time. At
times Muni takes the speak-
ing parts of Napoleon, Dia-
blero, Joe Gans, Willie Smith,
Franz Schubert, Don Juan
and Papa Cnibou.
Many New Yorkers will re-
member Paul Muni under his
old nan~ of Muni Weisen-
freundt

The Lure of
Tradation

Every one loves fine old
things that have the atmos-
phere of tradition clinging to
them old furniture old
china and silver and pewter
--old crinolines and lace-old
books-old homes-old cities
-historic trees and buildings
-old art-old friends, whose
"friendships tried," have
been fastened to one "with
hoops of steel."
All these properties of the
Past the world loves and so-
licits.
Travellers seek the historic


places first in their travels,
and return to them again and
again, ever finding new in-
spiration and interest in them
The rich man makes old
buildings and furnishings his
hobby, counting his millions
well spent in the possession of
them.
i e average family counts
among -its treasured heir-
looms a piece or two of old
china, or points with pride to
an ancient table or chair that
belonged to a distant ances-
tor.
All these material tradi-
tions, as well as old friends,
everyone, even the most mod-
ern of the modernites, loves
and approves unreservedly.
But applied to old morals-
the fine, strong, old code of
their fathers -tradition has
lost its lure, for all the mod-
ern age; not only lost its lure,
but accumulated an over-
growth of ridicule and criti-
cism and general disapproval
as it has rolled forward
through the years.
Is it the fault of the code.


or of the modernite, that tra-
dition fails in the spiritual
appeal ?
Since other things from the
past are approved by the gen-
eration of today, maybe they.
-the new generation-are
short-sighted, or unfair in
their judgement of the mor-
als of long ago.
Or, perhaps since the mod-
ernite stamps other fashions
of the past with his approval,
the fault may lie with the
morals.
The argument is as never-
ending as the discussion of
religion or politics.
(Continued from Page 2)
succeeded in working up
enough mental energy to mas-
ter another since. It's awful.
He'll start out with an Irish
joke and end up with a sob
poem. Then he'll sit down -and
load up his pockets with our
good cigars.
"Well, it can't be helped, I
guess. Gentlemen, this is a
dishonor that comes to me
seldom. I count myself unfor-


B i
To My Friends and Co-workers:
I take this means of expressing my sincere and heartfelt
thanks to all my co-workers in the cause of Taknud Torah,
Particularly to those earnest workers through vwhose'unsel-
fish devotion the Ball and Bazaar held on January 14th last,
was a splendid success; as well as to those who. advertised
Sin the program and those who attended and patronized the
affair so splendidly.
(MRS.) IDA BUCKSTEIN
j President Ladies Auxiliary
Beth David Talmud Torah
"-dIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIf IIIII I II ll lllllln llltlllllllllulllliill lln
,*Hn. l Hiiiniiiiiitiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii nilnu iii H1i Hiimuin iiHf l l l lnniiui iiiniiiiiunii Hiiiiiiii iniit


LOPEZ & TROJO
HAWAIIAN ENTERTAINERS
RADIO, CLUBS AND PRIVATE PARTIES
Phone 2-9243


i, Florida


alll1 p II~lII I II H II I II I


tunate to have to inflict this
blight on your banquet. I can
think of no one I would rather
not introduce to you at this
time than my old and untrue
dead-beat acquaintance. Gen-
tlemen, Mr. J. Mortimer
Fleep!"


OUR ADVERTISERS SAVE YOU MONEY AND GIVE YOU SERVICE!


/


Page Six


E. S. Johnson Coal Co.
COAL, COKE AND
CHARCOAL
We Deliver
I ---Y--
CITY DOCKS
25707


I =
SWhen Thinking of FURNITURE--
SBE IT AT A MODERATE PRICE OR EXPENSIVE I
PIECE FOR THE PALATIAL HOME
,Make It Your Business to Consult
I i

I.C. HELMLY

'FURNITURE COINC.
E Complete House Furnishers

1400- 1416 N. MIAMI AVENUE AT 14th STREET
I TERMS PHONE 3-3501 TERMS I
I |


THE NEW
SENSATION

PAUL

MUNI
of the Jewish Theatre,
New York City
Taking Seven Different
'Parts in the All Talking
Masterpiece

"SEVEN

FACES"
Also .
CLARK & McCULLOUGH
All Talking Comedy,
"HIRED & FIRED"
Begins Sat. Mid-Nite
Show and thru Wed.







N. MIAMI AVE AT THIRD
First Run Fox Pictures
Phone 21111


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I Ua I TV II -& Ir J6~- IA I .


9


Miam


5 1 N. E. Fourth Street


4 TIN


Ilse




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