The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
November 29, 1929
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00041

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text









klcisti Flend/L.ii


,VOL. II.-NO. XXXXXVIIII. MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 29, 1929


Price 5 Cents


To My Way of
Thinking
by
Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld

Are you interested in the
many sided manifestations of
human nature? Kindly read
the following items and draw
your own conclusions.
Number One:--George En-
derly of the small town Tway-
ford, England is a very happy
old man. At last he has suc-
ceeded in setting a tombstone
over the grave of his beloved
mother. Enderly was only sev-
en years old when his mother
died. There and then the sev-
en-year-old child vowed that
he would save pennies until
he could afford to buy a beau-
tiful tombstone and place it
upon his mother's grave.

Having neither father nor
mother, and dependent upon
the charity of kind hearted
neighbors, the child could
save very little. The years
passed relentlsesly by. George
was already a mature young
man. But life was harsh to
him. Stint as he did he could
not manage to scrape togeth-
er sufficient money to pay the
cost of a tombstone. Yet, he
was unwavering in his ideal.
That alone remained his goal
and purpose in life. In order
to attain this goal he denied
himself the barest necessities
of life and suffered untold
want. But as his hair turned
snow-white and his steps be-
came less and less firm, an
alarming fear beset his heart.
What if he should die and not
realize the one and only am-
bitiondf his life? ..... -------

Frenzied and despairing he
began to live in even greater
want and save those precious
coins. Then came the long
awaited and visualized mom-
ent of his life. At last he had
enough money to buy that
tombstone. And a few days
ago, in "te little cemetery of
Twayford, there took place
one of the most beautiful
events in the annals of civil-
ization a son dedicated a
life's savings to the cherish-
ed memory of his mother.
What pure, untainted, unso-
phisticated love. What nobil-
ity of sentiment and emotion
prompted this unusual sacri-
fice.

Ther beneath the lowering
skies of England stood the
most devoted son. There, un-
mindful of the rare beauty
of his deed, stood the happiest
man in all creation. Back bent
hair white and rapidly falling,
limbs weak and fatigued,
Painfully poor in the acquire-
ment of that which men call
riches, and which is reputed
to bring happiness and con-
tentment in its wake, and to
be a sure-fire panacea for all
earthly ills and ailments--de-


spite all this, there he stood,
head alert, eyes lighted up,
Il a trance, conscious only
that there had settled in his
heart an indescribable happi-
s and peace, such as is
(Continued from Page 2)


Beth David Of-
ficers Installed
at Banquet Here

The Get-to-Gether and In-
stallation Banquet of Beth
David Synagogue held at the
Biscayne Inn, last Monday
night was one that will long
be remembered by those pre-
sent for the feeling of good
will and friendliness that was
shown by all. Mr. Max Kup-
ferstein who was in charge of
arrangements deserved and re-
ceived a great deal of appro-
bation for the splendid even-
ing of enjoyment.
Mr. J. Louis Shochet the re-
tiring president presided and
called upon the various speak-
ers. Among those who spoke
briefly were the recently
elected members of the Board
of Trustees, Mr. Tobin, Mr.
Harry Markowitz, Mr. A. Pep-
per and Mr. P. M. Rosengar-
ten; the new Treasurer Mr.
Louis Weinkle, the new 2nd
Vice President Mr. Abe Aron-
ovitz, the Secretaries, Mr.
Simpson and Mr. Kupferstein,
Mr. Herbert Scherr, Mr. Man-
uel Rippa, Mr. Nathan Adel-
man and Mr. Samuel J. Spec-
tor. Especially noteworthy
were the addresses of Mr.
John Wolfe, Mr. Jos. M. Fine,
the incoming president, Mr.
M. H. Rosenhouse, Mr. Jake
Brown and Mrs. I. Buckstein
president of the Ladies Aux-
iliary of Beth David Talmud
Torah.
A splendid cordial set con-
sisting of decanter, goblets,
and tray all in beautiful silver
were presented on behalf of
the Congregation to Mr. Jake
Brown who had served the
Congregation as Secretary for
nine years. Mr. John Wolf
made the presentation ad-
dress and the recipient re-
sponded.
Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld
made the principal address of
the evening and encouraged
the new administration to re-
newed efforts towards the
successful culmination of the
work inaugurated by the out-
going officers.
Mrs. Julius Simpson read-
ing a poem composed by her
for the occasion presented the
outgoing President Mr. J.
Louis Shochet with a large sil-
ver platter as a token of good
wishes.
The formal installation by
the outgoing president and a
speech of congratulations and
promise of support to the new
administration closed the ban-
quet.

Father Sues For
Conversion of Child

Cairo, Nov. 23-Eli Mogh-
nage, the father of one of the
six children converted by a
Christian mission here with-
U,,U th. knowledge of their"


parents, has brought an action
for persuasion of a minor and
asks for damages to his honor.
The Jewish community is
looking forward to the suit
with interest, and on the re-
sult of the trial will depend
whether or not other parents
will follow Moghnage's action.
Iu^


Services Are Held
at Congregations

Services this Friday even-
ing at Congregation Beth Da-
vid will celebrate Junior Coun-
cil of Jewish Women night. In
addition to the sermon which
will be preached by Rabbi Is-
rael H. Weisfeld on "The One-
Sided Partnership," Mrs. Do-
rothy Mitchell will deliver an
address on behalf of the Jun-
ior Council. The services will
be chanted by Cantor Nathan
Wroobel who will also lead the
Congregational singing.
Sunday School will begin
promptly at 9:55 a. m. and
Bible class at 10:30 a. m.
At Temple Israel, Thanks-
giving was observed by spec-
ial services at 11 a. m. when
Rabbi Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan
delivered a sermon on "Be-
tween the turkey and the foot-
ball."
Friday night Rabbi Kaplan
will preach on "The relation
of Liberal Judaism to other
Religions." The usual services
and singing by the choir will
conclude the services.

Straving Students
Decline Jewish
Preferred Aid

Budapest.-Starving Chris-
tian students would rather
die than eat Jewish bread, de-
clared an anti-Semitic student
leader yesterday in prohibit-
ing Christian students from
accepting aid from the There-
seinstaedte Geselligkeitskulb,
a benevolent society for stu-
dents, and he also asked them
to refrain from taking free
meals given by the society on
the ground that most of its
members were Jewish.
After he had pronounced
this ban the Christian stu-
dents actually stopped taking
free meals at the society al-
though there had been 200
Christian students registered
there for meals. The Hungar-
ian press comments on the in-
cident as being characteristic
of the present anti?Semitic
situation in the country.

Newly Wed Ameri-
cans are Stranded

Warsaw. Many Ameri-
can citizens who have come
to Poland to marry now find
themselves in an awkward sit-
uation because they are un-
able to return to the United
States with their newly mar-
ried wives and husbands re-
spectively. This is due to the
refusal of the Polish Govern-
ment to issue marriage certi-
ficates to Americans newly
wed in Poland for fear that
they have left a family be-
hind in America or that they
have gone through a marriage
ceremony in order to be able


to smuggle Poles into Amer-
ica outside of the quota laws.
A warning has been issued
that all Americans coming to
Poland to get married should
bring a certificate showing
that they are unmarried.


Beth David Bazaar Zionists to Stage
is Announced for Meeting Sunday
January 14, 190 Because of the growing im-


Elaborate preparations are
being made for the annual
Ball and Bazaar of Beth Dav-
id Congregation which will be
held at the Cinderella Ball
room on January 14th, 1930.
Mrs. T. Arnold is chairman of
the Bazaar and Ball Commit-
tee and is assisted by Mrs. S.
Abenson who is the assistant
chairlady. Mrs. Jack Finkle-
stein is chairman of the pro-
gram committee and members
of her committee thus far an-
nounced are Mesdames Alex
Goldstein, Cecil Tannenbaum,
S. Futterfass, J. Neham, G.
Kotkin, and I. Tannenbaum.
Additional members of the
committee will be named
within the next few days and
will be announced in the col-
umns of the Jewish Floridian
next week. A number of gifts
from very prominent notables
throughout the country have
been received and will be sold
at the Bazaar. Great interest
is being shown by the mem-
bership of the Ladies Auxil-
iary under whose auspices the
affair is being arranged. A
large number of novel booths
for the sale of articles will be
erected and scenes depicting
Jewish life will be shown in
the decorations and arrange-
ments of the Hall and booth.
The chairman of the various
booths will be announced
soon.

Prominent Realtor
and Builder Dies

On last Thursday Mr. Nath-
an Stone, prominent realtor
of Brooklyn and Miami Beach
died as a result of a lingering
illness. The funeral took place
Friday afternoon and eulogies
were delivered in the Synago-
gue of Beth Jacob Congrega-
tion, Miami Beach where the
coffin was carried into, and
at the grave in Woodlawn
Cemetery on the burial
grounds of the Chesed Shel
Emes of Miami, by Mr. Harry
I. Lipnitz, Mr. B. Silverman
and others.
Mr. Stone was the builder
of the Blackstone Hotel Miami
Beach, now about to be com-
pleted. The Estate is left to
members of his family, under
the will filed in probate court.
Value of the assets is not giv-
en, but reference is made to
a number of properties.
After bequeathing an in-
come of $90 quarterly to his
sister, Estehr Dodrik, of Gen-
eva, Switzerland, the remain-
der of the estate is to be held
in trust and the income paid
one-half to the widow, Augus-
ta, and one-sixth to each of
the children, Bertha, Israels,
Elsa Ilshen and Alfred Stone.
The estate is to be adminis-
tered by the widow and two
friends, Adolph Heineman of
Brooklyn and David Atlas of
Philedelphia, who are given
full power. Twenty years af-
ter the death of Mr. Stone the
principal of theestate is to be
sold and divided among the
relatives.


portance to the world at large
of "Zionism" it is expected
that the Educational Mass
meeting sponsored by the local
Zionist District to be held at
the Talmud Torah Auditorium
this coming Sunday, December
1st, at 8 p. m. o'clock will be
rather well attended. Especial
stress will be laid upon the
true conditions existing in
Palestine population and Jew-
ry of the world at large to-
wards the upbuilding of the
Jewish Homeland in view of
the recent massacres by the
Arabs.
Among those who are ex-
pected to address the audience
are Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan of
Temple Israel, Rabbi Israel H.
Weisfeld of Beth David, Dr.
A. D. Halpern and others.
The committee in charge
consist of Mr. Harry I. Lip-
nitz, President of the local
District, Dr. A. D. Halpern
and Mr. John Wolf.

Miami Beach Con-
gregation to Wel-
come Its Rabbi

Elaborate preparations are
now being made to welcome
Rabbi Samuel Yallow ofSyra-
cuse, N. Y. to Miami next
Tuesday evening when he will
arrive here to occupy the pul-
pit of Congregation Beth Ja-
cob of Miami Beach to which
he was called last week.
Rabbi Yallow will be met at
the railroad station by the
committee who will escort him
to his home in Miami Beach
where an informal reception
will be held to welcome him
and Mrs. Yallow who will ar-
rive with him. Plans for the
formal reception which will
be held early next week will
be announced in the next issue
of the Jewish Floridian. Rabbi
Yallow is expected to deliver
his first sermon Saturday,
December 7th at the morning
services.

Jews Named to
Human Relations
Board at Yale

New Haven, Among the
members of the advisory
board named by President
James Rowland Angell of Yale
University to form the Human
Welfare Group which has been
organized around the Insti-
tute of Human Relations are
Franz Boaz, professor of an-
thropology at Columbia Uni-
versity; Lee K. Frankel, vice-
president of the Metropolitan
Life Insurance Company; Da-
vid Lawrence, editor of the
"United States Daily;" Wal-
ter Lippman, editor of the
New York "World," Adolph
S. Ochs, publisher of the New
York "Times" and Edwin R.
A. Seligman, professor of
economics at Columbia Uni-
versity.


nnnnrrsnrr~m~








r.T' I TruWTQU TT.RTT)LAN


L g & -I .l I JInA J -* Iii ir I


I'riday, November 9 io


couchsafed to few mortals.
From the grave there floated
the image of his deceased
mother and it settled on the
head of the tombstone. There
it rested, and soon he saw his
mother smile as he had never
seen her smile before. A smile
of such sheer tenderness and
gratitude .... His cup of joy
ran over. Death would be
sweet now. He had nothing
more to live for. He was hap-
py. Happy Happy .

Number Two:-Also about
death, but oh, how different!
Richard Weber of Brockton,
Mass., was sentenced to a
prison term of from two and
a half to five years for for-
gery. Which might not seem
so unusual an occurrence wor-
thy of recording were it not
for the following background
to his forging of the check.
Weber had lived very hap-
pily with his wife. They anti-
cipated many more years of
happiness and companionship.
Suddenly his wife fell sick.
and. despite all medical en-
deavors, died. The husband
was heartbroken. However,
there was one matter upon
which he was definitely resol-
ved. His wife was to have a
beautiful funeral, as befits
one who has been so dutiful
and loving a mate. With a
tear-laden voice he discussed
all necessary arrangements
with the undertaker. The fun-
eral lived up to his expecta-
tions. He immediately gave
the undertaker a check for
his services. A few days later
the check was returned. The
s:enature was a forgery.

Superficially it might seem
that \eber. too. had done a
noble thing. Imagine obligat-
ing himself for two hundred
and fifty dollars so that his
w ife would be buried in prop-
er fashion. Loyal husband
that he was': concernedd onl,
that proper and due tribute
he paid to his beloved com-
panion. Upon closer observa-
tion. however. his act which
iirought down an ignominious
prison term upon his head. ap-
pears in its true colours. An
empty gesture. Pain for
ihe last rite, of his wife with
a worthless check: An unmit-
i ated p)rofanation of the mo-st
-acred and sublime.

I refrain from further com-
ment in upon the atbo\e.
)raw o\oulr ow\\n conclusions.
'iute \ our (rown m orals. Just
Onle more item and we con-
Eiude peerinHg thru the micro-
scope at this -eek's cross-set-
tion of human nature.

lIecently it became the vogue
for all political prisoners to
register their protest hv de-
cldaring a hunger strike. It re-
mained for Franz ILitzman of
Budapest. Hungary. to intro-
duce a novel element into this
accepted form of protest.
Litzman was convicted on
the charge of being a com-


munist. He immediately went
on a hungar strike. A few days
lated he, together, with the
other prisoners was taken
out into the prison courtyard

THINKING(


for an airing. Suddenly he
broke away from the other
prisoners and began to scale
an eighty-foot flagpole that
stood in the center of
the courtyard. All forms
of entreaty and threat to
bring him down failed. He
remained obdurate. The sun
set. The moon and stars ap-
peared. Soon the moon disap-
peared. The deafening rumble
of thunder presaging the ap-
proach of a storm. Blinding
flashes of lightning. A deluge
of torrents of water. Still
Litzman obstinately and de-
fiantly clung to the mast of
the flag-pole. Dawn broke.
The morning star heralded the
approach of a new bitter cold
day. Despairingly he held on.
Thirty hours passed. Franz's
stamina and will power crum-
bled. Blindly he groped his
way down.

Immediately he was rush-
ed to the hospital in a semi-
conscious state. All efforts to
revive him failed. While on
the flag pole he had contract-
ed pneumonia. A few hours
later he was dead. It had been
his last spectacular protest.

What motivated his novel
action? A misguided fool-
hardy hunger for publicity or
notoriety? A desire to be in
the limelight if only for a
fleeting second and even at
the cost of life? Or was it the
madness of a starved body
and a semi-demented mind'
Who knows? Who will ever
know?


The Children i
of the
i I
Gutter

(Continued from last Week)
"To kill"'? repeated Fred.
.-cra chin: his hew\hiskered
a\. lwh:ich sluddelly began to
it I i.
"Yes." said John. "With a
i(< hi> h,.ad. Hie will not even
gitet forth a sigh: Then y
viil emilty his pockets. He
1 :,-,. erha!,s. a h'indilred do(l!.
.ars, a thousand dollars. rI.
ossi .ly diamonds."
-'(red turned his back to
John, nuitterinn: to himself.
"I Vwi become ic-h."

To My Way of Thinking
By Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld


John, as if apologizing for his
daring attempt. "I will go
away from this stinking rub-
bish. I will go to Texas, back
to my home, to my home. I
will be a rich man. No one
will dare say that I am a good-
for-nothing. If I'll be asked
where I got so much money,
I will say I got -it by dealing
with diamonds."
"Suppose we only bind him
and just cover his mouth,"
said Fred, turning around to
face his pal. "I wouldn't want
to have another murder on
my conscience. Supposing we
are caught? Then the punish-
ment will not be so severe.
B-r-r-r I wouldn't want
to swing on the scaffold."
"You are a coward"! replied
John.
Then silence.
The stillness was interrupt-
ed by the sound of the creak-
ing wheels of "Old Ike's"
wagon approaching from be-
hind a heap of refuse. The
rag peddler halted, got off the
wagon and placed a bag with
feed over the horse's head.
"Old Ike" asked them if
they had picked many piles ot
rags and old iron. His eye,
gazed at the gathered heaps.
They did pick enough. Then
he looked at the two ragged
outcasts with pity, saying to
them. business-like:
"Perhaps it would be a good
idea if yoU would move into
mv I basement for the winter
months. Every morning I'd
Zrin- you here with my horse
,nd v agon and take you tbac

J11hn lookd a:t him 'looim-
ily. Thcln he urst into laugh-
t r. He said"
hat (i ou meanTl. Jew
!i. think \we alr also ram -
k Ike you
"() lIk was -ileit aund
.-II ri hei d.
S '.' We are not rag-
:ei ,- "" an-e -red t i John's

"We aiY i:ian nud seekers'"

- lon't l i-- The Hi Tinme at the
JUNIOR HADASSAH
MOVIE BALL
Entertainment. Retfreshinent,
and Fa\or,
SMiramar Hoitel. Iecemnher ,th


called out John proudly.
"And we will yet be rich,"
helped out Fred.
"Old Ike" looked at them
shaking his head in wonder-
ment.
"Old Ike" began to load the
piles of rags and old iron,
while John and Fred took
apart the booth and brought
"Old Ike" all the rags, pieces
of wood, tin and iron bars
which they used for putting
up the booth.
"Here, accept a present
from us," said John. And
know that you have dealt
with MENI"
"Old Ike" took their gift
and bade them farewell.
Later from the seat on the
wagon he asked them when
they would come back again.
"Maybe next spring," said
Fred.
"Maybe not," said his pal.
When "Old Ike" was off a
short distance, John ran af-
ter him with a piece of iron
in his hand, calling:
"Hey, you Jew, wait a min-
ute"! waving high the piece
of iron.
"Old Ike" halted.
John came up to him
breathlessly, and said:
"It's a pity to leave such a
good piece of iron behind.
Here, take it along. For we
are going away from here and
somebody else may pick it
up."
)By the time John threw the
piece of iron on the wagon,
Fred had caught up with him.
";iood) night, Jew"! said
John and IFred.
"(ood niiiht to you," re-
plikd "Old Ike."
And John and Fred disap-
'pared s(omcwhere in the
dark.


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Every )ay Prices

Porcelain Top Table
S4.95
Drop Leaf Table
S4.95
Bowback Unf. Chairs
95,c
Hickory Cottage
Chairs, 95c
Austell Kitchen
Cabinets, 821.50


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Per Week
Pays For
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Friday, November 29, 1929

THE JEWISH

FLORIDIAN
A weekly newspaper published at
Miami, Florida
by
The Jewish Floridian Publishing
Company
302 S. W. FOURTH AVENUE
Phone 8745



EDITORIAL STAFF
J. LOUIS SHOCHET
A CHOCHOM
BEN DOROM
A. N. ASHER

EDITORIAL


JUST A WORD TO i
OUR LOCAL JEW-
ISH ORGANIZA-
TIONS I
I I
One of the wisest counsels
ever given is that of the fam-
ous Greek philosopher So-
crates. It consists of just two
words, "KNOW THYSELF."
The success of the individ-
ual, both materially and spir-
itually, depends first of all, on
his knowledge of himself. It
thus becomes important that
we pause and inquire what
this knowledge consists of.
An individual is only a link
in a long chain. It is his busi-
ness, when trying to know
himself, to learn something of
the chain of which he is a
link. That chain is, first of all
the religion of his people, its
history and all those things
of lasting value which his
race has produced. Without a
knowledge of these things no
man can be said to know him-
self.
Much has been said of the
duty of teaching the young
th;t history which has no
equal, the history of our own
people. But, how about the
teaching and learning and
studying of that glorious his-
tory by those of us who are
so woefully lacking in a
knowledge of these things was
part of the basic education of
all of us. Who of our parents
did not know the history, the
traditions and the religion of
our people ? Who did not know
that which made the Jewish
home a sanctuary of purity
and wholesome life, which
gave strength to the life of
the individual Jew, enabling
him to bear all his trials and
tribulations with courage and
hope.
May we respectfully urge
upon the local chapters of Ha-
dassah, the Council of Jew-
ish Women, the Sisterhoods,
the Junior Council, and all
other Jewish organizations
that but a fifteen minute per-
iod at each of their meetings


devoted to a study of our own
faith, our history and tradi-
tions would yield wonderful
returns both spiritually and
otherwise.

TOO MUCH TALK

We cannot help but reprint
SWhat we think is a wonderful
? bit of advice, so here goes:
D on't talk too much! Glen
Frank, President of Wiscon-
'sin University thinks, for he

OUR


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


has broadcasted an article en-
titled "The Peril of Talking."
President Frank says:
This is an age of talk.
S To the age-old habit of face
to face speech, we have
Brought a thousand new in-
struments that extend the
range of our talk-the talk-
ing machine, the radio, the
many forms of the press, and
so on.
Our great weakness is to
think we have done a thing
when we have said it. Some of
the most effective thunder-
ings of old Thomas Carlyle
were against the danger of
government degenerating into
mere talk.
Humanity continues to run
to talk, despite the fact that
the peril of much talking has
been the burden of advice of
the sages of all races and all
centuries.
It is interesting to note that
in a great compilation of the
World's Best Proverbs, there
are more proverbs devoted to
the peril of talking than to any
other topic. I find in this vol-
ume 204 proverbs advising
against too much talk, pro-
verbs distilled from the exper-
ience of some twenty nations.
"A fool cannot be silent,"
said the Spartans.
"A fool's voice is known by
multitude of words," said the
Hebrews.
"A great talker never wants
for enemies," say the Chinese.
"A man of sense talks lit-
tle and listens much," says
the Chinese.
"A Silent man's words are
not brought into court," say
the Danes.
"Empty wagons make most
noise," say the Danes.
"Full vessels give the least
sound," say the Germans.
"The more understanding
the fewer words," say the
Germans.
"Talk does not cook rice,"
says the Chinese.
"All successful men know
how to hold their tongues,"
said Talleyrand.
"Never hold any one by the
button, in order to be heard
out; better hold your tongue,"
said Chesterfield.
"The less a man thinks, the
more he talks," said the great
Montesquieu.
And there is the famous
saying of the Greek philoso-
pher:
"Nature has given us two
ears, two eyes, and but one
tongue, to the end that we
should hear and see more than
we speak."
There is no doubt that
there is too much talking and
too little thinking.
It is all very nice to be good
listeners and listen to others
talk. However, do the listeners
absorb what the talkers tell
them? Or are they so many
words wasted?
It would be a good thing of
we talked less and this in-
cludes everybody, even
preachers.


GOSPEL OF SELFISH-
NESS

To preach unselfishness and
to practice unselfishness be-
get poverty, misery and woe.
To preach unselfishness and
to practice unselfishness be-
get hypocrisy, hate and greed.
To preach selfishness and
to practice selfishness beget


ADVETISERSSAVE YOU MONRY AND.GIVE YOU-SERI!


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


W6 6 -









THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


ii- -I


Wedding of Miss Ethel Har-
riett Schonfeld and Dr. George
J. Gerson formerly of Miami
and now of Baltimore took
place Thursday at noon at the
home of her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Joseph Schonfeld, in the
presence of a large number of
relatives and friends. Rabbi
Jacob H. Kaplan performed
the ceremony.
Palms and profusion of
gladiollas combined with ferns
were elaborate decorations for
the home and made an effec-
tive altar in the living room
where the vows were said.
The bride was attended by
her sister, Miss Jane Schon-
feld, and Miss Martha Wein-
traub, both of whom were at-
tired in delicate blue after-
noon frocks and carried huge
bouquets of garden flowers in
blue shades. William Gerson
was best man.
The bride wore a handsome
brown English tweed travel-
ing suit designed with an egg-
shall satin blouse and long
coat. Her hat and other ap-
pointments were in brown and
she wore a corsage of brown
orchids. Her father gave her
in marriage.
Reception for the couple
took place Wednesday night
at the home and Thursday
night a dinner party was giv-
en by Mr. and Mrs. Schonfeld
for Dr. and Mrs. Gerson. The
couple left last night for Bal-
timore, where they will live.
They will stop in Savannah
and Philadelphia on their way
In Baltimore they will be at
home at The Garrison Apart-
ments, Forrest Park avenue
and Garrison boulevard.
The bride is well known
here where she made her
home with her parents since
childhood. She was graduated
from Miami High school later
attending college and receiv-
ing her diploma. Dr. Gerson,
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis
Gerson of Miami, has been
practicing in Baltimore for
some time.
*
Corrine Ernst opened the
program at the meeting of the
Mana-Zucca Music club Mon-
day afternoon with a piano
selection, followed by a bari-
tone solo by Maj. McKinley
Ash, with Frances Tarboux
at the piano. Ruth Marr Far-
rell and Ruby Showers Baker
presented solo groups, with
Frances Tarboux accompany-
ing. Mrs. Winifred Kates
James made an address.

New York Barber Shop i
431 N. W. 2nd Ave. |
Ladies Hair Bobbing Our I
Specialty. Special Attention to
Children. -
ESKENAZI BROS, Prop.
.-":." "".=:; ;'- ...... u-uw~ Il JwJMu aawawuuae Jiuuwwi.I,


C


IE


TY


Speaker of the meeting of Tuesday on the SS. Berkshire
the Ruth Bryan Owen Orator- for New York for a visit On
ical club at 2:30 p. m. Friday her return .she will be accom-
at the home of Mrs. Jewell panied by her mother, Mrs
Pearlman at 2340 S. W. llth panied by her mother, Mrs.
St., will be Dr. Everett S. Sol Wilson, who has spent the
Smith. Others on the program summer in Atlantic City.
will be Miss Rose Mary Ger- *
son, Mrs. A. E. Rosenthal Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Good-
Mrs. Joseph Williamson and man of Scranton, Pa., are here
Miss Helen Farkas. on their wedding trip and are
*qavinor at the Columbus Ho-


Trip abroad bridge party
was given by Mrs. Harry
Weinberg for members of the
Fortnightly Reading club at
her home in Miami Beach.
Prizes were awarded to Mrs.
Lee Russcol, Mrs. Albert Ros-
enthal and Mrs. Lil Rosengar-
ten. Luncheon was served.
*4
Tall green lighted tapers
were used as appointments
for the table with a center-
piece of flowers at the buffet
supper and bridge given by
Mrs. Dorothy Mitchell Sunday
evening at her home in honor
of Miss Ethel Tauber and Em-
don Herzog, whose marriage
will take place soon. Prizes
were awarded to Mrs. William
Shayne, Herbert Sepler and
H. H. Hyman. Miss Tauber
was presented with gifts.
Guests included Miss Addie
Ross, Miss Faye Sheldon, Mr.
and Mrs. Stanley C. Myers,
Mr. and 1rs. Joseph William-
son, Mr. and Mrs. Sepler, Mr.
and Mrs. Aaron Kanner, Mrs.
Shayne, Harry Baker, E.
Max Goldstein, Mr. Hyman,
Miss Tauber and Mr. Herzog.
*
The Junior Hadassah is
now conducting a membership
campaign and is offering a
prize for the best slogan. All
members are urged to submit
slogans to the Chairman of
the membership committee
Miss Reggie Goldstein, 652
Seybold Bldg., immediately
as the winner of the Slogan
contest will be announced at
the regular Hadassah meet-
ing to be held December 16th.

The next meeting of the
Junior Hadassah to be held
on December 2nd. at the Palm
Room of the Granada Apart-
ments and Hotel will start a
precedent by offering an at-
tendance prize at each meet-
ing.
Miss Leona Wilson left


tel. They have been to Cuba
since leaving Scranton. Mrs.
Goodman was formerly Miss
Edna May Lonker of Philadel-
phia.
*
Mrs. Harry Simonhoff is
ill at her home but is expect-
ed to be out again very short.
ly.
*
Mr. Larry Fay has returned
to his business though still
convalescing from his recent
illness.
*


The Junior Council of Jev
ish Women will celebrate Jur
ior Council Night by attend
ing Friday evening service
at Beth David, Friday evei
ing, November 29th, at 8:1
p. m. *
Lionel Levy, young arch
tect in charge of the construct
tion of the Madison Squar
Garden boxing arena in N. V
Seventh avenue, underwear
an operation for acute appear
dicitis at the Victoria hosp
tal last week.
Mr. Levy, who has the sta
dium almost completed for th
Florida-Oregon football garr
a week from Saturday, ha
been feeling ill since Frida
but it was not until late Sur
day that his condition became
serious and he immediatelyl
consulted a physician. Dr. I
A. Baker performed the ope
ation, assisted by Dr. E.
Hall. Mr. Levy is well know
in Miami through his wor
with the Garden stadium
Miami Beach last year, an
the construction of the pr

Florida Iron and
Equipment Co.
519 N. W. Third Avenue
Whokual Dealer in Machinery and
Contractors, Equlpaent
MIAMI, FLORIDA
PHONE 6602

AMBULANCE SERVICE
W. H. Combs Co., Estab. 1896
COMBS FUNERAL HOME
Phone Miami 32101 \
l153 N. g. nad Avenue
MIAMI BRACH FUNERAL BOME
Phone M. B. 5-2101
1231 Washington Ave


Julius Damenstein, Inc.
JEWELER
The Store With a Reputation


1o W. Flaner St.


Ph.e 4701


MIAMI, FLORIDA


Phone Miami
nes 7105 King
g d OP P"
FOR PROMPT Undertaking Co.
- SERVICE 29 N. W. THIRD AVENUE
ToheP" J H FP O 23535-31624

THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN-A MEDIUM OF


V-
n-
d-
es
n-
5
i-
c-
re
7.
it
in-
i-

a-


sent structure. He is a grad-
uate of Georgia Tech.
*4
Mr. Jack Lewis of Balti-
more, Md., is a visitor to Mi-
ami Beach, having arrived
here by Merchants and Min-
ers Boat Sunday afternoon.
He is a guest at the Beach
View Hotel and will remain
here for about three weeks.
Mr. Lewis is one of the promi-
nent communal workers of
Baltimore, being treasurer of
the Hebrew Free Loan Society
a member of the Board of
Trustees of the Eden St. Syn-
agogue, the largest Orthodox
Synagogue of Baltimore, and
is one of the members of the
State Board of Examiners for
Morticians of the State of
Maryland. Sunday evening
Mr. Lewis was the guest of
Mr. and Mrs. J. Louis Shoch-
et at dinner.
*
Dr. Julius Friedenwald of
Baltimore, a noted medical
authority was a guest of con-
gregation Beth David at its
Saturday morning services.
Dr. Friedenwald who comes of
a noted family of physicians
whose ancestors for several
generations back were born
in the United States is a strict
adherent of the Orthodox
Jewish faith.
*
Mrs. I. Buckstein, president
of the Beth David Ladies Aux-


P(e4


le
is Nothing's Too Good For Miami

n-
'e Says
ly




id
re-
li SINGER'S i



Sa CONTINENTAL



I RESTAURANT i

S8 S. E. FIRST AVE.
(One Flight Up)
(3 Doors Off Flagler Street)
-0
We express our sincere appreciation to our many
Friends present at our opening last Sunday night.

S Give Yourself, The Wife and Kiddies a Treat
by Dining at The Most Beautiful Restaurant in
Town, Providing The Finest in Continental
Cooking and Wholesome Fresh Foods.



SSinger s and Saisfaion

ARE SYNONYMOUS

L If You Still Demand The Best, Come to "SINGER'S"



AND FOR MIAMI JEWRY!


'' il;e


S


II._ ~ __~___._,~


0


-THE

FARWAY

DAIRY
SOLICITS YOUR
PATRONAGE


Flagler Dry Cle
a. Pre Dys

472 V. HFI, Sir
1"eI as Pm sswler Y Teu


Friday, November 29, 1929

iliary entertained the men.
bers of the Board and the of.
ficers at a luncheon at her
home in Shenandoah last
Wednesday. A long table in
the center of the large din.
ing room was beautifully de.
corated with flowers and can.
delabra as a centerpiece with
individual flowers as place
cards for the guests.
Business of the Ladies Aux.
iliary was discussed with the
plans for the coming Bazaar
being the main business un.
der consideration. The vari-
ous committees engaged in
the work of the Bazaar report.
ed that splendid progress had
been made.
After luncheon the business
session was held.
Among those present at the
meeting were: Mrs. I. Buck.
stein, Mrs. Israel H. Weisfeld,
Mrs. S. Tannenbaum, Mrs.
Chas. Tannenbaum, Mrs. Max
Kupferstein, Mrs. T. Arnold,
Mrs. Dave Kahn, Mrs. Meyer
Friedman, Mrs. I. Kotkin,
Mrs. J. Finkelstein, Mrs. Har-
ry Markowitz, Mrs. F. Marko-
witz, Mrs. Louis Ruscol, Mrs.
A. Dubler, Mrs. Alex Gold-
stein, Mrs. Manuel Rippa,
Mrs. Yunis, Mrs. Louis Wein-
kle, Mrs. J. Simpson, Mrs.
Kandel, Mrs. B. Katz, Mrs.
Morris Neham, Mrs. Rubin-
stein, Mrs. Sam Futterfass
and Mrs. I. Tannenbaum.
4 *
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel J.
Spector have moved from their
former home in Coral Gables
to 479 N. W. 4th St., Miami,
where they will be at home
to their many friends.
*
Last week the marriage of
Mr. B. Ornstein, prominent
Continued on Page 5


I II 1


h


*. i .. .* :-: ":--- .









Friday, November 29, 1929



SOCIETY


(Continued from Page 4)
merchant and long time resi-
dent of Miami, to Mrs. Anna
Arker was solemnized in the
presence of the immediate
families of the bride and
groom. They will make their
home in Miami where the
groom is in business

The Ladies Auxiliary of
Beth David Talmud Torah is
sending out committees for
the purpose of obtaining ad-
vertisements, gifts and mer-
chandise towards the Bazaar
which will be held in the early
part of January. All those who
are approached to make dona-
tions are requested to demand
credentials from all those who
represent themselves as com-
mittees. These credentials will
be signed by the President of
the Auxiliary, Mrs. I. Buck-
stein and by the Secretary.
This is being done so as to
avoid unauthorized solicita-
tion.
*
The Miami Chapter of Ha-
dassah has made plans for
one of the finest affairs of the
early winter season on Sun-
day evening, December 8th, at
7:30 p. m. o'clock at Singer's
Continental Restaurant, 8 S.
E. First Ave., above the old
Hollywood offices when a sup-
per card party will be given
for the benefit of itsvarious
activities. The Arrangements
committee consists of Mrs. M.
D. Kirsch as chairman, and
Mesdames Harry Rubin, I. A.
Ruscol, Isidor Cohen, I: L. Se-
ligman, M. Kandel, J. Katz
and IB. Birnkrantz.
Prizes will be awarded for
the highest scores. Reserva-
tions may be made with Mrs.
Harry Rubin by phoning
2-14(3. A very pleasant time
is promised to all who will at-
tend in addition to the good
accomplished.
*
The Junior Hadassah Movie
Ball is to be replete with a
number of novel decorations
and entertainments features,
chief of which wil be the set-
ting carrying one into the
portals of a real "movie"
house.
Posters advertising popular
"talkies" and "movies" will be
hung about the Miramar Hot-
el where he dance will take
place and everything possible
to cause one to think he is
in a movie house, outside of
showing the pictures, will be
done. (ainesville's most pop-
ular IDave Frank's Orchestra
will furnish the music for theu
evening which will begin at 9
o'clock. Miss Hannah Mack is
chairman of the committee of
arrangements.
All members are urged to
account for all tickets and
moneys in their possession
within the next few days to
the chairman at her home 520
*N. W. 7th street.


*
The Ladies Auxiliary of
Beth David Talmud Torah will
hold its regular bi-weekly card
Party next Tuesday evening,
December 3rd., at the Talmud
Torah Auditorium when Mrs.
l. Tannenbaum, Mrs. Harry
Seitlin and Mrs. Jack Finkle-
stein will be the hosts. Prizes
will be offered for highest


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


scores and refreshments will
be served. The funds will be
used for th efurtherance of
Talmud Torah work. All those
who are interested in the pro-
motion of Talmud Torah are
urged to come and bring their
friends. Tourists are promised
a splendid welcome and pleas-
ant evening of entertainment.
*
The many friends of Mr. Ja-
cob Goldberg the genial host
of the Nemo Hotel, Miami
Beach, will be shocked to learn
of the recent death of his
brother Morris, in Brooklyn,
N. Y. His brother leaves a
family consisting of his wife
and five small children.
*
More than two hundred
guests were present at the
Thanksgiving Eve dinner
dance of the Temple Israel,
Sisterhood last Wednesday
evening at the Alcazar Hotel.
It was one of the prettiest af-
fairs of the season was greatly
enjoyed by all present. The
committee in charge of ar-
rangements consisted of Mrs.
Mendel Cromer, chairman and
she was assisted by Mrs. D. J.
Apte, Mrs. I. L. Seligman, and
Mrs. Herbert E. Kleiman who
is chairman of Entertainment
for the Sisterhood.
*
The Big Night affair of the
Council of Jewish Women will
be held at the Womens Club,
on N. E. 17th Terrace and the
Bay, the evening of January
21st and will be in the form of
a dance and balll representing
"A night in Florida." Aaron
Farr's Orchetra will furnish
the music for the evening and
a number of other prominent
entertainers will be on hand to
enliven the guests. Mrs. Chas.
Greenfield is general chair-
man of the arrangements
committee and under her will
serve Mrs. Marvin Bronner
an(t Mrs. Lewis Brown on the
Entertainment c o m m i t tee;
Mrs. Isidor Cohen on the pro-
gram committee; Mrs. P.
Sch.in,,.rg, Mrs. MI. Dubler,
Mrs. R. Wolpert, Mrs. Samuel
Aronovitz, Mrs. Joe Richter,
Mrs. Max Ghertler, Mrs. Har-
ry Oliphant, Mrs. M. Rauzin,
and Mrs. AM. Finberg on the
refreshments and decorations
committee; Mrs. Mendel Cro-
mer Mrs. Jack Bernstein,
Mrs. S. Marr, Mrs. L. Morris,
and Mrs. Art Levine on the
Tickets Committee; Mrs.
Lewis Brown and Mrs. Jacob
h- + H,,, -Icnitnlitv


"HIT OF
ROMANCE"


"Through the dark of night
I gotta go where you are
Whether it's wrong or right
I gotta go where you are."
There she stood singing
"Chloe" right at him. Gee, she
was beautiful; well perhaps
not exactly beautiful, but
thrilling, with those deep dark
eyes and those wonderful red
lips. And her name was Levy.
There it was, down on the pro-
gram-Dorothy Levy. Songs
by Dorothy Levy. He had al-
ways loved the name of Dor-
othy-and Levy-that meant
she was one of his people! He
dared aspire to her. He had
thought she was a Jewess the
first few days on the steamer,
and just when he had screwed
his courage to the speaking
point she had gotten tied with
the "swell" Gentile crowd, and
so he had concluded she was
one of them after all. He had
tried to find out her name,
but none of his friends-the
Cohens, Ginsbergs or Jerry
Brown knew. And now there
it was Dorothy Levy, and
she was singing a love song
straight at him. Her eyes
sought his again and again,
and her mouth-was he imag-
ining things? She seemed to
be asking for a kiss. No-he
mustn't think such things.
Why should she care for him,
even if she was a Jew ? He was
just a poor insurance agent--
not handsome-of course, a
few girls had told him he was,
and his mother had, but moth-
ers somehow see beauty
where no one else does.
She was bowing now. It was
all over. The audience were
enthusiastic. So insistent was
the clapping that she had to
come back. She sang the last
verse again.
"Through the dismal swamp-
land
Searching for you;
Through the smoke and the
flame.
I gotta go where you are."


(Continued Next Week)


1. Kaplaii on Line I -
Committee.
For the benefit of all visi-
tors to the city transportation
may be arranged by calling |
Mrs. Isidore Cohen.
---- ----
Yea, old Lot had a wife, not
a lot o' wives.
.......... "... "...... W wondering If You All W ill Be
SCome and Make \\hoopeel at the
I at the JUNIOR HADASSAH
JUNIOR HADASSAH MOVIE BALL
S MOVIE BALL, SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8th
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8th S1.00 per person
-- $1.00 per person ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,



i THE BISCAYNE INN
158 N. E. THIRD STREET

The Home of The Finest Cooked Strictly Kosher
Meals at Most Reasonable Prices.

Take Advantage of Our Private Parking Facilities
A WWA T xOTT EIYrAXTUV AX


Page 5


BUSINESS DIRCT0000000Y00000000


I BUSINESS DIRECTORY I
>:- 1^::ese ^s6: S OZ ,**CIO 00SS00000000000


AUTO PARTS
MIAMI AUTO WRECKING CO.,
-Incorporated-
Has Parts For Your Car
606-608 North West Fifth Street
Phone 5050 (fifty-fifty)
BLOOM AUTO REPAIR
& PARTS CO.
N. W. 17th Ave. at 23rd St.
Phone 23631
The Largest car wreckers in
Florida
L. (Pop) GERSON
Buyer of All Kinds of Scrap Metal
We Sell Auto Parts
2141 N. W. SECOND AVE.
Phone 20621

BAKERIES
GOLDSTROM BAKING CO., Inc.
1349 Washington Ave.
Phone 2836 Miami Beach
The finest in Bread and Cakes
Obtainable at the
Rosedale Delicatessen, Nwe York
Delicatessen and Empire
Delicatessen

BAGS and METALS
AMERICAN BAG & METAL CO.
Phone 21147
610 North West Fifth Street
EAST COAST BAG & METAL CO.
(Inc.)
I. L. MINTZER
MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS
435-445 N. W. 8th Street ,
Phone 4485
PEPPER METAL CORP.
Scrap Metal and Machinery
N. W. Cor. 5th Ave. and 14th St.
Phone 22546

BUILDING SUPPLIES
J. SIMPSON
Building Materials,
Roofing Paper, Asphalt
423 N. W. N. River Drive
Phone 7251

DELICATESSEN
ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN
170 N. W. 5th St.
We Supply Your Every Want

FISH & SEA FOODS
STANDARD FISH CO.
629 W. Flagle'r St.
Phone 2-3362
EAST COAST FISH CO.
"The Best in Fish and Sea Food"
Curb Market S. W. 2nd Ave.
Phone 22736

FOUNTAINS
Cold Drinks
Candies and Lunches
THE SHRADERS
Corner 1st St. N. W. and 3rd Ave.


FOR YOUR OWN GOOD VISIT THE

West Flagler Market, No. 2, Inc.
941 S. W. 22nd AVENUE.
The Home of
CHOICE GROCERIES, FINE FRUITS AND
VEGETABLES

HIGH GRADE WESTERN MEATS
Phone 32771
WATCH FOR OUR FRIDAY AND SATURDAY SPECIALS


D GIVE YOU SERVICE!


OUR ADVERTISERS SAVE I v UMi,, .n A z wt, uv


FURNITURE
FURNITURE EXCHANGE,
INC.
321 N. Miami Ave.
We Buy and Sell Furniture

INSURANCE
Life Fire Casualty Bonds
RAUZIN INSURANCE
AGENCY, Inc.
Phones 22565 32452
137 N. E. First St.
Miami, Fla.
JOSEPH M. LIPNITZ
"Service That Makes Friends
and Keep Them"
Insurance Underwriter
Lawyer's Bldg. Phone 2-0317 2-1522
LEON ELKIN
Is now Local Representative of the
Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.
and is ready to serve his friends.
Residence
1620 N. W. 30th STREET
Phone 26085

LAUNDRIES
NATIONAL LAUNDRIES, INC.
"Trustworthy Service"
1048 N. W. 5th Ave.
Phone 8131

PHARMACISTS
BRYAN PARK PHARMACY
Chas. Tannenbaum,
Pharmacist
(reg. pharmacist for 17 years)
Cor 22nd Ave. and 8th St. S. W.
CRYSTAL PHARMACY
Dr. A. D. Halpern, Ph. G. Ph. D.
Prescriptions Our Specialty
128 N. Miami Ave. Phone 29713

PIPE and STEEL
ADELMAN PIPE & STEEL CO.
58 N. E. 25th St.
Aat F. E. C. R. R. Phone 21420

A. & B. PIPE AND METAL CO.
Phone 31355
53 North East 25th Street

PRINTERS

MIAMI PRINTING CO.
"Printing That Pays"
Phone 23261
107 South Miami Avenue

TIRES
MOHAWK TIRES
JOHNSON TIRE COMPANY
1361 N. E. 1st Ave..
Phones: 4114-4115


I-~R ~1- ---

For ICE-Use
Peninsular Ice Company
ICE
PLnt Located at 645 N. W. 13th Street
Phone 2-1297 or 2-1298 for
FREE DELIVERY


_=ri
-__ -


__


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


._._.


fl IL MI WMENI WO II I% M.V L










Page 6


BUSINESS
GOSSIP

The first showing of the
new line of cabinet Kelvinator
electric refrigerators, recent-
ly introduced by the manu-
facturers, is in progress at the
Kelvinator-Miami Company,
50 W. Flagler street. A. E.
Kane is manager. In outward
appearance and engineering
features the new models em-
phasize the improvement by
which four distinct tempera-
tures are maintained in four
separate compartments.

The many residents and
tourists of Miami and Miami
Beach will be pleased to learn
that the New York Kosher
dining Room under the man-
agement of Mr. L. Gratz will
reopen formally Sunday, De-
cember 1st, at 316 Collins
avenue where it has become
the favorite meeting place for
those desiring good food. The
place has been thoroughly re-
novated and every effort made
so as to insure the complet-
est satisfaction to the patrons.
Specializing in Hungarian
cooking for which the Gratz's
are well known the reopening
will come as welcome news.

Situated in the populous
South Beach section of Miami
in the heart of the Jewish
population of Miami Beach,
Sam Rappaport will shortly
open a strictly kosher poultry
and meat market at 138 Col-
lins avenue to be known as
Sam's Kosher Poultry and
Market" which will handle


bath attached, beautiful patio,
lobbies, large dining room,
splendid large kitchen, in ad-
dition to the Hotel building
occupied last year. The en-
larged hotel is one of the pret-
tiest on the Beach and will be
operated on the American
Plan. The large dining room
which can comfortably take
care of more than 300 guests
at one time will be equipped
to take care of large banquets,
dinner dances etc. The for-
mal opening will take place on
Sunday evening, December 8,
tht full details of which will
appear in the next issue of the
this paper.

One of the outstanding so-
cial events of Miami was the
formal opening of Singer's
Continental Restaurant oc-
cupying what was formerly
the Manderin Inn, at 8 S. E.
First Ave. above the Old
Hollywood offices. Aaron
Farr's Orchestra furnished
the music for the entire even-
ing, and several members of
the Orchestra gave individual
novelty numbers for the en-
tertainment of the guests pre-
sent. Jack Campbell, Miami's
popular vaudevillian sang a
number of songs during the
evening. Souvenirs consisting
of beautiful compacts were
given to the ladies present,
and cigars were presented to
the men.
All present expressed their
appreciation to Mrs. Singer,
who is operating the restau-
rant for the excellence of the
food and the manner in which
it was served.
Mrs. Singer operates the
well known Singer's Inn, at
Sharon, Mass. Among the af-


Friday, November 29,


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


fairs which will be held at the
new Restaurant will be that
of the Sisterhood of Temple
Israel on the evening of Dec-
ember 26th.

The Aristocrat dining room
153 Collins ave., Miami Beach
opened Wednesday evening
for the winter season. The
new establishment has been
tastefully decorated in the
modern manner and will serve
foods prepared with a view to
retaining all of the health
minerals and vitamin proper-
ties necessary for a well-bal-
anced diet.
The chefs who have been
engaged by the establishment
are experts in their line and
prepare steaks, sea foods and
vegetarian table d'hote din-
ners in metropolitan style.
Members of the staff are
thoroughly trained, it is said,
in the approved manner of
serving the public and all are
experienced waiters. The aris-
tocrat will make a specialty












Fun Galore Is In Store at the
JUNIOR HADASSAH
MOVIE BALL
$1.00 per person
Refreshments, Entertainment
Favors
-_=- =llllll111111~ 1111


of its service which is based
upon standards that are dis-
tinctive. Mr. and Mrs. A.
Bush, who have had years of
experience in the restaurant
business, having owned and
operated establishments of
prominence in Newark, N. J.,


will have complete char
A large number of p
nent men and women at
ed th opening as we
Thanksgiving Day and
pleasantly entertained d
dinner by the splendid or
tra in attendance.


You Can't Help But Be Pleased at the Re-Opening of
GRATZ'S

New York Kosher Dining Room
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1st
316- 318 Collins Avenue
WHERE THE FINEST OF HOME COOKED MEALS, SUC
AS MOTHER USED TO MAKE WILL BE SERVED.
0--
Our Friends, Patrons of Past Years Are Particularly
Invited to be Present



BIGGER AND BETTER IS THE BEAUTIFUl
GOLDBERG'S

NEMO HOTEL
CORNER FIRST STREET and COLLINS AVE.
MIAMI BEACH
Our Completely Remodeled Hotel With Our 54-Room Additiol
Each Room Containing Bath and all Modern Equipment

The Splendid Dining Room Accommodating 300 Guests, Th
Unexcelled Kitchen Facilities, Beautiful Lobby, Patio, Etc.

Make This The Finest Jewish Hotel In Miami Beach


Opening Sunday, December 8, 192!

WATCH NEXT WEEK'S ISSUE FOR NEWi
OF INTEREST
-" 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1


Watch for Announce- 138 Collins Aven

.of our Opening Sam's Kosher Poultry and Market hone 5-2330
- u n nn an m aiigignl leln e ialliiaiin m u ilslm lii il li i i an m sn nn i nnln a n ailiign lnn sin liinsnn toalaio in islsieaelesn lasoatm la i a n u n n n n n n o n n u n


both the wholesale and retail
business. During the building
period no work is being per-
mitted on Saturday as the
business is to be conducted in
accordance with the most rig-
id observance of Orthodox
Jewish principles. None but
the finest of kosher meats,
and kosher killed poultry will
be sold. Mr. Nathan Wroobel
will be the shoched in charge
and all residents of Miami and
Miami Beach are extended an
invitation to call and inspect
the new store at its opening
and thereafter, to assure
themselves of "kashrus"
Mr. Jacob Goldberg and as-
sociates who operated the Ho-
tel Nemo the past several
years has returned to Miami
Beach to assume full charge
of the new Hotel Nemo. The
hotel has a fifty-four room
addition, each room containing

Come One, Come All to the
JUNIOR HADASSAH
MOVIE BALL
SDecember 8th, Miramar Hotel


Splendid Room with Bath At-
| lached at Very Reasonable Ren-
tal. Prefer One or Two Refined
SGentlemen. Apply,
SKANDEL
2295 S. W. 9th Street I
s


'


MATZO-MEAL '
S MATZO-"ARFE L
CAKE MEAL
.. A-.-.. .oc.a..




THE ARISTOCRAT

DINING ROOM


153 COLLINS AVE.


MIAMI BEACH


"CATERING TO THOSE WHO C


S THANKS ITS MANY FRIENDS F
SPLENDID PATRONAGE ON OPEP

i We Are Prepared To Serve The B
SSTEAKS, SEA FOOD AND VE
TABLE D'HOTE DINNI
I REAL HUNGARIAN AND KOSHER

!MmmqMmw -=9-4 MOM,,


:ARE"

FOR THEIR
NING NIGHT

lest of
;GETARIAN
ERS
COOKING

I


FaymusFay'


-0End of Month
End of Month


24
NORTH
MIAMI
AVE. I'


OFF
FLAGLER
OFF
PRICES


150 81x90 42x36
Plaited $ 00 Scalloped $1.00 Pillow $1.0
Skirts ... Sheets 1 Cases-...

200 Sport Ladie's Fancy Printed
Jackets,
Velvets $1.95 Pajama $1.95 Rajah
Etc.. Suits....... 1 Suits .....--.

2000 Taffeta, Bengaline $1
Yard 50-inch Woolens Yds.
S40-inch Satins


1000Pair


CRAN


CURTAINS
All Colors
5-piece
24 yards long


Pair 59


500 SWEATERS 89c
Slightly Imnarferet


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN-A MEDIUM OF A ND FOR MIAMI JEWRY!


- --C -


I ........... ........... ------------------------------- ...... ............


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Illllllllllllllllllllllllll


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A W l l..


THEJLJJEW --ISH-FLRIDI


Plaid Taffetas


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