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The Jewish Floridian ( November 22, 1929 )

UFJUD
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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
November 22, 1929
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00040

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
November 22, 1929
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00040

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text





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V I V.- NO. XX, XX X- U WE EI I
VaL. II. NO. ......X.XV II MIAMI, FLOR NOVm BE 2, 19: 2
'^ 0XX X _I_. ^^ FMULORIDA, NOVEMBER 1929


S1 Price 5 Cents


SToMy ay of Miami Beach
Thin Mking Shul Elects Or-

Iby I W thodox Rabbi
Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld -


I I

One reads a book contain-
ng some three hundred and
fifty pages, and forgets the
pilot, the names of the hero
.nd heroine within a week or
a fortnight. A brief newspap-
er item of a dozen lines may
catch the eye and the story
it tells will leave an indelible
imprint on the heart and mind
of the reader. What heart-
rending tragedy, pathos, or
hopelessness is oft discovered
in a two-line item which not
infrequently owes its presence
in the newspaper to its value
as a filler to a highly priced
syndicated syrupy story.
There was such an item in
the press the other day.
Neighbors noticing gas fumes
escaping from an apartment
in a tenement house, notified
the police. A most ghastly and
unusual sight greeted the
policemen who broke the door
Tied to the bed was the dead
body of a six year old child
with a gas-pipe attached to
his nostrils. In the adjoining
room sat his mother near an
open window filling her lungs
with fresh invigorating air.
When taken into custody she
at first contended that her
little boy committed suicide,
but finally, under pressure, ad-
mitted that she killed the child
because "I hated him." It was
also recalled that about a year
and a ha'f ago her husband
had been found dead under
the identical conditions. At
the time it was generally ac-
cepted that he had committed
suicide y means of an open
gas jet. Now however, the
police accuse her of having
caused his death. Records al-
so revealed that this peculiar
wife, mother, murderess of
husband and son had been
twice an inmate of an institu-
tion for the feeble-minded.

What poignant pathos.
What indescribable barbarity.
The Midrash tells us that only/
the raven of all beasts aniP
fowl, acts inhumanly towards
her offspring by forsaking
them when they arpeyet- iny-
and unable to procure food
for themselves. The others
are unbelievably tender to-
wards their young. They are
'avage to others but not to
their own helpless ones. The
ferocious eagle, demon of the
air, is most gentle to her chil-
dren. Moses compares God's
love for Israel to that of an
cale for her young.
"As an eagle that stirreth up
her nest
Hovereth over her young,
Spreadeth abroad her wings,
taketh them,
lBeareth them on her pinions"
But then the eagle is not
feeble-minded.

What must be the reaction
of the intelligent person to oc-
currences such as the above?


To my way of thinking, there
can be only one universal re-
(Continued on Page 2)


At a special meeting of the
members of the Beth Jacb
Congregation the Orthodox
Congregation of Miami Beach,
Rabbi Yallo of Syracuse, N.
Y. was elected as its Rabbi
for the next six months. It is
the intention to provide a
Rabbi for the Congrregation
during the tourist season.
Rab)l i Yallo was a visitor to
Miami last year and is well
known in the Ralbinate. He
is a graduate of the Univer-
sity of Syracuse and holds his
Ral.binic "Smicha" from Eu-
lopcan Yeshives as well as
from some of th? leading
American Rabbis. He has been
Rabbi in Syracuse for more
than twelve years. Mrs. Yallo
who is the (laughter of Rabbi
Marcus of Richmond, Va., is
vel!, known in Hadassah cir-
cles having been president of
th:b Syracuse Chapter for a
number of years. Rabbi Yallo
s' scheduled to arrive in Miami
the latter part of next week
wh~n he will aumi his dut-
i:s with the Congregation.

Zionist Address
Attracts Large
Audience Here

The Synagogue of Beth
David was unusually well fill-
ed last Friday night by non-
Jews a,' well as J'ws who
came' to hear the address of
Rabbi I. H. Weisfeld on the
"Real Facts in Palestine"
which was a reply to the re-
'.nt 'utterances of Clayton
Sgdgewick Cooper on the
Z;onist question. Rabbi Weis-
feld presented a number of
interesting statistical reports
and told of the actual condi-
tions in Palestine today as
they actually were reported
by non-Jeys who stood high
in the jo nalistic world. The
opinions i nd ,stories of Mr.
Cooper wre easily shown to
have been a misapprehension
of the real conditions now ex-
isting in Palestine.

Installation Ban-
quet For New Of-
ficers Will be Held

The recently elected officers
,f Beth David Synagogue XV
assume their duties at a in-
stallation and get-to-g her
banquet to be held next Mon-
day evening, November 25th
at 7:30 p. m, o'clock at the
Biscayne Inn. A very elabor-
ate program has been prepar-
ed and the committee in
charge of arrangements are
sparing no trouble to make
the Banquet one to be well re-
membered and enjoyed by all.
A musical program nha beer
arranged, in addition to the
format installation. Re-erva-


tions for the affair may De
made by calling Miami 20604.


Jews Are Promi-
nent at Medical
Convention Here

At the convention of the
Southern Association now be-
iner held in Miami, Jewish
physicians are taking a very
prominent part. Among local
men Dr. M. D. Kirsch, Dr.
Samuel Aronowitz, Dr. I. H.
Agas and Dr. Dobrin have
IPen taking part in a number
of discussions in their respec-
live sections. Dr. Kirsch has
I en prominent in the Nose
and Throat section having led
in a discussion on "Brain Ab-
scess" last Wednesday after-
nIoon.
Among the Jewish physi-
,';ans prominent throughout
the Country who are attend-
ing the Convention are the
famous Dr. Julius Frieden
wi1'd of Baltimore, one of the
o standingg Gastro-Enterolo-
rist-' of the World and one of
lhb staff of John Hopkins
ltHoital and who has written
a large number of accepted
volumes on the subject. tle is
Si:,'other of Dr. Henry Fried-
en ,\ald for years president of
;ne Ziornst Organization Or-
genization of America. Dr
Joseph E. Gichner, one of Bal-
timore's prominent physicians
and recognized internist and
inmbcer of the staff of the
University of Maryland is al-
:o attending the Convention.
I dth have taken leading parts
in the work of the gastro en-
tel o!ogical sect:on..
Among other Jewish nhvs;-
cia-'s attending are: Dr. H.
G. Rudnr of Memphis, Tenn.,
who i'presnted a paper on
granulocytictic Angina" and
in which Dr. Alfred Blumberg
of Oteen, N. C. opened the dis-
cussion. Dr. A. L. Levin is
secretary of the section of
Gastro Entero!ogy and be-
sides being a member of the
staff of the leading hospitals
of New Orleans is also a mem-
ber of the staff of Tulane
University He is a well known
Talmudic scholar and daily
leads in the teaching of Tal-
mud in the Orthodox Synago-
gue of New Orleans. He is
considered one of the leading
authorities in his branch of
medicine. In the same section
is also Dr. Sydney K. Simon
of New Orleans who is also
one of the staff of Tulane Uni-
versity.
Among the prominent Jew-
ish surgeons attending th.
convention are Dr. Isidor
Cohn, of New Orleans La.
who delivered an address on
"Diminishing morbidity and
Mortality" in the section on
Surgery. Dr. Cohen is also a
member of the Tulane Uni-
versity staff.
In the section on Gyneco--
logy Dr. Joseph Cohen of
New Orleans read a paper be-
fore his section which evoked
a great deal of interest.
In the section on Medical
Education are Dr. I. I. Laman,


Tulane University, New Or-
leans, and Dr. Louis Daily,
prominent nose and throat
surgeon of Houston, Texas.
Among those active in the
Womans Auxiliary of the
Southern Medical Associatiorn


Beth David to Rabbi Solomon
Celebrate "Phy- Arrives in Miami
sicians Night" on November Tolr


Because of the convention
of the Southern Medical Asso-
ciation being held in Miami
this week, Bath David services
Friday night will be called
"Jewish Physicians Night"
and Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld
has arranged a special pro-
g.arn fo: the evening. In ad
edition to the sermon on "The
Jew and the Jewish Physi-
c;in" which will be preached
by IRalbi Weisfeld, a number
or the leading Jewish physi.
clans of the Country will
;]:eak, in addItion to several
of Miami's Jewish physicians.
1, is expected that Dr. Julius
Fri(denwald of Baltimore one
of the most noted medical
authorities in the Country and
am:ml.er of one of the most
prominent Jewish families, in
the Country vill address the
CnIgL gatlon.
The services will be chanted
by Mr. Nathan Wroobel who
will also lead the Congrega-
tional singing.
The Choir is now being re-
hearsed for the presentation
of a -pj]endid reper to r, beg.(n-
ning the early part of Decem-
ber. A special Chanucca pro-
:,\am is now being arranged
in which the Cantor and Choir
will take part.
'Ihe Adult Bible class will
nmeet Sunday morning at
10:30 in the Synagogue. The
Sunday school will convene at
9:55 in the Talmud Torah
building. Teacher's classes are
being held regularly every
Wednesday evening at the Tal-
mud Torah Hall.

Zionists to Hold
Education Meeting

The local Zionist District
under the leadership of Harry
I. Lipnitz and John Wolfe
have made arrangements for
a large Zionist mass meeting
which will be held at the Tal-
mud Torah Auditorium on
Sunday evening, December
1st, at 8 p. m. for the purpose
of acquainting Miami Jewry
with the true state of facts
now existing in Palestine. Mr.
Wolfe expressed his regret at
the fact that a number of Mi-
ami Jews as well as Non-Jews
seemed to take it for granted
that the Zionist venture was
lost because of the recent
massacres in Palestine, par-
ticularly when the actual facts
show the contrary. At this
meeting Rabbi Kaplan of Tem-
ple Israel, Rabbi Weisfeld of
Beth David and a number of
other speakers will address
the audience. A musical pro-
gram has been arranged.
are Mrs. Herman Lischkoff,
of Pensacola, Fla. who greet-
ed the visitors on behalf of
the State of Florida.
The Jewish physicians have
been invited to attend the
late services at Beth David
Friday night when a special
program has been arranged
for them.


Beginning Friday, Novem-
ber 15th, and continuing for
four weeks, approximately
300 Rabbis and laymen will
visit more than 200 cities in
Lehalf of the November Tour
for the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations and
Prefo:m Juda'sm.
A November Tour meeting
will I1e held here on Novem-
Ler 22nd at Temple Israel. The
j;spak-r will Le Rabbi George
So'omon of Savannah, Ga;
Ihis November Tour' has
been designed to spread in-
fo matlon al out and arouse
interest in the various'activ-
ities of the Union of Ameri-
can He',rew Congregation.
I'abi So'omo has .Just
irached the city tHe is an Al-
cumnus of the IHbrew Union
Coleg!e, the seminary main-
t"-'n d 1 y the Union of'Amer-
.can hteorew Congregations.
II, i; ex-president of the Al-
umni Association, and for
twenty six yeirs has been
Rabbi of Congregation Mickve
Israel of Savannah, Ga., o ie
of the oldest Congregations in
the United States.
His subject fo- Friday even-
ing will be "The Synagogue,
ihe Sym.ro! of Democracy."
,he address will not only be
of interest to the Jewish peo-
ple but will be of great edu-
c itional value to the general
1;ublic.
The committee for this Tour
for Temple Israel is: Mr. D.
J. Apte, Dr. Jacob H. Kaplan,
Mrs. I. L. Seligman, Mr. A.
Tauber, Mr Herbert Feible-
man and Mr. Henry D. Wil-
liams.

Charity Ball Plans
To Be Announced

Mr. Stanley C. Myers, chair-
man of the Charity Ball be-
ing sponsored by the Jewish
Welfare Bureau announces
that rather elaborate plans are
now being made for the Char-
ity Ball which will be announ-
eed very shortly. All those in-
terested in the alleviation of
the distressed and needy are
urged to get in touch with
Mr. Myers.

Mohel Acts at His
Grandchild's Bris

It is not unusual for cir-
cumcisions of Jewish children
,to be held in Miami-i but a cir-
cumcision at which the grand-
Ifather of the baby is the "MIa-
hlel" is rather unusual here.
At the circumcision of the
baby boy of Mr. and Mrs. L.
Grosberg, of 251 N. W. -1st
street, last Wednesday after-
noon, Rev. B. Mendel, the
father of Mrs. Grosberg per
formed the circumcision cere-
mony on his own grandson.
Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld was
the "Sandik."


*,4 I I I I


... --i 1-i~ ~_ _L L i


r-;---------~










Pare 2


To My Way of Thinking
By Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld


(Continued from Page 1)

action: feeble-minded people,
idiots, morons, imbeciles,
should not be permitted to
Lear children. Applicants for
state-recognized or religion
sanctioned marriage must sat-
isfy an accepted age require-
ment. Perhaps the time is not
so distant as we imagine,
when the intended groom and
the bride to-be will require of
each other a certificate of
physical health and mental
sanity before agreeing on the
wedding date. When that day
comes there will be fewer di-
vorces and far healthier and
happier generations.

For in the final analysis,
what is the primary function
of marriage? After innumer-
able fashions have suddenly
al:peared, and as sudden y
vanished in thin air, after in-
vention has superseded inven-
tion, and after ideas and be-
liefs current and widely ac-
cepted yesterday, have radi-
cally changed today, after the
big glamour of love and ro-
mance have been added or de-
ducted, what remains the
purpose and goal of marriage?
Two kindred souls, finding
that they share common ideas
that they rejoice and grieve
over the same matters, find-
ing that they respect and love
each other, that each one is
reddy and eager to sacrifice
his or her own desires for the
c her, decide to form a life-
long companionship. This
beautifl comradeship is con-
sunmated by producing a new
generation in whom these
ideas of self-sacrifice and
high regard, love and faith-
ful devotion are to be lovingly
planted. All current ideas,
fading fads, catch-phrase
philosophies, notwithstanding
the most important considera-
tion in marriage is yet, what
it was in the time of Adam-
ropagation of the race. The
divine injunction to the latter.
"Be fruitful, and multiply,
and replenish the earth," de-
srite all sophisticated skepti-
cism, is still, undoubtedly the
Irotivating factor in ninety of
al present-day marriages.

Of course the feeble-mind-
ed person, or one championing
his cause might argue "Why
can I not marry and bear chil-
dren? Why shall I be deprived
of the joy of parenthood? Am
I to blame that I was born an
im1ccie?'" And the answer is
No." It is no more your fault
that you were born an idiot
than it is thebeggar's fault
that he was born poor. But,

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just as he, thru no personal
cause must live his life sans
luxuries, comforts, or even
bare necessities of life so
must you be denied children.

Life may be maliciously
cruel but society must be self-
protective. An imbecile fam-
ily means a burdensome nuis-
ance to society. Whether one
is a staunch believer in here-
dity or an ardent devotee of
the environment idea, the
fusion of two feeble-minded
persons can but result in fu
utility and trouble to society.

All our higher strivings
are for beauty and perfection,
are they not? In painting we
seek to blend color harmoni-
ously; in music we eschew the
clash of discordant notes; in
architecture and sculptoring
we painstakingly strive for
symmetry; in dancing for
rhythm, in literature, drama,
in brief, in all our endeavors
we struggle for perfection.
In the less concrete and
subtler groping of religion
and philosophy, recognizing
the shortcomings and imper-
fections glaringly frequent in
the world that is, we conjure
up a sublime all-perfect world
to be.
Shall we not therefore,
strive for as nearly equally
perfect conditions among our
fellow men as is humanly pos-
sible? Shall we not eliminate
or a leviate deplorable social
conditions by preventing their
conception? Shall we not safe-
guard society by insisting
that only they who are physi-
cally, mentally and morally
fit shall marry and mate?
Marriage would become
more sacred and meaningful.
Lcaith, not disease would be
contagious. Unhappiness and
dissatisfaction would be on
the decline, and the millennium
approachable, because a more
perfect humanity would be
much more likely to attain
the eternal goal, perfection.


I The Children i
S of the
g Gutter I

For days at a time the Chil-
dren of the Gutter-outcasts,
filthy, ragged, half-barefoot-
ed, with bewhiskered faces
and hands thick with dirt-
dig into the refuse cast on an
isolated spot beyond the city
limits. All, though at times
there are gangs and at times
but a few, are in search of
diamonds; for they were told
that one of their gang had
found a big diamond amidst


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S Kashrus, ask your own Rabbi.
_I
:1111(1 1n111111 1 1(III uIII(IIRI(IIIIII u


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


the refuse brought from the
city to this isolated spof. He
became rich and bought a
ranch somewhere in Idaho.
So, for days they dig. They,
too, hope to become rich sud-
denly. Digging, they find in
the refuse rags, pieces of
brass, rusted locks, and iron
bars, which they assort and
pile in separate heaps. At
night comes the Jewish rag-
peddler, "old Ike," with a
wagon load of rags and old
iron which he picked up on
the road, bought in the neigh-
borhood villages or on the
farms. He stops at this dia-
mond-seeking spot. He loads
the rags and broken house-
hold objects which these dia-
mond-seekers gathered, di-
vides among his "workers,"
as he calls them, a few cents,
and grumbles that these piles
of refuse are not worth the
trouble of loading.
All, except John and Fred,
take the few cents without i
murmur. John and Fred, how-
ever, are dissatisfied with the
"price." They look unkindly
at "old Ike" and after he rides
off, they talk to each other,
saying that this Jew is a prof-
iteer; that he becomes rich
from their labor.
After a few days of fruit-
less toil, the search becomes
tedious to most of them. They
disappear somewhere on the
other side of the high-piled
yards of refuse. John and
Fred remain. They do not give
up the hope of finding dia-
monds; they remain there
throughout the summer while .
the rest of the gang come and
go, as they will.
Late in Autumn when a bit-
ing wind pierces through the
air and the sky is clouded and
terrible, when the rest of the
gang vanishes for good, John
and Fred-rumbling in the re-
fuse yards which are soaked
through with heavy rainfall
-are still searching. When
they, too, become soaked with
rain and shiver from cold and
dampness, they repair to the
booth they made of iron bars,
furnished with old, torn mat-
tresses and roofed with pieces
of tin and a wornout oilcloth.
On one of those Autumn
days, when the clouds-torn
like pieces of coarse cloth-
spread over the threatening
sky, John and Fred were lying
stretched out in the booth and
were talking deserting the
place for a warmer climate.
Said John: "We hax no
luck. We search and search
for diamonds, but we don
find any." \
"It's becoming tedious to
Le poor," said Fred.
"I suppose you were a good--
for-nothing before, just like
me," murmured John.
"I would have been one of
the richest farmers in the Da-
kotas," spoke Fred, as if to
himself. "I would have owned
so much that buyers would
race for my stuff."
!!"t"""""""""*"""""" lH" 11ll11nllttnitln


EONARD
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lower. Where you will feel at
cements in this Paper.

peas, Etc. For observance of
Phone 5-1955
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"Nonsense"! replied John.
"We will die poor."
"If not for the 'Wild Rose',"
continued Fred unheedfully.
"'Wild Rose'?" repeated
John, burying his head in his
clasped hands.
Fred got up quickly.
"What? Did you know my
'Wild'? I thought I heard you
say that you came from
Texas."
"Oh, just so", replied John.
"It's a nice name."
Fred's eyes blazed forth
sparks of fire, his face be-
came red. He said to John.
"Would you like to hear
how 'Wild Rose' became false
to me?"
"Go ahead and tell, if you
have pleasure in telling it,"
replied John.
Fred began to tell his story:
"For years I nursed the
thought that 'Wild Rose,' my
neighbor's daughter, with
whom I had been chums since
childhood, belonged to me;
that no one would dare come
between us. She was full of
life, passionate, sharp-eyed as
an Indian, swift as a devil;
she never played the game of
throwing horseshoes or ball,
but was passionately interest-
ed in hunting. So we would
shoulder guns, and be off on
our hunt. She rode her
'broncho' without saddle or
lines, but, holding on to the
horse's mass of black hair,
she rode so wildly over hill
and plain that it was impos-
sil le to catch her. She was a
good shot, rarely missing her
aim. She did not shoot at rab-
bits or skunks, but at deer
and buffaloes.
"And after the chase, when
we came to the 'rodeo,' the
young men envied me. They


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$4.95
Bowback Unf. Chairs
95c
Hickory Cottage
Chairs, 95c
Austell Kitchen
Cabinets, $24.50


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Pays For
$80 Worth


Per Week
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$160 Worth


Per Week
Pays For
$400 Worth


GOOD AND BAD NEW AND ASIS


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When on the Tamiami Trail, we shall be ple-ed to have you
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THINKING JEWS ALL SUBSCRIBE TO THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN! DO YOU?


For ICE-Use
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ICE
Plant lIcated at 645 N. W. 13th Street
Phone 2-1297 or 2-1298 for
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Friday, November 22, 1929

almost burned me up from
sheer Jealousy. She always
joined in the ride-bet and
would always win. We would
then go to the 'road house'
and drink to her health: The
result was that we started to
fight over her. Proud was
'Wild Rose' to see me giving
the fellows blow after blow.
She would stand aside and
smile, seeing how I came olt
the victor. And late at night
when we rode home on our
swift horses, she would bend
toward me and dig into my
flesh with her passionate
kissing. The horses sped
swiftly, while we were sitting
on them with head bent to
head and arm clasped in arm
(Continued on Page 5)



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FOR EVERY PURPOSE
We make any kind of
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vidual measurement,
made in our own fac-
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SSpecializing in Bell
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Friday, November 22, 1929
--------THE----- JEWISH FLORIDIAN


THE JEWISH

FL RIDIAN
A weekly newspaper published at
Miami. Florida
Sby
The Jewish Flor:dian Publishing
Company
302 S. W. FOURTH AVENUE
Phone 8745
----------


r EDITORIAL STAFF
d lOUIS SHOCHET
A CHtOCHOM
e HN DOROM
S A. N. ASHER

EDITORIAL
---- ~


Are Papers

Appreciated? j


Do your readers appreciate
the newspapers they buy and
read? It is a pertinent ques-
tion because every business
rests ultimately on the pub-
lic acceptance of its product.
We think there is plenty of
evidence that they do, even
though the appreciation is of-
ten unconscious.
Do they boost for the paper
that they read? Do they
praise it to their neighbors
and to out-of-town acquaint-
ances ?
These thoughts are inspired
in part by a conversation, re-
centy overheard, in which two
fellow residents of the same
town were debating which of
two local papers was the
worst.
"I claim that the Sentinel
is the most piffling paper be-
tween New York and Chica-
go," said the first.
"Go on," was the retort,
"for pure, unadulterated mis-
information on every insig-
nificant subject, give me the
Watchman every tlm2.
"But the Sentinel never
takes a stand on any subject
and when it does, it reverses
itself," urged the first.
"Yeah! Well just try to get
something into the Watchman
aLout what is really going on
down at the City Hall. Just
tlry."
"But the Watchman can't
be as bad as the Sentinel. It's
a newer paper. It hasn't had
the time to develop."
"Develop? Thunder! It was
Lorn that way."
You might conclude from
the al ove that each was de-
nouncing the other's choice
oft reading matter. But the
lact developed that No. 1 was
a daily buyer and reader of
the Sentinel, while No. 2 felt
that his evening was ruined
if the boy failed to leave the
Watchman at his door.


Panning the paper they
laid for was apparently part
of the pleasure of being a sub
scriber.
Life, the humorous weekly
oice conducted a contest to
find out which American
newspaper is the worst, as
evidenced by letters written
by subscribers. The contest
Was a great success, hundreds
of correspondents vying to

OUR


tell just how much they de-
spised their own local product.
Many seemed to take a keen
C'vc pride in proving that
their own home newspaper
was worse than any other citx
could "'oast."
We forget who won, but we
itmember that the papers
nominated were among the
, cst and most readable in
America.
Olserve any of these critics
when they are out of town
and you will find their first
move on arising from their
hotel beds is to hurry out to
a news stand and try to buy
the home-town paper. Per-
halps the stand does not carry
it. Ihen hear them yell!
There are men of more jud-
icial temperament who will
express sorrow that their
home city does not have a
paper more like the New York
Times or the Chicago Tribune
even though the home town
has less than 50,000 inhabi-
tants. But when they are in
New York or Chicago, the big
city papers seem strange and
unsatisfying. They pine for
the latest dirt from old Main
Street.
If there is any small pur-
chase that a man ought to ap-
preciate, it is his newspaper,
for in no other does he get
such large value for such an
insignificant sum. The paper
that sells for 5 cents may cost
anywhere from 10 cents up-
ward to produce.
We believe that newspapers
might well make a practice of
bringing to light more evi-
dence of the appreciation
which the great body of read-
ers unquestionably feel.
When a man has read a
paper for ten, twenty or thir-
ty years it has become a de-
finite part of his mental life
-his window to the universe,
his criterion of events. The
na v, Englishman who arose
in prayer meeting to intone,
"Oh Lord, as Thou doubtless
sawast in the Manchester
Guaruian, the blessed cause
of peace is making great
strides," really expressed the
sui-conscious attitude of
most loyal newspaper sub-
scribers.
We earnestly believe that
most papers are too modest
about themselves. We would
not have them given over to
boasting, neither would we
urge overstressing of the
commercial aspects of circu-
lation. But we think they
could do more to make their
readers feel that they are
members of an honorable
Lody and shares in splendid
traditions of unfettered jour-
nalism.
And thus, dear reader, you


will pardon us for having
burdened you this much. We
feel that the Jewish Floridan
is an integral part of you and
everything that means im-
provement in your paper will
interest you.
Let's hear from you not only
with the little subscription of
only $2.00 per year, but a
suggestion or two how your
paper may be improved. And
as the good Jew says:
"SHEMT SICH NIT."


Page 3


r


Liza: So you think I'se got
the nicest form in town?
Rastus: Yup, Ah knows a
good thing when Ah seize it.
*
"Your Majesty, a woman
awaits without."
"Without what, knave?"
"Without speaking."
"Show her in. She's the
ideal I've been waiting for."
*
One thing for the porous
plaster
Is said that ought to win-
Its friendship for you's surely
warm
And it sticks through thick
and thin.

Women are not so nervous
as they used to be. In fact
they are less ruffled.
*
"Yes, I heard a noise, and
got up in my night gown, and
there under the bed I saw a
man's leg!"
"Good heaven's! The burg-
lar's?"
"No, my husband's. He had
heard the noise, too!"
*
Housewife: Don't bring me
any more of that horrid milk.
It is positively blue.
Milkman: It ain't our fault,
lady. It's these long, dull ev-
enings as makes the cows de-
pressed.
*
Lloyd George: American
women have lost their nerve.
Coolidge: You ought to see
some of the entries in our
Leauty contests.

"So Jack told you of his
love ?"
"Well, not exactly. He just
went through the motions."

Ragged Ralph says he was
married by a justice of the
peace and he hasn't had any
peace since.
*
A young Negress, wearing
almost nothing, came before
the Municipal Court on a dis-
orderly and drunk charge. His
honor, having noticed her
scanty clothing, suggested
that she go home and put on
some clothes.
"Judge, Ah aspects Ah kin
dress like Ah wants."
"You are fined five dollars
for contempt of court."
Going to the clerk to pay
her fine, she was asked what
the fine was for. In a haughty
voice she replied:
"De court says dat Ah is
fined five dollars for temptin'
the court."
*
Ali Baba stood before the
door of the stone cavern and
repeated the words that had
been told to him.
"Open Sesame!" he said
loudly. Nothing happened.
"Open Sesame!" he said,
more loudly. Less than north,
ing happened.
Finally he fairly bellowed:
"Open Sesame!" This time


"I'll tell you when 'e gets
near enough fer us to begin,"
spoke the fourth, spitting on


his hands


and approaching


night, son," he said; "the
place has just been raided."

Great ease comes from litt-
ling meddling.

A good business sweetens
pleasure just as hard work
sweetens rest.

A woman may be brave in
mo;t things, but she is afraid
to wear a hat that is a fright.
*4
We don't envy the big nor-
thern cities that have to put
up with both a cold wave nad
a crime wave.

No, a person who makes out
income tax blanks profession-
ally is not an income taxider-
mist.
*
After a man has been mar-
ried a few months he admits
to himself that it is not near-
ly as bad as the comic papers
led him to believe.
*
They sat in the swing at mid-
night,
He thought she was mighty
sweet
As he clung to her neck and
the skeeters
Thought the same thing of
her feet.

They sat in the car at mid-
night,
Locked in a tight embrace.
A curve-a big embankment--
A slab marks their resting
place.

Four burly men, wearing
shabby caps at accentuated
angles over their eyes, stood
at the corner of a building in
the grim factory section of
the town. The morning sun,
just topping the skyline,
drenched the street with chill
orange; patches of wavering
shadow held their last fort
here and there under an al-
cove or in an alley mouth.
'Ere comes the blighter,"
snarled that one of the quar-
tet, whose jaw hung the low-
est.
His consorts peered over
his shoulder.
"It looks like 'im from
'ere," agreed the second man;
his expression was not pleas-
ant.
They remained in silence
for space, nervously clench-
ing and unclenching their cal-
loused hands.
"Tyke another look," com-
manded the first speaker. One
of his companions cautiously
glanced around the corner.
"It's 'im, orl right, orl
right!" he exclaimed.
The four men stepped back
and prepared themselves.
They slid out of their sweat-
ers, and circumspectly rolled
up their sleeves. One seized
a length of pipe that lay near
him on the ground; another
drew a massive wrench from
his pocket; a third grasped
the narrow end of a small
plank, and lifted it to his
shoulder.


sof' voice, ze vinking eye of
ze beautiful lady ? It is ze lad-
ies who sweeten ze cares of
life. It is ze ladies who do not
cheer but inebriate. A*' so,
my fren's, vid great respect'
to ze sex, ze toast I have make
is 'Ze Ladies, God bless sem
all I"


CHASER
.~~ ~ ~~ IIII


the great stone door rolled
aside, and a weazened old
man peeped from the opening.
"Come around tomorrow


ADVERTISERtS SAVE YOU MONEY ANDGIVE YOU SERVICE!


the corner.
They held their breath.
"Orl right, mates," hoarse-
ly cried the man on lookout.
"'E'll be 'ere in a minute!"
"Let's get at it, then,"
whispered the first speaker.
"We don't want to get
caught."
And thus, when the boss
rounded the angle, he found
his four plumbers hard at
work.
*
It was shortly after the
country decided to dry up,
that the Manhattan Cocktail
America's pre-dry most popu-
lar fancy drink, took its place
at the American Bar in the
French Cafes. Two Ameri-
cans, obviously tourists, their
feet on the brass rail of ten-
der memories, called for the
now expatriated old favorite
drink. A Frenchman nearby,
with a glass of absinthe, his
own national drink, at his el-
bow, watched the proceedings
with puzzled interest from the
bartender's first pour of
whiskey into the glasses to
the final gurgle as the liquid
found its way down the
throats of the participants.
Turning to his neighbor,
another American, he remark-
ed, "Ze Americaine he is ver'
funny. Ze Frenchman can
nev' understand' heem-jus'
like ze Americaine cocktail.
Firs' he put een whiskey to
make ze drink strong, zen he
put in water to make her
weak, zen he drop in some
sugar to make her sweet, nex'
he put in lemon to make her
sour, zen he say 'here's to you
an' he dreenk her he'self!"
*
Mine is going to be about a
Frenchman, too: It was at an
American affair, held in
Paris. The hall glittered with
lights, white shirt-fronts and
beautiful women. Toasts of
mutual admiration had been
drunk when the toastmaster
suddenly bethought himself
that no toast had been drunk
to the fair sex. One of the
guests, a Frenchman, than
whom there is no better judge
of ladies, was called upon and
responded in this manner:
"Miladies an' Gentlemans.
Your excellent chairman, he
have tell me, 'Make ze toast.'
Zen I tell him I have not able
to make ze taost. But he say
dere is von toast nobody but
a Frenchman can make prop-
er an' so, vid your kin' per-
mission, I vill make ze toast.
"Ze brevete is ze soul of ze
feet, as ze great philosophaire
he say, an' derefore I vill not
say much to ze point. Ah, my
fren's, ze immortal Shakes-
peare he say, a zing of beauty
is a joy for nevermore. It is
ze ladies for who I make zis
toast. Vot is more entrancing
zan ze charmante smile, ae


A6 Mib-%O


- - w 1 rq-Ak


j










Pare 4


.I


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


SOCIE


Monthly luncheon bridge of
the Sisterhood of Temple Is-
rael was held yesterday at
the Park View grill, Biscayne
boulevard, with 125 members
present.
Mrs. Samuel Aronovitz, as-
sisted by Mrs. J. A. Richter,
Mrs. J. Bernstein and Mrs. I.
A. Weinstein, was in charge
of the affair. Next meeting
will be a Thanksgiving dinner
dance at the Alcazar hotel,
November 27, in charge of
Mrs. Mendal Cromer, Mrs. D.
J. Apte and Mrs. M. Bronner.
Reservations will be received
by Mrs. H. E. Kleiman, the
entertainment chairman, or
any of the above committee.
*
Prizes for the bridge spon-
sored by the Council of Jew-
ish Women, Sunday evening
were awarded to Mrs. Bert
Riesner, Mrs. Sam Aronovitz,
G. King and Ben Watts. Miss
Sara Kahn was presented with
the door prize. More than 150
guests attended.
*
"Marriage or Career for
Women" was the subject of a
talk given at the meeting of
the Ruth Bryan Owen Orator-
ical club by Miss Rose Mary
Gerson at the home of Mrs.
Sydney Weintraub. tt was de-
cided that "Friendship" will
be the subject for the next
meeting to be held at the
home of Mrs. Gerald Lewis at
2:30 p. m. Friday. Mrs. David
Bogen will preside and Mrs.
Jules Pearlman will talk on
the stock exchange. A tele-
phone conversation will be
given by Mrs. Joe Williamson.
Others taking part in the pro-
gram will be Mrs. Herbert
Scher, Mrs. A. L. Kanter and
Miss Gerson.
*
Clever pajama party was
held by members of the Miami
section of the Council of Jew-
ish Juniors at the home of
1k9__ A71Q Iyir a 1Mr


Mrs. wiilialm Snay n
Dorothy Mitchell
charge of arrant
Board members assist(
tertaining. Games wer
and prizes awarded
best costumes to M
Casanoff, Miss Lila Ti
Miss Tilly Predinger. I
ments were served. P
elections were played
Irene Farr.
*
Ten tables of brid
arranged for the par
scored Friday afternoon
home' of Mrs. S. J. F
the Miami chapter of
S -"N-- .. --. .... rn- -n-.
SNew York Barber
431 N. W. 2nd A
I-0---o--
Ladies Hair Bobbing
Specialty. Special Atte
Children.
-----
ESKENAZI BROS,


Flagler Dry Clea
a-L P gmu, Dyei

472 W. RrOa sW
rm o320
Fer the Preservaion a Your


sah. Prizes were won by Ethel
Goldberry and Mrs. M. Magid.
.,
Formal pledging of Miss
Bluma Goldberg, Miss Ethel
Goldberg, Mrs. Louella Farr
and Miss Malvina Weiss took
place Friday evening at the
home of Mrs. S. Lutsky. Pur-
ple and white, sorority colors,
were used in the decorations
and refreshments. Mrs. Lut-
sky gave an address following
the service. Patronesses and
members present were Miss
Faye Weintraub, president;
Miss Rose Shayne, Miss Mar
tha Myers, Miss Marcella
Kanner, Miss Ruth Orovitz,
Miss Rose Rifas, Mrs. Ben-
jamin Axelroad, Mrs. J. H.
Kaplan and Mrs. Lutsky.
*
Weekly program of the
Mana-Zucca Music club at 4
p. m. Monday at Mazica hall
included a number of selec-
tions by some of Miami's
gifted artists. The enrollment
of the club, which recently has
Legun its season's programs,
includes most of the leading
musicians of Metropolitan
Miami, and the programs pre-
sented by the organizations
are arranged to reproduce the
works of the world's leading
composers.
The program Monday as fol-
lows: Piano solo, "Fantapie
Impromptu" ( Chopin ) by
Eleanor Clark; soprano solos,
"Caro mio ben" (Glordani)
and "Il Bacio" (Arditi) by
Mildred Baker Fletcher; vio-
lin solo, "Ballad and Polon-
aise" (Vieuxtemps) by Rob-
ert Kistler, accompanied by
Corrinne Ernst at the piano;
vocal solo by Major McKinley
Ash; soprano solos, "Hills"
(LaForge) and "To the Chil-
dren" (Rachmaninoff) and
"My Native Land? (Gretch-
anenoff) by Mrs. John Kirk
Shinn, accompanied by Chas.
T. Ferry at the piano.


TY I
1


Guests included Mrs. Mit-
chell Wolfson, Mrs. Albert
Seiden, Mrs. Jack Lear, M ss
Ethel Schonfeld. Miss Jan,
Schonfeld, Miss Harriet Salz-
berg, Mrs. Helen Sloan, Mrs.
Dorothy Mitchell, Miss Doro-
thy Brill, Mrs. Max Orovitz,
Mrs. Aaron Kaner, Mrs. Stan-
ley Myers, Mrs. William
Shayne, Mrs. Joseph Wein-
traub, Mrs. Sol Hollander,
Miss Edith Katz, Miss Flor-
ence Alpert, Miss Reggie Gold-
stein, Mies. Sydney Weintraul
Mrs. Herlert Sepler, Mis.
Lillian Chisling, Miss Sylvia
Katz, Miss Lauretta Simons,
Miss Evelyn Marks, Mrs.
Loris Rifas, Miss Lillian Ri-
fas, Miss Freida Hirsch, Miss
Mayvme Hirsch, Mrs. Sophia
Warren and Mrs. Strauss of
New York.
*
Mrs. T. Herman entertained
at her home, 1145 N. W. 3rd
street, Sunday, in celebration
of the birthday of her daugh-
ter, Mrs. Sylvia Kellman.
Dancing and games were en-
.oyved on the lawn where a re-
freshment table bore a large
cake and tropical dainties.
Reception for Miss Ethel
Harriet Schonfeld and Dr.
George J. Gerson whose mar-
riage took place Thursday,
was given Wednesday night
by her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph Schonfeld, at their
home.
A profusion of palms and
flowers decorated the recep-
tion rooms, where Mr. and
Mrs. Schonfeld and the wed-
ding couple received. Refresh-
ments were served in the din-
ing room where the table was
arrayed with attractive de-
corations. M i s s Rosemary
Gerson, Miss Jane Schonfeld
and Miss Martha Weintraub
assisted in serving.
Mr. and Mrs. Schonfeld
were hosts Thursday at din-
ner for members of the wed-
ding party at their home.


1 osenthal, Miss Rae Rosen-
oarttn, Mrs. Libby Rost, Mrs.
HIenry Berg, Mrs. Alex Gold-
stein, Mrs. I. A. Russcol and
Mrs. Charles Rosengarten.
*
The Junior Hadassah will
hold a spinster's Tea this Sat-
unday at 8:30 p. m. at the
home of Mrs. Frieda Lutzky,
Miami Beach.
*
An important meeting of
the Junior Council of Jewish
\omen will be held Tuesday
November 26th at Kaplan
Hall, at 8 p. m. A snappy pro-
g.am has been arranged.
*
The regular meeting of the
Friendship League was held
at the Miramar Hotel, last
Wednesday night, when the
usual dance and entertain-
ment was held immediately
after the regular business
meeting. At this meeting
Billie Mohilner was elected to
membership and the plans for
the 'Ihanksgiving Eve Dance
to Le held next Wednesday
evening at the Miramar Hotel
were announced.
The Florida Pirates Orches-
tra will furnish the dance
music and a number of enter-
tainment features have been
promised The dancing will
start after the close of the
business meeting, at 10 p. m.
o'clock. Miss Betty Greenberg
former secretary of the Leag-
ue made a short address.

One of the prettiest and
most successful dances staged
in recent years in Miami was
held at the Beth David Tal-
mud Torah under the auspices
of the Ladies Auxiliary. The
committee in charge consist-
ing of Mrs. Meyer Friedman,
Mrs. S. Futterfas, Mrs. T. Ar-
nold, Mrs. C. Tannenbaum,
Mrs. B. Kotkin, Mrs. M. Rip-
pa, Mrs. Yunis, Mrs. G. Fink-
elstein and Mrs. Buckstein ar-


ie. Mrs. ..
was in * *
gements. Shower and bridge comli- Members of the Fortnight-
ed in en- meeting Miss Ethel Tauoer i" Book Review club met GENUINE
-e played whose engagement to Emden Tuesday night at the home of A NU
for the Herzog has been announced, Mrs. A. L. Kanter. Mrs. Harry
iss Lee was given by Miss Adalyn Weinberg reviewed. "Scarlet CLAUDE NEON DISPLAY SIGN
obin and Ross Saturday afternoon at Sister Mary," by Julia Peter-
Refresh- her home on Michigan ave., kin. Others present were: Dr. Was Chosen As The
'iano se- Miami Beach. Appointments WeinLerg, Dr. and Mrs. A. E.
by Miss were cleverly arranged and AMBULANCE SERVICE BEACON LIGHT TO SUCCESS
prizes were awarded. An ice W. H. Combs Co., Estab. 1896
course was served. COMBS FUNERAL HOME By
ge were Phone Miami 32101
y sonn139 N. E. Znd Avenue
ty spon- MIAMI BEACH FUNERAL HOME
n at the THE Phone M. B. 5-2101
fields for L 123 Wa uinto Ave

FARWAY Continental Ref aurant
r Shop Julius Damenstein, Inc.
| DAIRY JEWELER 8 S. E. FIRST AVE.
Our SOLICITS YOUR The Store with a Reputation ----
ntion to SOLICITS YOUR
PATRONAGE 1o w. Flager s Phone 4701 WHY NOT FOLLOW THE GOOD EXAMPLE?
Prop. I __ MIAMI, FLORIDA o---
s- ----- v -
Phone Miami C
mcrs 7105 King

FOR PROMPT Undertaking Co.
Southern tiyorpo n
SERVICE 29 N. W. THIRD AVENUE
ClasodH" __________ Phoaes 23535-31624

THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN-A MEDIUM OF AND FOR MIAMI JEWRY!


CT ~--- -- ~7- -- ---- ---- -----_


Friday, November 22,1929

ranged for an evening of en.
tertainment that pleased all.
Young's Orchestra furnished
the music and during the
evening a dance was present.
ed by Miss Myerson and sev.
eral musical numbers render.
ed by a number of entertain-
eis. More than one hundred
ani fifty attended. A large
turkey presented by Mrs. A.
Daum and raffled was won by
Mrs. B. Hirshfield. Refresh.
ments were sold during the
evening and as a result the
funds of the Talmud Torah
will be benefited considerably.
*
A meeting of the members
of the Beth David Ladies
Auxiliary will be held at the
Talmud Torah Auditorium
next Tuesday evening, at 8 p.
m. o'clock and all members
are urged to attend and be
I'rompt.
*
The all day sewing arrang-
ed for the Hadassah for the
purpose of preparing gar-
ments to be sent to the Had-
assah Medical Units in Pales-
tine will be held at the home
of Mrs. I. L. Seligman, 820 N.
W. 18th Place, this coming
Monday, November 25th in.
stead of last Monday as re-
ported erroneously in last
week's issue. Lunch will be
served at noon, and all inter.
ested in good work are urged
to be on hand early.
*
The Workmens Circle
Branch, 692, held the first of
Continued on Page 5


Congratulations
-To-
Singer's Continental
Restaurant
S ----

"JOE" ZALIS
241 N. W. 5th St. i
-0-
---o---- i
S WHOLESALE AND
RETAIL
FRUITS and
VEGETABLES
,, ,i i I II l n: l ll l l n l i ll ,l ltll, li,,,,,










Friday, November 22, 1929


SOCIETY


a series of educational and so-
cial meetings at its Club
rooms last Sunday night un-
der the auspices of the Wo-
men's Club and the Work-
men's Circle School Mr. Abe
Dock presided and in a brief
address outlined the purpose
of the gatherings. He was fol-
lowed by Mr. J. Groham the
teacher of the School who
stressed the importance of the
instruction of Jewish children
in the history of their people
in Yiddish language. There
were a number of impromptu
speeches and recitations by
various of the members in
Yiddish and a number of Jew-
ish folk songs were sung. Re-
freshments were served dur-
ing the evening.

Mr. Jacob Brenner returned
to his home in Roanoke, Va.,
after having been the house
guest of his brother-in-law
and sister Mr. and Mrs. Nath-
an Adelman.

Mr. S. Niger, prominent
Lecturer and writer of New
York City will arrive here
soon to deliver a lecture under
the auspices of the Arbeiter
Ring on December 10th. The
associate bodies such as the
Women's Club, and the Schule
will take part in the meeting.
Mr. Niger is rather well
known in the world of Yiddish
letters and is not a newcomer
to Miami having addressed a
very large audience in Miami
last year. His visit to Miami
is part of a tour of the Coun-
try being made by him at thi-
time.

The second annual Mas-
cuerade and Civic Ball will be
held at the Miami Women'.'
C'uJ on the Bayfront on Tues-
day, January 7th, under the
auspices of the Arbeiter Ring
Branch, Womens Club and
Schule. The proceeds will be
used towards the upkeep of
the Schule.


BUSINESS
GOSSIP

he opening, of Singer's
Continental Restaurant next
Sunday evening, will provide
Miami with a restaurant
which for beauty and quality
of food will be unexcelled. Sit-
uated in the heart of the busi-
ness district of Miami at 8 S.
E. First Avenue, (upstairs of
the old Hollywood offices) it
will afford Miamians the op-
portunity they have long wait-
ed for. Mrs. Singer is well-
known to New Englanders be-
ing the owner and operator of
the famous Singer's Inn at
Sharon, Mass.


For the opening night no
expense has ben spared. One
of Miami's best Orchestras
have been provided in addition
to a cabaret entertainment
plculated to keep the diners
Interested all evening. Souve-
irs have been provided for
dies which will make things
father interesting to them.
Of course, a real banquet has
been provided and from the
"on list of goodies scheduled
the guests present will be kept

I THE


9 THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


busy having a good time all
uight long.

Miami Beach is soon to
boast of a delicatessen second
to none in the country, with
the opening of Samet's Deli-
catessen on Collins avenue as
announced in our advertising
columns. Equipped with the
most modern show cases, each
individually refrigerated by
the most modern of plants so
as to insure the whole some-
ness of all foods sold by them
and so arranged that the cus-
tomer may see at a glance
just what is before his eyes,
the store presents as beauti-
ful an array of merchandise
as ever shown in the South.
Mr. Samet advises that noth-
ing but "strictly kosher" de-
licatessen will be offered for
sale in the store. A line of
dairy products and fancy gro-
ceries as well as breads, pas-
tries, etc., will make the cus-
tomer wonder whether he is
really in Miami Beach or back
in some large Northern City.
The store will be under the
management of J. E. better
known as "Jerry" Samet
whose experience in the food
products line insures the cus-
tomer real satisfaction.

The Jewish tourists to Mi-
ami will be pleased to learn
of the fact that the Leonard
Hotel on Miami Beach will be
under the management of the
well known Max Feit, this
coming season. It will be op-
erated as an American plan
hotel with emphasis being laid
on the fact that all the food
will be strictly kosher. Mr.
Feit feels that there should
be no question in the minds of
any of the tourists or resi-
dents of Miami and he has
invited the inspection of any
Rabbi be he resident or visit-
ing to insure absolute adher-
ence to the laws of "Kashrus"
as they should be observed.
The hotel is one of the show
places of Miami Beach con-
taining more than fifty rooms
each room having bath and
shower and all being outside
rooms. Being situated within
one block of the Ocean it is
easily accessible for those who
come here for bathing or sun-
shine. The roof garden is one
of the largest in the vicinity,
and in addition a splendid
patio will be used for the con-
venience of the guests.
Arrangements have been
made for card party after-
noon teas, social meetings etc,
for both the visitors and the
residents of Miami Beach and
attention will be given to cat-
ering of banquets and parties
for those to whom "Kashrus'
is desirable. The formal open-
ing will be announced in these
columns shortly.

Housewife: Don't bring me
any more of that horrid milk.
It is positively blue.


- Milkman: It ain't our fault.
lady. It's these long, dull ev-
enings as makes the cows de-


+--BU.IN---
The Children BUSINE
of the
Gutter AUTO PARTS
MI AMT A ITT WRIT VIr T


(Continued from Page 2)
"But Ithe 'cow-puncher,'
Jim, came between us, and
made an end to my happi-
ness, Jim was a good horse-
man. Once he won the ride-
bet off 'Wild Rose'. All were
astonished at his victory. I,
of course, was vexed. Yet I
suppressed my feeling, and
went up to 'Wild Rose' to con-
sole her, saying that in spite
of her losing the bet she was
dearer to me now than ever
before. But my consolation
was useless, for since then she
became cold toward me. She
was in love with Jim. So, once
in the 'roadhouse,' when she
was dancing with Jim, swirl-
ing with him over the floor
like a whirlwind, my blood be
gan to boil. I jumped into the
dancing crowd and pulled her
away from him. A tumult set
in. We began to fight. I pulled
out my revolver and fired at
him. A cry. A scream. 'Wild
Rose' threw herself down at
his writhing body and kissed
him passionately. I don't know
if I killed him, but I ran out,
jumped on my horse and ran
off. The horsemen followed
me, but I was brisker than
they. I rode away into the
prairie, left my horse there
and wandered around ever
since." ....
By the time Fred had ended
his story, John was fast
asleep, his snoring resounded
in every corner of the booth.
Fred scowled at him, called
him a "dirty dog," and lay
down beside him, listening to
the rain on the tin-roofed
booth.
It was dark when John a-
woke. Fred also got up. Both
came out of the booth and
looked for a while at the
clouded sky. Again they dug
,nto tne refuse.
"Maybe we will yet find
diamonds before we leave,"
said John.
Suddenly John stopped dig-
ging.
"What's the matter, John?
asked Fred. "Did you find
something valuable?"
"Listen"! said John quietly,
as if he had a secret to tell
him. "Maybe it would be a
good idea to get rich quickly
other than by searching for
diamonds."
"How"? asked Fred, look-
ing sternly at his pal.
John leaned toward Fred,
and said: "You know that
every Jew is rich, as rich as
Rockefeller."
"So what of it"? asked
Fred.
"Well, we will kill the Jew
peddler when he comes here
tonight and take away his
money," whispered John into
Fred's ear.
rrcnntinued Next Week)


'Mr rnO


-Incorporated-
Has Parts For Your Car
606-608 North West Fifth Street
Phone 5050 (fifty-fifty)
BLOOM AUTO REPAIR
& PARTS CO.
N. W. 17th Ave. at 23rd St.
Phone 23631
The Largest car wreckers in
Florida
L. (Pop) PERSON
Buyer of All Kinds of Scrap Metal
We Sell Auto Parts
2141 N. W. SECOND AVE.
Phone 20621

BAKERIES
GOLDSTROM BAKING CO., Inc.
1349 Washington Ave.
Phone 2836 Miami Beach
The finest in Bread and Cakes
Obtainable at the
Rosedale Delicatessen, Nwe York
Delicatessen and Empire
Delicatessen

BAGS and METALS
AMERICAN BAG & METAL CO.
Phone 21147
610 North West Fifth Street
EAST COAST BAG & METAL CO.
(Inc.)
I. L. MINTZER
MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS
435-445 N. W. 8th Street
Phone 4485
PEPPER METAL CORP.
Scrap Metal and Machinery
N. W. Cor. 5th Ave. and 14th St.
Phone 22546

BUILDING SUPPLIES
J. SIMPSON
Building Materials,
Roofing Paper, Asphalt
423 N. W. N. River Drive
Phone 7251

DELICATESSEN
ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN
170 N. W. 5th St.
We Supply Your Every Want

FISH & SEA FOODS
STANDARD FISH CO.
629 W. Flagler St.
Phone 2-3362
EAST COAST FISH CO.
"The Best in Fish and Sea Food"
Curb Market S. W. 2nd Ave.
Phone 22736


FOUNTAINS
Cold Drinks
Candies and Lunches
THE SHRADERS
Corner 1st St. N. W. and 3rd


Ave.


FURNITURE EXCHANGE,
INC.
321 N. Miami Ave.
We Buy and Sell Furniture

INSURANCE
Life Fire Casualty Bonds
RAUZIN INSURANCE
AGENCY, Inc.
Phones 22565 32452
137 N. E. First St.
Miami, Fla.
JOSEPH M. LIPNITZ
"Service That Makes Friends
and Keep Them"
Insurance Underwriter
Lawyer's Bldg. Phone 2-0317 2-1522
LEON ELKIN
Is now Local Representative of the
Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.
and is ready to serve his friends.
Residence
1620 N. W. 30th STREET
Phone 26085

LAUNDRIES
NATIONAL LAUNDRIES, INC.
"Trustworthy Service"
1048 N. W. 5th Ave.
Phone 8131

PHARMACISTS
BRYAN PARK PHARMACY
Chas. Tannenbaum,
Pharmacist
(reg. pharmacist for 17 years)
Cor 22nd Ave. and 8th St. S. W.
CRYSTAL PHARMACY
Dr. A. D. Halpern, Ph. G. Ph. D.
Prescriptions Our Specialty
128 N. Miami Ave. Phone 29713

PIPE and STEEL
ADELMAN PIPE & STEEL CO.
58 N. E. 25th St.
Aat F. E. C. R. R. Phone 21420

A. & B. PIPE AND METAL CO.
Phone 31355
53 North East 25th Street

PRINTERS
MIAMI PRINTING CO.
"Printing That Pays"
Phone 23261
107 South Miami Avenue


TIRES
MOHAWK TIRES
JOHNSON TIRE COMPANY
1361 N. E. 1st Ave..
Phones: 4114-4115


FOR YOUR OWN GOOD VISIT THE

West Flagler Market, No. 2, Inc.
941 S. W. 22nd AVENUE.
The Home of
CHOICE GROCERIES, FINE FRUITS AND
VEGETABLES
HIGH GRADE WESTERN MEATS
Phone 32771
WATCH FOR OUR FRIDAY AND SATURDAY SPECIALS


pressed .. .... V... Jl I -iJ %L i AnI
pressed. -------- LISTINGS IN ALL LOCAT
.iY- -"- PRICES LOW

THE BISCAYNEINN GESCHEID
158 N. E. THIRD STREET Realtors and Build

The Home of The Finest Cooked Strictly Kosher ave. Wn. Pei
Meals at Most Reasonable Prices. Washington Ave.
--Phone Miami Beach 5-1
Take Advantage of Our Private Parking Facilities


JEWIH FLORDIAN-A MEDIUM OF AND FOR MIAMI JEWRY!

IS FLOR'DI


Page 5


SS DIRECTORY

FURNITURE









Pagefe


1; a, ni mee"
member It'p 6f tHle "Mens club
of M m l1,, held last t.Wpig-
day night at the iscayn'e
Masonic Hall, the nominating
committee appointed by the
president was instructed to
bring in its report at a meet-
ing to be held in December at
which time the elections for
officers will be held. The De-
cember meeting will be a com-
bined business and entertain-
ment meeting and the mem-
bers and their wives will be
permitted to attend. Non-
members will not be allowed
at this meeting.
Great interest is being
shown in the Hospital project
furthered by the Mens Club
and a desire to again take
part in the Civic life of the
City was shown by the mem-
bers. Efforts are now being
made to locate a suitable
building to house the activi-
ties of the Club.
The annual Banquet of the

Congratulations
-To-
SSinger's Continental
S Restaurant
---- --oIS----_-
SFor Sea Food of the Finest
-SEE-
Biscayne
Sea Food Co.
706 Collins Avenue
MIAMI BEACH
C ongratu11111111111111ations1111111 11111
Congratulations
-To-


SAME'S
DELICATESSEN
0-
i ---o- i
The Finest in Rye, Whole
Wheat, Pumpernickel and
Vienna Breads; Pastries, Pies,
Cakes, Etc.
0--o--

Goldstrom
SBaking Co.
1349 Washington Ave.
T- IIIIIII llllll lli ull lll llll ll ll IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII l ll ll Il I llll l l llII

S Congratulations
-To-
SAMET'S
DELICATESSEN
0-
FRIGIDAIRE ,SALES
& SERVICE CORP.
134 N. W. Third Ave.
0-
:__ ---o-- -
We Furnished the Modern
Refrigeration Plant



S BEST WISHES
S-To--
SAMET'S
DELICATESSEN
S_=
I. --------

J. Frank Vann
S Store Fixtures
S1650 N. W. 7th Avenue
Phone 2-1525

IOU
oul


;was app61fted
Srangementa Eip
fair. The-comj
structed to pr
er"' meal at th

An Excellent O
FOR JEW
Capable bookke
to help in La
Wear store to
position. Write
B. L. care of J
302 S. W


BEST V
= -i
Singer's C
Resta
-=
S"Joe" I
Kosher Meats
S 166 N. \\
Phone


Wishing S
Prospel
SING
-0
We Serve The
New
Bakin
(A complete
Restau
4 71 -5 S. WV
Phone
=" """' ""l "III II I!lll HIllllllllll


= ~- ..~1 F~PROJ"L~~~I~~.I.~.. 1.-1_ .


CONGRATULATIONS TO SAMET'S DELICATESSEN
--o---
WE SUPPLIED THE MODERN, SANITARY DISPLAY CASES USED IN THIS UP-TO-THE
MINUTE STORE GUARANTEED TO INSU E HEALTHY AND WHOLESOME FOODS.


WARREN CO.


1341 North East Second Avenue


Phone Miami 2-8723


SALES AGENTS FOR THE WARREN REFRIGERATORS AND DAYTON SCALES


/ 1

BEST WISHES
-To--
A Feast For The Eyes A Treat For The Palate DESAMETESE
DELICATESSEN
BY VISITING ___
General Paper
SAME'S DELICATESSEN Corp.
"STRCTL KS TES EN I Everything in Paper
0--..I".
"STRICTLY KOSHER" 68 N. E. 26th St.


608 COLLINS AVENUE MIAMI BEACH, FLA.
PHONE 5-3512
--0-
Smoked Meats, Sausages, Salami all Strictly Kosher. Dairy Products of
The Finest Obtainable. Fancy Groceries of Unexcelled Qual-
ity. Breads and Pastries.

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL Dl
Usi
RESTAURANTS AND HOTELS SUPPLIED

GRAND OPENING Cerl

Tuesday, November 26th, 1929 1045
Pay Us One Visit And You Will Remain A Constant Friend


R ADV ERS SAVE YOU MONEY AND GIVOUERVICE!
JE.R I C


Fnone Z-4u3J



congratulationss
-To-
SAMET'S
DELICATESSEN
ng Eggs of Quality
Supplied By

tified Egg Co.
S. W. 20th Avenue
-P0---
Phone 3-1716

Mum...i..i- iillallllllll- ""


II I __.__._ I __~~~~ _--. -- _~.~~.-~;- -----'---- ---


hiaine -ke ..fi After.a-mnan Jias. .bean .mn a %ar-
Wejs xEvt ied a feA Bolths her dmit4 ',
pcL3 ing t hi e A tn is r near. T Nothing's Too Good F
rY-tu1j s : A, as bad a)e h aemic paper ,. S --. ...
S .Aronovitz Ied him to baeve. ....
tbinake ar- -
r 1 1 g n1ra f 1.- -r"""'""'"'1- 111""1""1 1
mittee was in- Congratulations

Singer's Continental
opportunity Restaurant
!ISH GIRL --o-
eper and willing Safety in Insurance, Reliability
ladies' Ready-to- in Piroperty Management, Bar- 4
obtain splendid gains in Realty.
full Details to --o RESTAURANT
Jewish Floridian T
4th Ave. Tobin & Tobin
.......... ........... =- R ealty and
ISHES insurance o.,In.8 S. E. FIRST AVE.
W (One Flight Up)
ntinenta 23 N E. 2nd Avenue (3 )oors Off Flagler Street)
urant Phone 2-5459 -
. .. .............. .. GALA OPENING
teisman 1 i,.ii.iii;i A
Sand Poultry BEST WISHES SUNDAY, NOV. 24th, at 7 P. M.
V. 5th St. = -
S-To- -
3-2270 ntinental Featuring The Finest in Continental and Hungarian Cook;ng.
-S : ngers Continental
................11 I Restaurant -g \
Succ "and ORCHESTRA CABARET ENTERTAIN-
uccess and FOR THE LA ES TR
rity to The Finest and Best in Esgg MENT SOUVENIRS FOR THE LADIES
ER'S Furnished By __ o-
--__
m Exclusively Northern Grade The Most Beautiful Restaurant in Town
York "A" Products Co.
g Co. MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS NOW!
Service 136S.W. 9th Ave. 0
sra ice to -S. .9thAve. If You Still Demand The Best, Come to "SINGER'S"
. th Street Na t Zalka Phone 3-2209
21773 // | r,111111^