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The Jewish Floridian ( November 15, 1929 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
November 15, 1929
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00039

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
November 15, 1929
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:00039

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text

































I.


Price 5 Cento


COUPLE


C waof congregations
Thinking Conduct Varied
by Friday Services
n^hi; Tcraal U W iaflfl i


K R abtUUI xA i V .1., i.
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An exceedingly interesting
trial took place recently. No
financial considerations were
involved. Nor had anyone been
murdered. Moreover the ac-
tual plaintiff willingly and de-
liberately assumed the role of
defendant. Why? Because
there was at stake something
far more precious than silver
or gold, something rare and
priceless; the dignity of a pro-
fession, the self-respect and
feeling of responsibility in
thought and utterance of an
vowed and accepted leader.
Both plaintiff and defen-
dant in the case are, in the
Jewish world, nationally
known figures. On the one
hand, Reuben Brainin, father
of modern Hebrew in this
Country, one of the few pion-
eers in Zionist thought and
action; and, on the other,
Chaim Nachman Bialik, poet
laureate of the Jewish people
and ardent lover of Zion.
What could possibly have
induced the men to appear in
such unaccustomed and ill-fit-
ting roles? Professional jeal-
ousy? Artistic clashes? By no
means! How did it all come
about? This is what occurred.
Brainin had been busy tour-
ing the world in the interests
of the "Jo:nt" or, more speci-
fically, the colonization of
Jews in Russia. Included in
his itinerary was a prolonged
visit to Russia. (Somehow,
try as one will to refrain from
doing so one must eventually
refer to that country.) While
there he was dined, wined and
lavishly lauded. Local Zionists
rememler:ng his beautiful He-
brew prose and his fervent y
expressed love for the Land
of Israel, awaited his arrival
with great anxiety and abat-
ed breath. At last the Messiah
appeared. Alas, again it prov-
ed to be a false Messiah! Stol-
idly he sat by at banquets,
when the hopes of Jewish na-
tionalists were deprecated,
condemned, blasted. Not a
word in their defense did he
utter. Not a finger did he
raise to aid crazy idealists
whose sole aim had been pro-
mulgating Hebrew literature,
who now languished in the ov-
ercrowded prisons-hopeless-
ly forgotten, because they had
dared hazard the opinion that
the Jewish Homeland might,
Ame day, prove a safer hav-
.n of justice and freedom than
Soviet Russia.

On the theory that "silence
means assent" interviews be-
'an appearing in the press in
'Which Brainin was reported
4 justifying the action of the
government in its tyrannical,
nti-Semitic attitude towards
its three million Jewish citi-
8es. Brainin never took the
(Continued from Page 2)


L


ELOPE


TO


Beth David Elects Faiths Unite to
New Officers Discuss Tolerance


1* -


MIAMI


Romance Ends In
Marriage Here

Beth David which has been
the scene of many happy mar-
riage witnessed the culmina-
tion of another romance last
Friday, when Miss Tillie'Yos-
pin, a member of one of the
most prominent Jewish famil-
ies of Paterson, N. J. became
the Lride of Mr. Alex Glick
of the same city.
The couple have known each
other for a number of years
and toth are graduates of
Batten High School of Eliza-
Leth, N. J., and in the minds
of many of their friends their
marriage had been a foregone
conclusion.
Having known and kept
company with each other for
more than five years the cou-
rlp dp+.trnminel fn ho ri c


The usual late Friday night
services will be held beginning
at 8:15 p. m. The choir under
the leadership of Mr. Nathan
Wroobel will present a musi-
cal program. Rabbi Israel H.
Weisfeld will preach the ser-
mon on "The Zionist Advan-
ture: The outstanding mirac-
le in a miracle age:--a reply
to Clayton Sedgewick Coop-
er."
Because of the interest
shown in Zionist affairs Lby
the general public of Miami
a large audience is expected
to attend.
The Bible Class will resume
its session promptly at 10:30
a. m. this coming Sunday
morning in the Synagogue.
Sunday school classes will
meet in the Talmud Torah as
usual at 10 a. m. Sunday
morning.
Services at Temple Israel,
Reform Jewish Congregation,
Friday evening, at 8 o'clock.
)r. Kaplan will speak on the
subject "The Interest of the
American Jew Is Americi.
The public is most cordially
invited to attend.
Saturday morning at 10:30
a. m. there will be opened a
teacher's preparatory class in
the Rabbi's study. All young
men and women who wish to
become teachers in the Relig-
ious School are cordially in-
vited to attend this class.
Dr. Kaplan will conduct two
classes on Sunday morning.
One from 10:30 to 11:15 in
Jewish, Current events, and
one from 11:15 to 12:00 in
the modern interpretation of
the BiLle. These classes are
open to all those who wish to
join.

West Palm Beach
Elects Its Rabbi

Consummation of arrange-
ments to procure the services
of Rabbi Myron Rissman of
Chicago as permanent relig-
ious head and Hebrew school
teacher for Congregation
Beth El, of West Palm Beach,
was announced Wednesday
night by Samuel Schutzer,
president of the congregation.
Rabbi Rissman will meet all
parents and children at the
first Hebrew school class Sun-
day morning at 10 o'clock at
th ecommunity house, 414 7th
street. He will officiate at
Sabbath services Friday night
at 8 o'clock at the commun-
ity house and following the
prayerg:will deliver a sermon.
Rabbi Rissman, a graduate
of the Hebrew Theological
College, will begin his duties
with Congregation Beth El at
once. Parents of children de-
siring to enroll their children
in the Hebrew school classes
have been requested to ac-
company them to the initial
class Sunday.


9eJ Iin


II~LII


I


L-I.-N. XXXXXVIIAMIORIDA, NOVEMBER 15, 1929


Last Sunday evening the
Talmud Torah Auditorium
was the scene of an unusually
well attended and interesting
meeting of Congregation Beth
David. The election of officers
for the coming year was held
and the following were elect-
ed. Mr. M. H. Rosenhouse,
prominent local Jewish attor-
ney, President; John Wolf,
one of the most active com-
munal workers of Miami, 1st
Vice-President; Abe Arono-
witz, an active Jewish Attor
ney of Miami and president of
the Mens Club of Miami, 2nd
Vice-President; Mr. Julius
Simrson a prominent build-
ing supply merchant of this
City, Recording Secretary;
Mr. Max Kupferstein, an ac-
tive Talmud Torah worker,
Financial Secretary; Mr.
Louis Weinkle, actively inter-
ested in religious and chari-
table affairs of Miami, Treas-
urer; P. G. Blanck, one of Mi-
ami's pioneer residents and
founders of Beth David, ser-
geant-at-arms. To fill the va-
cancies on the Board of Trus-
tees, Mr. P. M. Rosengarten
fo- a four year term, Mr.
Harry Markowitz for a three
year term, Mr. A. Pepper for
a two year term and Mr. S. H.
Tobin for a one year term,
were chosen. Mr. Rosengarten
is one of the leading mer-
chants of Miami, Mr. Marko-
witz is a member of the firm
of Markowitz and Resnick,
one of the leading plumbing
firms in the State, Mr. Pep..
per one of the leading metal
dealers and Mr. Tobin one of
the prominent realtors of Mi-
ami.
Resolutions thanking the
outgoing officers were adopt-
ed and gifts will be presented
at the installation to several
of the officers, particularly
Mr. Jake Brown who retired
as secretary after more than
nine years service.
The installation of the new-
ly elected officers will take
place at a banquet which will
be tendered the incoming and
outgoing officers at the Tal-
mud Torah Auditorium on
Sunday evening, November
24th, at 6:30 p. m. o'clock by
the Ladies Auxiliary. The
committee in charge of the
Banquet is headed by Mrs. S.
Abenson, one of its active
members. Reservations for
the banquet may be made by
calling Mrs. Abenson the
chairman, Mrs. Buckstein the
president or at the office of
the congregation..

Men's Club to
Meet Next Week

The Mens Club of Miami
will hold an open meeting to
which all Jewish residents of
Miami are invited, next Wed-
nesday evening, at the Bis-
cayne Masonic Hall.


'-1C UC-. bus t111inesU L.U UU k :, lt I ldt lleu
recruited from business and immediately and fearing par-
professional leaders. Presi- mental opposition they were
dent A. Lawrence Lowell op- married before a Justice of
ened the session. He traced the Peace in New Jersey and
briefly the history of relig- immediately came to Miami
ious enmities and said: on their honeymoon. When
"Is mankind doomed for- they arrived in Miami Friday
ever to have its love linked morning to visit Mr. Glick's
with its hatred, its Lest with uncle, they sought the aid of
worst propensities? Our RaLbi Israel H. Weisfeld of
problem for the future is to Beth David, and late Fridity
arouse religious fervor with- afternoon just prior to the
out religious rancor. An at- regular Mincha services, the
tempt to prepare the way for couple were married in the
a better state of that kind is presence of a large number of
the mark set by the Round the worshippers of Beth Da-
Table and there can be none vid.
greater." The couple will make their
In order to promote abso- permanent home in Miami
lutely free discussion, the where Mr. Glick expects to
press was not permitted to engage in business.
quote directly any of the
speakers at the round table Lecturer Arrives
discussions. Lecturer Arrives
Each group presented its to Speak in Miami
grievances. A priest complain-
ed of school text books which
misrepresented Catholic his- Mr. Melech Epstein, well
tory and dogma; a Protestant known lecturer of New York
declared that Catholic doc- City on the subject of labor
trines, which were objection- conditions throughout the
able to him, were forced on world will arrive in Miami,
his son in a school; a rabbi Friday morning, preparatory
said a Protestant minister had to an address which he will de-
taught children in his church liver this coming Sunday
that the whole Jewish race evening, Nov. 17th at Odd Fel-
was and is responsible for the lows Hall, N. W. 2nd ave. and
crucifixion of Jesus Christ. 4th street, at 8:30 p. m.
After two days of frank ex- Mr. Epstein is in Miami on
changes of opinions and be- his return from Havana where
liefs, Catholics, Protestants he was sent by the New York
and Jews have closed the ex- Cuban Workmens Organiza-
periment in understanding at tion as part of the work of the
Harvard university by agree- Workmens Cultural Organiza-
ing to respect each other's be- tion. The subject of his local
liefs and cooperate in combat- address will be "Problems of
ing religious intolerance American Jewish Labor."
throughout America.
At the end of their sessions disagree as to the fundamen-
they adopted unanimously a tals of their respective faiths
resolution declaring: in no way interferes with
"That sincere conviction as to their active cooperation in all
the absolute truth of ade- undertakings making for the
quacy of one's own faith and welfare of the community.
as a corollary the error of in- "That discrimination-pol-
adequacy of all other religions itical, social or economic-
involves no question of the based solely upon religious
spiritual sincerity of those prejudices and intolerance,
who differ and -who' hold violates the letter and tie
firmly to the tenets of their spirit of the constituotiop and
own faith, their inalienable is caught with grave peril to
right to the practice of their the secirty, of ,the lr~pblc."
religion, or as to their eter- Many, promilnnt Catholips,
nal reward. Jews and Protestants took
"That such agreement to' #art, '


Cambridge, Mass. Catho-
lic, Jew and Protestant sat
down together at Harvard to
discuss the causes and effects
of religious intolerance, in the
filst sLminar of its kind ever
held in New England and one
of the first in America. Rab-
bis, priests and Protestant
clergyman, educational and
bus ncss leaders were among
the 490 persons who took
part.
Fihe seminar, which will
lasL two days, was conducted
by the Calvert Round Table
of Boston, an organization in-
cluding equal representation
of the three religious groups,


11~9~


0'











THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


To My Way of Thinilking
By Rabbi Israel H. Weisfeld

^ ?444$4a> a


(Continued from Page 1)

pains to deny the authenticity
of these interviews. Apparent-
ly he was in perfect accord
with these statements. In
subsequent lectures about his
visit to Russia, Brainin never
attacked the Russian govern-
ment, very conveniently slur-
red over the sad plight of the
Zionists in Russia, and, in
general, appeared but slightly
stirred over the present and
future of Russian Jewry.
In addition invaluable data
offered him by Russian Zion-
ists at the risk of life, in the
hopes they would be of aid
to him in arousing public
opinion against the atrocities
perpetrated upon them daily.
were ignored by him and nev-
er saw the light of day.

So shocked were the He-
brew authors, in particular
at this remarkable nonchal-
ance, this unbecoming indif-
ference, that they adopted a
resolution sharply condemn-
ing Brainin for his decidedly
unbefitting behavior, and
branded his conduct as an
"act of treason." Needless to
state, Brainin felt very keen'y
about this resolution. What
hurt most was that Bialik, the
national poet, had affixed his
signature to this protest.
When the latter came to Ber-
lin a short while ago he learn-
ed that Brainin was also
there. He immediately dis-
patched a letter to him, say-
ing "Summon me within the
next forty-eight hours to a
trial before an Honor Court to
determine who was right."
Brainin accepted.

Tho' Bialik was nominally
the defendant, it soon became
apparent to the judges and
the intensely interested spec-
totors that he was really the
"accuser" and Brainin was
there to answer charges. The
above charges were advanced.
Frainin replied that he con-
sidered it politic at the time
to remain silent. He is not a
I reliever in wanton hysterics
or maudlin sentimentality. Pa-
tient and watchful waiting is
his motto. In principle he had
remained the same Brainin;
It was on y in method that
he had changed and in which
he differed from his colleagues.
'1hen, turning dramatically to
Bialik, the prophetic appear-
ing, hoary headed litterateur
and leader exclaimed in a pas-
sion laden voice. "YOU, Bialik
a1y yourself with those who
accuse me of an act of trea-
son!" I, who have written He-
brew these many years, who
have fought consistently for
Zionism and who shall, most
I probably die not in America
but in our Holy Land, I am
doubted in my sincerity and
am condemned?" The trial be-
gan in the evening and the
verdict of the friendly, volun.


tary judges was returned at
the break of dawn. Brainin
was found nine-tenths guilty,
and Bialik one tenth guilty
because of the harshness of


language employed against
the former.
I am not so vitally interest-
ed in the charges, the argu-
ments launched pro and con,
nor in the verdict rendered.
I am primarily interested in
the high-mindedness that
prompted the entire action.
This is no case of petty jeal-
ousy. Our Jewish men of let-
ters are more than mere au-
thors. They feel the solemn
responsibility they have as-
sumed in their capacity of
moulders of public opinion,
and this responsibility they
jealously guard. And if one
of their number stands plac-
id y and unconcernedly by
while the hopes of his people
are being blasphemously jeer-
ed at, scorned, he has betray-
ed a sacred trust and they
immediately take him to task
for it.

What are their methods?
Challenging to a duel? Select-
ing the most intimate friend
to act as second-a potential
pall-tearer? A dusky dawn...
the two heroes standing like
belligerent cocks, glaring at
each other, or teeth chatter
ing in the raw morning air,
stealing furtively a possibly
last glance at the rising sun
S. a flash of steel in the un-
certain light a shot .
one mortally wounded the
other proud his score ev-
ened Is this their method?
Rubbish! They are as far a-
love this melodramatic pish-
r osh as are the heavens above
the earth.

theirs is the sane and un-
dramatic method of airing
their arguments before an im-
partial group of intelligent
people. Victory in a duel is
by no means an indisputable
indicationn of justice having
triumphed. Not by a long
shot. It is merely an indica-
tion that the one most prof-
.ccnt in the use of arms was
quick on the trigger. Its aid
in establishing the guilt or in-
nocence is precisely zero.
Furthermore, consider the
unusual high-mindedness of a
man willing to step into the
unenviable role of defendant
in order to offord an oppor-
tunity to the real defendant
to state his case, and if pos-
sib'e, prove his innocence.

If therefore this remark-*
able trial has fulfilled no func-
tion other than displaying the
exceptionally high integrity
of our great authors, their
sincere conviction that they
belong not to themselves but
are merely vehicles for the
realization of their people's
fondest dreams even then
this trial has served a noble
purpose. Despite their fail-
ings, they stand enhanced in
their greatness bright ex-
amlles, encouraging, stimul-
ating, enduring.


The Clock Strikes

S.v.rm


Field and forest and a sea
of sky, in the midst a house
with many windows on all
four sides-that is his house.
He rises very early, per-
forms his ablutions in cold
water, murmurs in a low tone
a prayer to God's name. and
leaves the house. He stands
and gazes. The sky is clear,
from somewhere in the dis-
tnace the rushing of a rain
is heard. In the east advances
a half circle of the sun, which
has an appearance of a fiery
iron ring, which the black-
smith strikes with his hammer
and sparks fly on all sides.
He thinks "God is great,
the smith of all the planets,"
and goes quickly to the barn
to his cattle and feeds them,
and tends them with a feel-
ing which is a mixture of pity
and love of God, who has cre-
ated Man higher than the
animals.
Then he returns to the
house. His wife and children
are up. The table is spread
with bread, butter and cheese.
The scent of coffee lies over
the whole house. He washes
his hands and sits at table,
the two little ones on each side
and his wife opposite him.
They eat their fill and
bread and cheese is left over.
He takes the bread and cheese
and crumbles it in tiny mor-
sels, and goes outdoors with
the children with fiery-red
combs come running from all
sides to stand still in a circu-
lar row around him and the
children, and they scatter the
crumbs of bread and cheese.
The chickens catch, gulp,
spring on each other, gobble
up the cheese first, leave the
I read to the last-God is great
how do chickens know that
cheese is better than bread?
And when he glances at the
sky and sun is already higher
than all the trees and woods;
he goes into the barn, opens
wide the doors, and lets the
cows and horses out; the chil-
(ren help him to drive them
down into the valley. With
a clear mind, leisurely he
lights his pipe, takes out of
the outhouse three sharp hoes
and he and the children shoul-
der each one a hoe and go off
to the potato field, which is
separated from the house by
a little, sparse copse.
They set to work. He starts
second and third. The chil-
dren follow him. He a full-
grown man-the little ones



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THINKING JEWS ALL SUBSCRIBE TO THE JEWISH FLORIDIANI DO YOU?

i .... .. -,. '


I 1 13 1


i .









Friday, November 15, 1929
H-E JEWISH FLORIDIAN


THE JEWISH

FLORIDIAN
A weekly newspaper published at
Miami, Florida
by
The Jewish Floridian Publishing
Company

302 S. W. FOURTH AVENUE
Phone 8745



EDITORIAL STAFF
J. LOUIS SHOCHET
A CHOCHOM
BEN DOROM
A. N. ASHER

EDITORIAL

DISSATISFACTION:
AN AID TO PROGRESS

Not one wants to quarrel
with the idea that dissatis-
faction stimulates progress.
It always has and always will.
There is a certain construc-
tive dissatisfaction that the
world cannot get along with-
out. It is the dissatisfaction
that sent Columbus across
the Atlantic in the 15th cen-
Stury and sent Commander
Byrd to the Antartic in the
20th century. It is the dissat-
isfaction that invented the
steam engine, developed the
railroads, and is promoting
the airplane. It is the dissat-
isfaction which has given us
everyone of the conveniences
and luxuries which we con-
sider indispensable today. It
is easily recognized because it
results in some kind of work,
some effort to improve the
thing with which there is dis-
satisfaction.
There is another kind of
dissatisfaction. We hear it in
the grumblings of the chron-
ically discontented. We see it
in the faultfinders, the back-
liters, and the professional
pessimists. It is a destructive
dissatisfaction. In every field
of human endeavor it main-
tains a specialist who does
nothing but complain. His
specialty is not the mastery
of that particular field of en-
deavor but a constant harp-
ing on the annoying imperfec-
tions which to the normal man
are obliterated by the super-
ior good of which they are
only a waste product. It is the
kind of dissatisfaction we can
do without. It is easily recog-
nized because it results in
nothing but irritation to the
more constructive minds
working toward perfection.
This is not a new problem
arising out .of the increasing
complexity of modern life. It
is just about as oldas the pro-
verbial hills. It was just as
current and vicious when life
was simple as it is when life
is complex. In the 6th century
St. Benedict solved the prob-
lei for all time. His solution
is buried under fourteen cen-


tries of" problems and solu-
tions of problems but it is dug
out every once in a while and
ttght to be promulgated
throughout the world con-
stantly. Here it is:
"If any pilgrim monk come
from distant parts, if with
Wish as a guest to dwell with -
in the monastery, and will be
content Witlh the customs
which he fins in the place,
iand o not petchance with his
lvishness disturb the mon-


F


of the business end ot it.
"After all, fellows, "the
speaker concluded, "there is
no surer test of anyone's pos-
session of a sense of humor
than the ability, and willing-
ness, to laugh at oneself."
There is a lot of truth in
that, don't you think?
Men of humor are always
in some degree men of genius;
and their peculiar genius lies
in their ability to see and ap-


(HAI IER
I 1 \: iml i i u


astery, but is simply content
with what he finds, he shall
be received, for as long a timo
as he desires. If, indeed, he
find fault with anything, or
expose it, reasonable, an('
Switch the humility of charity,
the AbLot shall discuss it pru-
dently, lest perchance God
had sent him for this very
thing. But, if he have been
found gossipy, and contuma-
cious in the time of his so-
journ as guest, not ,only ought
he not to be joined to the body-
of the monastery, but also it
shall be said to him, honestly,
that he must depart. If he
does not go, let two stout
monks, in the name of God,
(xlplain the matter to nim."
It might be expressed in
everyday language like this.
Everyone comes into this
world without an invitation.
No one here claims it is a per-
fect world but there is a vast
army at work trying to make
life as pleasant and profitable
as it can be. If the newcomer
is satisfied with conditions,
all right. If he is not satisfied
and has a constructive idea,
the world wants it. If he has
no ideas of his own but can
develop the ideas of someone
else, the world wants him to
do it. But if he has no ideas
and can't develop the ideas of
anyone else and is still dis-
satisfied, he ought to keep
still about it. If he persists in
criticizing the honest efforts
of others merely to hide his
own barrenness, then let's put
him on a skrocket for Mars!

THE TEST OF SENSE
OF HUMOR

The discussion started when
someone asserted that So-and-
So was a fine chap, mentally,
morally and physically, but
that he lacked the crowning
grace of a sense of humor.
"Surely you are mistaken
about that," replied another.
"I have seen him preside as
toastmaster at banquets, and
lead the festivities at social
gatherings, and everybody
voted him a jolly good fellow.
In fact, he's the life of the
party wherever he happens to
be."
"I'll grant all that," said
the first speaker, "but I still
insist that he has no real
sense of humor-and I'll tell
you why. He can tell funny
stories and rattle off witti-
cisms like a machine gun-
but he can't take a joke."
"I have known him to sulk
for a whole day in his hotel
room because some of the
boys at a convention we were
attending played a harmless
prank on him. Everybody in
on it enjoyed a good laugh
at the ridiculous situation in
which he found himself. But
he couldn't see anything fun-
ny in it, because he has no
sense of humor. All he could
see was that he, the clever
brilliant, witty So-and-So,


and prejudice, prompts a tol-
erant, charitable view of life
in all its aspects, and increases
the sum of human happiness.


A little learning
Is a dangerous thing,
That's very true
We say, By Jing.

But a little widow
We of course know
Is without doubt
- A darned sight more so.
*
A little loving
On the sly
Hlas a way of
Coming high.
*
It's a long head that has no
scratching.
*
Dresses are to be longer-
and so are bills.
*
The worst back talk from a
wife is back seat driving.
*
What has become of the old
red flannel undershirt? Guess
it has gone to join the red
flannel petticoat.

Nobody loves a fat man;
1 ut then nobody shoves one
either-very far.
*
A little loving is a danger-
ous thing; it may lead to mat-
rimony, you know.
*
Girls are clever; even the
long, tall ones manage to fold
up in a rumble seat.
*
No matter how cold the
weather gets, we seem to see
just as much silk stocking ....
*
The Thanksgiving turkeys
will certainly attend the din-
ner; we know they will be ax-
ed anyhow.
"I might have lost them!"
"And you just bought them
too," replied the first girl as

preciate the mirth-provoking
things of life wherever they
may exist or occur, and to
whomsoever they may hap-
pen-including themselves.
And we should not forget
that there's a difference be-
tween wit and humor. Wit is
a flash of lightning; humor is
mellow sunshine. Wit cuts
and stings; humor insinuates
itself with a tickling sensa-
tion. Wit is a cold as the in-
tellect from which it springs;
humor is as warm as the
heart's crimson tide. Wit is
cruel and merciless; humor is
so closely allied to pity that
wherever you find humor you
will find pathos close by its
side. Shafts dipped in venom-
ous wit have driven men mad;
humor is asure defense
against the insanities that be-
set us. Wit is brutalizing; hu-
mor is probably the greatest
humanizing influence univer-
sally existent among men.
:.In short, true humor is a
divine blend of love, pity, com-
mon sense and a keen recog-
nition of the ludicrous, absurd
and incongruous, which enab-
les us to preserve rational
perspective, keep the vision
undistorted ..by ..self-interest


Page 3


she picked up the package and
handed it to her friend.
*
Two girls were walking
along the street.
bloomers fell."
"Thanks," said the other,
"Oh," said one, "your
*
Editor's Wife (entering
sanctum and finding steno-
grapher on husband's lap):
Ah, ha! So this is that "edi-
torial we" I've been hearing
so much about.
*
"How did you like the geo
logy lecture ?"
"Fine! I was rocked to
sleep."

"So this is Hell! Well, well,
who would have guessed it?
This place isn't so good. I
wonder if they have any
boosters here? They can't do
much business. They ought to
organize and put this place on
a paying basis.
"Say, this Pluto Water is
rotten. Why, Joe's stuff, he's
my bootlegger back home you
know, is real Canadian com-
pared to this. I wonder how
they get away with it? There
ought to be a law against sell-
ing a man stuff like this.
"Ha, ha, I have to laugh
when I see the boat this Char-
on uses. You should see the
ferry-boat we have back in
the home town.
"Who are you guys going
to vote for in this campaign?
I'm all for continuing the pre-
sent administration. What's
the use of always changing
everything? You can't go
wrong here, I say.
"Well, I'll see all you devils
at the luncheon next Wednes-
day. Let's put it over in a
cloud of steam, fellows. Re-
member, this is the hottest
little place a man ever had."
*
The average doctor pulls
off an "organ recital" nearly
every day of his life.
*
Marriage to most girls is
like a telephone-they get a
ring and then wake up.

"Hole in one," says a headline
Says a headline-whew-
As to our shoes
There's a hole in two.

"Well," said Dante, grin-
ning, "I'm the man that put
Hades on a pain basis."
*
Notice outside second hand
store: "Mrs. Molinsky, having
cast off clothes, now invites
inspection."
*
French Guide: What do vou


think of that immense tower *
over there? Many will sympathize with
American: It's quite an the sentiment of the darky
Eiffel! who said: "No, sah, Ah ain't
got no use foh dem airplanes.
Today's best: Every time Ah stays on terrgh firmah;
the Chinese take a look at the and de mo' firmah de less
Manchurian railroad they see terrah."
Red. *
An eminent architect pre-
The lazy man seldom goes dicts that we shall be living
wrong; it's the hustler who in glass houses fifty years
has to watch his step. from now. But it won't make
any difference by that time,
Always look on the bright anway.


-rv r %V yiV I & N we l A Wd% I W A in r W V rW kWr


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN-A MEDIUM OF AND FOR MIAMI JEWRYt


~---~C~LC411


__


side of things-but if you're
buying a used car you had bet-
ter look all over the thing.

A number of stern persons
are urging the spanking of
children. As yet, no body has
proposed it for parents, tho
goodness knows, a lot of them
need it, too.

Prejudices are like rats and
men's minds are like traps.
Prejudices get in easily, but it
is doubtful if they ever get
out.
*
The theory that mankind
sprang from anthropoid apes
will not excite much attention
if men will continue to keep
their legs covered.
*
Her marriage is a success
if she has to go to movie for
a "good cry."

"When you answer me,
speak-don't nod or shake
your heads," said the profes-
sor, sharply. "Did you think I
could hear them rattle away
up here?"
*
The up-and-coming young
man is pretty likely to suc-
ceed, unless he is up at four
and just coming home.

At Hallowe'en some boys
left a densely populated wasp-
nest on a prominent and dig-
nified citizen's front steps for
him to kick off when he came
home, and he kicked it all
right. It makes us sad to re-
flect that we never thought
of that when we were young-
er, and now it's too late.
*
The German language is
said to have three hundred
equivalents for "drunk." Ap-
parently we do not equal the
fertility of the Germans, al-
though our language is also
rich in slang synonyms for
drunk.
Some readers may be able
to add to the following, col-
lected by Manuel Prenner and
published in the periodical
American Speech:
Crocked, basted, blind, blot-
t, boiled, boozed, bunned, can-
ned, cockeyed, elevated, fox-
ed, frazzled, fried, full, geez-
ed, ginned, half seas over
high, hit, loaded, lushed, mel-
low, oiled, organized, orie-
eyed, ossified, pickled, pie-
eyed, plastered, potted, pre-
served, primed, Rileyed, rum-
med, sewed up, shot, snozzled,
soapy-eyed, soused, spifflicat-
ed, squiffed, stewed, stuccoed,
tanked, three sheets in the
wind, tight, tipsy, tuned,
woozy.

Insanity is said to be de-
creasing. Maybe it's because
so many things that used to
be considered crazy, aren't
any more.


'










Pare 4


THE JEWISH FLORTDIAN


I

S_ SOCIETYY "

PAt .--...- .


Mr. and Mrs. Dave Kahn
were hosts to Mr. Jacob Bren-
ner of Roanoke, Va., at dinner
last week. Among those pre-
sent were Mr. and Mrs. Max
Kupferstein, Mr. and Mrs.
Nathan Adelman, Mr. Leo
Kupferstein, Arthur Kahn,
Jack Adelman and Rachel
Adelman. After dinner Mr.
Brenner attended a theatre
party.
*
Mrs. H. Gottesman and
daughter returned to Miami
this week after having spent
the summer in the North vis-
iting relatives in Paterson, N.
J., Atlantic City and other
nearly resorts.

Mrs. A. Singer operating
the Singer Inn, at Sharon,
Mass., arrived in Miami this
week. She will operate the
Singer Restaurant in Miami
during the winter season.

The Executive Board of the
Miami Chapter of Hadassah
will be hosts at a bridge party
on Friday, Nevember 15th, at
2:30 p. m., at the home of
Mrs. J. S. Fields, 218 S. W.
'iw nty-first Road. The pub-
lic is cordially invited to at-
tend
*
The first meeting of the
season for the Miami Chap-
ter of Hadassah, was held last
Monday afternoon at Kaplan
Hall. Mrs. M. D. Kirsch, well
known local communal worker
and active in Hadassah for a
number of years was elected
president, to succeed Mrs.
Lois Dobrin, who resigned.
Mrs. Kirsch is the wife of Dr.
M. D. Kirsch who at the pre-
sent time is the head of the
Childs Hospital committee
sponsored by the Mens Club
of Miami, Mrs. Kirsch is the
daughter of Mr. M. B. Her-
man of Miami and Miami
Beach and has been a visitor
to Europe on a number of oc-
cassions and it is believed Ha-
dassah will accomplish much
due to her splendid abilities.
During the afternoon Mrs.
H. U. Feibelman sang several
selections, accompanied by
Miss Martha Weintraub at
the piano. Harry Lipnitz,
president of the local Zion-
ist District and well versed in
Zionist matters, and who re-
cently returned after having
attended a number of Zionist
conferences in New York City
delivered an address on Zion-
ist conditions in Palestine.

An important meting of
the Council of Jewish Women
was held at Kaplan Hall last
Wednesday afternoon. Mrs.
Meyer Schwartz presided and
announced the appointment of


Mrs. Jaco'> H. Kaplan as chair-
man of Religion and religious
observance, and Mrs. Ben
Watts as chairman of public-
ity.
The annual affair of the
Council will be held in Jan-
uary and the exact date will
Le announced shortly, and will
be in charge of a committee
headed by Mrs. Chas. Green-
field. At the meeting it was
decided that the Council will
sponsor a one year's scholar-
ship to the University of Mi-
ami.
It being Peace week, a peace
program was presented under
the auspices of the chairman
of the Peace committee, Mrs.
Joe Williamson who introduc-
ed the speaker of the after-
noon, Mrs. P. S. Davenport,
state rehabilitation chairman
of American Legion Auxiliary
on "Rehabilitation work
amongst World War Veter-
ans." Miss Rose Gerson sang
several selections, and Miss
Dorothy Finkelstein gave a
reading. A social hour pre-
sided over by Mrs. Lewis
Brown followed.
*
Mr. Cecil Tannenbaum en-
tertained a number of friends
last Wednesday afternoon at
her home in Shenandoah at a
bridge luncheon in honor of
Mrs. Israel H. Weisfeld. A
brief program of entertain-
ment was presented by Mrs.
Lillian Friedman who gave
humorous imitation of would
be orators in Clubs, and Mrs.
J. Simpson who told a num-
ber of anecdotes.
Prizes were awarded to
Mrs. A. Goldstein for high
score, and to Mrs. Friedman
for runner-up. Mrs. Ruben-
stein was awarded the consol-
ation prize. A beautiful guest
prize was presented to the
guest of honor Mrs. Israel H.
Weisfeld. Among those pre-
sent were Mrs. S. Tannen-
baum, Mrs. J. L. Shochet,
Mrs. C. Tannenbaum, Mrs. M.
Kotkin, Mrs. L. Kotkin, Mrs.
Rubenstein, Mrs. T. Arnold,
Mrs. M. Friedman, Mrs. J.
Simpson, Mrs. S. Futterfas,
Mrs. S. Abenson, Mrs. I. H.
Weisfeld, Mrs. I. Tannenbaum
Mrs. A. Goldstein, Mrs. H.
Dubler, Mrs. Harry Seitlin,
Mrs. I. Buckstein.

Dr. A. E. Rosenthal, well
known Miami dentist is ill at
his home with an attack of
the grippe but is expected to

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resume his duties the latter
I art of this week.
*
Miami Chapter of Hadas-
sah will be hosts at a theatre
party to be held some time in
December for the benefit of
Hadassah Hospitals. The ex-
act time and place will be an-
Pounced shortly by the chair-
men in charge, Mrs. I. L. Sel-
igman and Mrs. Herbert Klei-
manl.
*
The Council of Jewish Wo-
men will be hosts at a supper
at the Talmud Torah Audi-
torium this coming Sunday
evening, NovemLer 17th, at
6:30 p. m. for the benefit of
its scholarship fund.
*
The first monthly all-day
sewing for the benefit of Ha-
dassah hospital units will be
held this coming Monday at
the home of Mrs. I. L. Selig-
man on N. W. 18th Place.
Lunch will be served at
noon.
*
As we are going to press
the Junior Council of Jewish
Women are holding a pajama
frolic, at the home of Mrs.
Wm. Shayne, 1600 S. W. 11th
Street.
*
Mr. Nathan Adelman ac-
companied by his brother-in-
law, Mr. Jacob Brenner of
Roanoke, Va., who is in Mi-
ami on a brief visit spent the
week-end at Havana and re-
turned to Miami Wednesday.
*
A very enjoyable time was
had by some of the younger
set of Miami at a card party
held last Monday night. Prizes
for high score were awarded
to Miss Hannah Mack, Miss
Tillie Predinger, and Miss
Minnie Blanck. A salad course
was served at a late hour.
Among those present were
Miss Tillie Predinger, Miss
Marjorie Predinger, Miss Han-
nah Mack, Miss Minnie

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III )I


B'anck, Mrs. Mollie Rohald.
Miss Lillie Jackson.
*
Mrs. Estelle Steinberg, Mrs.
Bert Green and Mrs. Sadye C.
Rose were hostesses at the
bridge party given by the
Loyalty Club of the Emunah
Chapter, O. E. S. at the home
of Mrs. Steinberg, 1725 N. W.
19th St., last Monday, Even-
ing. Prizes for high score
were awarded to: Mrs.
Schwartz, Mrs. Rathfort, Miss
Holtzman, Mrs. Sadye Oli-
phant, Mrs. Susie Gordon
Schechter, and consolation
prize to Mrs. Florence Bach-
er. Prizes to the male players
were awarded to Messrs. Rob-
eit J. Wallis, Dr. Frank Cor-
et.
During the evening delic-
ious refreshments were served
and a good time was had by
all.

The benefit dance of the
Beth David Ladies Auxiliary
for the Talmud Torah fund
under the leadership of Mrs.
Meyer Friedman will be hled
next Tuesday night at the
Talmud Torah Auditorium. A
splendid band of music has
1 een engaged and a good time
is promised all who will at-
tend.
*
A large number of reserva-
tions are being made for the
I ridge luncheon given by the
Sisterhood of Temple Israel,
Monday afternoon, Nov. 18 at
the Bayshore grill with Mrs.
Samuel Aronovitz in charge.


I; _I


---


I


Friday, November 15, 1929

Assisting in entertaining will
be Mrs. J. A. Richter, Mrs.
Joe Fields, Mrs. I. M. Wein.
stein and Mrs. J. Bernstein.
Reservation may be made
calling Mrs. Herbert K. Klie.
man.

Enthusiastic audience at-
tended the well-presented pro.
gram yesterday afternoon at
Mazica hall by members of
the Mana-Zucca Music Club
Mrs. Thomas Fleming and
Mrs. Lydia Smith of Fort Lau-
derdale were special guests.
Mme. Elise Graziana was
guest of honor.
The program was as follows
Piano solo "Scherzo-B-Minor"
(Chopin), Frances Drucker,
man; soprano solo, "Ave Mar-
ia," (Mascagni), Faye Rogers
Jane French, violin obbligato,
Frances Tarboux at the pia-
no; reading "The Fine Arts,"
Adelaide Sterling Clark; vio-
lin solos, "Andantino," (Cor-
e 11 i K r e i sler), "Prelude,"
(Punnani-Kreisler), Mari an
Ta y lo r, accompanied by
Eleanor Clark; soprano solos,
(Continued on Page 5)



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Friday, November


15, 1929


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN


Page 5


SOCIETY


( Continued from Page 4)
"The Spirit Flower," (Camp-
bell.Tipton), "Down in the
Forest," (Ronald) and "Loves
pilgrimage," (Mana-Zucca),
by Helen Flanagan, accom-
panied by Mana-Zucca.
It was announced that the
board of directors would meet
Saturday night at the home
of Mrs. D. Cromer, 32 N. E.
Twenty-sixth terrace. Follow-
ing the meeting the hostess
will serve a buffet supper.
Members of the board include
Mana-Zucca, Frances Tarboux
Faye Rogers, Adelaide Ster-
ling Clark, Gertrude A. Sher-
man, Ruby Showers Baker,
Frances Druckerman, Belle
Bissett, I. M. Cassel, Mrs. L.
B. Safford, Louise Tarboux,
Eleanor Clark, Estelle Crom-
er and Beatrice Hunt.
*
Afternoon shower and
bridge will be given by Miss
Adalyn Ross for Miss Ethel
Tauber whose engagement to
Emden Heizog has been an-
nounced, at 2:30 o'clock Sat-
urday at her home. 726 Mich-
igan ave., Miami Beach Thirty
two invitations have been is-
sued.
*


Complimenting Miss Ethel
Schonfeld whose marriage to
Dr. George Gerson will take
place at an early date, Mrs.
Dave Solomon entertained at
Bridge Wednesday evening.
Prizes were won by Mrs. Al-
fred Seider, Miss May Bandle
and Miss Norma Wolfe.

The Friendship League
held its regular weekly meet-
ing and dance at the Miramar
Hotel, last Wednesday night
and inducted Miss Elinor Ru-
Sin into membership. Mr. Le-
on Wolf was appointed on the
Entertainment C o m m i ttee.
The recommendation of the
Entertainment C o m m i t tee
that the Miramar Hotel is to
be the headquarters for the
weekly dance and meeting of
the League was adopted. A
very interesting talk was
made by Mr. Williams who
compared the meetings of the
Friendship League, several
years ago and the meetings
of the League today.
Because of a better orches-
tra having been employed the
admission fee has been chang-
ed to be 35c weekly instead of
the smaller amount previous-
ly charged.
The Thanksgiving Dance
will be held at the Miramar
Hotel, Wednesday evening,
November 27th, and will be in
charge of a committee con-
sisting of Herbert Snowe, Ben
Zavon and Leon Wolf.
*
Miss Laura Goldberger,
Fint, Mich., is the guest of
*r. and Mrs. Lewis Brown,
1900 N. W. 35th street. She
ill be here several weeks and
Will be the recipient of social
courtesies.

SThe Sholom Lodge of Bnai
rith is holding its November
business meeting at Kaplan
41a1 as we are going to press.
plans for Bnai Brith day are
being formulated and will be
announced shortly,

THE


IF YOU WERE BUSY



If you were busy being kind,
Before you knew it you would find
You'd soon forget to think 'twas true
That someone was unkind to you.

If you were busy being glad,
And cheering people who are sad,
Although your heart might ache a bit,
You'd soon forget to notice it.

S If you were busy being good,
SAnd doing just the best you could,
You'd not have time to blame some man
Who's doing just the best he can.

. If you were busy being true
S To what you know you ought to do,
You'd be so busy you'd forget
The blunders of the folk's you've met.

S If you were busy being right,
You'd find yourself too busy, quite,
To criticize your neighbor long
SBecause he's busy being wrong.


The Clock

Strikes Seven
I

(Continued from Page 2)

farer passes on the road and
sees someone lying, he will
stop and come up close and
take a look an say, "Ah, some-
one has died, just look how
Beautiful his potatoes are!"
And all of a sudden he is
so taken up with his children,
a resounding, musical call is
heard coming through the
woods to their ears, mother is
calling, the noonday meal is
ready.
He sticks his wooden-hand-
led hoe into the soft earth,
the children follow his exam-
ple, they take hands and go
home hand in hand to lunch.
And the three of them go
along and pour into the house
like a squad of soldiers, and
wash in cold water and smooth
their hair and sit down at
the table.
The table is laid with bread
and salt, hot potatoes, meat
and a jug of apple cider, little
dishes full of stewed fruit
and little tender red radishes
and young green little onions.
They eat with a hearty will.
The children tell their mother
the story of how they all
three blundreed into a prickly
wild bush in the little wood
and how they barely escaped
with their lives; of how the
bird that catches little chicks
flew over the field and how
they shouted at him and drove
him off. And mother tells
them a world of stories with-
out end, which seem to have
happened lately, and with
child-like naivete, they believe
her.
After the meal he lights his
pipe and stretches out on the
soft sofa. The children sit


down at the small table and
turn the leaves of their pic-
ture books, and every little
while they run up to him to
show him some special won-
der.
He has a sense of great
well-being, his cattle, too, are
lying somewhere in the shade
of the trees, and his horses
are wandering on the yielding
earth of the grassy valley and
are sated with water from the
spring. So he lies half dozing
and half awake, and decides,
within himself what work
must be done tomorrow, and
thinks of the tasks which can
wait for a more opportune
time and mind more free, he
thinks as through a veil .

The alarm clock rings! The
alarm clock rings and rings
without a stop. He gets up
hurriedly from his bed and
hurries his clothes on his
body.
Oh, how late it is already!
He hurries to the factory
through streets and streets.
He hurries the work out of
himself the whole day long-
and yet as he stands at his
work he is full of dreams and
visions.


-BUSINSS D T090Y00-
I BUSINESS DIRECTORY
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AUTO PARTS
MIAMI AUTO WRECKING CO.,
-Incorporated-
Has Parts For Your Car
606-608 North West Fifth Street
Phone 5050 (fifty-fifty)
BLOOM AUTO REPAIR
& PARTS CO.
N. W. 17th Ave. at 23rd St.
Phone 23631
The Largest car wreckers in
Florida
L. (Pop) GERSON
Buyer of All Kinds of Scrap Metal
We Sell Auto Parts
2141 N. W. SECOND AVE.
Phone 20621

BAKERIES
GOLDSTROM BAKING CO., Inc.
1349 Washington Ave.
Phone 2836 Miami Beach
The finest in Bread and Cakes
Obtainable at the
Rosedale Delicatessen, Nwe York
Delicatessen and Empire
Delicatessen

BAGS and METALS
AMERICAN BAG & METAL CO.
Phone 21147
610 North West Fifth Street
EAST COAST BAG & METAL CO.
(Inc.)
I. L. MINTZER
MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS
435-445 N. W. 8th Street
Phone 4485
PEPPER METAL CORP.
Scrap Metal and Machinery
N. W. Cor. 5th Ave. and 14th St.
Phone 22546

BUILDING SUPPLIES
J. SIMPSON
Building Materials,
Roofing Paper, Asphalt
423 N. W. N. River Drive
Phone 7251

DELICATESSEN
ROSEDALE DELICATESSEN
170 N. W. 5th St.
We Supply Your Every Want

FISH & SEA FOODS
STANDARD FISH CO.
629 W. Flagler St.
Phone 2-3362
EAST COAST FISH CO.
"The Best in Fish and Sea Food"
Curb Market S. W. 2nd Ave.
Phone 22736

FOUNTAINS
Cold Drinks
Candies and Lunches
THE SHRADERS
Corner 1st St. N. W. and 3rd Ave.


FURNITURE
FURNITURE EXCHANGE,
INC.
321 N. Miami Ave.
We Buy and Sell Furniture

INSURANCE
Life Fire Casualty Bonds
RAUZIN INSURANCE
AGENCY, Inc.
Phones 22565 32452
137 N. E. First St.
Miami, Fla.
JOSEPH M. LIPNITZ
"Service That Makes Friends
and Keep Them"
Insurance Underwriter
Lawyer's Bldg. Phone 2-0317 2-1522
LEON ELKIN
Is now Local Representative of the
Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.
and is ready to serve his friends.
Residence
1620 N. W. 30th STREET
Phone 26085

LAUNDRIES
NATIONAL LAUNDRIES, INC.
"Trustworthy Service"
1048 N. W. 5th Ave.
Phone 8131

PHARMACISTS
BRYAN PARK PHARMACY
Chas. Tannenbaum,
Pharmacist
(reg. pharmacist for 17 years)
Cor 22nd Ave. and 8th St. S. W.
CRYSTAL PHARMACY
Dr. A. D. Halpern, Ph. G. Ph. D.
Prescriptions Our Specialty
128 N. Miami Ave. Phone 29713

PIPE and STEEL
ADELMAN PIPE & STEEL CO.
58 N. E. 25th St.
Aat F. E. C. R. R. Phone 21420

A. & B. PIPE AND METAL CO.
Phone 31355
53 North East 25th Street

PRINTERS
MIAMI PRINTING CO.
"Printing That Pays"
Phone 23261
107 South Miami Avenue


TIRES
MOHAWK TIRES
JOHNSON TIRE COMPANY
1361 N. E. 1st Ave. .
Phones: 4114-4115


FOR YOUR OWN GOOD VISIT THE

West Flagler Market, No. 2, Inc.
941 S. W. 22nd AVENUE.
The Home of
CHOICE GROCERIES, FINE FRUITS AND
VEGETABLES


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H FLORIDIAN-A MEDIUM OF AND FOR MIAMIJEWRY!


.--`...:I n-._._










Page 6


BUSINESS
GOSSIP

The housewife's paradise is
what one good woman said
about; the new Sunshine
Kosher Market, opening next
Thursday, at Miami Beach.
Rolls, breads, dairy produce,
delicatessen, fish, fruits, veg-
etables, poultry and meats in
one trip without walking out
of the store is this good wo-
man's idea of labor saving de-
vice and health conservation.
Equipped with the finest in
cases, ice boxes, refrigera-
tions plant, display counters,
and every possible method of
dealing and selling only the
finest obtainable in foods the
Sunshine Kosher Market is
bound to make its success in
a very short time. Manned by
men having the experience of
years in their respective de-
partments and well known to
the trade as reliable the Sun-
amunistlllnlll alllllll lllllll llllllll ulli nalinist111111 1 II l 1111111i -
Congratulations
to
SSUNSHINE KOSHER
MARKET

MIAMI POULTRY and
EGG CO.
S 1145 S. W. 8th Street
I Phone 22530
Hotels and Restaurants Supplied
Strictly Fresh Farm Eggs
- t lll ni ntll ii ll t ttl illiilllll IIItII I ii niI nIII i II111 -

Congratulations
SUNSHINE KOSHER
MARKET
r~r/m 'T~(


shine Kosher Market has ov-
ercome at its very start the
greatest handicap of modern
business. Situated in the
heart of the Jewish shopping
district of Miami Beach, 'Joe'
Mecklow, E. M. Reisman, H.
Albert, 'Lou' Ruscol who are
associated together in the op-
eration of the new store have
announced the policy of al-
ways pleasing the customer
and 'have adopted the slogan
"The customer is always
right."

The Palatial Kosher Restau-
rant which had its opening
last Sunday night has an-
nounced its policy of taking
care of the busy business and
professional men who are de-
sirous of getting a splendid
lunch and want it to be strict-
ly kosher by providing a bus-
iness men's lunch at only 75c.
This, of course is in addition
to the regular dinners for
which the Palatial is famous.
Many New Englanders will
Many New Englanders will


-. ~__ -~ II~.n-----Ilr.*C'-lrII --~-~-P;3~-2;-J~~;I;33i~s~
-- I I-- -III~C--~


CONGRATULATIONS SUNSHINE KOSHER MARKET
For the Finestin Rye, Whole Wheat, Pumpernickel, and Vienna Breads; Pastries, Pies, Cakes, Etc.
STRY THE PRODUCTS OF

GOLDSTROM BAKING CO., INC. Washion Ave.
- ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,. ,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,. ,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,n ,,,. ., .,,nnn n ,nnnnnn .. ,n ,n ,on ,,n ,,,


IIIIIIIII,,,,,,,,,,, ,l oll 1111 ,,,,,, it, .n[1111111111 111111111111111 Hll l 1 1111111111111111111111111111111111=1
BEST WISHES Congratulations
SSUNSHINE KOSHER
Climax Paint MARKET
Shop
SLouis ob i Superior Glass Co.
Louis Touby-
IPAINTERS & DECORATORS 100 N. W. 5th St.
137 N. E. First St. P hone 2-7236
Phone 2-2565 (lass for your every Need
, III nII m I ,,I n nnI n I I IInIII Ih ,1 11 11 IIIII III IIII Illllltlllllllll IIIInIIIIIIIIIIII III 1111 11IIM


BEST WISHES
to the
SSUNSHINE KOSHER=
MARKET

Brill Electric Co.
529 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach, Fla.
0
Electrical Contractors of
SDistinction
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Congratulations
SUNSHINE KOSHER
MARKET

i New York
Baking Co.
471 S. W. 8th St.
Phone 21773
Pumpernickel, Rye, Vienna
Bread, Rolls, Cakes, Pastries



Congratulations
to
SUNSHINE KOSHER!
MARKET


SAUGUST BROS1 l
MAGIC BAKERY BEGINNING THURSDAY Y, NOV. 21st
I 361 S. W. 8th St. We'll be happy to greet you in the most modern and splendidly equip- The Miami
Producers of the best ped Kosher Market in the South, comparing most favorably with any Wholesal
SPUMPERNICKEL, RYE store in the Country, Handling only the finest in
AND VIENNA BREAD | = -
Grocery Co.
Real Crispy Vienna Roll Kosher Meats and Kosher Delicatessen 26 N E.th S.
Real Crispy Vienna Rolls 216 N. E. 11th St.
Phone 2-9435 Poultry and Fresh Fish and Dairy Products
,,.,,,,,.,,.",,H A LBERT, Prop. ",.n.dei.. th e Supervision ofl o e.1................................. .............
"JOE" MECKLOW formerly of New .".................... .
E. M. REISMAN, Mgr. York Delicatessen Store
May the Sun Shine
in the BEST WISHES
SUNSHINE KOSHER Choice Fruits and Fresh
to the
MARKET Vegetables SUNSHINE KOSHER
That You May See Daylight Under the supervision of LOUIS RUSCOL MARKET
And Success
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEPARTMENTS --
The Plumbing Department HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS OUR SPECIALTY Geo. Ehlenberger
Store Your Shopping Will Be A Pleasure To You When You Visit The

Markowitz SUNSHINE KOSHER MARKET &Co.,Inc.
Dairy Products
& Resnick, Inc. 434 436 438 Collins Avenue EPro
tMIAMI BEACH PHONE 5-3552 216 N. E. 11th St.
MIAMI BEACH
839 west Flagler Street MIAMI BEACH PHONE 5-3552
llllllllll lllllll(l llllllllllllllllllllllllII II lllllll = 00 11,f1U ll lllllI4lllll l
_,I1t111ifiu i 111111111111 1 1fImI I I ll It mn .III II Ii lull im igi ll n I 111 1111111nm11n111111 11111i
BEST WISHES :
Best Wishes To BEST WISHES
CONGRATULATIONS!
THE SUNSHINE KOSHER MARKET SUNSHINE KOSHER SUNSHINE KOSHER MARKET
II MARKETSHESUNSHINE KOSHER MARKET
_--= --: MARKET -

G. L. MILLER CO. G o I
721 N. Miami Ave., Phone 2-3755 General Paper GEO. L. DIXON CO.
Representing
Represents Crp. 841 N. Miami Ave.
HOBART MEAT CHOPPER AND Everything in Paper PHONE 26751
TOLEDO SCALES --o-- --
(No Springs- Honest Weight) 68 N. E. 26th St.
Snna l uttlllluu um Phone 2-4054 ---HOTEL AND RESTAURANT SUPPLIES-----
-in.^H.^ ^.^.,^n,M,m...m^^ ^ "?^ ^ ,--- ^ .^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^nlllt~l Phone 2-4054--------.-.._ .... .
Im onn.u..m um.m~munumumamunmmatul *l mulgasanm~mun .uma u.netiimenumulm na = E.,mm.,I,,i,,,,,,m.m,,m.,..,me.m ,mm...ume..u..sues..u..mn...m.,n..s ................. ..nsu-.unu,.u-,,-.-mmatum'm


OUR ADVERTISERS SAVE YOU MONEY AND GIVE YOU -SRVi~il

,. . ... . ..... . .


THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN

be happy to learn of the fact
that Mrs. A. Singer who has'
operated the famous Singer's
Inn, at Sharon, Mass., for
many years is to open a res-
taurant at 8 S. E. First ave.,
above the old Hollywood of-
fices, in the heart of Miami's
shopping district. From the
stories told by New England-
ers who have been guests at
the Sharon Inn, Miami is
bound to receive the news of
the new restaurant as another
indication of Miami's prog-
ress.
"Joe" Zalis, for a number of
years in the fruits and veget-
able business in the 100 block
of N. W. Fifth street, has
again gone into the fruits and
produce business and is equip-
ped to handle both the retail
and wholesale trade. In his
new place of business at 241
N. W. Fifth street, Joe has a
large stock of fresh produce
and fruits replenished daily,
and is in a position to take
care of his customers and save


--. -- ----------"~~~~


Friday, November 15, 1929

them considerably in their As we are going to press
purchases. the Emunah Chapter, 0. E. S.
is holding its regular meeting
"There's a woman peddler at the Scottish Rite Temple.
wants to see you," announced
the green office boy.
"Tell him to come in and Alas! We can no longer
bring a couple of blonde sam- boast that American money is
ples," replied the boss. Bigger and Better.

DINE IN STYLE
-at-

SINGERS HUNGARIAN
RESTAURANT
S8S. E. FIRST AVE.
(One Flight Up)
(3 Doors Off Flagler Street)
IN THE HEART OF MIAMI

WATCH FOR ANNOUNCEMENT OF OUR
OPENING

Now Operating The Singer Inn, Sharon, Mass.
l IIi il illil ltlll lllll l ll lllll llll llll l lll ll IIIIIIII lMIIII III I III I I


71-


I