UF Digital Humanities Working Group (DHWG) Fall 2013 Focus on Looking at the Humanities; Information and Visualization

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Title:
UF Digital Humanities Working Group (DHWG) Fall 2013 Focus on Looking at the Humanities; Information and Visualization
Series Title:
Digital Humanities Working Group Announcements and Agendas
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Language:
English
Creator:
Thorat, Dhanashree
Taylor, Laurie N.
Acord, Sophia K.
Publisher:
George A. Smathers Libraries
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publication Date:

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Abstract:
Descriptions of the Fall 2013 UF Digital Humanities Working Group meetings.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID:
AA00009751:00015


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Page 1 of 6 UF DHWG Meetings, Activities, and Events The UF DHW G group meets regularly throughout the academic y ear as well as coordinating, supporting, facilitating, and promoting related workshops and events. Please see the Events page for upcoming event and meeting information. The Fall 2013 working groups will focus on Looking at the Humanities; Information and Visualization. We will discuss the various ways in which forms of data and research in the humanities are visualized, the theory behind visualization, and tools for expan ding our own visualization practices. Meetings for 2013 2014 are from 12 1:30pm, in Pugh Hall 210: Sept 25, 2013; Oct 23, 2013; Nov 20, 2013; Jan 22, 2014; Feb 24, 2014; March 24, 2014. Please see the Events page for upcoming event and meeting information. Also, please contact the DHWG Meeting Facilitators for 2013 2014: Sophia Krzys Acord, skacord@ufl.edu Dhanashree Thorat, dthorat@ufl.edu Laurie N. Taylor, laurien@ufl.edu DHWG Zotero Group Library The UF DHWG has a Zotero Group for sharing readings and resources: https ://www.zotero.org/groups/uf dhwg Please email Laurie Taylor to be added.

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Page 2 of 6 Digital Humanities Working Group: Why Visualize? A Showcase of UF Projects 25 September 2013, 12:00 1:30 pm, Pugh Hall, 210 This fall 2013, the DHWG meetings will focus on Looking at the Humanities; Information and Visualization Visual representations of knowledge are usually thought to re state concepts that are already known, or to repeat ideas that can in principle exist outside their visual representation s. But is this true? To what extent do diagrams, graphs, and images produce new knowledge? Visual representations do not repeat ideas, and leverage spatial metaphors which introduce new knowledge by way of these metaphors (e.g., flow, position in space). T he first meeting will open into these discussions from sharing UF projects in the Digital Humanities Project Showcase. The Project Showcase is an opportunity to share about your own projects, learn about projects by others, and make collaborative connectio ns regarding the projects, visualization concepts and applications, and new opportunities that build upon and grow with the existing abundant work at UF. Project Examples Check the new UF DH Project Showcase webpage: http://cms.uflib.ufl.edu/DigitalHumanities/UFDigitalHumanitiesProjects.aspx progress!) Rea ding Read up on Visualization from which gives an overview with some theoretical grounding and practical information for creating visualizations. The online version is dynamic with links to examples and resources, and a printable version is available here For a more in depth discussion of visualization, see Ben Fry's (2008) Visualizing Data: Exploring and Explaining Data with the Processing Environment Sebastopol: O'Reilly Media. Discussion Questions 1. short (~ 5 minutes) to share information and spark new conversations 2. Bring a favorite visualization from anywhere to share as conversation starters and potential collaboration openers The UF Digital Humanities Working Group (DHWG) is a group of academic and library faculty, staff, and graduate students who meet monthly to discuss current projects and topics at the intersection of digital technologies and core research needs and questions in the humanities disciplines. The Fall 2013 working groups will focus on Looki ng at the Humanities; Information and Visualization We will discuss the

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Page 3 of 6 various ways in which forms of data and research in the humanities are visualized, the theory behind visualization, and tools for expanding our own visualization practices.

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Page 4 of 6 Digital Humanities Working Group: Thinking Visually: Seeing Information and Ideologies 23 October 2013, 12:00 1:30 pm, Pugh Ha ll, 210 In many disciplines, the main interest in visualization is practical: how can I enhance my current practice and better communicate it to others by visualizing my data? At this level, the contribution of artists is typically presentational, and consists in sharing strategies or methods to show information clearly. But, visualization is seldom, if ever, a neutral tool for sharing information. Rather, visualizations transmit their own ideological assumptions encoded in them and in the digital devices that we u se to disseminate them, often below the awareness of those who create or use them. In addition to visualization's 'practical' uses, we can also think about information visualization as a narrative strategy, for example, to stimulate creative or discovery, to engage in community building via crowd sourcing input, or to otherwise to construct our experiences with and knowledge of information in particular ways. This DHWG discussion will be led by Profs. Jack Stenner (Art + Art History) and Terry Harpold (Eng lish) to discuss the tremendous opportunities raised by information visualization, as well as the important critical and reflexive processes that researchers and communicators must engage in to truly understand the impact of visualization technologies. Pr oject Examples Prof. Jack Stenner's Delicious list of visualization links: http://delicious.com/jstenner/tag_bundle/visualization including http://demonocracy.info/infographics/usa/us_debt/us_debt.html A map of Twitter users in the Gainesville area: http://www.mapbox.com/labs/twitter gnip/locals/#8/29.729/ 83.477 and a reflexive discussion of Twitter visualizations: http://www.visualizing.org/stories/visualizing twitter Reading 1. Edward R. Tufte (2001) "Aesthetics and Technique in Data Graphical Design" The Visual Display of Quantitative Information (2nd ed.) Cheshire, CT: Graphics P ress: 177 190. 2. Mitchell Whitelaw (2008) "Art Against Information: Case Studies in Data Practice" The Fibreculture Journal (11). < http://el even.fibreculturejournal.org/fcj 067 art against information case studies in data practice > 3. Optional Reading: James Elkins (1997) The Art Bulletin 79.2: 191 98. Discussion Questions 1. Choose a particular visualization to discuss. What information does this visualization convey, and what elements of knowledge or information -for example, on the textual level -do we overlook when we map or visualize data?

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Page 5 of 6 2. How can visualization tools act as narrative strategies, by revealing other, less explicit, processes of democratization or exclusivity in how they are presented to their users? The UF Digital Humanities Working Group (DHWG) is a gr oup of academic and library faculty, staff, and graduate students who meet monthly to discuss current projects and topics at the intersection of digital technologies and core research needs and questions in the humanities disciplines. The Fall 2013 working groups will focus on Looking at the Humanities; Information and Visualization We will discuss the various ways in which forms of data and research in the humanities are visualized, the theories behind visualization, and tools for expanding our own visual ization practices.

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Page 6 of 6 Digital Humanities Working Group: Diving Into Visualization: Tools for Research and Teaching 20 November 2013, 12:00 1:30 pm, Pugh Hall, 210 Bring your laptops! After discussing the forms and theories behind i nformation visualization practices in the humanities, today we will bring our own texts, test drive a suite of different visualization tools, and discuss how we might use these tools in ou r research and teaching. From text analysis and wordles, to mapping and geographic analysis, to timelines and network analysis, the sky is the limit. In preparation for the DHWG meeting, you may wish to browse some of the project examples below, but please also bring examples of your own tool discoveries to share with others. Project Examples Voyant Tools: Reveal your texts http://voyant tools.org/ Geocommons: Visual analytics through maps http://geocommons.com/ TimeLiner: Building sequences to show cause and effect http://www.cobbk12.org/sites/literacy/fetc/timeliner/ timeliner.htm Reading 1. TBD Discussion Questions 1. How would you like to be able to work with your texts and other forms of data in your research or teaching? 2. What tips or questions do you have about using visualization tools in your teaching? The UF Digital Humanities Working Group (DHWG) is a group of academic and library faculty, staff, and graduate students who meet monthly to discuss current projects and topics at the intersection of di gital technologies and core research needs and questions in the humanities disciplines. The Fall 2013 working groups will focus on Looking at the Humanities; Information and Visualization We will discuss the various ways in which forms of data and researc h in the humanities are visualized, the theories behind visualization, and tools for expanding our own visualization practices.