Library Informer (Vol. 8 no. 3)

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Library Informer (Vol. 8 no. 3)
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Library Informer
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Libraries & Instructional Media Services Department
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Libraries & Instructional Media Services Department
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Libraries -- Newsletters   ( lcsh )

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Library Informer (Vol. 8 no. 3 - Notable dates in history and at COB).

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r---------------------------------! ILiL __r'VOIiime VIIINo.3TheCollegeof tneBaliamasMarcn:1lptil"g!5l l_A Bi-MontlyNewsletter.J'Pleasenote, if youleaveyourbags,books, ... at a table oron chairsnexttothe table they ;'Rilll)e placedinone oftwo locationsunderthe Idisplaycase nexttosecurityoroutsidethe librar)' onthewalk way. Thebasicproblems t'Bcausethere appears to be alarge numberIJfindividualsattemptingtooccupyaseatfor 4Ito 6 hourseachdavoftheweek.I < 1liTheBuzzWords thenare,ShareTheAvailable S:eating Space!r.PeterFriedCarletonUniversitanada Psychology: A BasicCourse,DavidKrecht.a1.AlfredKnopf,1976. PregnancyandLife-StyleHabits,PeterFried,troddard,1983., PsYchology, RobertE.Silver'man,Prenticeall,1982.DrugsinModernSociety.Charles R Carrol..C.Brown1989. societYk3ndHumanBehavior.Oakleyayan tiharles sir,Mosby1993. Drugs of Choice.CurrentPerspectivesonfur Use. RicharaG.Schlaadtand Peter T.'hannon.PrenticeHall, 1986. HumanMotivation.ASocialPsychological.roach.Russell R Green,Brook/ColePub1..,1995.1.DrugUseandMisuse.StephenA.Maisto;M.alezio;andG.J.Connors,Holt,ReinhartndWmston.1991SecondworkQUietlyIeareconsantly rRrpi'Jing complaintsregardingtheexcessnoiseof talkers whoarenot stUdying,nor regarding heirfellow students whodesire a quietplacetoothelr work. YourCooperationwillbegreatlyppreciatedIanationsmade toCOBLibrarb"',LibrarySeatingBooks,Bags,Noise I j .. \ \ 'w .. \i r 11 IIStudents:I1 .lweldwish youtounderstandthatthe lIbraryhas limitedseatingfewerthan220 seats to nearly3.000students.Idon'tknow >;hat thisimpliesormeansfor ea,:h of you, wedowant VCiU tounderstandthatyou :l,enot toleave bags, books etc... GO thetablesor,_Itl-18 chall's whileyou are outattendingclass, withfriendsoutsideU'le libraryor Lttm_something to eat attheCafeteria, ,\1"Dor,alds, WendysorKFC. It youare not'.,'resent, thenthatspace you wereusingis foranyother person to lise. ;3eating isbasicallyon a firstcornefirst served Onceyouleaveyour seat for any ofthe :3.bove reasonsorother activ.ities.tr18seatyouVIad -noccupyingthenbecomesa for l"i"le nextperson lookmg for a placetoSItand

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J'T(jtable Dates inHistoryandatCOB. JvlarchandAprilI stAsh Wednesdayj71h St. P3tricks Day 19('1"1FirstTecorded robbery1631. OthFirstdayDfSpring::it.!"lFir'tcolor TV Broadcast19S':.Oth C.O.B.TeachingPracticeSymposium i,pr'il LibraryExhibitionMainPostOffice Wag.1st' .6.pril Fool'sDay '(nd uayligi-ltSavingTime Begins<.':thM'artin LutherKingAssassinated ti\ World HealthDay th PalmSunday 13r:tl LastDayofClassesSpringSemester COB. 14th Good Friday1 S'hFirst Dayof Passover16Ui Easter 17th PatriotsDayJ8i:h--28thFinalExaminationsSpring1995 PipelessOrganInventedbyLaurensHammond1934 L5rl) Ella Fitzgerald, FirstLadyofSong,born1918. I.illrary OrientationScheduledDatesto Nr;te I j\!In:'h 1 a Sth meeting:Deadl'Lf!; colle.ction timefe,l' Assignment#4 As<::O'nment#5h3ndec1out.1"1:11Th21st 6thandfinalmeeting. Deadiine. collection fur a.>ignment#5. EndofCourseI Grades willbeavaiiablefromMarch27th.I Unary StaffNotes F.;irthdays. Best Wishes to All :tL Mrs. Sandra DDnovan Ms. JaneRoach 16thMr. JimDonovanNewBooks Received: Cataloguing :ModernCaribbeanPolitics:editedbyAnthonyPayneandPaul Sutton. PublishedbyJohnHopkinsUniversityPress,Baltimore:1993.332p.F2183M631993'Women of trle Caribbean: editedbyPatEllis.Publlshed by Zed Books, London:1966. 165p.HQ1870'9W65 1986 Radic lismandSocialChangeinJamaica,1 60-1972:by Gbika Gray.Publishedby University ofTennesseePressKnoxville: 1990289p.HN23029R34 1990 { Teaching Communication:Theoryand Research Methods:editedbyJohnDaly... PublishedbyLawrenceErlbaumAssociates,Hillsdale,N.J.: 1990 Sl1p. P91.3T431990CounsellingforCollege:byEileenMatthayPublishedbyPeterson'sGuides,Princeton, N.J. 1991432p_LB1620.5M381991Methodsin Social Science:byAndrewSayer.PublishedbyRoutledge, London:199Z313p.H6::.829J992.Marketingin Travel andTourism:byVictorT.C.Middleton,PublishedbyButterworthHeinemann, Cr,dord: 198830Bp.G155AM51988TheMedia:byBeverlySkeggs.PublishedbyNelson,Edenborgh:199Z126p. P90 8531992. Case StudiesinAbnormalPsychology:by Thomas F. Oltmanns.Published byJohnWiley,New York.: 1986 355p.RC465N4250471986APracticalApproachtoTeachingPhysicalEducation:David1.Kizer, publishedbyMouvementPublications,NewYork:1984291pGV363 K59J984BookReviewMethodsinSocial Science: Demonstrates the criticalimplications [or SocialScientificresearcflraisedby a realistphilosophyofSocialScience.Itbridgesthe gapbetweenwhatphilosophersandmethodologists say aboul:SocialScienceandwhatstudentsand

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1'actu"311ydo.Examplesaredr'awn ,-on[If,social sciences.This anideal text for advanced students of .... ial sciences insocialogy, economics,r history,geography, and anthropology. 12.HF1416 T56 13.PN145W74 14,(] 133 EllS InternationalMarketing 3rd. ed. 3 Vols. 1988TheWriter'sHandbook 1993EncyclopediaofWorldGeography.24Vols.1994 ForCollege:Inthisguide thec::-authaI'SaddreSs such issues 3S:..InderstandingandeV31uating postsecondary options; "I'I':'ltivating studentstL!pursue ahIgher to:' catlOn; P'" nning Academically'ilnclfinancially for a ': ollegeeducation;)ealingw1t:h the c'jllegeselectIonprocess; lingwith tl'1I5 college admissionprocess;'",ouJ1sellingspec1"3lpl.lblicatlOns. .', very \Taluableguide forguidancecounselors, intraining,andschool Frotn the Reference I.jbrarian Ti1ere t"l?lvebeen severalnewtitlesreceivedand pL:tceclem theReference St'lelY8s. ThefollowingJ.S apgrtiallisbng of some ofthe new additions: P368.2 Encyclopediaof Food Serviceand E62Tecl'mology4 Vols.1992. F1406 TheCambridgeEncy,ofLatin e36Americaandtrl-Gar.ibt-ean 2ndeel.1992, 3 LC4D07ConciseEncy. ofSpecialEqucationES3 1990 tK5001 TI-18 OxfordHa db ok152 1994 '3.':::;102:The Oxford HammondAtlasoftt'Je093 World 19,GT1ZLl WI',o's Wt10AI:longBlaCk America 8thed.1994NewJournalsinthePeriodicalCollection:1.Electronic Letter:Aninternationalpublication of trleInstitution ofElectrical Engmeers. Itis publlshed bi-weekly.2.Geology:Publishedmonthly.3.JournalofResearchinScience Pu list1edmon hlyitis t.rleofficial journalorth NatlonaA sociationforResearch In ScienceTeachin.4.ScienceEducation:Published 6issuesperyear.5.Tourism Published bi-montrl1y, 6' iSSll"peryear. MediaSoftware, VideoStoryoftheAmericanCivilWar1861-1865WrittenandDirectedbyPeterBattyFiveParts:Vol.1.DividedUnion, Forward to Sumtl!r,The 15610 08'f148V''71'., 10.E184AIE5811. POI.5 ISThe OXford HistoryofClassical Art1993InternationalDictionary of Arclij tects andArchitecture2 Vols. 1993 TI-IeryIarshallCavendish Illustrated EncyClopedia of PlantsEarth Sciences10 1966 Encyclopecliaof Ml,.Ilt culturalism6 Vals. 1993InternationalEncyclopedia of Communications 4 Vols.1989Vol.2.DividedUnion,BloodyStalematf:,TheVol. 3,DividedUnion,HighTideOf The ConfederacyVol.4.DividedUnion,TotalWarVol.5.Divided Union, Conclusion at Appomattox3

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r:BacJUngltcross J1ISClpllneS J.-'er--tRemain_,High DespiteConcerns H 'r Coverage 1rl eclucatlOn, a field conSIdered sus eptlble!-ds,interdisciplinryino'ole for Ii"ng heldtheinterestofeducatorso'lertime./ 'j.t disciplinaryteachii1ghaSIJeen around in:. armssincetheturnof the century1900, Ii schoolsbefore publicor government. Eno: anew concept,butis a veryposItive methodology,by theeditorof t.mormer whenh,e was inthe classroomJ,.ery.;arsOCd15CUsioi1 ai1lj exploratior., t :ch -s rarnamattra edto theidea oi Jil'::r of SlITiJgthe ChalkDust:Talesof Teachel's Cha.nging Classroom breakingthroughdisciplineboundaries,teacherscan make thecurriculummorerelevantand contemporary,srle says,becausetheycan embe,j knowledgeandskillsinreal-lifecontextsr tier thnteaching them (rom adrytext'book_Cnceptsrom biologyandSOCIalstudies,for exampl,could be taughtthroughafocusonbloengmeeringatopicalfocusthat studentswould bindintersting.Thisapproachalso helps studentsunderstandthereal-worldneed forwhat trley learn,whichmakes willingto workharder. itspopularity,interdisciplinary teachmg ralsesconcerns among someparentsandeducators.Theconcernvoiced mostoften thatmoving fromadisciplinebasedto atheme-basedapproachwillcauseimportantcontenttofallbythewayside. EspeCIallyat uppergradelevels,teachersfearthatthe"purity"oftheirdisciplineswillbeloserinintegratedunits,Fogartysays.Teachers worry theywon't be able to go ntodepthinthelr :sujcctarca:sbccau:sethey're tryingto moet1:2 themticfocus. Anothercommonconcernisthat in integratedunits,onediscipline will be allowed to overshadowanother.Liz Orrne,who teaches{,t Mon.tgomery Jr./Sec;ondary SchoolinCoquitlam, Bntlsh Columbia, notes thatthe chronologie" 1framework of thesocialstudiescurriculumcan"smothe.r" trle Englishcurriculum,which is concreteandsequential.Te.achersa10worrythatone subjectwlll be used a"handmaiden"toanotherMathmight

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it::,ilo1."lcl"c1yZttoo! of ",d ee,for 0 studied forit::ownsake. "english lSused ,I :::.:1,::'01,"so.yGl'ii.dyofMcRE1,whotrains I e',rersIna process for developing"hun s,"of ':It -dcurriculum.In pJ.,5tnninE .tlldE: ,': :Junks, II teachersoften askstude-ntstoffl3keJJe.sentations or wrotepo.pcl';>,butt'layneglect',0inc1ude novels and poetry, she says.J!8educator;;} say they haveleamed from P}: that thesefeaf3'areell founded. :C;lthleen Roth, anassociate.ofteacflerp'ur:ation at MichiganStateUniversitywho teaches 5th grade ence, was dissatisfied theresultsofa year longunitinwhich she loolt part.The unit,wiiicl1 blended social studies CIne science, was organized around a"1492" lherne. Rotl1felt tl1at tl-Jeunitdid notdoenough\0helpstudentsgrow asscientificthinkers.I Despite careful, collaborative [jlanning, I was '.ILable tocreate activities thatfitthe theme and l:::;.nnectedWittl the socialstudiesactivities simultaneously engagingstudentsin ,ldi'lJe, meaningfulscientificinquiry," Rothhas "Wecalledthis unit integrated ::cl.::nce/social stUdies, butitreallyfeltlike :::isl studies."Her experience was not unusual, Roth Thematic unitsoftenfailtofocus on pcnr'erful ide3 or organi2ing concepts from from di:scipines, shesays. In selecting concepts for I;uchumts, teachersoften choose Whatfits best \ th the tI-Jeme, ra therthanemprlasizing the: d,?::-sthat most important and useful within discipline.As a result, contentisI .IJmpromised or diluted." Teachers shouldn't.ll. assumethat curriculumintegrationis a goodthing, Roth says. The should I:J{plore what k.indsofintegration yield benefits, 01'sb.ldent learning. Experience with interdisciplin::try teaching : ;,iSuzanneKrogh of WestemWashin:,ton Jiversity to asimilar conclusion. When her bOOK, "Integrated Early Curriculum", Krogh. took a,tl<3ltical tote'ach 2nd grade, so she could "try lJverything out" in the classroom. She was badly :,when a visitor asked herclass what they Ifd'S learninginsocial stUdies, and the children :ust looked at her blankly. "They didn'tknow \iltlt 'social studies' meant," Krogh realized. In 1r:ling hardtointegrate content,shehad failto ain h-erstudents any conceptionofthe subject:l'ea 'andtheir mean'ing-something she believesstudentsshouldknowand understand. Sincethattime, Kroghhastempered her thinking aboutinterdisciplinaryeffectsin general. She had assumedthatthe second editionofher bOOK would take a more radical, far-reaching approachtointegrating contentthan tfle first, she says. But in surveying theliterature, she discovered a lotofconcern(evBnmore advocates of curriculumintegration} that trle integrityof specificsubjects couldbe last. Because sheshared thisconcern, evenatthe early childhood level, she decidedtoretain the fIrst edition's cons81'vatism. The concern over losing important contentL "very reasonable," says Jacobs, teacners shouldfusethe disciplines only when doing so allows themtoteach important content more effectively.Byproviding a context for the knowledge and sk.illsstudentslearn,interdisciplinaryteaching can improvestudents'retention, Jacobs notes. Butif teachers reel thataparticularefforttointegrate:contentis"sabotaging"theirwork, they simply shouldn'tdoit. Teacher may want to reflectonwhythey feelthatway,however.Often,whenteachersbegin\0blend the disciplines,they feel"a nagging fearthatthey're not doing trleir job,"saysWasley.Trained as single-discipline teachers, they worrythatthey may be "shrinkingtheircurriculumresponsibilities."Thisfear stems from the old conceptionoflearningas simply the acquisitionofcontent knowledge, Wasley says.Itteacher believes that studentsshouldlearnagreatdealofvocabularyinBiologyI,for example, then using aninterdisciplinaryapproach focusedonbroad concepts might constitute "shrink.ing." Buttormanyteachers tpday, wasley notes, thegoallstoensurethatstudentsunderstandwhat theyknow,A teacher.whowantsstudents tounderstandinterdependencewithbiological systems, for example, might better achieve that goalbyusing an integrated approachthatpayslessattention to vocabulary. In a well-designed integrated unit, lessis more,saysJaneMcgeehan, a former teacherwtlOnowworks for the consulting firm Susan Kovalik and Associates in Kent, Washington. Although some topics will notbeaddressed, the most powerful skillsand concepts from the5disciplinescanbewoveninto a year-long

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rj;1rISr8evantto youngpeople'sshe,;2\" ..:.IT.isapproac,ir:, "t dentscpp,.'l'tunities toapplyknowledgeinsteadofjust \through themotions"of memOl'i2ing,andthf'"forgetting information. Te3chel'scan'tbe.:u"estudentsreallyunde.rstanciwtlatthey'veh:11ed unless studentsapply itin a different Lontc:y.t,Jacobs believe .. r example,amath could find outwhatstudentstrulyknow :::.b:J'Ut statistics,shesays,byaskingtl1emto statistics todemographicpatternsinirilmigration. thePitfallsCnrevising ttl8 curriculumto focus onthemes (r problems,howcanteacherspreventessential from winding up onthecutting room fL()()r?Teamplanningis"vital"toensure u:jjectintegrity,saysOnl1e. Whentwoormore IJQjectareaexperts plancurriculumtogether,. person is going to protect hediscipline," 3ays. WhenOrme,an Englishteacher, andtaughtatwohourHumanities ((oI.lfSe with 3social studies teacher, shewas (,t.Ie to thesamenumberofnovelsand ()oemsas shehadinEnglish, but "whatwegot itC:.Oss was richer." because the literaturewas l,laced inhistoricalcontext. Now as a teacher responsibleforteachingHumanities,she &l'ves "arealEnglishslant"tosocialstudies, concedes,because EnglishrJisrler areaof Thebenefitsgainedwhenteachersrepresent zLnct defendtheirdisciplinesduringplanning hElve tLeendemonstratedinthe Bellingtlam, schools. According to Taylorofthe l'l;;trict's centraloffice,acommitteeof BFillingham educatorsworkedthreemonthsto Eve-lop andinterdisciplinarycurriculum 'I r :Irnework ..whichisnowbeing usedin 75 lilssrooms. [ Iltially, theframework focused on math, :c:,:,nl;, socialstUdies, and reading, TaylorCl's. Ittookonly a "brief swipe" at music and !Ihy-ical education,listingsongs and activities !l.:c:hsquare dancing.This "cursoryl'durS6ilent" did notsatisfysome music andphylea)educationteachers, who to see, (l::f,th,a;da. ofskills"in theirIli::iplines .. bo.ttheir ownrequest specialist in Jfl'ricarldplwsical education,anda mediajec..ician,h3ve beenaddedtothein:: 'disciplinary committee. T_schers'defendingtheirdisciplines can be a l c;-ed&c however,saysGrady. Although f.D teachersshouldprotectthecontentthatisintegraltotheirsubjectareas,theshouldn't tr)' tomaketheirowndisciplinesgedominant.Teachersalsoneed toappreciatethatsometimE,:; anothel' subjectmighttakethelead,Grady "Nexttimeitmight beyours."Another wayto avoidlosingimportantcontentininterdisciplinaryunitsisbypayingexplicitattentic,nto standards andout-comes, experts say.BecauseteachersinBellinghamwere concerned about coverage ofimportantcontentininterdisciplinaryunits,Taylorsays,thedistricthasemphasizedtheneed for umt outcomesthatarewellarticulatedfromthebeginning. TrJe "driving torce" inplanning,shesays, is toensurethat"criticalcontent"isclearlyidentified.OtherWise, "youcanhavecutesy activities, butwhatdotheyaddupto?"TI-Ieprocessforcurriculumplanning that McREL promotes paycloseattentiontostandardsand benchmarks, sayGrady.Typically,teachersselecta themeortopic (Deus,thenidentify the standardsfromtheirdistrictorstate,orfromnationalsubject-areagroupsthatmustbeembedded in instruction.Teachersfeel comfortablewiththeMcRELapproachbecauseityieldscurriculumstronglyfoundedinstandards, Grady says.Teachersdon't feel "my subjectislosingout,"shesays. Andthestandardsbasismakesthenewcurriculumeasiertoselltoparents,becauseeducatorscanshowthatit's"notjustalotof fun activitiesthat kids liketo do." Likediscipline-basedcourses,interdisciplinarycourses benefit fromclearlydefinedperformanceexpectations,saysDavidAckerman,superintendentoftheCatalinaFoothillsSchool inTucson, Ariz. Teachersshouldbeable tostate,"Bytaking thlS course,studentswillbe able to .....11Theperformanceexpectationsshouldmakeclear trlB "val ue-addeddimension"oftheinterdisciplinaryapproach,Ackermansays,which should "help the forit.IIDoinginterdisciplinaryteachingwellisverypowerful--butvery difficult, Roth "Says. Althoughshe was nothappywiththe"1492"unit,shehadbettersuccesswithanotherefforttomergescienceandsocialstudies.Inscience, she taughtherstudentsaboutthingsthatdissolve;insocialstudiesshetaughtaboutfarmingintheUnitedStates.Thenshepulledthetwo togetherbyteachingaboutfarmers'useofpesticidesandinsecticides,includingwhatdissolvesinrainwater.Because

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,;. hnarvweremade after ,:,.Ilcldabaseofunderstanding inbotl1ttiE'Ywere"e.asierfor thekiclstograsp," .:."t;;t::lCVC .n pI nning integrated curriculum,teachers i".:'Ecl ta;:,j{,"Is t 5.rlCitdral connection,ora t,:.Ci? and superficTalone?"Rothsays,":'LHurally occurri linksare extremely p)werful." Since thattime, Krogh has tempered h;;1" tl-jinking aboutinterdisciplinaryeffects in She hadassumed that trl8 second elUtion ofherbookwould take a more 1'3dical,hr-!"eachingapproach tointegratingcontent tllz,n the first, she s ys.Butinsurveying tfle IJ shediscovered a lotof concern (evenIT ore advocatesofcurriculumintegration) trlat tJIE'lntegrityofspecificsubjectsCOLlld be lost."liUSeshe sharedtl-lisconcern, evenatthe e:wlv chil.jhoodlevel,shedecided toretainthefJr ;;t edition' 3 conservatism. Theconcern over losing important contentis ""t'ryreasonable," saysJacobs,teachersshould (lwetr18 disciplinesonlywhen doing so allows themtG teachimportant content more el;,::;tively. Byproviding a context (or trle knowledge andskillsstudentslearn, interdisciplinary teachingcanimprove s:IJelens'retention, Jacobs notes. But itteachersf':c-l that a particulareffortto integrate content L:'abot3g-ing" theirwork,theysimply-"ILl'ldn'tdoit. Teachers may want toreflecton why tl"leyfeel .:Ultway, however. Often,when teachers begin to b Lcd tiledisci plines,theyfeel"a nagging (ear t.l'1 they'renotdoing their job," says Wasley. 1"'ained as single-discipline teacl"lers, they 'i'!OtTy thattheymaybe"shrinkingtheir :-!':"Lculum responsibilities."Thisfearstemsfrom the oldconception of learningassimplytheacquisitionofntentknowledge, Wasleysays. If theteachertllat studentsshouldlearn a gl"eat deal : l1Qcabulary inBiologyI,for example, then '-inaninterdisciplinaryapproachfocusedon bconcepts mightconstitute"shrinking."E formany teachers today, Wasley notes, theg..isto ensure thatstudentsunderstandwhatt t'./ know. A teacherwrlo wants stuclentsto Ln(Jerstand interdependencewithbiological sy':tems, forexample,might better achievethat. -,:.1by usinganintegrated approach thatpays l attentionto 1Tocabulary. In a well-designedintegratedunit,lessis muff:. saysJaneMcgeehan, a fDrmerteacherwho nowworks for theconsulting firm SusanKovalil'i.anclAssociates inKent,Washington.Althoughsometopics will notbeaddressed, tfl8most powerful skills and conceptsfrom trle disciplines can be woyen intoayear-longthemethatisrelevanttoyoungpeople'slives, sfle says.Thisapproachgivesstudentsopportunitiestoapplyknowledgeinsteadofjust"goingthrough the motions"of memorizingand thenforgettinginformation. Teacherscan't besurestudentsreally understandwhat tl1ey'velearned unlessstudents apply itin a differentcontext, Jacobs believes.Forexample,amathteacher couldfindoutwhatstudentstrulyknowaboutstatistics,shesays,byasl{ing them toapplystatisticstodemographicpatternsin immigration. '101.JEt,Mo. 10. Del.' .. 199'1,ASN.(OfSupuvislono.ndCurrirulwnDqvdopmc.nt.W&ri1liiUIIPWSII The Winner--isalways partofthe answer;The Loser---isalwayspartoftheproblem;The 1Ninner--always has a program;The Loser --alwayshasanexcuse;The Winner--says "Letmedoitfor you; 01 The Loser --says"That's not myJob;"TheWinner--seesan answerforeveryproblem;TheLoser --sees a problemforeveryanswer; The Winner--sees a greennearevery sandtrap;TheLoser--seestwoorthreesandtrapsneareverygreen; TheWinncr--:says, "It mayhI::difficult but it':; possible;"TheLoser--says, OIitmay bepossiblebutit'stoodifficult."BeAWinnerI7