Round the world in eighty days

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Material Information

Title:
Round the world in eighty days
Series Title:
Every boy's library
Uniform Title:
Le tour du monde en quatre-vingts jours
Uncontrolled:
Around the world in eighty days
Physical Description:
254, 31 p. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Verne, Jules, 1828-1905
Frith, Henry, 1840-
George Routledge and Sons
Charles Dickens and Evans
Crystal Palace Press
J. Ogden and Co
Publisher:
George Routledge and Sons
Place of Publication:
London (Broadway, Ludgate Hill) ;
New York (416 Broome Street)
Manufacturer:
Charles Dickens and Evans, Crystal Palace Press
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1879   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1879   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1879
Genre:
Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Jules Verne ; translated by Henry Frith.
General Note:
Includes publisher's catalog.
General Note:
Publisher's catalog printed by J. Ogden and Co., 172, St. John Street, E.C.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001614417
oclc - 24013028
notis - AHN8843
System ID:
AA00009641:00001

Full Text
















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The Baldwin Library

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MONTHLY MAGAZINES

FOR THE HOUSEHOLD.


EVERY BOY'S MAGAZINE, 6d.
EVERY GIRL'S MAGAZINE, 6d.
LITTLE WIDEAWAKE, 3d.














CONTENTS.


CHAPTER I. PAGE
In which Phileas Fogg and Passe-partout accept, relatively, the
positions of Master and Servant 5
CHAPTER II.
Passe-partout is convinced that he has attained the object of his
ambition I
CHAPTER IIt.
Inwhich a Conversation arises which is likely to cost Phileas Fogg dear 16
CHAPTER IV.
In which Phileas Fogg astonishes Passe-partout 23
CHAPTER V.
In which a New Kind of Investment appears on the Stock Exchange 29
CHAPTER VI.
In which Fix, the Detective, betrays some not'unnatural Impatience 33
CHAPTER VII.
Which once more shows the Futility of Passports where Policemen
are concerned. 39
CHAPTER VIII.
In which Passe-partout talks a little more than he ought to have done 42
CHAPTER IX.
In which the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean favour the Projects of
Phileas Fogg 48
CHAPTER X.
In which Passe-partout thinks himself lucky in escaping with only
the Loss of his Shoes 54
CHAPTER XI.
Showing how Phileas Fogg purchased a" Mount" at a Fabulous Price Co
CHAPTER XII.
Showing what happened to Phileas Fogg and his Companioly as
they traversed the Forest .
CHAPTER XIII.
Showing how Passe-partout perceives once again that Fortune
favours the Brave so
CHAPTER XIV.
In which Phileas Fogg descends the charming Valley of the Ganges,
without noticing its Beauties 89
CHAPTER XV.
In which the Bag of Bank-notes is lightened by some Thousands of
Pounds more. 93
CHAPTER XVI.
Fix does not at all understand what is said to him o6
CHAPTER XVII.
What happened on the Voyage between Singapore and Ilong Kong 112
A2








4 CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XVIII. PAGE
In which Phileas Fogg, Passe-partout, and Fix severally go each
about his own business x18
CHAPTER XIX.
Showing how Passe-partout took too great an interest in his Master,
and what came of it. 124
CHAPTER XX.
Showing how Fix and Fogg come face to face .. 132
CHAPTER XXI.
Showing how the Owner of the Tankadere nearly lost the Bonus of
Two Hundred Pounds 140
CHAPTER XXII.
Showing how Passe-partout finds out that, even at the Antipodes, it
is prudent to have Money in his Pocket 148
CHAPTER XXIII.
In which Passe-partout's Nose gets immeasurably long 56
CHAPTER XXIV.
In which the Pacific Ocean is crossed 164
CHAPTER XXV.
A Glimpse of San Francisco-A Political Meeting 170
CHAPTER XXVI.
Showing how Mr. Fogg and Party journeyed in the Pacific Express 177
CHAPTER XXVII.
Showing how Passe-partout went through a Course of Mormon
History at the rate of Twenty Miles an Hour 83
CHAPTER XXVIII.
In which Passe-partout cannot make anyone listen to the Language
of Reason. ..........go
CHAPTER XXIX.
In which certain Incidents are told which are never met with except
on Railroads in the United States. 200
CHAPTER XXX.
In which Phileas Fogg simply does his Duty 208
CHAPTER XXXI,
In which the Detective forwards Mr. Fogg's Interest considerably 216
CHAPTER XXXII.
In which Phileas Fogg struggles against Ill-luck 222
CHAPTER XXXIII.
In which Phileas Fogg rises to the Occasion. 226
CHAPTER XXXIV.
In which Passe-partout uses Strong Language 235
CHAPTER XXXV.
Passe-partout obeys Orders quickly. 238
CHAPTER XXXVI.
In which Phileas Fogg's Name is once again at a premium on the
Exchange 245
CHAPTER XXXVII.
Showing holw Phileas Fogg gained only Happiness by his Tour
round the World 250














ROUND THE WORLD IN

EIGHTY DAYS.




CHAPTER I.

In which Phileas Fogg and Passe-partout accept, relatively, the
positions of Master and Servant.

IN the year of grace One thousand eight hundred
and seventy-two, the house in which Sheridan died
in i816-viz. No. 7, Saville Row, Burlington Gardens-
was occupied by Phileas Fogg, Esq., one of the most
eccentric members of the Reform Club, though it always
appeared as if he were very anxious to avoid remark.
Phileas had succeeded to the house of one of England's
greatest orators, but, unlike his predecessor, no one knew
anything of Fogg, who was impenetrable, though a brave
man and moving in the best society. Some people
declared that he resembled Byron-merely in appear-
ance, for he was irreproachable in tone-but still a Byron
with whiskers and moustache : an impassible Byron, who
might live a thousand years and not get old.
A thorough Briton was Phileas Fogg, though perhaps
not a Londoner. He was never seen on the Stock







ROUND THE WORLD


Exchange, nor at the Bank of England, nor at any of
the great City houses. No vessel with a cargo consigned
to Phileas Fogg ever entered the port of London. He
held no Government appointment. He had never been
entered at any of the Inns of Court. He had never
pleaded at the Chancery Bar, the Queen's Bench, the
Exchequer, or the Ecclesiastical Courts. He was not
a merchant, a manufacturer, a farmer, nor a man of
business of any kind. He was not in the habit of
frequenting the Royal Institution or any other of the
learned societies of the metropolis. He was simply a
member of the Reform," and that was all !
If anyone ever inquired how it was that he had
become a member of the club, the questioner was
informed that he had been put up by the Barings, with
whom he kept his account, which always showed a good
balance, and from which his cheques were regularly and
promptly honoured.
Was Phileas Fogg a rich man? Unquestionably.
But in what manner he had made his money even the
best-informed gossips could not tell, and Mr. Fogg
was the very last person from whom one would seek
to obtain information on the subject. He was never
prodigal in expenditure, but never stingy; and whenever
his contribution towards some good or useful object
was required he gave cheerfully, and in many cases
anonymously.
In short, he was one of the most uncommunicative
of men. He talked little, and his habitual taciturnity
added to the mystery surrounding him. Nevertheless,







IN EIGHTY DAYS.


his life was simple and open enough, but he regulated
all his actions with a mathematical exactness which, to the
imagination of the quidnuncs, was in itself suspicious.
Had he ever travelled ? It was very probable, for
no one was better informed in the science of geography.
There was apparently no out-of-the-way place concerning
which he had not some exclusive information. Occa-
sionally, in a few sentences, he would clear away the
thousand-and-one rumours which circulated in the club
concerning some lost or some nearly-forgotten traveller;
he would point out the true probabilities; and it really
appeared as if he were gifted with second sight, so
correctly were his anticipations justified by succeeding
events. He was a man who must have been everywhere
-in spirit at least.
One thing at any rate was certain, viz. that he had
not been absent from London for many a year. Those
with whom he was on a more intimate footing used to
declare that no one had ever seen him anywhere else but
on his way to or from his club. His only amusement
was a game of whist, varied by the perusal of the daily
papers. At whist, which was a game peculiarly fitted to
such a taciturn disposition as his, he was habitually a
winner; but his gains always were expended in charitable
objects. Besides, it was evident to everyone that
Mr. Fogg played for the game, not for the sake of
winning money. It was a trial of skill with him, a
combat; but a fight unaccompanied by fatigue, and one
entailing no great exertion, and thus suiting him down
to the ground !"







ROUND THE WORLD


No one had ever credited Phileas Fogg with wife or
child, which even the most scrupulously honest people
may possess; nor even had he any near relatives or
intimate friends, who are more rare in this world. He
lived alone in his house in Saville Row, and no one
called upon him, or at any rate entered there. One
servant sufficed for him. He took all his meals at his
club, but he never shared a table with any of his
acquaintance, nor did he ever invite a stranger to
dinner. He only returned home to sleep at midnight
precisely, for he never occupied any one of the com-
fortable bedrooms provided by the "Reform" for its
members. Ten hours of the four-and-twenty he passed
at home, partly sleeping, partly dressing or undressing.
If he walked, it was in the entrance-hall with its mosaic
pavement, or in the circular gallery beneath the dome,
which was supported by twenty Ionic columns. Here
he would pace with measured step. When he dined or
breakfasted, all the resources of the club were taxed to
supply his table with the daintiest fare; he was waited
upon by the gravest black-coated servants, who stepped
softly as they ministered to his wants upon a special
porcelain service and upon the most expensive damask.
His wine was contained in decanters of a now unobtain-
able mould, while his sherry was iced to the most
excellent point of refrigeration of the Wenham Lake.
If existence under such circumstances be a proof of
eccentricity, it must be confessed that something may be
said in favour of it.
The house in Saville Row, without being luxurious,







IN EIGHTY DA YS.


was extremely comfortable. Besides, in accordance with
the habits of the tenant, the service was reduced to a
minimum. But Phileas Fogg exacted the most rigid
punctuality on the part of his sole domestic-something
supernatural in fact. On this very day, the 2nd of
October, Fogg had given James Forster notice to leave,
because the fellow had actually brought up his master's
shaving-water at a temperature of eighty-four instead of
eighty-six degrees Fahrenheit; and Phileas was now look-
ing out for a successor, who was expected between eleven
and half-past.
Phileas Fogg was seated in his arm-chair, his feet
close together at the position of attention ;" his hands
were resting on his knees, his body was drawn up; with
head erect he was watching the clock, which, by a com-
plexity of mechanism, told the hours, minutes, seconds,
the days of the week, and the month and year. As
this clock chimed half-past eleven, Mr. Fogg, according
to custom, would leave the house and walk down to
his club.
Just then a knock was heard at the door of the room,
and James Forster, the outgoing servant, appeared and
announced, The new young man for the place.
A young fellow of about thirty entered and bowed.
"You are a Frenchman, and your name is John,
eh ?" inquired Phileas Fogg.
"Jean, sir, if you have no objection," replied the new-
comer. Jean Passe-partout, a surname which clings to
me because I have a weakness for change. I believe I
am honest, sir; but to speak plainly, I have tried a good







ROUND THE WORLD


many things. I have been an itinerant singer; a rider in a
circus, where I used to do the trapeze like Leotard and
walk the tight-rope like Blondin; then I became a pro-
fessor of gymnastics; and, finally, in order to make
myself useful, I became a fireman in Paris, and bear on
my back to this day the sears of several bad burns. But
it is five years since I left France, and wishing to enjoy a
taste of domestic life I became a valet in England. Just
now being out of a situation, and having heard that you,
sir, were the most punctual and regular gentleman in the
United Kingdom, I have come here in the hope that I
shall be able to live a quiet life and forget my name of
Jack-of-all-trades-Passe-partout !"
"Passe-partout suits me," replied Mr. Fogg. I
have heard a very good character of you, and you have
been well recommended. You are aware of my con-
ditions of service ?"
"Yes, sir."
Very well. What o'clock do you make it ?"
"Twenty-two minutes past eleven," replied the valet,
as he consulted an enormous silver watch.
You are too slow," said Mr. Fogg.
"Excuse me, sir, that is impossible !"
"You are four minutes too slow. Never mind, it is
enough to note the error. Now from this moment,
twenty-nine minutes past eleven o'clock in the forenoon
upon this 2nd of October, 1872, you are in my service !"
As he spoke, Phileas Fogg rose from his chair, took
up his hat, put it on his head as an automaton might
have done, and left the room without another word.







IN EIGHTY DA YS.


Passe-partout heard the street-door shut; it was his
new master who had gone out. Shortly afterwards he
heard it shut again-that was his predecessor, James
Forster, departing in his turn.
Passe-partout was then left alone in the house in
Saville Row.







CHAPTER II.

Passe-partout is convinced that he has attained the object of his
ambition.

"FAITH," muttered Passe-partout, who for the moment
felt rather in a flutter; "faith, I have seen creatures at
Madame Tussaud's quite as lively as my new master."
Madame Tussaud's creatures" are all of wax, and
only want the power of speech.
During the short period that Passe-partout had been
in Mr. Fogg's presence, he had carefully scrutinised his
future master. He appeared to be about forty years of
age, with a fine face; a tall and well-made man, whose
figure was not too stout. He had light hair and whiskers,
a clear brow, a somewhat pale face, and splendid teeth.
He appeared to possess in a very marked degree that
attribute which physiognomists call "repose in action," a
fa.cultyaylppl.rltarining to those whose motto is "Deeds, not







ROUND THE WORLD


words." Calm and phlegmatic, with a clear and steady
eye, he was the perfect type of those cool Englishmen
whom one meets so frequently in the United Kingdom,
and whom Angelica Kauffmann has so wonderfully por-
trayed. Mr. Fogg gave one the idea of being perfectly
balanced, like a perfect chronometer, and as well regu-
lated. He was, in fact, the personification of exactness,
which was evident in the very expression of his hands
and feet; for amongst men, as amongst the lower animals,
the members are expressive of certain passions.
Phileas Fogg was one of those mathematical people
who, never in a hurry, and always ready, are economical
of their movements. He never made even one step too
many; he always took the shortest cut; he never wasted
a glance, nor permitted himself a superfluous gesture.
No one had ever seen him agitated or moved by any
emotion. He was the last man in the world to hurry
himself, but he always arrived in time. He lived quite
alone, and, so to speak, outside the social scale. He
knew that in life there is a great deal of friction; and as
friction always retards progress, he never rubbed against
anybody.
As for Jean, who called himself Passe-partout, he
was a Parisian of the Parisians. He had been for five
years in England, and had taken service in London as
a valet-de-chambre, during which period he had in vain
sought for such a master as Mr. Fogg.
Passe-partout was not one of those Frontii or
Mascarilles, who, with high shoulders and snubbed noses,
and plenty of assurance, are nothing more than impudent







IN EIGHTY DAYS.


dunces; he was a good fellow, with a pleasant face,
somewhat full lips, always ready to eat or to kiss, with one
of those g od round heads that one likes to see on the
shoulders of one's friends. He had bright blue eyes,
was somewhat stout, but very muscular, and possessed of
great strength. He wore his hair in a somewhat
tumbled fashion. If sculptors of antiquity were aware
of eighteen ways of arranging the hair of Minerva,
Passe-partout knew but one way of doing his, namely,
with three strokes of a comb.
We will not go as far as to predict how the man's
nature would accord with Mr. Fogg's. It was a question
whether Passe-partout was the exact sort of servant to
suit such a master. Experience only would show. After
having passed his youth in such a vagabond manner, he
looked forward to some repose.
Having heard of the proverbial method and coolness
of the English gentleman, he had come to seek his
fortune in England; but up to the present time fate had
been adverse. He had tried six situations, but remained
in none. In all of them he had found either a
whimsical, an irregular, or a restless master, which did
not suit Passe-partout. His last master, the young Lord
Longsferry, M.P.,.after passing the evening in the Hay-
market, was carried home on the policemen's shoulders.
Passe-partout, wishing above all things to respect his
master, remonstrated in a respectful manner; but as his
expostulations were so ill received, he took his leave.
It was at that time that he heard Philcas Fogg was in
search of a servant: and he presented himself for the







ROUND THE WORLD


situation. A gentleman whose life was so regular,
who never stayed away from home, who never travelled,
who never was absent even for a day, was the very master
for him, so he presented himself and was engaged, as we
have seen.
Thus it came to pass that at half-past eleven o'clock,
Passe-partout found himself alone in the house in Saville
Row. He immediately commenced to look about him,
and search the house from cellar to garret. This well-
arranged, severe, almost puritanical house pleased him
very much. It appeared to him like the pretty shell of
a snail; but a snail's shell lighted and warmed with gas
would serve for both those purposes. He soon dis-
covered the room he was to occupy, and was quite
satisfied. Electric bells and indiarubber speaking-tubes
put him into communication with the rooms below.
Upon the chimney-piece stood an electric clock, which
kept time exactly with that in Phileas Fogg's bedroom.
"This will suit me exactly," said Passe-partout to
himself.
He also remarked in his room a notice fixed above
the clock. It was the programme of his daily duties.
It included the whole details of the service from eight
o'clock in the morning, the hour at which Mr. Fogg
invariably arose, to half-past eleven, when he left the
house to breakfast at the Reform Club. It comprised
everything-the tea and toast at twenty-three minutes
past eight, the shaving-water at thirty-seven minutes past
nine, and his attendance at his master's toilet at twenty
minutes to ten, and so on. Then from half-past eleven A.M.







IN EIGHTY DA YS.


until midnight, when the methodical Fogg retired to
bed, everything was noted down and arranged for.
Passe-partout joyfully set himself to study the pro.
gramme and to master its contents.
Mr. Fogg's wardrobe was well stocked and wonder-
fully arranged. Every pair of trousers, coat, or waistcoat
bore a number, which was also noted in a register of
entries and exits, indicating the date on which, accord-
ing to the season, the clothes were to be worn. There
were even relays of shoes and boots.
In fact, in this house in Saville Row, which had been
a temple of disorder in the days of the illustrious but
dissipated Sheridan, cosiness reigned supreme. There
was no library and no books, which would have been
useless to Mr. Fogg, since there were two reading-rooms
at the Reform Club. In his bedroom was a small safe,
perfectly burglar and fire proof. There were no firearms
nor any other weapons in the house; everything pro-
claimed the owner to be a man of peaceable habits.
After having examined the house thoroughly, Passe-
partout rubbed his hands joyously, a genial smile over-
spread his rounded face, and he muttered:
This suits me completely. It is the very thing.
We understand each other thoroughly, Mr. Fogg and I.
He is a thoroughly regular and domestic man, a true
machine. Well, I am not sorry to serve a machine."







ROUND THE WORLD


CHAPTER III.

In which a Conversation arises which is likely to cost Phileas
Fogg dear.

PHILEAS FOGG left home at half-past eleven, and having
placed his right foot before his left exactly five hundred
and seventy-five times, and his left foot before his right
five hundred and seventy-six times, he arrived at the
Reform Club in Pall Mall, and immediately went up to
the dining-room and took his place at his usual table,
where his breakfast awaited him. The meal was com-
posed of one "side-dish," a delicious little bit of boiled
fish, a slice of underdone roast beef with mushrooms, a
rhubarb and gooseberry tart; and some Cheshire cheese;
the whole washed down with several cups of excellent
tea, for which the Reform Club is celebrated.
At forty-seven minutes after twelve he rose from
table and went into the drawing-room; there the servant
handed him an uncut copy of The Times, which Phileas
Fogg folded and cut with a dexterity which denoted a
practised hand. The perusal of this journal occupied
him till a quarter to four, and then The Standard sufficed
till dinner-time. This repast was eaten under the same
conditions as his breakfast, and at twenty minutes to
six he returned to the saloon and read T/e Morning
Chronicle.
About half an hour later, several of Mr. Fogg's friends
entered the -room and collected round the fireplace.







IN EIGHTY DA IS.


These gentlemen were his usual partners at whist, and,
like him, were all inveterate players.
They comprised Andrew Stuart, an engineer; the
bankers, John Sullivan and Samuel Fallentin; Thomas
Flanagan, the brewer; and Gauthier Ralph, one of the
directors of the Bank of England;--all rich, and men of
consequence, even in that club which comprised so
many men of mark.
"Well, Ralph," asked Thomas Flanagan, "what
about this robbery ? "
"The bank must lose the money," replied Stuart.
"On the contrary," replied Ralph, I am in hopes
that. we shall be able to put our hand upon the thief.
We have detectives in America and Europe, at all the
principal ports, and it will be no easy matter for him to
escape the clutches of the law."
Then you have the robber's description, of course,"
said Andrew Stuart.
In the first place he is not a thief at all," replied
Ralph seriously.
"What do you mean? Is not a man a thief who
takes away fifty-five thousand pounds in bank-notes ?"
"No," replied Ralph.
"He is then a man of business; I suppose ?" said
Sullivan.
TheMorning Chronicle assures mehe is a gentleman."
This last observation was uttered by Phileas Fogg,
whose head rose up from the sea of papers surrounding
him, and then Phileas got up and exchanged greetings
with his acquaintances.







ROUND THE WORLD


The subject of conversation was a robbery, which
was in everyone's mouth, and had been committed three
days previously-viz. on the 29th of September. A pile
of bank-notes, amounting to the enormous sum of fifty-
five thousand pounds, had been stolen from the counter
at the Bank of England.
The astonishing part of the matter was that the
robbery had been so easily accomplished, and as Ralph,
who was one of the deputy-governors, explained, that
when the fifty-five thousand pounds were stolen, the
cashier was occupied in carefully registering the receipt
of three shillings and sixpence, and of course could not
have his eyes in every direction at once.
It may not be out of place here to remark, which in
some measure may account for the robbery, that the
Bank of England trusts greatly in the honesty of the
public. There are no guards, or commissionaires, or
gratings; gold, silver, and notes are all exposed freely,
and, so to speak, at the mercy of the first-comer. No
one's honesty is suspected. Take the following instance,
related by one of the closest observers of English cus
toms. This gentleman was one day in one of the parlours
of the Bank, and had the curiosity to take up and closely-
examine a nugget of gold weighing seven or eight pounds,
which was lying on the table. Having examined the
ingot, he passed it to his neighbour, he to the next man;
and so the gold went from hand to hand quite down to
the dark entry, and was not returned for quite half an
hour, and all the time the bank official had not raised his
head.







IN EIGHTY DAYS.


But on the 29th of September things did not work so
nicely; the pile of bank-notes was not returned; and
when the hands of the magnificent clock in the drawing-
office pointed to the hour of five, at which time the bank
is closed, the sum of fifty-five thousand pounds was
written off to "profit and loss."
When it was certain that a robbery had been com-
mitted, the most skilful detectives were sent down to
Liverpool and Glasgow and other principal ports, also to
Suez, Brindisi, New York, &c., with promises of a reward
of two thousand pounds, and five per cent. on the
amount recovered. In the meantime, inspectors were
appointed to observe scrupulously all travellers arriving
at and departing from the several seaports.
Now there was some reason to suppose, as The
Morning C/hronicle put it, that the thief did not belong
to a gang, for during the 29th of September a well-
dressed gentlemanly man had been observed in the
bank, near where the robbery had been perpetrated.
An exact description of this person was fortunately
obtained, and supplied to all the detectives; and so
some sanguine persons, of whom Ralph was one, be-
lieved the thief could not escape.
As may be imagined, nothing else was talked about
just then. The probabilities of success and failure were
warmly discussed in the newspapers, so it was not sur-
prising that the members of the Reform Club should
talk about it, particularly as one of the deputy-governors
of the bank was present.
Ralph did not doubt that the search would be
B 2







ROUND THE WORLD


successful because of the amount of the reward, which
would probably stimulate the zeal of the detectives. But
Andrew Stuart was of a different opinion, and the dis-
cussion was continued between these gentlemen during
their game of whist. Stuart was Flanagan's partner, and
Fallentin was Fogg's. While they played they did not
talk; but between the rubbers the subject cropped up
again.
"Well," said Stuart, "I maintain that the chances
are in favour of the thief, who must be a sharp one."
"But," replied Ralph, "there is no place a fellow
can go to."
Oh, come !"
Well, where can he go to ?"
I can't tell," replied Stuart; "but the world is big
enough, at any rate."
"It used to be," said Phileas Fogg, in an undertone.
"Cut, if you please," he added, handing the cards to
Flanagan.
Conversation was then suspended, but after the
rubber Stuart took it up again, saying :
"What do you mean by 'used to be?' Has the
world grown smaller, then ? "
Of course it has," replied Ralph. "I am of
Mr. Fogg's opinion; the world has grown smaller, inas-
much as one can go round it ten times quicker than you
could a hundred years ago. That is the reason why, in
the present case, search will be more rapid, and render
the escape of the thief easier."
"Your lead, Mr. Stuart," said Fogg.







IN EIGHTY DA YS.


But the incredulous Stuart was not convinced, and
he again returned to the subject.
"I must say, Mr. Ralph," he continued, "that you
have found an easy way that the world has grown smaller,
because one now go round it in three months."
"In eighty days only," said Phileas Fogg.
"That is a fact, gentlemen," added John Sullivan.
"You can make the tour of the world in eighty days,
now that.the section of the Great Indian Peninsular
Railway is opened between Rothal and Allahabad, and
here is the estimate made by The Morning Chronicle:


"London to Suez, by Mont Cenis and
Brindisi, Rail and Steamer 7 days.
Suez to Bombay, by Steamer 3
Bombay to Calcutta, by Rail 3
Calcutta to Hong Kong, by Steamer 13 ,,
Hong Kong to Yokohama, by
Steamer 6
Yokohama to San Francisco, by
Steamer .22 ,,
San Francisco to New York, by Rail 7 ,,
New York to London, Steam and
Rail 9 ,,
Total 80 days."


"Yes, eighty days!" exclaimed Stuart, who, being
absorbed in his calculations, made a mis-deal; "but that







ROUND THE WORLD


estimate does not take into consideration bad weather,
head-winds, shipwreck, railway accidents, &c."
"They are all included," remarked Fogg, as he con-
tinued to play, for this time the conversation did not
cease with the deal.
"Even if the Hindoos or Indians take up the rails?
Suppose they stop the trains, pillage the baggage-waggons,
and scalp the travellers ?"
"All included," replied Fogg quietly. "Two trumps,"
he added, as he won the tricks.
Stuart, who was "pony," collected the cards, and
said: No doubt you are right in theory, Mr. Fogg, but
in practice- "
"In practice too, Mr. Stuart."
"I should like to see you do it."
"It only rests with you. Let us go together."
"Heaven forbid," cried Stuart; "but I will bet you
a cool four thousand that such a journey, under such
conditions, is impossible."
"On the contrary, it is quite possible," replied
Mr. Fogg.
"Well, then, why don't you do it ?"
"Go round the world in eighty days, do you
mean ? "
Yes."
"I will."
"When ?"
"At once; only I give you warning I shall do it at
your expense."
Oh, this is all nonsense," replied Stuart, who began







IN EIGHTY DAYS.


to feel a little vexed at Fogg's persistence; "let us
continue the game."
"You had better deal, then; that was a mis-deal."
Andrew Stuart took up the cards, and suddenly put
them down again.
"Look here, Mr. Fogg," he said; "if you like, I will
bet you four thousand."
Mydear Stuart," said Fallentin, don't be ridiculous;
it is only a joke."
"When I say I will bet," said Stuart, "I mean it."
"All right," said Mr. Fogg; then, turning towards
the others, he said: "I have twenty thousand pounds
deposited at Baring's. I will willingly risk that sum."
"Twenty thousand pounds!" exclaimed Sullivan;
"why, the slightest accident might cause you to lose the
whole of it. Anything unforeseen-"
"The unforeseen does not exist," replied Fogg
simply.
"But, Mr. Fogg, this estimate of eighty days is the
very least time in which the journey can be accomplished."
"A minimum well employed is quite sufficient."
"But to succeed you must pass from railways to
steamers, from steamers to railways, with. mathematical
accuracy."
"I will be mathematically accurate."
"Oh, this is a joke !"
"A true Englishman never jokes when he has a stake
depending on the matter. I bet twenty thousand against
any of you 'that I will make the tour of the world in
eighty days or less; that is to say, in nineteen hundred







ROUND THE WORLD


and twenty hours, or a hundred and fifteen thousand
two hundred minutes. Will you take me ?"
"We do,"replied the others, after consultationtogether.
"Very well, then," said Fogg, "the Dover mail starts
at 8.45 ; I will go by it."
"This evening?" said Stuart.
"Yes, this evening," replied Fogg. Then, referring
to a pocket almanack, he added: "This is Wednesday,
the 2nd of .October; I shall be due in London, in this
room, on Saturday, the 21st of December, at a quarter
to nine in the evening, or, in default, the twenty thousand
at Baring's, to. my credit, will be yours, gentlemen. Here
is my cheque for that sum."
A memorandum of the conditions of the bet was
made and signed by all parties concerned. Phileas Fogg
was as cool as ever. He had certainly not bet to
win the money, and he had only bet twenty thousand
pounds, half of his fortune, because he foresaw that he
would probably have to spend the other half to enable
him to carry out this difficult if not actually impossible
feat. His opponents appeared quite agitated, not on
account of the value of their stake, but because they had
some misgivings and scruples about betting under such
conditions.
Seven o'clock struck, and it was suggested that the
game should stop, while Mr. Fogg made his preparations
for the journey.
"I am always ready," replied this impassible gentle-
man, as he dealt the cards. "Diamonds are trumps,"
he added; your lead, Mr. Stuart."







IN EIGHTY DA YS.


CHAPTER IV.

In which Phileas Fogg astonishes Passe-partout.

AT twenty-five minutes past seven, Phileas Fogg,
having won twenty guineas at whist, took leave of his
friends and left the club. At ten minutes to eight he
reached home.
Passe-partout, who had conscientiously studied his pro-
gramme, was astonished to see Mr. Fogg appear at such
an unusual hour, for, according to all precedent, he was
not due in Saville Row till midnight.
Phileas Fogg went straight up to his room and called
for Passe-partout.
Passe-partout did not reply. It was evident this could
not refer to him, it was not time.
"Passe-partout," cried Mr. Fogg again, but without
raising his voice; "this is the second time I have called
you," said Mr. Fogg.
"But it is not midnight," replied Passe-partout, pro-
ducing his watch.
"I know that," replied Fogg, "and I do not blame
you. We start for Dover and Calais in ten minutes."
A sort of grimace contracted the Frenchman's round
face; he evidently did not understand.
"Are you going out, sir," he asked.
"Yes," replied his master; "we are going around
the world."
Passe-partout at this announcement opened his eyes







ROUND THE WORLD


to their greatest extent, held up his arms, and looked the
picture of stupefied astonishment.
"Around the world I" he muttered.
"In eighty days," replied Mr. Fogg; "so we have
not a moment to lose."
"But the luggage," said Passe-partout, who was wag-
ging his head unconsciously from side to side.
"We want no luggage; a carpet-bag will do. Pack
up two night-shirts and three pairs of socks, and the same
for yourself. We will buy what we want as we go along.
Bring my mackintosh and travelling-cloak down with
you, and a couple of pairs of strong boots, although we
shall have little or no walking. Look alive."
Passe-partout wished to speak, but could not. He
left his master's bedroom, and went upstairs to his own,
fell into a chair, and exclaimed :
"Well, this is coming it pretty strong, and for me
too, who wanted to be quiet !"
Mechanically he set about making preparations for
departure. Around the world in eighty days Had he
engaged himself with a maniac ? No-it was only a
joke. But they were going to Dover and to Calais. So
far so good. After all, he did not object to that very
much, for it was five years since he had seen his native
land. Perhaps they would even go on to Paris, and he
would be delighted to see the capital again. No doubt
a gentleman so economical of his steps would stop there;
but on the other hand, this hitherto very domestic gentle-
man was leaving home. That was a fact.
At eight o'clock Passe-partout had packed the small







SIN EIGHTY DAYS.


bag which now contained his master's luggage and his
own, and in a very troubled frame of mind he quitted his
room, closed the door carefully, and went downstairs to
Mr. Fogg.
That gentleman was quite ready. Under his arm he
carried a copy of Bradshaw's Continental Guide." He
took the small bag from Passe-partout, opened it, and
placed therein a bulky roll of bank-notes, which will pass
in any country.
"You are sure you have not forgotten anything?" he
asked.
"Quite sure, sir."
"-You have my mackintosh and travelling-cloak ?"
Here they are, sir."
"All right, take the bag;" and Mr. Fogg handed it
back to the man. "You had better take care of it," he
added, "there are twenty thousand pounds in it."
Passe-partout nearly let the bag fall, as if it were
weighted with the twenty thousand pounds in gold.
Master and man went downstairs together; the
door was shut and double-locked. Phileas called
a cab from the bottom of Saville Row, and drove
to Charing Cross Station. It was twenty minutes
past eight when they reached the railway. Passe-
partout jumped out.- His master followed, and
paid the cabman. At this moment a poor beggar-
woman, carrying a baby, looking very miserable with
her naked feet and tattered appearance, approached
Mr. Fogg, and asked for alms.
Mr. Fogg drew from his waistcoat-pocket the twenty







ROUND THE WORLD


guineas he had won at whist, and handing them to the
beggar-woman, said: "Take these, my good woman. I
am glad I have met you." He then entered the station.
This action of his master brought the tears into
Passe-partout's susceptible eyes. Mr. Fogg had risen in
his estimation. That eccentric individual now told him
to take two first-class tickets for Paris, and as he turned
round he perceived his five friends from the Reform Club.
"Well, gentlemen, you see I am about to start, and
the visas on my passport on my return will convince you
that I have performed the journey."
"Oh, Mr. Fogg," replied Gauthier Ralph politely,
"that is quite unnecessary. We believe you to be a.man
of your word."
"All the better," was Fogg's reply.
"You won't forget when you have to come back,"
observed Stuart.
"In eighty days," replied Mr. Fogg. On Saturday,
the 21st day of December, 1872, at forty-five minutes past
eight in the evening. Au revoir, gentlemen."
At twenty minutes to nine Phileas Fogg and his
servant took their places in the train. At 8.45 the
engine whistled and the train started.
The night was dark, and a fine rain was. falling.
Mr. Fogg was comfortably settled in his corner, and did
not say a word. Passe-partout, still rather in a state of
stupefaction, mechanically gripped the bag with the bank-
notes.
But scarcely had the train rushed through Sydenham,
than Passe-partout uttered a cry of despair.







IN EIGHTY DAYS.


What is the matter with you ? asked Mr. Fogg.
"Oh dear me In my hurry I quite forgot "
"What?"
"I forgot to turn the gas off in my room !"
"Very well, my lad," replied Mr. Fogg coolly, then
it must burn while we are away-at your expense."








CHAPTER V.

In which a New Kind of Investment appears on the Stock Exchange.

WHEN Phileas Fogg quitted London, he had no
doubt that his departure would create a great sensation.
The report of the bet spread from the club to outsiders,
and so to all the newspapers in the United Kingdom.
This question of going round the world in eighty
days was commented upon, discussed, and dissected,
and argued as much as the Alabama Claims had been.
Some agreed with Phileas Fogg, but the majority were
against him. To accomplish the tour in fact was an
impossibility, under the present system of communication.
It was sheer madness.
The Times, The Standard, The Morning Chronicle, and
twenty other respectable journals gave their verdict
against Mr. Fogg. The Daily Telegraph was the only







ROUND THE WORLD


paper that to a certain extent supported him. Phileas
Fogg was generally looked upon as a maniac, and his
friends at the Reform Club were much blamed for
having taken up the wager, which only betrayed the
want of brain of its proposer.
Extremely passionate but logical articles were written
upon the question. We all know the interest that the
English take in any geographical problem, and readers
of every class devoured the columns in which Mr. Fogg's
expedition was debated.
For the first few days some bold spirits, principally
women, espoused his cause, particularly when The Illus-
trated London NVews published his portrait, and certain
gentlemen went so far as to say: "Well, why should he
not after all? More extraordinary things have happened."
These were chiefly readers of The Daily Telegraph, but
they very soon felt that that journal itself began to waver.
On the 7th of October a long article appeared in the
proceedings of the Royal Geographical Society, the
writer of which treated the question from all points of
view, and clearly demonstrated the futility of the enter-
prise. According to that article, everything was against
the traveller-all obstacles material and physical were
against him. In order to succeed, it was necessary to
admit miraculous concordance in the hours of the arrival
and departure of trains and ships-a concordance which
could not and did not exist. In Europe perhaps he
might be able to reckon upon the punctuality of trains,
but when three days are occupied in crossing India, and
seven in traversing the American continent, how was it







IN EIGHTY DA YS.


possible that he could count upon absolute success?
Were not accidents to machinery, runnings off the rails,
collisions, bad weather, or snowdrifts all against Phileas
Fogg? On board ship in winter-time he would be at
the mercy of hurricanes or contrary winds. Even the
best steamers of the transoceanic lines experience a
delay of sometimes two or three days. Now, if only
one such delay occurred, the chain of communication
would be irreparably severed. If Phileas Fogg lost a
steamer by only a few hours, he would be obliged to
wait for the following boat; and that fact alone would
imperil the success of the whole undertaking.
This article made a great sensation. It was copied
into almost all the papers, and the "shares" of Phileas
Fogg fell in proportion.
For the first few days after his departure a good deal
of money was laid on the success or failure of the enter-
prise. Everyone knows that people in England are
great gamblers; it comes natural to them. So the
public all went into the speculation. Phileas Fogg
became a sort of favourite, as in horse-racing. He was
of a certain value on the Stock Exchange. Fogg bonds
were offered at par or at a premium, and enormous
speculations were entered into. But five days after his
departure, subsequently to the appearance of the article
above quoted, the bonds were at a discount, and they
were offered to anybody who would take them.
One supporter was still left to him, and that the
paralytic Lord Albemarle. This worthy gentleman, who
was unable to leave his chair, would have given his whole







ROUND THE WORLD


fortune to have made the tour of the world, even in ten
years, and he had laid fifty thousand pounds on Phileas
Fogg; and when people explained to him at the same
time the folly and uselessness of the expedition, he would
merely reply: If the thing can be done, the first man
to do it ought to be an Englishman."
Now as things were, the partisans of Phileas Fogg
were becoming fewer by degrees and beautifully less.
Everybody, and not without reason, was against him.
People would only take fifty or even two hundred to
one, when, seven days after his departure, a quite un-
expected incident deprived him of support at any price.
In fact, at nine o'clock on the evening of the seventh
day, the Chief Inspector of Metropolitan Police received
the following telegram :

"From Fix, Detective, Suez,
To Rowan, Commissioner of Police, Scotland Yard.

"I have traced the bank-robber, Phileas Fogg.
Send immediately authority for arrest to Bombay.-Fix."

The effect of this despatch was immediately ap-
parent. The honourable man gave place to the "bank-
robber." His photograph, deposited in the Reform Club
with those of other members, was narrowly scrutinised.
It appeared to be, feature by feature, the very man
whose description had been already furnished to the
police. People now began to recollect Fogg's mys-
terious manner, his solitary habits, and his sudden







IN EIGHTY DAYS.


departure. He must be the culprit, and it was evident
that under the pretext of a voyage round the world,
under shelter of a ridiculous bet, he had no other end in
view but to throw the detectives off the scent.







CHAPTER VI.

In which Fix, the Detective, betrays some not unnatural Impatience.

THE circumstances under which the foregoing telegram
had been despatched were as follows:
On Wednesday, the 29th of October, the Peninsular
and Oriental Company's steamer Mongolia was being
anxiously expected at Suez. This vessel made the
passage between Brindisi and Bombay through the Suez
Canal. She is one of the swiftest of the Company's
vessels, and her usual speed is ten knots an hour between
Brindisi and Suez, and nine and a half between Suez
and Bombay, and sometimes even more.
Pending the arrival of the Mongolia, two men were
walking together up and down the quay in the midst of
the crowd of natives and visitors who thronged the little
town, which, thanks to the enterprise of M. de Lesseps,
was becoming a considerable place. One of these men
was the British Consular Agent at Suez, who, in spite of
c







ROUND THE WORLD


the prophecies of the English Government, and the
unfavourable opinion of Stephenson the engineer, beheld
daily English ships passing through the canal, thus
shortening by one-half the old route to India round the
Cape.
The other was a small thin man with a nervous
intelligent face. Beneath his long eyelashes his eyes
sparkled brightly, and at that moment he was displaying
unquestionable signs of impatience, moving hither and
thither, quite unable to keep still for one moment.
This man was Fix, the English detective, who had
been sent out in consequence of the bank robbery. He
carefully scrutinised every traveller, and if one of them
bore any resemblance to the culprit he would be arrested.
Two days previously, Fix had received from London the
description of the criminal. It was that of the well-
dressed person who had been observed in the bank.
The detective was evidently inspired by the hope of
obtaining the large reward offered, and was awaiting
the arrival of the Mongolia with much impatience
accordingly.
"So you say that the steamer is never behind its
time," remarked Mr. Fix to the Consul.
No," replied the other. She was signalled off Port
Said yesterday, and the length of the Canal is nothing to
such a vessel as she is. I repeat that the Mongolia has
always gained the twenty-five pounds allowance granted
by the Government for every advance of twenty-four
hours on the regulation time."
Does she come from Brindisi direct ? asked Fix.







IN EIGHTY DA YS.


"Yes, direct. She takes the Indian mails on board
there. She left on Saturday afternoon at five o'clock.
So be patient. She will not be late. But I really do
not see how you will be able to recognize your man from
the description you have, even supposing he be on
board."
One knows him by instinct more than by feature,"
replied Fix; "by scent, as it were, more than sight. I
have had to do with more than one of these gentlemen
in my time, and if the thief be on board I guarantee he
will not slip through my fingers."
I hope you will catch him it is a big
robbery."
"First-rate," replied Fix enthusiastically; fifty-five
thousand pounds. We don't often have such a windfall
as that. These sort of fellows are becoming scarce. The
family of Jack Sheppard has died out-people get
'lagged' now for a few shillings."
"You speak like an enthusiast, Mr. Fix," replied the
Agent, "and I hope you will succeed, but I fear under
the circumstances you will find it very difficult. Be-
sides, after all, the description you have received might
be that of a very honest man."
"Great criminals always do resemble honest men,"
replied the detective dogmatically. "You must under-
stand that ruffianly-looking fellows would not have a
chance. They must remain honest or they would be
arrested at once. It is the honest appearance that we
are obliged to unmask; it is a difficult thing, I confess,
and one that really is an art."







ROUND THE WORLD


It was evident that Mr. Fix thought a good deal of
his profession.
Meanwhile the bustle on the quay increased. Sailors
of all nations, merchants, porters, and fellahs were
crowding together. The steamer was evidently expected
shortly.
It was a beautiful day and the east wind cooled the
air. The rays of the sun lighted up the distant minarets
of the town. Towards the south the long jetty extended
into the roadstead. A crowd of fishing-boats dotted the
waters of the Red Sea, and amongst them one could
perceive some ships of the ancient build of galleys.
Fix kept moving about amongst the crowd, scruti-
nising professionally the countenances of its component
members.
It was half-past ten o'clock.
"This steamer is not coming," he said, as he heard
the clock strike.
"It can't be far off," said the Consul.
"How long will she stop at Suez ?" said Fix.
"Four hours, to take her coal on board. From Suez
to Aden it is thirteen hundred and ten miles, so she is to
take in a good supply."
And from Suez the boat goes directly to Bombay ?"
asked Fix.
Direct, without breaking bulk."
"Well," said Fix, if the thief has taken this route,
and by this steamer, it will no doubt be his little game to
land at Suez, so as to reach the Dutch or French posses-
sions in Asia by some other route. He must know very







IN EIGHTY DA YS.


well that he would not be safe in India, which is British
territory."
I don't think he can be a very sharp fellow," replied
the Consul, "for London is the best place to hide in,
after all."
The Consul having thus given the detective some-
thing to think about, went away to his office close by.
The detective, now alone, became more and more impa-
tient, as he had some peculiar presentiment that the
robber was on board the Mongolia; and if he had left
England with the intention to gain the new world, the
route vid India, being less open to observation, or more
difficult to watch than the Atlantic route, would naturally
be the one chosen.
The detective was not left long to his reflections. A
succession of shrill whistles denoted the approach of the
steamer. The whole crowd of porters and fellahs hurried
towards the quay in a manner somewhat distressing for
the limbs and clothes of the lookers-on. A number of
boats also put off to meet the Mongolia.
Her immense hull was soon perceived passing between
the banks of the Canal, and as eleven o'clock was striking
she came to an anchor in the roadstead, while a cloud of
steam was blown off from her safety-valves.
There were a great number of passengers on board.
Some of them remained upon the bridge, admiring the
view, but the greater number came ashore in the boats,
which had put off to meet the vessel.
Fix carefully examined each one as they landed. As
he was thus employed, one of the passengers approached







ROUND THE WORLD


him, and vigorously pushing aside the fellahs who sur-
rounded him, inquired of the detective the way to the
British Consul's office; at the same time, the passenger
produced his passport, upon which he desired, no doubt,
to have the British visa.
Fix mechanically took the passport, and mastered its
contents at a glance. His hand shook involuntarily.
The description on the passport agreed exactly with the
description of the thief.
This passport does not belong to you ?" he said to
the passenger.
"No," replied the man addressed; "it is my
master's."
"And where is your master?"
"He is on board."
"But," replied the detective, "he must come himself
to the Consul's office to establish his identity."
"Oh, is that necessary ?"
"Quite indispensable."
"Where is the office ?"
"In the corner of the square yonder," replied the
detective, indicating a house about two hundred paces off.
"Well then, I will go and fetch my master; but I
can tell you he won't thank you for disturbing him."
So saying, the passenger saluted Fix, and returned on
board the steamer.







IN EIGHTY DAYS.


CHAPTER VII.

Which once more shows the Futility of Passports where Policemen
are concerned.

THE detective quickly traversed the quay once more in
the direction of the Consul's office. At his particular
request he was at once ushered into the presence of the
official.
I beg your pardon," he said to the Consul abruptly,
"but I have great reason to believe that my man is
really on board the Mongolia." And then Mr. Fix
related what had passed between him and the servant.
Good," replied the Consul; "I should not be sorry
to see the rascal's face myself; but perhaps he will not
present himself here if the case stands as you believe it
does. No thief likes to leave a trace behind him; and
moreover, the visa to the passport is not necessary."
"If he is the sharp fellow he ought to be, he will
come," replied Mr. Fix..
"To have his passport examined ?"
"Yes. Passports are no use, except to worry honest
people and to facilitate the escape of rogues. I have
no doubt whatever that this fellow's passport will be all
right; but I hope you will not visit it all the same."
Why not ? If the passport is all regular I have no
right to refuse my visa," replied the Consul.
"Nevertheless, I must keep the fellow here until I
have received the warrant of arrest from London."







ROUND THE WORLD


"Ah, Mr. Fix, that is your business," said the Consul;
"for my part I must--"
The Consul did not conclude the sentence. At that
moment a knock was heard, and the servant introduced
two strangers, one of whom was the servant who had
lately interviewed the detective on the quay. The new-
comers were master and servant. The former handed
his passport to the Consul, and laconically requested him
to attach his visa.
The Consul took the passport and examined it
narrowly, while Fix from a corner devoured the stranger
with his eyes. When the Consul had perused the
document, he said:
"You are Phileas Fogg?"
"Yes," replied that gentleman.
"And this man is your servant ?"
"Yes; he is a Frenchman named Passe-partout."
"You have come from London ?"
Yes."
"And you are bound-whither ?"
"To Bombay."
"Very well, sir. You are aware, perhaps, that this
formality is unnecessary, even useless. We only require
to see the passport."
I know that," replied Fogg; but I want you to
testify to my presence at Suez."
"Very well, sir, so be it," replied the Consul, who
thereupon attested the passport. Mr. Fogg paid the
fee, and bowing formally, departed, followed by his
servant.







IN EIGHTY DA YS.


"Well, what do you think, sir?" said the detective.
I think he looks a perfectly honest man," replied
the Consul.
That may be," said Fix; "but that is not the point.
Do you not perceive that this cool gentleman answers in
every particular to the description of the thief sent out ?"
I grant you that; but you know all descriptions-- "
"I will settle the business," replied Fix. "It strikes
me that the servant is more get-at-able than the master.
Besides, he is a Frenchman, and cannot help chattering.
I will return soon, sir." As he finished speaking, the
detective left the Consul's office in search of Passe-partout.
Meanwhile, Mr. Fogg, having left the Consul's house,
proceeded down to the quay. There he gave his
servant some instructions, and then put off in a boat to
the Mongolia, and descended to his cabin. Taking out
his note-book, he made the following entries :

Left London, Wednesday, 2nd October, at 8.45 P.M.
Reached Paris, Thursday, at 8.40 A.M.
Arrived at Turin, vid Mont Cenis, Friday, 4th October,
6.35 A.M.
Left Turin, Friday, at 7.20 A.M.
Arrived at Brindisi, Saturday, 5th October, 4 P.M.
Embarked on Mongolia, Saturday, 5 P.M.
Reached Suez, Wednesday, 9th October, ii A.M.
Total of hours occupied in the journey, 158Y, or
6Y days.

Mr. Fogg made these entries in a journal ruled in







ROUND THE WORLD


columns, commencing on the 2nd of October, and so on
to the 2ist of December, which indicated respectively
the month, the day of the month, and the day of the
week, as well as the days at which he was due at the
principal places en route-as, for instance, Paris, Brindisi,
Suez, Bombay, Calcutta, Singapore, Hong Kong, Yoko-
hama, San Francisco, New York, Liverpool, London.
There was also a column in which the gain or loss upon
the stipulated time could be entered against each place.
This methodical arrangement of dates showed Mr. Fogg
whether he was in advance or behindhand, and contained
all necessary information.
So on that occasion, Wednesday, the 9th of October,
was recorded as the day of his arrival at Suez, and he
perceived at a glance that he had neither gained nor lost
so far.
He then had his luncheon sent into his cabin. It did
not occur to him to go and look at the town; he was one
of those gentlemen who are quite content to see foreign
countries through the eyes of their servants.





CHAPTER VIII.

In which Passe-partout talks a little more than he ought to have done.

IT was not very long before Fix rejoined Passe-partout
on the quay. The latter was looking about him, as he







IN EIGHTY DAYS.


did not feel he was debarred from seeing all he
could.
"Well, my friend," said Fix, as he came up to him,
"has your passport been vised all right?"
"Ah it is you," replied the valet. "I am much
obliged to you. Yes, everything was in order."
"And now you are seeing something of the place,
I suppose?"
"Yes, but we are going on so fast that it seems to
me like a dream. And so we are in Suez, are
we?"
"Yes, you are."
"In Egypt?"
"In Egypt, most decidedly."
"And in Africa?"
"Yes, in Africa."
"Well now," replied Passe-partout, "I could scarcely
believe it. In Africa, actually in Africa. Just fancy. I
had not the slightest idea that we should go beyond
Paris, and all I saw of that beautiful city was from
7.20 A.M. to 8.40, between the terminus of the Northern
Railway and the terminus of the Lyons line, and this
through the windows of a fiacre as we drove through the
rain. I am very sorry for it. I should like to have seen
Phre La Chaise and the Circus in the Champs Elysdes
again."
You are in a very great hurry then ?" said the
detective.
"No, I am not in the least hurry," replied Passe-
partout. "It is my master. By-the-way, I must buy some







ROUND THE WORLD


shirts and a pair of shoes. We came away without any
luggage except a small carpet-bag."
"I will take you to a bazaar where you will find
everything you want."
"Really, sir," replied Passe-partout, "you are ex-
tremely good-natured."
So they started off together, Passe-partout talking all
the time.
"I must take very good care I do not lose the
steamer," said he.
Oh, you have plenty of time," replied Fix; it is
only twelve o'clock."
Passe-partout drew out his great watch. "Twelve
o'clock," said he. Nonsense. It is fifty-two minutes
past nine."
"Your watch is slow," replied Fix.
"Slow, my watch slow; why this watch has come to
me from my grandfather. It is an heirloom, and does
not vary five minutes in a year. It is a regular chrono-
meter."
I see how it is," replied Fix; "you have got London
time, which is about two hours slower than Suez time.
You must take care to set your watch at twelve o'clock
in every country you visit."
"Not a bit of it," said Passe-partout, "I am not going
to touch my watch."
"Well, then, it won't agree with the sun."
I can't help that. So much the worse for the sun;
it will be wrong then." And the brave fellow put his
watch back in his pocket with a contemptuous gesture.







IN EIGHTY DA _S.


After a few minutes' pause, Fix remarked, "You
must have left London very suddenly ?"
"I believe you. Last Wednesday evening at eight
o'clock, Mr. Fogg came home from his club, and in
three-quarters of an hour afterwards we started."
"But where is your master going to ? "
"Straight ahead-he is going round the world."
"Going round the world!" exclaimed Fix.
"Yes, in eighty days. He says it is for a wager, but
between ourselves, I don't believe a word of it. It is
not common-sense. There must be some other reason."
"This master of yours is quite an original, I should
think."
Rather," replied the valet.
Is he very rich ?"
He must be; and he carries a large sum with him,
all in new bank-notes. He never spares expense. He
promised a large reward to the engineer of the Mongolia
if he reached Bombay well in advance of time."
"Have you known your master long ?"
Oh dear no," replied Passe-partout. "I only entered
his service the very day we left."
The effect which all these replies had upon the
suspicious nature of the detective may be imagined.
The hurried departure from London, so soon after
the robbery, the large sum in bank-notes, the haste to
reach India, under the pretext of an eccentric bet, all
confirmed Fix, and not unnaturally, in his previously
conceived ideas. He made up his mind to pump the
Frenchman a little more, and make certain that the







ROUND THE WORLD


valet knew no more concerning his master than that he
lived alone in London, was reported to be very rich,
though no one knew from whence his fortune was derived,
and that he was a very mysterious man, etc. But at the
same time, Fix felt sure that Phileas Fogg would not
land at Suez, and would really go on to Bombay.
"Is Bombay far off?" asked Passe-partout.
"Pretty well. It is ten days' steaming from here."
"And whereabouts is Bombay ?"
"It is in India."
"In Asia?"
"Naturally."
"The devil I was going to say that there is some-
thing on my mind, and that is my burner."
"What burner?"
"Why, my gas-burner, which I forgot to turn off when
I left London, and which is still alight at my expense.
Now I have calculated that I lose two shillings every
four-and-twenty hours, which is just sixpence more than
my wages. So you see that the longer our journey is--"
It is not very likely that Fix paid much attention to
this question of the gas; he was thinking of something
else. The pair soon reached the bazaar, and leaving his
companion to make his purchases, Fix hastened back to
the Consul's office, and now that his suspicions were
confirmed he regained his usual coolness.
"I am quite certain now," he said to the Consul,
"that this is our man. He wishes to pass himself off as
an eccentric person who wants to go round the world in
eighty days."







IN EIGHTY DAYS.


He is a very sharp fellow, and he probably counts
on returning to London, after having thrown all the
police off the scent."
"Well, we shall see," replied Fix.
But are you sure you are right ?" asked the Consul
once more.
"I am sure I am not mistaken."
"Well then, how do you account for the fellow being'
so determined upon proving he had been here by having
his passport visd? "
"Why- Well, I can't say," replied the detective;
"but listen a moment." And then in as few words as
possible he communicated the heads of his conversation
with Passe-partout.
"Well, I must confess that appearances are very much
against him," replied the Consul. Now what are you
going to do?"
I shall telegraph to London, with a pressing request
that a warrant of arrest may be immediately transmitted
to Bombay. I shall then embark in the MAongolia, and
so keep my eye on my man till we reach Bombay, and
then, on English ground, quietly arrest him."
As he coolly finished this explanation, the detective
bowed to the Consul, walked to the telegraph-office, and
there despatched the message we have already seen.
A quarter of an hour later, Mr. Fix, carrying his
light baggage and well furnished with money, embarked
on board the Mongolia. In a short time afterwards the
vessel was ploughing her way at full speed down the
Red Sea.







ROUND THE WORLD


CHAPTER IX.

In which the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean favour the Projects of
Phileas Fogg.

THE distance between Suez and Aden is exactly three
hundred and ten miles, and the steamers are allowed one
hundred and thirty-eight hours to do it in. The
Mongolia, however, was going at a speed which seemed
likely to bring her to her destination considerably before
time.
The majority of the passengers from Brindisi were
bound for India, some for Calcutta, some for Bombay;
and since the railway crosses the peninsula it is not
necessary to go round by Ceylon.
Amongst the passengers were many military officers
and civil servants of every degree. The former included
officers of the regular as well as the Indian army,
holding lucrative appointments, for the sub-lieutenants
get two hundred and eighty; brigadiers, two thousand
four hundred; and generals, four thousand pounds
a year.
Society, therefore, on board the Mongolia was very
pleasant. The purser feasted them sumptuously every
day. They had early breakfast, then tiffin at two o'clock,
dinner at half-past five, and supper at eight; and the
tables groaned beneath the variety of dishes. The
ladies on board changed their toilettes twice a day, and







IN EIGHTY DAYS.


there was music and dancing when the weather was
sufficiently favourable to admit of those amusements.
But the Red Sea is very capricious; it is frequently
very rough, like all long and narrow gulfs. When the
wind blew broadside on, the Mongolia rolled fearfully.
At these times the ladies went below, the pianos were
silent, singing and dancing ceased. But notwithstanding
the wind and the sea, the vessel, urged by her powerful
screw, dashed onward to the straits of Bab-el-Mandeb.
And what was Phileas Fogg doing all this time?
Perhaps it may be supposed that he was anxious and
restless, thinking of the contrary winds and the speed of
the.ship, which was likely to be retarded by the storm,
and so compromise the success of his undertaking. At
any rate, whether he did or did not concern himself with
these things, he never betrayed the least anxiety on the
subject. He was as taciturn and impassible as ever; a
man whom no eventuality could surprise. He did not
appear to be any more interested than one of the ship's
chronometers. He was rarely seen on deck. He
troubled himself very little about the Red Sea, so full of
interest, the scene of some of the greatest incidents in
the history of mankind. He never cared to look at the
towns standing out in relief against the sky. He had
no fear of the dangers of the Arabian Gulf, of which
ancient writers, Strabo, Arian, Artemidorus, etc., have
always written with horror, and upon which sailors
of those days never dared to venture without first
making a propitiatory sacrifice.
How then did this eccentric gentleman occupy his
D







ROUND THE WORLD


time, cooped up in his cabin? In the first place he
regularly ate his four meals a day, for neither pitching nor
rolling had the least effect upon his appetite. And he
played whist, for he had made the acquaintance of some
lovers of the game as enthusiastic as himself, a collector
of revenue en route to Goa, a clergyman, the Rev.
Decimus Smith, returning to Bombay, and an English
general officer bound for Benares. These three were as
madly devoted to whist as Mr. Fogg himself, and they
spent whole days silently enjoying it.
As for Passe-partout, he had also escaped sea-sickness,
and ate his meals with pleasing regularity and in a con-
scientious manner, worthy of imitation. The voyage
after all did not displease him; he had made up his
mind; he gazed at the scenery as he went along, enjoyed
his meals, and was fully persuaded that all this absurd
business would come to an end at Bombay.
The day after their departure from Suez, viz. the
loth of October, Passe-partout was by no means ill-pleased
to meet upon deck the person who had been so civil to
him in Egypt.
"I'm sure I cannot be mistaken," he said. Have
I not the pleasure of meeting the gentleman who was so
polite to me at Suez ?"
"Ah yes, I remember you now. You are the servant
of that eccentric Englishman."
"Exactly. Mr.-"
"Fix," replied the detective.
Mr. Fix," continued Passe-partout, I am delighted
to find you on bar'd. Whither are you bound?"







IN EIGHTY DAYS.


"Like yourself, to Bombay."
"All the better. Have you ever made this voyage
before ?"
"Frequently. I am an agent of the P. and O.
Company."
Oh, then you know India very well, no
doubt?"
"Well, yes," replied Fix, who did not wish to commit
himself.
It is a curious part of the world, isn't it ?"
"Very much so. There are mosques, minarets,
temples, fakirs, pagodas, tigers, serpents, and dancing-
girls. It is to be hoped that you will have time to see
the country."
"I hope so too, Mr. Fix. You must be aware that
a man can hardly be expected to pass his whole existence
in jumping from the deck of a steamer into a train, and
from the train to another steamer, under the pretence of
going round the world in eighty days. No; all these
gymnastics will end at Bombay, I trust."
"Is Mr. Fogg quite well?" asked Fix, politely.
"Quite well, thank you. So am I. I eat like an
ogre. I suppose that is the effect of the sea-air."
"I never see your master on deck."
"No, he has no curiosity whatever."
"Do you know, Mr. Passe-partout, that I fancy this
pretended journey round the world in eighty days is only
a cover for a more important object, a diplomatic mission
perhaps ?"
"Upon my word, Mr. Fix, I know nothing about it,
D 2







.ROUND THE WORLD


I declare; and what is more, I would not give half-a-
crown to know !"
After this, Passe-partout and Fix frequently chatted
together; the detective doing all in his power to draw
the valet out, whenever possible. He would offer the
Frenchman a glass of whisky or bitter beer, which the
latter accepted without ceremony, and pronounced Fix a
perfect gentleman.
Meantime the steamer plunged and ploughed on her
way rapidly. Mocha was sighted on the i3th, surrounded
by its ruined walls, above which some date-palms reared
their heads. Beyond extended immense coffee planta-
tions. Passe-partout was delighted to gaze upon this
celebrated town, and fancied that it and its ruined walls
bore a great resemblance to a gigantic cup and saucer.
During the following night the Mongolia cleared the
strait of Bab-el-Mandeb, which means the Gate of Tears,
and the following day they came to Steamer Point, to the
N.W. of Aden harbour, where the supply of coal was to
be shipped.
It is rio light task to provide the steamers with coal
at such a distance from the mines, and the P. and 0.
Company expend annually no less a sum than eight
hundred thousand pounds on this service. Dep6ts have
to be established at distant ports, and the coal costs
more than three pounds a ton.
The Mongolia had still sixteen hundred and fifty
miles to run before she could reach Bombay, and she
was therefore obliged to remain four hours at Steamer
Point to complete her coaling. But this delay was not







IN EIGHTY DA YS.


at all detrimental to the plans of Phileas Fogg. It had
been foreseen. Besides, the Mongolia, instead of reaching
Aden on the 15th, had made that port on the evening of
the 14th, so there was a gain of about fifteen hours.
Mr. Fogg and his servant went ashore. The former
wished to have his passport visid. Fix followed him
unnoticed. The formality of the visk having been accom-
plished, Phileas Fogg returned on board to his game of
whist.
Passe-partout, as usual, lounged about amongst the
mixed races which make up the inhabitants of Aden.
He admired the fortifications of this eastern Gibraltar,
and the splendid tanks at which the British engineers
were still at work, two thousand years after Solomon's
craftsmen.
"Very curious, very curious indeed," thought Passe-
partout, as he returned on board. It is worth travelling
if one can see something new each time."
At six P.M. the MAongolia weighed anchor, and made
her way across the Indian Ocean. She had now one
hundred and sixty-eight hours in which to make the
passage to Bombay. The weather was good, with a
pleasant nor'-west wind; so the sails were hoisted to aid
the screw.
The ship being thus steadied, the lady passengers
took the opportunity to reappear in fresh toilettes, and
dancing and singing were again indulged in. The voyage
continued under most favourable conditions. Passe-
partout was delighted that he had such a pleasant com-
panion as Fix.







ROUND THE WORLD


On Sunday, the 2oth of October, about mid-day,
they sighted the coast of Hindostan. Two hours later
the pilot came on board. A long range of hills cut the
sky-line, and soon palm-trees began to show themselves.
The mail steamer ran into the roadstead formed between
the islands of Salsette, Colaba, Elephanta, and Butcher,
and at half-past four o'clock the vessel came alongside
the quay.
Phileas Fogg was just finishing his thirty-third rubber
for that day. His partner and he had succeeded in
scoring a treble," and thus terminated the voyage with
a stroke of luck.
The Mlongolia was not due at Bombay until the 22nd
of October; she had actually arrived on the 2oth; so
Mr. Fogg had really gained two days upon the estimated
period, and he entered the profit" accordingly in the
column of his diary set apart for that purpose.






CHAPTER X.

In which Passe-partout thinks himself lucky in escaping with only
the Loss of his Shoes.

EVERYBODY is aware that the peninsula of Hindostan
has a superficial area of one million four hundred
thousand square miles, in which the unequally-distri-







IN EIGHTY DA YS.


buted population numbers one hundred and eighty
millions. The British Government rules absolutely
over the greater portion of this immense tract of
country. The Governor-General resides at Calcutta,
and there are also governors of presidencies at Madras
and Bombay, and a deputy-governor at Agra, as well as a
governor for Bengal.
British India proper only includes an area of seven
hundred thousand square miles, and a population of
one hundred to one hundred and ten millions; so there
is still a large portion of India independent, and, in fact,
there are rajahs in the interior who .wield absolute
authority.
From the year 1756 to the great Sepoy Mutiny, the
East India Company was the supreme authority in British
India; but now the country is under the rule of the
English Crown. The manners and customs of India are
in a continual state of change. Till lately, travelling was
only by antiquated modes of conveyance, but now
steamers cover the Ganges, and the railways have opened
up the country, and one can go from Bombay to Calcutta
in three days. But the railroad does not cut the penin-
sula in a direct line. As the crow flies, the distance from
Calcutta to Bombay is only about eleven hundred miles,
and the trains would not occupy three days in accom-
plishing that distance; but the journey is lengthened at
least one-third of that distance by the loop the line
describes up to Allahabad.
The Great Indian Peninsula Railway line is as fol-
lows : leaving Bombay Island, it crosses Salsette, reaches







ROUND THE WORLD,


the mainland at Tannah, crosses the Western Ghauts,
thence runs north-east to Burhampoor, skirts the inde-
pendent territory of Bundelcund, ascends to Allahabad,
and then, turning eastward, meets the Ganges at Benares;
then, quitting it again, the line descends in a south-
easterly direction, by Burdivan and Chandernagore, to the
terminal station at Calcutta.
It was half-past four P.M. when the Bombay passengers
landed from the Mongolia, and the train for Calcutta was
timed to start at eight o'clock.
Mr. Fogg took leave of his colleagues of the whist-
table, and going ashore, gave his servant orders concern-
ing a few necessary purchases, enjoining him to be at the
railroad station before eight o'clock, and then, at his own
regular pace, he started for the Consul's office.
He saw nothing of the sights of Bombay-the town-
hall, the magnificent library, the forts, the docks, the
cotton market, the bazaars, mosques, &c., were all dis-
regarded. Elephanta was ignored, and the grottos of
Salsette unexplored by Phileas Fogg.
After leaving the consulate, he walked calmly to the
railroad station and dined. The proprietor of the hotel
particularly recommended "a native rabbit." Phileas
accepted the dish as put before him, but found it
horrible.
He rang the bell. The landlord was sent for.
"Is that a rabbit ?" inquired Mr. Fogg.
"Yes, my lord, a jungle rabbit."
"Has that rabbit never mewed, do you think ?"
Oh, my lord, a jungle-rabbit mew I swear-"







IN EIGHTY DA YS.


"Don't swear," said Fogg calmly, "and remember
that formerly cats were sacred animals in India. Those
were happy days."
For the cats, my lord ?"
"And perhaps for travellers too," said Fogg, as he
proceeded with his dinner.
Soon afterwards Mr. Fix landed, and his first act was
to go to the police-office. He said who and what he
was, and stated his business and how matters stood
regarding the robbery. Had any warrant been for-
warded ? No, nothing of the kind had been received,
and of course it could not have reached Bombay, as it
was despatched after Fogg's departure.
Fix was disappointed. He wanted the Commissioner
to grant him a warrant on the spot, but the request was
refused. The business was the Home Government's
affair, not his, and he could not issue the warrant. This
red-tapeism is quite British style. Fix of course did not
insist, and made up his mind to await the arrival of the
warrant. But he resolved not to lose sight of the robber
meanwhile. He had no doubt whatever that Fogg
would remain some time in Bombay-we know that
was also Passe-partout's notion-and the warrant would
probably arrive before the criminal left the town.
But it was now evident to Passe-partout that his
master intended to push on from Bombay as rapidly as
he had left Paris and Suez; that the journey was not to
end at Bombay, it was to be continued to Calcutta at
any rate, and perhaps even farther still. Passe-partout
then began to think that perhaps the bet was really the







ROUND THE WORLD


object, and that fate had indeed condemned him, with all
his wish for rest, to journey around the world in eighty
days.
However, having purchased some necessary articles,
he walked about the streets of Bombay. There were a
great number of people about-Europeans of all nation-
alities; Persians, wearing pointed caps; Buntryas, with
round turbans; Scindees, with square caps; Armenians,
in their flowing robes; Parsees, with black mitres. It
was a Parsee festival that day.
These Parsees are followers of Zoroaster, and are
the most industrious, most intelligent, and most civilised
of the native races, and to which the majority of the
Bombay merchants belong. On that occasion a sort of
religious carnival was being held; there were processions,
and numbers of dancing-girls clad in gauzy rose-coloured
garments, who danced modestly and gracefully to the
sound of the tom-tom and viols.
Passe-partout, as may be imagined, drank in all these
sights and sounds with delight; and his expression at
the unusual spectacle was that of the greatest astonish-
ment.
Unfortunately, his curiosity very nearly compromised
the object of his master's journey. He wandered on,
after watching the carnival, on his way to the station.
but seeing the splendid pagoda on Malabar Hill, he
thought he would like to go in. He was quite unaware
of two things : first, that certain pagodas are closed to
all Christians, and even the believers can only obtain
admittance by leaving their shoes or slippers at the doors







IN EIGHTY DA YS.


of the temple. The British Government, respecting the
native creed, severely punishes anyone attempting to
violate the sanctity of the native mosques or
temples.
But Passe-partout, innocent of harm, tourist-like,
went in, and was admiring the pagoda and the lavish
ornamentation of the interior, when he suddenly found
himself sprawling on his back on the pavement. Over
him stood three angry men, who rushed upon him, tore
off his shoes, and began to pommel him soundly, uttering
savage cries as they did so.
The agile Frenchman was quickly upon his feet again,
and with a couple of well-directed blows of his fists
upset two of his adversaries, who were much encumbered
in their long robes; then, rushing out of the temple, he
quickly distanced the remaining Hindoo and evaded
him in the crowd.
At five minutes to eight he presented himself at the
railroad station, without his hat and shoes and minus the
parcel in which all his purchases were wrapped. Fix
was there on the platform. Having tracked Fogg, he
perceived that that worthy was about to leave Bombay at
once. Fix made up his mind to go with him as far as
Calcutta, and even beyond if necessary. Passe-partout
did not notice the detective, who kept in the shade;
but the policeman heard the recital of the valet's adven-
tures, which Passe-partout told to his master in a few
sentences.
"I trust this will not happen again," replied Fogg,
quietly, as he took his seat in the carriage.







ROUND THE WORLD


The poor lad, quite upset and minus his hat and
shoes, took his place also without replying.
Fix was getting into another compartment, when
suddenly a thought struck him, and he muttered:
"No, I will remain. An offence has been committed
upon Indian ground. I've got my man I"
At that moment the engine uttered a piercing whistle,
and the train moved out into the night.







CHAPTER XI.

Showing how Phileas Fogg purchased a Mount" at a Fabulous
Price.

THE train started punctually, carrying the usual comple-
ment of travellers, including officers of the civil and
military classes and merchants. Passe-partout was seated
near his master, a third traveller had secured a corner
opposite.
This gentleman was General Sir Francis Cromarty, one
of Mr. Fogg's whist-party on board the Mongolia, who
was en route to take up his command at Benares.
Sir Francis was a tall fair specimen of the British
officer, about fifty years old. He had greatly distinguished
himself during the Mutiny. He had been in India
almost all his life, and only paid occasional visits to his







IN EIGHTY DAYS.


native country. He was a well-informed man, and
would willingly have imparted any information he pos-
sessed, had Phileas Fogg chosen to apply to him. But
the latter did nothing of the kind. He never travelled.
He merely made a track across country. He was a heavy
body, describing an orbit around the terrestrial globe,
according to certain mechanical laws. At that time he
was actually engaged in calculating how many hours had
passed since he left London, and he would have rubbed
his hands joyfully, had he been one of those people who
indulge in these needless enthusiastic demonstrations.-
Sir Francis Cromarty had already noticed the eccen-
tricity of his companion while at whist, and had
questioned seriously whether a human heart actually
beat beneath that cold envelope of flesh, whether Fogg
really possessed a soul alive to the beauties of nature,
and subject to human failings and aspirations. That was
what puzzled the gallant soldier. None of the many
original characters which it had been his fortune to
encounter had, in any way, resembled this product of
the action of exact science upon humanity.
Phileas Fogg had not concealed from Sir Francis the
object of his journey round the world, nor the conditions
under which he had undertaken it. The general saw
nothing in this wager but the eccentricity of its surround-
ings, and the want of transire benefaciendo which ought
to guide any reasonable man. If this extraordinary man
went on in this manner all his life, he would finally quit
the world, having done absolutely nothing for his own
benefit or for that of others.







ROUND THE WORLD


An hour after leaving Bombay, the train crossed the
viaduct carrying the line from Salsette to the mainland.
At Callyan station they left the branch-line to Kandallah
and Poona on the right, and proceeded to Panwell. Here
they traversed the gorges of the Western Ghauts, com-
posed of trap and basaltic rocks, the highest summits of
which are crowned with thick trees.
Sir Francis Cromarty and Phileas Fogg occasionally
exchanged a few words, and at one time the general
picked up the thread of conversation by remarking :
"A few years ago, Mr. Fogg, you would have ex-
perienced a considerable impediment to your journey
here, and would most likely have compromised your
success."
How do you mean, Sir Francis ?"
"Because the railway did not go beyond the base of
these mountains, and it was then necessary to make the
journey in palanquins or on ponies as far as Kandallah
on the opposite slope."
"Such an interruption would not in any way have
disarranged my plans," replied Mr. Fogg. "I have
taken precautions against certain obstacles."
"Nevertheless, Mr. Fogg, you very nearly had an
awkward bit of business on hand in consequence of
yonder fellow's adventure."
Passe-partout was fast asleep, with his feet well
muffled up in the railway-rug, and was quite unconscious
that he was the subject of conversation.
"The British Government is extremely strict, and
with reason, upon any such offences," continued Sir







IN EIGHTY DAYS.


Francis. "Above everything, it considers that the
religious feelings of the native races should be respected,
and if your servant had been arrested- "
"Well," interrupted Mr. Fogg, "well, Sir Francis,
suppose he had been taken and condemned and
punished, he might have returned quietly to Europe
afterwards. That would not have been a reason for
stopping his master."
And then the conversation again languished. During
the night the train crossed the mountains, passed
Nassik, and next day, the 21st October, it traversed a
comparatively flat district of Kandish. The well-culti-
vated country was sprinkled with villages, above which
the minarets of the pagodas took the place of the
English church-spires. Numerous tributaries of the
Godavery watered this fertile territory.
Passe-partout awoke and looked about him. He
could not at first believe that he actually was crossing
India in a carriage upon the G. I. P. Railway. It
appeared quite incredible, but it was none the less
real. The locomotive, driven by an English engineer
and fed with English coal, puffed its steam over coffee,
cotton, clove, and pepper plantations. The smoke
curled around the palm-trees, amid which picturesque
bungalows were frequently visible, and "viharis," a sort
of abandoned monasteries, as well as a few temples en-
riched with wonderful Indian architecture, were here and
there apparent. Farther on, they passed immense tracts of
land extending as far as the eye could reach, and jungles
in which serpents and tigers fled scared at the roar and







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rattle of the train; then succeeded forests through which
the line passed, the abode of elephants which, with
pensive gaze, watched the speeding train.
During the forenoon our travellers traversed the
blood-stained district beyond Malligaum, sacred to the
votaries of the goddess Kali. Not far from this arose
the minarets of Ellora and its pagodas, and the famous
Aurungabad, the capital of the ferocious Aurung-Zeb,
now the chief town of one of the detached kingdoms of
the Nizam. It was in this country that Feringhea,
chief of the Thugs-the King of Stranglers-exercised
sway. These assassins, united in an invisible and secret
association, strangled, in honour of the goddess of death,
victims of every age without shedding blood, and in time
there was scarcely a place where a corpse was not to be
found. The English Government has succeeded in
checking very considerably these wholesale massacres,
but Thugs still exist and pursue their horrible vocation.
At half-past twelve the train stopped at Burhampore,
and Passe-partout succeeded in obtaining a pair of
slippers decorated with false pearls, which he wore with
evident conceit.
The passengers ate a hurried breakfast, and the train
again started for Assinghur, skirting for a moment the
river Tapy, a small stream which flows into the Gulf of
Cambay, near Surat.
It may now not be out of place to record Passe-
partout's reflections. Until his arrival at Bombay he
had cherished the idea that the journey would not be
continued farther. But now that he was being carried







IN EIGHTY DA YS.


across India he saw things in a different light. His old
love of wandering returned in full force. The fantastic
ideas of his youthful days came back to him again; he
took his master's projects quite seriously; he began to
believe in the wager, and consequently in the tour of the
world to be completed in that maximum of eighty days
which must not on any account be exceeded. Even
now he was beginning to feel anxious about possible
delays and accidents en route. He felt interested in
winning, and trembled when he considered that he had
actually compromised the whole thing by his stupidity
on the previous day. So he was much more restless
than Mr. Fogg, because less phlegmatic. He counted
over and over again the days that had already passed
since he had started, cursed at the stoppages at stations,
found fault with the slow speed, and in his heart blamed
Mr. Fogg for not having "tipped" the engine-driver
He quite overlooked the fact that, though such a thing
was possible on board a steamer, it was out of question
on a railroad where the time of the trains is fixed and
the speed regulated.
Towards evening they penetrated the defiles of the
mountains of Sutpoor, which separate the territory of
Khandeish from that of Bundelcund.
Next day, the 22nd, Passe-partout replied, to a
question of Sir Francis Cromarty, that it was three A.M.,
but, as a matter of fact, this wonderful watch was about
four hours slow, as it was always kept at Greenwich time,
which was then nearly seventy-seven degrees west, and
the watch would of course get slower and slower.







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Sir Francis corrected Passe-partout's time, respecting
which he made a remark similar to that made by
Mr. Fix. He endeavoured to convince the valet that he
ought to regulate his watch by each new meridian, and
as he was still going east the days became shorter and
shorter by four minutes for every degree. But all this was
useless. Whether the headstrong fellow understood the
general or not, he certainly did not alter his watch, which
was steadily kept at London time. At any rate it was a
delusion which pleased him and hurt nobody.
At eight o'clock in the morning the train stopped
about fifteen miles from Rothal, at a place where there
were many bungalows and huts erected. The guard
passed along the line, crying out, All change here !"
Phileas Fogg looked at Sir Francis Cromarty, who
did not appear to understand this unexpected halt.
Passe-partout, not less astonished, leaped down, and
in a moment or two returned, exclaiming, There is no
railway beyond this place, sir."
"What do you mean? inquired Sir Francis.
"I mean that the train does not go any farther."
The general immediately got out. Phileas Fogg
followed quietly. Both these gentlemen accosted the
guard.
"Where are we ?" asked Sir Francis.
At the village of Kholby, sir," replied the guard.
"Why do we stop here?"
"Because the line is not finished beyond."
"Not finished How is that ?"
"There are about fifty miles yet to be laid between







IN EIGHTY DAYS. 67

this point and Allahabad, where we take the train
again."
The papers announced the line complete."
"I cannot help that, sir; the papers were mistaken."
"But you book people 'through' from Bombay to
Calcutta," persisted Sir Francis, who was waxing angry.
Certainly we do; but it is an understood thing that
the passengers provide their own conveyance between
Kholby and Allahabad."
Sir Francis was furious. Passe-partout would have
liked to have knocked the guard down, if he had been
able. He did not dare to look at his master.
"We had better get on, Sir Francis," said Mr. Fogg;
we must get to Allahabad somehow; let us see how we
can do so."
It strikes me that this delay will upset your arrange-
ments considerably, Mr. Fogg," replied Sir Francis.
Oh dear no all this has been discounted," replied
Fogg.
"What! did you know that the line was unfinished?"
"No; but I was quite sure that some obstacles would
crop up to retard me. Nothing is yet lost. I have two
days in reserve. The steamer does not leave Calcutta
for Hong Kong until the 23rd, at mid-day. This is
only the 22nd, and we shall reach Calcutta in good time
even now."
What could be urged against such an assured reply
as this ? It was only too evident that the railway ceased
at that point. Newspapers are so fond of anticipating,
and in this case they had been decidedly premature in
E 2







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announcing the completion of the line. The majority
of the passengers had been made aware of the existing
state of things, and provided themselves with conveyance
accordingly, whatever they could obtain-" palkigharies "
with four wheels, waggons drawn by zebus, a sort of
brahma ox, palanquins, ponies, &c. So it happened
that there was nothing left for Mr. Fogg and Sir Francis
Cromarty.
I shall walk," said Phileas Fogg.
Passe-partout, who was close to his master, made a
very expressive grimace when he gazed at his elegant but
very thin slippers. Fortunately he had made a discovery,
but hesitated a little to announce it.
Sir," he said at length, "I think I have found means
for our transport."
"What is it?"
"An elephant. It belongs to a native who lives
close by."
Let us go and see this animal," said Mr. Fogg.
Five minutes later Sir Francis and Mr. Fogg, accom-
panied by Passe-partout, reached the hut, which was
surrounded by a palisade. In the hut resided the native ;
inside the palisade the elephant lived. The former intro-
duced the new arrivals to the latter, at their particular
request.
They found that the animal was half domesticated;
it had originally been purchased for a fighting elephant,
not for carrying purposes. With this end in view, the
owner had begun to alter the naturally placid disposition
of the beast by irritating him, and getting him gradually







IN EIGHTY DAYS.


up to that pitch of fury called mutsh" by the Hindoos,
and this is done by feeding the elephant on sugar and
butter for three months. This at first sight would appear
scarcely the treatment likely to conduce to such an
object, but it is successfully employed.
Fortunately, however, for Mr. Fogg, the elephant in
question had not been subjected to this treatment for a
very long time, and the "mutsh had not appeared.
Kiouni-for so was the animal called-was no doubt
quite competent to perform the journey required, and in
the absence of other conveyance, Phileas Fogg deter-
mined to hire him.
But elephants in India are dear, for they are becoming
somewhat scarce. The males, which only are suited to
the circus training, are much in request. They seldom
breed when in a domesticated state, so they can only be
procured by hunting. They are, therefore, the objects
of much solicitude, and when Mr. Fogg asked the owner
what he could hire his elephant for, the man declined
point-blank to lend him at all.
Fogg persisted, and offered ten pounds an hour for
the beast! It was refused. Twenty? Still refused.
Forty? Declined with thanks. Passe-partout actually
jumped at each "bid." But the native would not yield
to the temptation.
Nevertheless the price tendered was a handsome one.
Suppdsing that the elephant took fifteen hours to reach
Allahabad, the price would amount to six hundred
pounds!
Phileas Fogg, without betraying the least irritation,







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then proposed to the owner that he should sell the
animal outright, and offered one thousand pounds for
him.
But the Hindoo declined; perhaps he thought he
would make more by so doing.
Sir Francis Cromarty then took Mr. Fogg aside, and
requested him to reflect ere he bid higher. Mr. Fogg
replied that he was not in the habit of acting on impulse,
that a bet of twenty thousand pounds depended upon
the accomplishment of the journey, that the elephant
was absolutely necessary, and if he paid twenty times the
value of the animal, it must be lad.
So Mr. Fogg returned to the Indian, who perceived
it was only a question of asking. Phileas offered in quick
succession twelve hundred, fifteen hundred, eighteen
hundred, and finally two thousand pounds. Passe-partout,
usually so ruddy, was now pale with emotion.
At two thousand pounds the native yielded.
I declare by my slippers, that's a pretty price for an
elephant !" exclaimed Passe-partout.
This business over, there was nothing but to obtain a
guide. That was easily done. A young and intelligent-
looking Parsee offered his services. Mr. Fogg engaged
him, and promised him a good reward, which would
naturally increase his intelligence.
The elephant was got ready without delay. The
Parsee was quite skilled in the business of a "mahout."
He placed a sort of saddle on the elephant's back, and
at each end of it he fixed a small howdah.
Mr. Fogg paid the native the two thousand pounds







IN EIGHTY DAYS.


in bank-notes, which he took from the inexhaustible
carpet-bag. Passe-partout writhed as they were paid over.
Then Mr. Fogg offered Sir Francis Cromarty a seat on
the elephant, which the general gratefully accepted.
One traveller more or less would not signify to such an
animal.
Provisions were purchased. Sir Francis and Mr.
Fogg each occupied a howdah, while Passe-partout sat
astride between them. The Parsee seated himself upon
the elephant's neck, and at nine o'clock they quitted the
village, the- elephant taking a short cut through the thick
palm-forest.







CHAPTER XII.

Showing what happened to Phileas Fogg and his Companions as
they traversed the Forest.

THE guide, hoping to shorten the journey, kept to the
left of the railroad line, which would be carried in a
circuitous manner through the Vindhia Mountains when
completed. The Parsee, who was well acquainted with
all the byways, declared that twenty miles would be
saved by striking directly across the forest; so the party
yielded.
Sir Francis and Mr. Fogg, buried up to their necks







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in the howdahs, got terribly shaken by the rough
trotting of the elephant, which was urged by the driver.
But they put up with the inconvenience with true British
self-restraint; they spoke but seldom and scarcely
looked at each other.
Passe-partout was obliged to be very careful not to
keep his tongue between his teeth, else it would have
been bitten off, so unmercifully was he jogged up
and down. The brave fellow, sometimes thrown for-
ward on the animal's neck, sometimes upon the croup,
performed a series of vaulting movements, something
like a circus clown on the spring-board." But all
the time he joked and laughed at the somersaults he
performed so involuntarily; occasionally he took out a
lump of sugar from his pocket and handed it to
Kiouni, who took it in his trunk without slackening his
pace for a second.
After proceeding thus for a couple of hours, the driver
called a halt and gave the elephant an hour's rest. The
animal ate all the branches and shrubs in the vicinity, as
soon as he had quenched his thirst at a neighboring
spring. Sir Francis did not complain of this delay; he
was terribly bruised. Mr. Fogg did not appear any
more discomposed than if he had only got out of bed.
He is a man of iron !" exclaimed the general, as he
gazed at his companion admiringly.
Of hammered iron," replied Passe-partout, who was
preparing a hasty breakfast.
At noon the driver gave the signal for departure.
The country soon became very wild. The dense forest







IN EIGHTY DA Ys.


was succeeded by groves of dates and palms; then came
extensive arid plains dotted here and there with bushes,
and sprinkled with immense blocks of syenite. The
whole of this region of Bundelcund, which is seldom
traversed, is inhabited by a fanatical people inured to
the most fearful practices of the Hindoos. The English
Government has scarcely yet entirely obtained the
control over this region, which is ruled by rajahs, who
are very difficult to bring to book from their almost
inaccessible mountain fastnesses. Many times the
travellers noticed bands of fierce natives, who gesticu-
lated angrily at perceiving the swift-footed elephant pass
by; and the Parsee took care to give them all a wide
berth. They encountered very few wild animals; even
monkeys were not numerous, and they fled away with
grimaces and gestures, which amused Passe-partout very
much indeed.
One reflection, however, troubled Passe-partout
exceedingly, and that was how would his master dispose
of the elephant when they reached Allahabad? Would
he take it on with him? That was scarcely possible.
The price of conveyance, added to the purchase-money,
would be ruinous. Would he sell the beast or set him
free ? No doubt the animal deserved some considera-
tion. Suppose Mr. Fogg made him, Passe-partout, a
present of the elephant? He would feel very much
embarrassed. So these considerations worried the valet
not a little.
At eight o'clock they had crossed the principal
heights of the Vindhia chain, and at a ruined bungalow







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upon the southern slope of the mountains our travellers
halted again.
The distance traversed was about twenty-five miles,
and they had still as far to go to reach Allahabad. The
night was quite chilly. A fire lighted by the Parsee was
very acceptable, and the travellers made an excellent
supper of the provisions they had purchased at Kholby.
The intermittent conversation soon gave way to steady
snoring. The guide kept watch by the elephant, which
slept outside, supported by the trunk of an enor-
mous tree.
Nothing happened to disturb' the party during the
night. Now and then the growls of wild animals, or the
chattering of monkeys, broke the silence, but nothing
more terrible was heard, and the larger animals did not
disturb the occupants of the bungalow. Sir Francis
Cromarty "lay like a warrior taking his rest." Passe-
partout, in a restless sleep, appeared to be practising the
gymnastics he had executed on the elephant's back. As
for Mr. Fogg, he slept as peacefully as if he were in his
quiet bed in Saville Row.
At six o'clock they resumed their journey. The
guide hoped to reach Allahabad that evening. In that
case Mr. Fogg would only lose a portion of the eight-
and-forty hours already saved since the commencement
of the trip.
They descended the last slopes of the Vindhias.
The elephant resumed his rapid pace. Towards mid-
day the guide passed round the village of Kallenger on
the Cani, one of the small affluents of the Ganges. He







IN EIGHTY DA YS.


appeared to avoid all inhabited places, feeling more
secure in the deserted tracts. Allahabad was thence
only a dozen miles off in a north-easterly direction.
They halted once more under a banana-tree, the fruit of
which, as wholesome as bread and "as succulent as
cream," as they said, was highly appreciated by our
travellers.
At two o'clock they entered a dense forest, which
they had to traverse for some miles. The guide pre-
ferred to travel in the shade of the woods. So far at
any rate they had encountered nothing unpleasant, and
there was every reason to suppose that the journey would
be accomplished without accident, when the elephant, after
a few premonitory symptoms, stopped suddenly.
It was then four o'clock in the afternoon.
"What is the matter ?" asked Sir Francis Cromarty,
putting his head up over the top of his howdah.
"I don't know, sir," replied the Parsee, listening
intently to a confused murmuring sound which came
through the thickly-interlacing branches.
Soon the sound became more defined. One might
have fancied it was a concert at a great distance; com-
posed of human voices and brass instruments all per-
forming at once. Passe-partout was all eyes and ears.
Mr. Fogg waited patiently without uttering a word.
The Parsee leaped down, fastened the elephant to a
tree, and plunged into the thick underwood. In a few
moments he came back, exclaiming: "A procession of
Brahmins is coming this way Let us hide ourselves if
we can."







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As he spoke he loosed the elephant and led him
into a thicket, bidding the travellers to stay where they
were. He was ready to remount should flight be neces-
sary, but he thought that the procession would pass
without noticing the party, for the thick foliage com-
pletely concealed them.
The discordant sounds kept approaching-a mono-
tonous kind of chant, mingled with the beating of
tom-toms and the clash of cymbals. The head of the
procession soon became visible beneath the trees about
fifty paces off, and Mr. Fogg and his party easily distin-
guished the curious individuals who composed it.
The priests, wearing mitres and long robes trimmed
with lace, marched in front. They were surrounded by a
motley crowd of men, women, and children, who were
chanting a sort of funeral hymn, broken at intervals by
the sound of the various instruments. Behind these
came, on a car (the large wheels of which, spokes and
all, were ornamented with the similitude of serpents), a
hideous figure drawn by four richly-caparisoned zebus.
This idol had four arms, the body was painted a dusky
red, with staring eyes, matted hair, a protruding tongue,
and lips tinted with henna and betel. Round its neck
was hung a necklace of skulls, and it was girt with a
zone of human hands; it stood upright upon the head-
less trunk of a giant figure.
Sir Francis Cromarty recognized the idol at once.
"That is the goddess Kali," he whispered; "the
goddess of love and of death."
Of death I can understand, but not of love,"







IN EIGHTY DA YS.


muttered Passe-partout; "what a villainous hag it
is !"
The Parsee signed to him to hold his tongue.
Around the idol a number of fakirs danced and
twirled about.
These wretches were daubed with ochre, and covered
with wounds, from which the blood issued drop by
drop; absurd idiots, who would throw themselves under
the wheels of Juggernaut's chariot had they the oppor-
tunity.
Behind these fanatics marched some Brahmins, clad
in all their oriental sumptuousness of .garb, dragging a
woman along, who faltered at each step.
This female was young, and as white as a European.
Her head, neck, shoulders, ears, arms, hands, and ankles
were covered with jewels, bracelets, or rings. A gold-
laced tunic, over which she wore a thin muslin robe,
revealed the swelling contours of her form.
Behind this young woman, and in violent contrast to
her, came a guard, armed with naked sabres and long
damascened pistols, carrying a dead body in a palanquin.
The corpse was that of an old man clothed in the
rich dress of a rajah; the turban embroidered with
pearls, the robe of silk tissue and gold, the girdle of
cashmere studded with diamonds, and wearing the
beautiful weapons of an Indian prince.
The musicians brought up the rear with a guard of
fanatics, whose cries even drowned the noise of the
instruments at times. These closed the cortige.
Sir Francis Cromarty watched the procession pass by







ROUND THE WORLD


and his face wore a peculiarly saddened expression.
Turning to the guide, he said:
Is it a suttee ?"
The Parsee made a sign in the affirmative, and put
his fingers on his lips. The long procession wended its
way slowly amongst the trees, and before long the last of
it disappeared in the depths of the forest. The music
gradually died away, occasionally a few cries could be
heard, but soon they ceased, and silence reigned around.
Phileas Fogg had heard what Sir Francis had said,
and as soon as the procession had passed out of sight,
he said :
"What is a suttee ?"
"A suttee," replied the general, is a human sacri-
fice-but a voluntary one. That woman you saw just
now will be burned to-morrow morning at daylight."
"The scoundrels !" exclaimed Passe-partout, who
could not repress his indignation.
"And that dead body?" said Mr. Fogg.
"Is that of her husband-a prince," replied the
guide. "He was an independent rajah in Bundelcund."
Do you mean to say that these barbarous customs
still obtain in India-under British rule ? said Mr. Fogg,
without betraying any emotion whatever.
In the greater portion of India," replied Sir Francis
Cromarty, "these sacrifices do not take place; but we
have no authority in the savage districts, one of the prin-
cipal of which is Bundelcund. The entiredistrict north
of the Vindhia range is the theatre of pillage and murder."







IN EIGHTY DAYS.


"Poor creature," exclaimed Passe-partout; "burned
alive !"
"Yes," continued the general, "burned alive; and
if she was not, you have no idea to what a wretched
condition she would be reduced by her relatives. They
would shave off her hair, feed her very scantily upon rice,
and hold no communication with her, for she would be
regarded as unclean, and would die like a dog. The
prospect of such treatment, even more strongly than
affection or religious fanaticism, often urges the widows
to submit themselves to suttee. Sometimes, however,
the act is really voluntary, and energetic interference by
the Government is necessary to prevent it. Some years
ago, when I was in Bombay, a young widow asked the
governor's leave to be burned with her late husband's
body. As you may imagine, he refused her request.
Then the disconsolate widow left the town, took refuge
with an independent rajah, and burned herself, to the
satisfaction of all concerned."
As the general proceeded, the guide nodded in
assent to the truthfulness of the relation, and when the
speaker had finished, the Parsee said:
"But the suttee to take place to-morrow is not
voluntary."
"How do you know ?"
"Everyone in Bundelcund knows that," replied the
guide.
Yet the unfortunate woman offered no resistance,"
said Sir Francis Cromarty







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Because she was drugged with hemp and opium,"
replied the Parsee.
"But whither are they taking her ?"
"To the Pagoda of Pillaji, two miles away from
here. There she will pass the night, and wait for the
hour appointed for the sacrifice."
And the sacrifice will take place ?"
"At dawn to-morrow."
As he spoke, the guide led forth the elephant and
clambered up to his seat on its neck; but just as he was
about to whistle to the animal to proceed, Mr. Fogg
stopped him, and said to Sir Francis Cromarty, "Suppose
we save this woman?"
"Save her !" exclaimed the general.
"I have still twelve hours to spare," continued Fogg;
"I can devote that time to the purpose."
Well, I declare you are a man with a heart in the
right place," cried Sir Francis.
Sometimes it is," replied Mr. Fogg, smiling grimly,
"when I have time I"





CHAPTER XIII.

Chowing how Passe-partout perceives once again that Fortune
favors the Brave.

THE project was a difficult one and a bold, almost im-
possible to carry out. Mr. Fogg was about to risk his







IN EIGHTY DAYS.


life, or at least his liberty, and consequently the success
of his undertaking; but, nevertheless, he hesitated not a
moment. Besides, he found in Sir Francis Cromarty a
sturdy ally. Passe-partout also was at their disposal; he
was quite ready, and his opinion of his master was rising
every moment. He possessed a heart, after all, beneath
that cold exterior. Passe-partout was beginning to love
Mr. Fogg.
The guide remained. What course would he take
in this business? He would probably side with the
natives. At any rate, if he would not assist, his neutrality
must be assured.
Sir Francis put the question to him plainly.
"Your honour," replied the man, "I am a Parsee.
The woman is a Parsee also. You may dispose of me
as you wish."
"Good," replied Sir Francis.
"But," continued the guide, "you must remember
that not only do we risk our lives in this affair, but we
may be horribly tortured if we are taken alive. So take
care."
We have made up our minds to run the risk," said
Mr. Fogg. "I think we had better wait till nightfall
before we act."
I think so too," said the guide, who then proceeded
to give his employers some information respecting the
lady. He said she was a Parsee, a celebrated Indian
beauty, daughter of one of the richest merchants in
Bombay. She had received a complete English edu-
cation; her manners and tastes were all European. Her
r







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name was Aouda. She was, moreover, an orphan, and
had been married against her will to the rajah. She
had only been three months wed. Knowing the fate
that awaited her, she had attempted to escape, but was
immediately retaken; and the rajah's relatives, who
were desirous, from motives of interest, for her death,
had devoted her to the suttee, which now appeared
inevitable.
These particulars only served to confirm Mr. Fogg
and his companions in their generous resolve. It
was then decided that the guide should take them as
near to the pagoda as possible without attracting
attention.
In about half an hour the elephant was halted in the
brushwood about five hundred yards from the temple,
which was not visible; but the shouts of the fanatics
were distinctly audible.
The best manner of releasing the intended victim
was then discussed. The guide was acquainted with the
pagoda in which he declared the young woman was
imprisoned. Was it possible to enter by one of the
doors, when all the band of priests, etc., were wrapped in
a drunken sleep ? or, should they enter through a hole in
the wall? This could only be decided when they
reached the pagoda. But one thing was very certain,
and that was that the deed must be done at night, and
not at daybreak, when the victim was being led to
the sacrifice. Then human aid would be powerless to
save her.
So the party waited till night. At about six o'clock







IN EIGHTY DA YS.


in the evening it would be dark, and then they would
make a reconnaissance. The last cries of the fakirs
would by that time be hushed. The Hindoos would by
that time, according to custom, be wrapped in the
intoxicating arms of bang "-liquid opium mixed with
hemp; and it would be possible to glide past them into
the temple.
The whole party, guided by the Parsee, then ad-
vanced stealthily through the forest. After ten minutes'
creeping beneath the branches of the trees, they reached
a rivulet, whence, by the glare of the torches, they were
enabled to distinguish the funeral pyre,, composed of the
fragrant sandal-wood, and already saturated with perfumed
oil. Upon this pile lay the dead body of the deceased
prince, which was to be burned with his widow. A
hundred paces from the pyre was the pagoda, the
minarets of which uprose beyond the tops of the sur-
rounding trees.
Come on," whispered the guide.
With increasing caution the Parsee, followed by his
companions, glided silently amongst the tall grasses.
The murmur of the breeze through the trees was the
only sound that broke the silence.
The Parsee soon halted on the border of the clearing.
-Some torches lit up the space. The ground was covered
with groups of tipsy sleepers, and bore a great resem-
blance to a battle-field strewn with dead bodies. Men,
women, and children lay all together. Some drunken
individuals still staggered about here and there. In the
background the temple loomed amid the thick trees.
F 2







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But greatly to the disappointment of the guide, armed
rajpoots kept watch by torchlight upon the doors, in front
of which they paced up and down with naked swords.
No doubt the priests within were equally vigilant.
The Parsee advanced no farther. He perceived at
once that it was impossible to force an entrance to the
temple, and he led his companions back again. Sir
Francis and Mr. Fogg also understood that no more
could be done in that direction. They stopped and
consulted together in undertones.
"Let us wait a little," whispered the brigadier. "It
is only eight o'clock. Those sentries may go to sleep
later."
"That is possible, certainly," said the Parsee.
So they all lay down under the trees and waited.
The time passed very slowly. At intervals the guide
would go forward and reconnoitre. But the guards
were always there; the torches burned brightly still, and
an uncertain glimmer penetrated through the windows of
the temple from the inside.
They waited until nearly midnight. There was no
change in the situation. The sentries were sleepless,
and it became evident that they intended to keep watch
all night. They were probably quite sober. It now
became necessary to try another plan and to cut through
the walls of the pagoda. There was then the chance of
finding the priests awake inside, watching their intended
victim as closely as the soldiers guarded the door.
After a final consultation, the guide expressed him-
self ready to proceed. Mr. Fogg, Sir Francis, and







IN EIGHTY DAYS.


Passe-partout followed. They made a long detour with
the intention of approaching the pagoda from behind.
About half-past twelve they gained the walls without
having encountered anyone. Evidently no watch was
kept at the side, but it was equally evident that there
was neither window nor door at the back.
The night was dark. The moon, then in her last
quarter, appeared scarcely above the horizon, and was
covered frequently by thick clouds. The trees also
served to render the darkness more profound. It was
enough to have reached the wall, an opening must be
discovered or made. To accomplish this, Mr. Fogg and
his companions had nothing but their pocket-knives.
Fortunately, the temple walls were only composed of
bricks and wood, which would not be very hard to cut
through. Once the first brick had been taken out, the
rest was easy.
They set about the work immediately, and as noise-
lessly as possible. The Parsee and Passe-partout worked
away to loosen the bricks in a space about two feet wide.
The labour was continued, and they were getting on
capitally, when a cry was heard from the interior of the
temple, and was immediately succeeded by others from
the outside. Passe-partout and the guide ceased work-
ing. Had they been heard, and had the alarm been
given ? Common prudence necessitated a retreat, which
was effected in company with Sir Francis Cromarty and
Phileas Fogg. They ensconced themselves again beneath
the trees to wait until the alarm, if it were an alarm, had
subsided, and ready in that event to resume their opera-







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tions. But, alas the guards now completely surrounded
the pagoda and prevented all approach. It would be
difficult to depict the disappointment of these four men
at this unfortunate contretemps. As they were prevented
from approaching the victim, how could they hope to
save her? Sir Francis Cromarty clenched his hands,
Passe-partout was almost beside himself, and even the
guide had some difficulty in preserving his self-restraint.
The impassible Phileas Fogg alone preserved his
equanimity.
"I suppose we may as well go away now ? whispered
Sir Francis Cromarty.
"That's all we can do," the guide assented.
"Don't be in a hurry," said Mr. Fogg. It will suit
me well enough if we reach Allahabad at mid-day."
"But what do you expect to do if we remain here ?"
said Sir Francis. "It will be daylight in a couple of
hours, and--"
We may get a chance at the last moment."
The brigadier would have liked to have been able to
read the expression of Mr. Fogg's face. What was he
thinking about, this cool-headed Englishman? Would
he, at the last moment, throw himself upon the burning
pile, and snatch her from the clutches of her executioners
openly?
Such a proceeding would have been the height of
folly, and no one could for a moment imagine that
Mr. Fogg was so foolhardy as that. Nevertheless, Sir
Francis consented to wait the denouement of this terrible
scene. But the guide led the party to the edge of the







IN EIGHTY DA YS.


clearing, where, from behind a thicket, they could observe
all the proceedings. Meanwhile, Passe-partout had been
hatching a project in his busy brain, and at last the idea
came forth like a flash of lightning. His first concep-
tion of the notion he had repudiated as ridiculously
foolish, but at length he began to look upon the project
as feasible. "It is a chance," he muttered, "but perhaps
the only one with such bigoted idiots." At any rate
he wriggled himself to the end of the lowest branch of
a tree, the extremity of which almost touched the
ground.
The hours passed slowly on, and at length some
faint indications of day became visible in the sky. But
it was still quite dark in the neighbourhood of the
pagoda.
This was the time chosen for the sacrifice. The
sleeping groups arose as if the resurrection had arrived.
The tom-toms sounded. Chants and cries were once
more heard. The sublime moment had come !
Just then the doors of the pagoda were opened, and
a strong light flashed out from the interior. The victim
could be perceived being dragged by two priests to the
door. It appeared to the spectators that the unhappy
woman, having shaken off the effects of her enforced
intoxication, was endeavouring to escape from her
executioners. Sir Francis Cromarty was deeply agitated,
and seizing Mr. Fogg's hand convulsively he perceived
that the hand grasped an open knife.
The crowd now began to move about. The young
woman had been again stupefied with hemp-fumes, and







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passed between the lines of fakirs who escorted her,
uttering wild cries as they proceeded.
Phileas Fogg and his companions followed on the
outskirts of the crowd. Two minutes later they reached
the bank of the stream, and stopped about fifty paces
from the funeral pyre, upon which the corpse was
extended. In the dim religious light, they could per-
ceive the outline of the victim close beside her
deceased husband.
A lighted torch was then quickly applied to the pile
of wood, which, saturated with oil, was instantly in a blaze.
Sir Francis Cromarty and the guide had to exert all their
strength to restrain Mr. Fogg, who, in his generous
indignation, appeared about to rush upon the blazing
pile.
But just as Phileas Fogg had succeeded in throwing
them off, a change came o'er the scene. A cry of terror
rose from the natives, and they bowed themselves to the
earth in indescribable terror.
The old rajah was not dead after all; there he was
standing upright upon the fiery funeral pile, clasping his
young wife in his arms; ready to leap from amid the
smoke into the midst of the horror-stricken crowd.
The fakirs, the guards, the priests were all seized with
superstitious fear, and lay, faces to the earth, not daring
to lift their eyes to behold such a stupendous miracle.
The resuscitated man was thus practically quite close
to the place where Phileas Fogg and Sir Francis Cromarty
were standing with the guide.
"Let us be off," exclaimed the spectre."







IN EIGHTY DAYS.


It was only Passe-partout, who had, unperceived,
gained the pyre under cover of the smoke, and had
rescued the young lady from certain death. It was
Passe-partout himself who, thanks to his happy audacity,
was enabled to pass unharmed through the terrified
assemblage.
In an instant the four friends had disappeared in the
woods, and the elephant was trotting rapidly away. But
very soon the loud cries and the clamour that arose told
them that the trick had been discovered, and a bullet
whizzed by as an additional confirmation. For there
upon the blazing pile lay the rajah's corpse; and the
priests quickly understood that a rescue had been so far
successfully accomplished. They immediately dashed
into the forest, accompanied by the soldiers, who fired a
volley; but the fugitives had got away, and in a few
moments more were out of reach of arrows and bullets
both.






CHAPTER XIV.

In which Phileas Fogg descends the charming Valley of the Ganges,
without noticing its Beauties.

THE rash attempt had proved successful. An hour
later, Passe-partout was laughing at the result of his







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venturous plan. Sir Francis Cromarty had shaken hands
with him. His master had said, "Well done !" which
from him was high commendation indeed. To which
expressions of approbation, Passe-partout had replied
that all the credit of the affair belonged to his master.
His own share in it had been an absurd notion after
all; and he laughed again when he thought that he,
Passe-partout, the ex-gymnast, ex-sergeant of the fire
brigade, had actually played the part of spouse of
a beautiful young lady, the widow of an embalmed
rajah I
As for the young lady herself, she was still insensible,
and quite unconscious of all that was passing or had
lately passed. Wrapped up in a railroad-rug, she was
now reclining in one of the howdahs.
Meanwhile the elephant, guided with unerring care
by the Parsee, was progressing rapidly through the still
gloomy forest. After an hour's ride, they arrived at an
extensive plain. At seven o'clock they halted. The
young lady was still quite unconscious. The guide
poured some brandy down her throat, but she remained
insensible for some time afterwards. Sir Francis
Cromarty, who was aware that no serious evil effects
supervened from the inhalation of the fumes of hemp,
was in no way anxious about her.
But if her restoration to consciousness was not a
subject of anxiety to the brigadier, he was less assured
respecting her life in the future. He did not hesitate to
tell Mr. Fogg that if Madame Aouda remained in India,
she would sooner or later be taken by her would-be







0 IN EIGHTY DAYS.


executioners. Those fanatics were scattered everywhere
through the peninsula, and there was not a doubt that,
despite the English police, the Hindoos would claim
their victim, no matter in what presidency she might
endeavour to take refuge. And in support of his
assertion, Sir Francis instanced a similar case which had
recently taken place. His opinion, therefore, was that
she would only be in absolute safety when she quitted
India for ever.
Mr. Fogg replied that he would consider the matter,
and give his opinion later.
About ten o'clock the guide announced that they
were close to Allahabad. Then they would be able to
continue their journey by the railroad, and in about four-
and-twenty hours they would reach Calcutta. Phileas
Fogg would in that case be in time to catch the Hong
Kong steamer, which was to sail at noon on the 25th of
October. The young woman was safely bestowed in a
private waiting-room, while Passe-partout was hurriedly
despatched to purchase various necessary articles of
clothing, etc., for her use. His master supplied the funds
for the purpose.
Passe-partout hastened away, and ran through the
streets of Allahabad-the City of God-one of the most
sacred cities of India, inasmuch as it is built at the
junction of the two holy streams of the Ganges and the
Jumna, whose waters attract pilgrims from every part of
the peninsula. We are also told that the Ganges has its
source in heaven, whence, owing to the influence of
Bramah, it condescends to earth.







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While he made his purchases diligently, Passe-partout
did not forget to look about him and see something of
the city. It was at one time defended by a splendid
fort, which has since become the State prison. Commerce
and business no longer occupy their former places in
Allahabad. Vainly did the worthy European seek for
such emporiums as he would have met in Regent Street;
he could find nothing better than the shop of an old
Jew clothesman-a crusty old man he was too. From
him he purchased a tweed dress, a large cloak, and a
magnificent otter-skin pelisse which cost seventy-five
pounds. With these garments he returned in triumph to
the railway station.
Mrs. Aouda had by that time partly recovered con-
sciousness. The influence of the drug administered by
the priests was passing away by degrees, and her bright
eyes were once again resuming their soft and charming
Indian expression.
The poet-king, Ugaf Uddaul, celebrating the charms
of the Queen of Ahundnagara, thus sings :
"Her shining locks, parted in the centre of her fore-
head, set off the harmonious contours of her white and
delicate cheeks, all glowing in their freshness. Her ebon
brows have the shape and power of the bow of Kama,
the god of love; and beneath her silken lashes, her dark
eyes swim in liquid tenderness, as in the sacred lakes of
the Himalayas is reflected the celestial light. Her
glittering, even, pearl-like teeth shine between the
smiling lips as the dewdrops in the half-closed petals of
the passion-flower. Her tiny ears, with curves divine,







IN EIGHTY DAYS.


her small hands, her little feet, tender as the buds of
lotus, sparkle with the pearls of Ceylon and the dazzling
diamonds of the famed Golconda. Her rounded, supple
waist, which hand may circle round;displays the curving
outline of the hips, and swelling bosom, where youth in
all its loveliness expands its perfect treasures. Beneath
the tunic-folds the limbs seem formed within a silver
mould by the god-like hand of Vicvarcarnia, the im-
mortal sculptor."
Without exactly comparing Mrs. Aouda with the
foregoing description, it may be stated that she was a
most charming woman, in the fullest acceptation of the
term. She spoke English with fluency and purity, and
the guide had only stated the truth when he had averred
that the Parsee lady had been transformed by her
education.
The train was about to start; Mr. Fogg was paying
the Parsee guide his hire as agreed-not a farthing in
excess. This business-like arrangement rather astonished
Passe-partout, when he recalled all they owed to the
guide's devotion. In fact, the Parsee had risked his life
voluntarily by engaging in the affair at Pillaji, and if he
should be caught by the Hindoos he would very likely
be severely dealt with. There was still Kiouni, however.
What was to be done with the elephant, which had cost
so much? But Phileas Fogg had already made up
his mind on that point.
"Parsee," said he to the guide, "you have been most
useful and devoted to us. I have paid for your services,
but not for your devotion. Would your like to have the







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elephant ? If so, he is yours." The eyes of the guide
sparkled.
"Your honour is giving me a fortune!" he exclaimed.
"Take him," replied Mr. Fogg, "and then I shall still
be in your debt."
"Hurrah I" cried Passe-partout; "take him, my
friend. Kiouni is a fine animal;" and going up to the
beast, he gave him some pieces of sugar, saying, Here,
Kiouni, take this, and this."
The elephant gave vent to some grunts of satisfaction,
and then seizing Passe-partout by the waist with his
trunk, he lifted him up. Passe-partout, not in the least
afraid, continued to caress the animal, which replaced
him gently on the ground, and to the pressure of the
honest Kiouni's trunk, Passe-partout responded with a
kindly blow.
Some short time after, Phileas Fogg, Sir Francis
Cromarty, and Passerpartout were seated with Mrs. Aouda,
who occupied the best place in a comfortable compart-
ment of the train, which was speeding towards Benares.
This run of eighty miles from Allahabad was accom-
plished in two hours, and in that time the young lady
had quite recovered from the drugs she had inhaled.
Her astonishment at finding herself in the train,
dressed in European garments, and with three travellers
utterly unknown to her, may be imagined.
Her companions in the first place showed her every
attention, even to the administration of a few drops of
liqueur, and then the general told her what had happened.
He particularly dwelt upon the devotedness of Phileas







IN EIGHTY DA YS.


Fogg, who had risked his life to save hers, and upon the
termination of the adventure, of which Passe-partout was
the hero. Mr. Fogg made no remark whatever, and
Passe-partout looked very bashful, and declared it was
not worth speaking of.
Mrs. Aouda thanked her deliverers effusively by
tears at least as much as by words. Her beautiful eyes
even more than her lips expressed her gratitude. Then
her thoughts flew back to the suttee, and as she
remarked she was still on Indian territory, she shud-
dered with horror. Phileas Fogg, guessing her thoughts,
hastened to reassure her, and quietly offered to escort
her to Hong Kong, where she could remain till the
affair had blown over. This offer the lady most gratefully
accepted, for-curiously enough-a relative of hers, a
Parsee like herself, was then residing at Hong Kong, and
was one of the principal merchants of that British
settlement.
At half-past twelve the train stopped at Benares.
Brahmin legends state that this town is built upon the
site of the ancient Casi, which was at one time suspended
between heaven and earth, like Mahomet's coffin. But
in these practical days, Benares, which orientals call the
Athens of India, rests prosaically upon the ground, and
Passe-partout caught many a glimpse of brick houses
and numerous clay huts, which gave the place a desolate
appearance, without any local colour.
Sir Francis Cromarty had now reached his destina-
tion; the troops he was to command were encamped a
few miles to the north of the town. He took farewell of







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Phileas Fogg, wished him every success, and expressed a
hope that he would continue his journey in a more
profitable and less original manner. Mr. Fogg gently
pressed his companion's hand. Mrs. Aouda was more
demonstrative; she could not forget what she owed to
Sir Francis Cromarty. As for Passe-partout, he was
honoured with a hearty shake of the general's hand, and
was much impressed thereby. So they parted.
From Benares the railway traverses the valley of the
Ganges. The travellers had many glimpses of the varied
country of Behar, the hills covered with verdure, and a
succession of barley, wheat, and corn fields, jungles full
of alligators, neat villages, and thick forests. Elephants
and other animals were bathing in the sacred river, as
were also bands of Hindoos of both sexes, who, notwith-
standing the advanced season of the year, were accom-
plishing their pious ablutions. These devotees were
declared enemies of Buddhism, and were strict-Brah-
mins, believing in Vishnu, the sun god; Shiva, the
personification of nature; and Brahma, the head of
priests and rulers. But how do Brahma, Shiva, and
Vishnu regard India, now completely Anglicised, with
hundreds of steamers darting and screaming along the
holy waters of the Ganges, frightening the birds and
beasts and faithful followers of the gods dwelling along
the banks ?
The landscape passed rapidly by, and was occasion-
ally hidden by the stream. The travellers could now
discern the fort of Chunar, twenty miles south-west of
Benares; then Ghazipore and its important rose-water







IN EIGHTY DAYS.


manufactories came in sight; then they caught a glimpse
of the tomb of Lord Cornwallis, which rises on the left
bank of the river; then the fortified town of Buxar;
Patna, the great commercial city and principal opium-
market of India; Monghir, an European town, as
English as Manchester or Birmingham, with its foun-
dries, factories, and tall chimneys vomiting forth volumes
of black smoke.
Night fell, and still the train rushed on, in the midst
of the roaring and growling of wild animals, which fled
from the advancing locomotive. Nothing could of course
then be seen of those wonders of Bengal, Golconda, the
ruins of Gom, and Morschabad, Burdwan, the ancient
capital, Hooghly, Chandernagore, in French territory,
where Passe-Partout would have been'glad to see his
country's ensign.
At last, at seven o'clock in the morning, they reached
Calcutta. The steamer for Hong Kong was not to leave
till mid-day, so Phileas Fogg had still five hours to spare.
According to his journal, he was due at Calcutta on
the 25th October-twenty-three days from London; and
at Calcutta he.was as arranged. He had neither gained
nor lost so far. Unfortunately, the two days he had had
to spare he spent as we have seen while crossing the
peninsula; but we must not suppose that Phileas Fogg
regretted his actions for a moment.
i..







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CHAPTER XV.

In which the Bag of Bank-notes is lightened by some Thousands of
Pounds more.

PASSE-PARTOUT was the first to alight from the train;
Mr. Fogg followed, and helped out his fair companion.
Phileas had counted upon proceeding directly to the
steamer, so as to settle Mrs. Aouda comfortably on
board. He was unwilling to leave her so long, as she
was on such dangerous ground.
As Mr. Fogg was leaving the station a policeman
approached him, and said, "Mr. Phileas Fogg, is it
not ?"
"It is," replied Phileas.
"And this is your servant ?" continued the police-
man, indicating Passe-partout.
"Yes."
"Will you be so good as to follow me?"
Mr. Fogg did not appear in the least degree sur-
prised. The policeman was a representative of the law,
and to an Englishman the law is sacred. Passe-partout,
like a Frenchman, wanted to argue the point, but the
policeman touched him with his cane, and his master
made him a sign to obey.
"This young lady can accompany us ?" said Mr. Fogg.
"Certainly," replied the policeman.
Mr. Fogg, Mrs. Aouda, and Passe-partout were
then conducted to a "palkighari," a sort of four-wheeled




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