Farm population estimates

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Material Information

Title:
Farm population estimates
Series Title:
AMS
Physical Description:
v. : ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service. -- Economic Development Division
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Farm Population Branch
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service. -- Human Resources Branch
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, Economic Development Division.
Place of Publication:
Washington
Creation Date:
1940
Frequency:
annual
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Farmers -- Statistics -- United States   ( lcsh )
Population, Rural -- Statistics -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Issuing Body:
Issued --1950-59 by U.S. Agricultural Marketing Service; 1910-62 by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service; 1963-64 by the Economic Research Service, Farm Population Branch; 1965-72 by the Economic Research Service, Human Resources Branch.
General Note:
Issues for --1950-59 are U.S. Agricultural Marketing Service AMS 80; 1910-62--1973 are U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service. ERS 130 etc.; 1974- are Agricultural economic report no. 319, etc.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004703719
oclc - 02977293
Classification:
lcc - HB2385 .A42
System ID:
AA00009497:00003


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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
S /2 Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Washington
Released July, 1940


FARM POPULATION ESTIMATES

January 1, 1940


On January 1, 1940 there were 32,245,000 persons living on farms,

according to the estimates of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics. This

figure is close to the all-time high record of 1916 when the farm popula-

tion consisted of 32,530,000 persons. The 1940 estimate shows an increase

of 186,000 over last year, and brought the total increase for the last

10 years to 2,076,000. There has been an increase every year since 1929,

with the exception of 1936 when ieare was a decrease of approximately 80,000.

The increase in farm population during the 1930's follows a decrease

of 1,445,000 during the 1920's and a net loss of 463,000 between 1910 and

1920. By 1910 most of the farm land of the country had boon occupied, and

though there were some increases during the early years of the War of

1914-1918, there were rapid decreases after the entry of the United States

into that War, with the resulting mobilization of manpower and large

demands for workers in rapidly expanding industries which were no longer

able to secure needed new workers from Europe. The decreases during the

latter part of that decade were so large that there was a net loss for

the entire period. In the years immediately following the War, farm

population was rapidly drained off into expanding industrial and other

employment. By 1927 there was some slowing down of the migration from

frrms to cities, and after the 1929 crash there was a further reduction

in migration from farms. Whereas the net migration during the 1920's was

approximately 6,000,000 and that for the preceding decade was about the

same, the net migration from farms during the 1930's was only 2,179,000

persons.









This difference is not due primarily to an unprecedentedly
large back-to-the-land movement resulting from the depression, but
to the fact that when urban jobs were difficult to get the farm
appeared more attractive to the young men and women reaching ma-
turity in the 1930's. The Bureau's estimates show more people
moving both to and from farms between 1920 and 1930 than between
1930 and 1940. The total number of moves to farms decreased from
13,100,000 to 10,600,000, and the total number of moves away from
farms decreased even more sharply in the latter decade, dropping
from 19,400,000 to 12,800,000.

The decrease in migration away from farms is due in large
measure to the decrease in deployment opportunities for rural youth
during a period when jobs wcre scarce. The number of young people
reaching the ago when migration is normally at its height did not
decrease during the decade. Instead it increased, and the Bureau
believes that this increase will continue for several years more,
as the effects of the peak in births of 1921 to 1924 are ftlt in
a correspondingly large number of young people currently reach-
ing the age when they ordinarily start out for themselves. But
as a result of the decrease in migration, there are between 32
and 4 million more persons on farms than iwuld be there if mi-
gration had be -n at the sane rate as during the 1920's. Young
adulthood, lwich is the tine of greatest migration, was especially
affected by this reduction in migration at least 2 million of
this total are young people between 15 and 30 years of age.

Charges in farm population throughout the country were by
no means uniform. Some arcas were affected by severe droughts
which forced readjustments in farming organization and a not re-
duction in the population. Other arcas wcre affected by rapid
increases in the use of mcchanical power for some farm operations
or the dovelopncnt of improved strains of plants or animals or
improved practices with the result that less manpower was required
per unit of production. And in some areas there were important
repercussions from changed domestic and foreign demands for our
agricultural products and the attempts to adjust acreage to these
demands. On the other hand, some areas served as havens of refuge
for persons no longer required in urban industry, providing an
opportunity wherecy persons with little or no capital might assure
thenmslves at least of subsistence, or perhaps offering the oppor-
tunity of red'c.-- living costs. In same areas the number of young
people rcLc';i.-.; ral-..'ity was especially large.. but the training
which these :,'.:c ~, ;ople had received was not sufficient to enable
them to compete in an overcrowded labor narkLt. The result was
they remained near their homes where they know conditions and wore
able to secure subeistuncoo rather than venture into an unknown
distant spot where the prospects appeared very uninviting. In
some areas a dcliand fjr seasonal agricultural workers, coupled
with the belief that opportunity lay in the West or the belief that
under favorable climatic conditions one could certainly get along,










- 3 -


brought about an increase in farm population.

In general, it may be said that in the areas best adapted
to commercial farming there was enough migration away from farms
to have brought about a reduction in farm population, but in
these areas less well adapted to commercial farming there were
increases. Among the major geographic divisions, the largest
percentage increases during the last ten years were reported by
the New England and the Pacific Coast States, with the Middle
Atlantic, East South Central, South Atlantic, and East North
Central States also showing increases. The West i.orth Central
States reported a decrease and the increases in the West South
Central and the Mountain States wore very small, only of 1 per-
cent and 2- percent, respectively.

One result of these different rates of change was to in-
crease the differences in the number of people living on the farms
of the several major divisions. In 1930, the West ITorth Central
with a farm population of 5,030,000, the East South Central with
5,052,000, and the West South Central with 5,275,000, were all
bunched together. But by 1940, the number of people living on
farms in the East South Central States had increased to 5,624,000,
that of the \~.zt South Central States had increased to only
5,303,000, while that of the ;, ,;I, North Central States had de-
creased to 4,840,000. The maximum difference among those three
divisions was less than 250,000 in 1930, but in 1940 it had be-
come nearly 800,000.

An increase in farm population at the present time means
growing pressure of population on natural resources, especially
in the poorer agricultural areas. Technological changes in agri-
culture have kept pace with those in industry, and the labor re-
quirements for agricultural production have been decreased. Normal
requirements in farm production for both domestic and foreign out-
lets can now be met with approximately 1,600,000 fewer workers
on fams than in 1929 which, iwith their dependents, means about
3,500,000 fewer persons. The estimates of employment on farms
show a decrease of more than 300,000 between the beginning of 1930
and of 1940. Although the number of persons working on farns who
are not effectively employed or who work only a small portion of
the year is not known, it is probably quite large for already in
1929 nearly half of the farns produced only about 10 percent of
all the crops that were sold or traded. Unr-i-.;.oyment on farms,
which s ceroed an anomaly prior to the prscent period, has increased,
and the fact that the Census of Unemployment in 1937 reported
971,000 males living on farns who were totally unemployed or work-
ing on enmrgency projects, and an additional 576,000 wvho wore clas-
sified as only partly employed is directly a result of the reduced
migration away from farms.















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- 5 -


Differences between 1930-34 and 1935-39 reflect the differ-
ences in the level of business conditions during those two periods.
The total farm population increased by 1,632,000 persons during the
first 5 years, with the largest increase coming in 1932 when it
amounted to more than 700,000. During the second 5-year period,
how ever, the net increase was only 444,000 persons, and more
than nine-tenths of this total is accounted for by the increases
during 1938 and 1939. Conversely, the not loss by migration from
farms was about two and one-half times as large during 1935-40 as
during the preceding 5 years 1,581,000 as compared with 598,000.
During each of the 3 years 1937, 1938, and 1939, the net migration
from farms was between 200,000 and 300,000. These losses are much
loss than those reported in the 1920's; in no year between 1920
and 1930 was the not migration from farms as low as 300,000 and
in the peak year, 1922, it reached more than 1,000,000. Not only
was the not migration from farms during the 1930's loss than during
the 1920's, but the gross movement, both'that to farms and that
from farns, was also ama llr during the latter period. There was
less movement in either direction during the 5 years, 1935-39,
than during the preceding 5 years, or during 1925-29, or 1920-24.
Apparently during a period of urban prosperity, young people on
farms are more ready to take a chani0 and move, even though they
have no assurance that they will be able to get a job there. Field
studies have shown that after 1930 there was a somewhat greater
tendency on the part of prospective migrants to move only if there
was some assurance of placement at the destination, though it is
well known that there is still a large volume of migration to
destinations about which the migrants have little advance informa-
tion and at which they remain only a short time.

The largest absolute gain during the 10-year period was in
the South Atlantic States, the group consisting of the States
along the Atlantic Coast from Maryland and Delaware to Florida.
The next largest gain was in the East South Central States, in-
cluding Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, and Mississippi, where the
gain during the second 5 years was slightly greater than that dur-
ing the first 5 years. The only other division in which the gain
in 1935-39 exceeded that of 1930-34 was that including the three
Pacific Coast States, where the farm population showed net in-
creases of 69,000 in the first half and 165,000 in the second half
of the decade. In the New England, the Middle Atlantic, and the
East North Central States, the increases during the first 5-year
period were approximately 4 to 6 times as great as those during
the second 5 years. On the other hand, the three groups of States,
which include the areas most severely affected by the droughts of
1934 and 1936 the West North Central, West South Central, and
the Mountain States, report increases before 1935 and decreases
thereafter. The difference was especially marked in the West
North Central States, where the increase was 78,000 for the first
5 years, but the decrease was 268,000 for the second 5 years of
the 1930's.








-6 -


Chanioes During 1939


The increase of 186,000 in the farm population during
1939, follows an increase of 240,000 in 1938. As in each of
the 6 preceding years, more persons moved from farms to vil-
lages, towns, and cities than moved to farms during 1939. Ac-
cording to these estimates, 1,063,000 persons moved from farms
to village_:, towns, and cities, and 805,000 persons moved to
farms. The net loss by this migration was 253,000. But this
was more than offset by the excess of births over deaths. There
were 753,000 births and 309,000 deaths.

With the exception of the West South Central State., in
which the farm population remained about the same during the
year, each of the major geographic divisions reported an in-
crease. As in the preceding year, there was a net movement to
farms in both the llevi England and the Pacific Coast States. In
all of the other geographic divisions, the not movement was away
from farms. The South Atlantic States contributed 64,000 to
this not movement; the West South Central States, 63,000; the
East South Central St-.tos, 61,000; and the VYWst North Central
States, 57,000. As in previous years, there was an excess of
births over deaths in each division, with the South Atlantic
and the East South Central Division: coach adding more than
100,000 persons, a nd the WrQst South Central States contribut-
ing 85,000. These thr)e groups of States, all in the South,
contributed two-thirds of the total excess of births over deaths,
although they include clnly about one-half of the total farm popu-
lation.

The estimates for 1939 are based upon reports from 13,609
farmers in all parts of the country, supplying information for
78,544 farms.












Tables


INotp:
Bureau
for 19


,xccpt as otherwise indicated, the estimates given below are by the
of Agricultural Economics and are adjust d to Census figures. Figures
3J-1940 are subject to revision when 1940 Census data are released.


Estimates for years since 1920 are based on returns from questionnaires
mailed to farmers.


T.ahle 1. Farm Population in the United States


Year Number of persons : Year Number of persons
: on farms January : : on farms January 1


1910 : :l 32, ,-,': :,,
1911 32,11,0 :
1912 32,210, 0'JOi
1913 32, 271),"n00
1914 : 32,320,000
1915 32, ",000 :C
1916 32,530,0
1917 32, 3C, 00 :
191 : 31,770,000 :
1919 : 3J, 930, 00 :
1920 2 31,6 6, 2?:
1921 : 31,73, 000
1922 : 1, ?79,000
1923 31,13 ,000
192 30, 17, '0 :
1925 : 30, 3', 000


Estimated, U. S. .:r-eu cf thte Cnsuis
Enumefrated, [1. 3. E'Blreau ;f th. C'riEsus


1-?2C.
1927
1928.
1920

1931
9 32
1733
1'1?."

193 .
l'??

1 ',3-'
r.' Jc


30,619,000
30,170,000
30,188,000
30,220,000
30, 169,000
30, 497,000
30,971,000
31,693,000
31,770,000
2 31,800,907
31,809,000
31,729,000
31,819,000
32,059,000
32,245,000


- 7-










- 8-


Table 2. Recent Losses and Gains in the Farm
Population of the United States


During period or calendar year : Net loss of : Iet gain in
: farm population farm population


lq10 1C19i
i'' ? 1?24
1025 1929
1930 1934
1 35 1939
1910 1939

1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1.37
193-S
1939


463,9000

661,000










80, 300


1,632,000
4,L4, '00
168,000

323, 000
471,000
722, 000
77,000



31, :00
8,0 00
*0,000
240,000
1,86, 000









-9-


Table 3. Movement To and From Farms


: Persons Persons : Not movement from
: arriving at leaving : Cities, : Farms
: farms farms for towns, and :to cities,
Year : from cities, cities, : villages : towns,
:towns, and : towns, and to : and
j villages villages farms :villages


560,000
759,000
1,115,000
1,355,000
1,581,000

1,336,000
1,427,000
1,705,000
1,698,000
1,604,000

1,611,000
1,546,000
1,777,000
944,000
700,000

825,000
719,000
872,000
823,000
805,000

5,370,000
7,770,000
6,578,000
4,044,000


896,000
1,323,000
2,252,000
2,162,000
2,068,000

2,038,000
2,334,000
2,162,000
2,120,000
2,081,000

1,823,000
1,566,000
1,511,000
1,225,000
1,051,000

1,211,000
1,166,000
1,160,000
1,025,000
1,063,000

8,701,000
10,735,000
7,176,000
5,625,000


1920
1921
1922
1923
1924

1925
1926
1927
1928
1929

S 1930
1931
1932
1933
1934

1935
1936
1937
1938
1939


336,000
564,000
1,137,000
807,000
487,000

702,000
907,000
457,000
422,000
477,000


266,000


1920
1925
1930
1935


212,000
20,000

281,000
351,000

386,000
447,000
288,000
202,000
258,000


1924
1929
1934
1939


3,331,000
2,965,000
598,000
1,581,000







10 -
Table 4. Annual estimates of the farm population, births and deaths occurring
in the farm population, and number of persons moving to and from
farms for the United States and major geographic divisions,
1923 1940 /

: : Increases in farm : Decreases in farm : Gain or
: Farm : population during : population during :loss due to
Division : population : the year due to: : the year due to: :farm to farm
and : on : : Arrivals :: Departures : migra-
year : January 1 : : from city, :: for city, : tion /2
: :Births: town, or :Deaths : town, or
: : : village : : village
000's 000's 000's 000's 000's 000's


UNITED STATES:
1940
1939
1938
1937
1936
1935 /3
1934
1933
1932
1931
1930 A4
1929
1928
1927
1926
1925
1924
1923

New England:
1940
1939
1938
1937
1936
1935 /3
1934
1933
1932
1931
1930 /4
1929
1928
1927
1926
1925
1924
1923


32,245
32,059
31,819
31,729
31,809
31,801
31,770
31,693
30,971
30,497
30,169
30,220
30,188
30,170
30,619
30,830
30,817
31,130


746
729
722
709
708
712
713
698
660
631
568
583
586
589
604
610
604
608


753
747
719
716
727
749
721
746
741
742
750
757
763
782
795
801
810



14
12
11
10
10
11
10
10
11
10
10
10
10
11
11
11
11


805
823
872
719
825
700
944
1,777
1,546
1,611
1,604
1,698
1,705
1,427
1,336
1,581
1,355



40
34
37
33
29
27
32
56
61
64
45
49
55
49
41
49
41


309
305
341
349
333
344
326
328
334
344
324
303
288
324
304
301
316



9
9
9
9
8
8
S
8
8
8
8
7
7
8
7
7
7


1,063
1,025
1,160
1,166
1,211
1,051
1,225
1,511
1,566
1,823
2,081
2,120
2,162
2,334
2,038
2,068
2,162







- 11.-
r


Table 4. Annual estimates of the farm population, births and deaths occurring
in the farm population, and rnuber of persons movinrii to and from
farms for the United States and major geographic divisions,
1923 1940 /1, continued.

: : Increases in far:m : Decreases in farm :
:Farm : population during : population during : Gain or
Division : population : the year due to: : the year due to: :loss due to
and on : : Arrvals : : Departures:farm-to-farm
year : January 1 : from city, : : for city,: migra-
::Births: tomwn, or :Deaths : town, or : tion /2
: : village : : -Ulige :
000's 000's 000's 000's 000's 000's

Middle Atlantic:
1940 1,941
1939 1,922 32 72 22 74 11
1938 1,896 31 69 20 58 4
1937 1,887 26 68 22 68 5
1936 1,900 25 51 23 68 2
1935 /3 1,904 25 61 22 88 20
1034 1,893 25 64 24 58 4
1933 1,850 26 95 24 70 7
1932 1,784 27 139 23 88 1
1931 1,751 28 101 24 90 1
1930 /4 1,692 29 130 24 96 1
1929 1,714 29 112 23 140
1928 1,731 30 104 21 130
1927 1,748 30 97 20 124
1926 1,791 31 104 23 155
1925 1,807 31 102 21 128
1924 1,825 31 110 21 138
1923 1,852 32 103 22 140

East Horth Central:
1940 4,852
1939 4,818 90 127 48 151 16
1938 4,780 86 143 47 150 6
1937 4,777 82 142 50 186 15
1936 4,790 80 135 52 187 11
1935 /2 4,769 81 139 51 190 42
1934 4,750 81 112 54 150 30
1933 4,695 83 181 51 188 21
1932 4,583 85 293 52 231 3
1931 4,508 85 236 53 211 2
1930 /4 4,442 86 259 53 246 4
1929 4,429 87 261 50 285 -
1928 4,487 88 214 47 313
1927 4,477 88 275 44 309
1926 4,550 90 211 50 324
1925 4,598 92 252 47 345
1924 4,587 93 297 47 332
1923 4,621 94 264 49 343







, 12 -


Table 4. Annual estimates of the fariml'population, births and deaths occurring
in the farm population and number of persons moving to and from
farms for the United States and major geographic divisions,
1923 1940 /l, continued.

: : Increases in farm : Decreases in farm :
: Farm : population during : population during : Gain or
Division : population : the year due to: : the year due to: : loss due to
and : on : : Arrivals :: Departures:farm to farm
year : January 1 : : from city, : for city,: migra-
: :Births: town, or :Deaths : town, or : tion /2
S: : village : : village :
COO's 000's O00's 000's 000's 000's

West North Central:
1940 4,840
1939 4,323 94 94 36 151 16
193.3 4,:??7 6 110 36 178 4
1937 4,940 9C 96 45 231 -31
1936 5,041 102 90 49 217 -27
1935 /! 5,108 104 108 45 212 -22
1934 5,162 111 90 49 204 2
1933 5,149 109 125 46 175 2
1932 ,069 112 306 46 291 4
1931 ?5,05 114 300 46 298 7
1930 /4 ,030 116 283 47 375 -10
1929 034 117 294 44 371
1928 5,019 118 311 41 373
1927 5,055 119 301 39 417
1926 5,098 122 249 44 370
1925 5,134 124 242 41 361
1924 5,133 125 278 41 361
1923 5,163 127 238 43 352 -

South Atlantic:
1940 6,432
1939 6,4'.5 177 106 64 170 -32
1938 6,376 173 117 64 168 -19
1937 6,314 168 128 72 151 -11
1936 6,275 164 93 75 174 26
1935 /3 6,2)4 164 139 72 162 2
194 ? 6,14C It 109 73 151 20
1933 6,131 157 133 66 207 8
1932 6,038 164 178 68 180 9
1931 5,947 159 170 70 196 0
1930 /4 5,864 160 172 72 207 0
1929 5,900 162 185 68 315 -
1923 5,910 163 198 63 308
1927 5,80 165 215 60 290
1926 6,013 168 155 68 388
1925 6,136 171 170 63 401
1924 6,125 173 219 63 318
1923 6,242 174 185 66 410











Table 4. Annual estimates of the farm population, births and deaths occurring
in the farm population, and number of persons moving to and from
farms for the United States and major geographic divisions,
1923 1940 /1, continued.

: : Increases in farm : Decreases in farm :
: Farm : population during : population during : Gain or
Division :population : the year due to: : the year due to: :loss due to
and on :: Arrivals : :Departures :farm to farm
year : January 1 : from city, : : for city, : migra-
: :Births: tovn, or :Deaths : town, or : tion /2
: : village : : village :
000's 000's 000's 000's 000's 000s

East South Central:
1940 5,624
1939 5,588 162 97 55 158 -10
1938 5,505 159 113 54 121 -14
1937 5,430 152 108 60 134 9
1936 5,377 152 94 59 129 5
1935 /3 5,335 153 109 57 161 2
1934 5,322 154 75 57 142 -12
1933 5,357 147 105 54 193 -17
1932 5,230 153 191 54 159 0
1931 5,136 146 153 55 151 0
1930 /4 5,052 146 169 59 177 0
1929 5,027 148 160 55 228 -
1928 4,992 149 195 52 257
1927 4,979 150 194 50 281
1926 5,057 154 120 55 297
1925 5,089 157 100 52 237
1924 5,088 158 153 52 258
1923 5,135 159 118 54 270

West South Central:
1940 5,303
1939 5,305 133 141 48 204 -24
1938 5,291 139 126 47 197 7
1937 5,282 135 146 56 212 4
1936 5,344 135 112 56 222 -31
1935 /3 5,388 141 138 51 221 -51
1934 5,415 149 131 53 199 -46
1933 5,464 142 157 52 235 -36
1932 5,299 147 308 52 233 2
1931 5,249 150 305 53 346 6
1930 /4 5,275 147 264 55 378 6
1929 5,290 149 281 52 393 --
1928 5,243 150 300 48 355
1927 5,245 151 278 46 385
1926 5,343 155 261 52 462
1925 5,302 158 217 49 285
1924 5,305 159 235 48 349 --
1923 5,338 160 209 51 351







= 14 =


Table 4. Annual estimates of the farm population, births and deaths occurring
in the farm population, and number of persons moving to and from
farms for the United States and major geographic divisions,
1923 1940 /1, continued.

: : Increases in farm : Decreases in farm :
: Frm : population during : population during : Gain or
Division :population : the year due to: : the year due to: : loss due to
and on : : Arrivals ::Departures :farm to farm
year : January 1 : from city, : : for city, : migra-
: :Biiths: town, or :Deaths : town, or : tion /2
:: : village : village :
000's 000's 000's 000's 000's 000's

Mountain:
1940 1,149
1939 1,141 27 57 11 73 8
1938 1,131 29 47 12 60 6
1937 1,143 27 48 12 75 0
1936 1,164 28 42 12 79 0
1935 /3 1,188 30 42 13 81 2
1934 1,207 30 43 13 72 7
1933 1,202 29 47 12 69 8
1932 1,183 29 121 12 131 10
1931 1,140 30 97 12 86 9
1930 /4 1,122 31 113 13 123 3
1929 1,130 32 130 12 158 -
1928 1,112 32 164 12 166
1927 1,109 32 143 11 161
1926 1,100 33 137 12 149
1925 1,108 33 106 12 135
1924 1,109 33 134 11 157
1923 1,124 34 107 12 144

Pacific:
1940 1,358
1939 1,318 24 71 16 54 15
1938 1,291 22 64 16 63 20
1937 1,247 20 99 15 77 17
1936 1,210 20 64 14 56 23
1935 /3 1,193 19 60 14 60 12
1934 1,168 19 49 13 43 13
1933 1,147 18 64 13 62 12
1932 1,125 19 185 13 165 8
1931 1,130 18 123 13 141 1
1930 /4 1,124 17 157 13 171 8
1929 1,113 16 136 12 129 -
1928 1,108 17 163 12 163
1927 1,088 18 147 11 134
S1926 1,063 18 141 12 122
1925 1,046 18 106 12 95
1924 1,041 18 106 11 108
1923 1,047 19 90 12 103








15 =
A Preliminary figures, subject to correction when Census data become
available. The farm population at the beginning of one year is
equal to the farm population at the beginning of the previous year
plus the births and arrivals at farms, minus deaths and departures
from farms, plus or minus the gain or loss due to farm to farm migra-
tion. For the years 1930 to 1934, inclusive, certain allowances
are included, though not shown in the table. These allowances are
due to (a) changes to or from farming without change in residence
and (b) changes in interpretation of Census instructions. It is
not possible to separate the effects of these two factors.

/2 Persons who move from farms in one geographic division to farms
in another division, For the United States total these must bal-
ance. The figures on farm to farm movement were not tabulated
separately before 1930.

/3 Farm Population January 1, as enumerated by United States Bureau of
the Census.

/4 Farm Population January 1, as estimated on the basis of Census
enumeration of April 1, 1930.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
I I lll3 1262 08li9
3 1262 08589 8046




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