Farm population estimates

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Material Information

Title:
Farm population estimates
Series Title:
AMS
Physical Description:
v. : ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service. -- Economic Development Division
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Farm Population Branch
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service. -- Human Resources Branch
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, Economic Development Division.
Place of Publication:
Washington
Creation Date:
1937
Frequency:
annual
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Farmers -- Statistics -- United States   ( lcsh )
Population, Rural -- Statistics -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Issuing Body:
Issued --1950-59 by U.S. Agricultural Marketing Service; 1910-62 by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service; 1963-64 by the Economic Research Service, Farm Population Branch; 1965-72 by the Economic Research Service, Human Resources Branch.
General Note:
Issues for --1950-59 are U.S. Agricultural Marketing Service AMS 80; 1910-62--1973 are U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service. ERS 130 etc.; 1974- are Agricultural economic report no. 319, etc.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004703719
oclc - 02977293
Classification:
lcc - HB2385 .A42
System ID:
AA00009497:00001


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0 Released June 24, 1937.





UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Washington


FARM POPULATION ESTIMATES
January 1, 1937


About 80,000 fewer persons lived on farms at the beginning of

1937 than a year earlier. According to estimates of the Bureau of

Agricultural Economics, the farm population was 31,729,000 on Jan-

uary 1 this year compared with 31,809,000 a year earlier and 31,501,000

in 1935. The net loss of 80,000 persons is the first net loss reported
I'
since 192N. During 1935, farm population gained by ,,000 persons.

It is estimated that during the past calendar year, 716,000

babies were born to farm women and that 349,000 farm residents died.

Therefore, if there had been no migration from or to farms during 1936,

the farm population would have been increased by 367,000 persons. But

some farm people moved to towns and cities and some townspeople moved

to farms: 1,166,000 persons moved from farms to villages, towns and

cities, and 719,000 persons moved to farms from villages, towns and

cities. That is, 447,000 more persons left farms than came to farms.

The number of babies born to farm women was not enough to make up for

all the losses through migration and through death.

These estimates, based upon reports for 63,000 farms in all

parts of the country, were furnished by 12,000 farmers.





-2-


Decrease in Farm Population During 1936

The decrease in farm population during 1936 followed a small
increase in 1935. The largest difference between the figure for 1935
and 1936 is in the number of persons who moved to farms from villages,
towns and cities. The number moving to farms last year decreased by
more than 100,000 over 1935. The number moving from farms during 1936
was about the same as during 1935, resulting in a larger net movement
from farms to villages, towns and cities during 1936 than there had
been during 1955. Births showed a slight decline -rd deaths a slight
increase, in common with the trends for the entire country. During
both 1935 and 1936 there was an appreciable excess of births over
deaths; the net migration away from farms, however, accounted for a
loss of 80,000 persons during 1936. During 1935, there had been a
gain of 8,000 persons.

Reversal of 1930-35 trend

With a decrease in farm population there is a reversal of the
trend observed during the years 1930-35, when farm population in-
creased every yenr. Since 1910 there have been several periods when
the farm population reported decreases. From 1910 to 191S there was
a decrease which became pronounced during the World War. Following
the war, farm population increased until 1921. Farm population de-
creased between 1922 and 1929, and at the beginning of 1930 there
were fewer people on farms than there had be-en at any time since the
World War. From 1930 to 1936 farm population increased somewhat.
During the past four years the number of people on farms has remained
nearly constant, changing by less than 100,000 each year.

The result of all the changes of the last 27 years is that the
farm population today is about 1 percent less than it was in 1910.
Thus, although the number of people in th3 United States has increased
by nearly 40 percent since 1910, the nunbjr of people living on farms
today is slightly less than it was in 1910.

Farm population decreased during 1936 because more people moved
from farms than moved to farms, and this difference was greater than
the number added to the farm population through the excess of births
over deaths. Since 1920, more people have moved from farms than to
farms during every year except 1932. The increases in farm population
between 1930 and 1935 were due more to the fact that fewer people were
moving to towns ani cities than to any "back-to-the-land movement."
With the resumption of urban employment opportunities in recent years,
there has been an increase in net migration from farms. The number
of people who left farms was nearly half a million greater than the
number of people who moved to farms. But this number is still less
than the average before 1930. During the period of urban prosperity,
1925-29, farms were annually sending out nearly 600,000 more persons
than they were receiving from villages, towns and cities, and during






-3-


the years 1920 to 1924 the average was even greater. Once, in 1922,
the loss by migration to towns and cities was mere than one. million,
and during 1926 it exceeded 00,000. Thus, the net migration from
farms t: towns and cities during 1936 was only about half as large
as during 1926.

Farm population changes not unusual

Among farm people, as among Americans generally, there is a
great deal of movement avery year. The Census of 1935 showed that
one out of every six farmers moves each year, although nearly half
of all farm owners had been on their farms for 15 years or more.
Every year many farmers move from one farm to another and many farm
people move to villages, tov-ns and cities. Some of these are young
men and women looking for their first.jobs, some are people who re-
cently came from towns and cities to try their luck at farming,
others are older people who are giving up farming for some other
occupation or are retiring, and still others live on farms only dur-
ing the summers, spending the winters in town. At the same time
people are moving to farms from towns and cities, some are returning
to the parental home after an unsuccessful search for jobs or un-
satisfactory employment, others are returning to take up farming;
some are returning temporarily or alternating farm work with other
employment and every year some persons move from towns anf cities to
start farming.

As a result of this ebb and flow of farr population the number
of people living on farms changes from year to year. Every State re-
ports some movement in both directions; even in the drought area last
year, some people moved to farms from towns and cities, although the
number leaving farms was greater.

Many of the persons who move to farms are the same persons who
moved from farms earlier in the year or during a previous year. Usu-
ally, when many people are leaving farms there is also a large number
moving to farms. During 1936, for every 100 persons who left farms
62 moved to farms; and during 1935 for every 100 persons who left
farms 6S.moved to farms. During the depression years, 1930-34, for
every 100 persons who left farms there were 92 who moved to fnrms.

Pronounced changes in some regions

Although the net change in farm population for the United
States as a whole was slight in 1936, pronounced changes took place
in some of the major geographic divisions. In the West North Cen-
tral and West South Central States, where the drought of 1936 was
particularly severe, the decreases reported during 1934 and 1935
were continued during 1936. As a result of its losses, the West
North Central division at the first of this year had fewer people on









farms than in 1930. In the other geographic divisions the number of
people on farms was greater than it was in 1930, but in the West
South Central and Mountain States the differences were small. If
there are further decreases during 1937, farm population in the latter
regions will drop below the 1930 level. A number of States in these
regions -lready have fewer people on farms than they had in 1930. Dur-
ing 1936 there were decreases in the Mountain States, although the
fact that the western portion, including Idaho and Arizona, was receiv-
ing migrants from the drought States to the east, kept the losses of
the entire region at a relatively small figure. The Middle Atlantic
States, including New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, also reported
a decrease in farm population, as did the industrialized States of the
East North Central group. In both cases the losses were due largely
to migration from farms to towns and cities. In the South Atlantic
and East South Central States, farm population increased, primarily
because there were many more births than deaths in these States.

The movement from farms to villages, tons and cities was great-
er than the movement to farms from villages, towns and cities. Only
the Pacific Coast States and Florida are exceptions. These exceptions
are probably the result of movement of persons from towns and cities
in other States to farns in these States, which were receiving mi-
grants from the drought areas. Although the movement from farms to
towns and cities was approximately the same in 1936 as it had been
during 1935, the movement to farms during 1936 Vas somewhat less.
This was particularly true in the West North Central States where
217,000 persons left farms and only 90,000 persons moved to farms, and
in the West South Central States where 222,000 persons moved from farms
to towns and cities and only 112,000 persons moved to farms from towns
and cities. Likewise, in the South Atlantic States 174,000 persons
moved from farms to towns and cities nnd only 98,000 persons moved to
farms from towns and cities.

The movement of persons from farms in one State to farms in
some other State accounts for a part of the population changes last
year. In proportion to their farm population, the Pacific States
gained most through this movement from farm to farm. It is estimated
that farms in the Pacific States received a net gain of 23,000 persons
from farms in other areas. Twenty-seven thousand persons moved from
farms in the West North Central States to farms in other areas, while
in the West South Centrnl States 31,000 persons left to go to farms
in other areas. The South Atlantic division reports a large gain as
a result of the farm-to-farm movement; in the other geographic divi-
sions the gains or losses through this movement were small.

Droughts ma.ior factors in population movement

The outstanding event of 1936 for the farm population was the
drought. The West North Central and West South Central divisions,
which include most of the area that was severely affected, lost farm




-5-


population. In the West North Central States, according to these
estimates, farm population declined by 101,000 persons and in the
West South Central States the decrease was 62,000 persons. The
Mountain division withthe eastern -,art suffering from drought and
the western part receiving migrants from the drought area, reported
a decrease of 21,000. Farm population in the Pacific Coast States
increased by 37,000 persons, largjly as a result of migrations from
the drought area. Increase.; in the South Atlantic and East South
Central divisions are less clearly trace..ble to migrations from the
drought area, but undoubtedly the effects wore felt there also.

These esti;Lantes may seen small in view of the general irmpres-
sion of persons flocking from the drought areas to the more humid
slopes of the West Coast. The figures given represent only the move-
ment to and froii: farms and are not intended to show the total move-
ment from the dro.ight States to other areas. Moreover, a few people
left farns in Pacific Coast States to return tc their former resi-
dence or to go elsewhere; this movement has been taken into account.
Many farm people who novele to the West Const d' not settle on farms
when they first arrive, some, of then move to to'.ns or cities a:-',
therefore, are not included in the fi,'res for the Pacific States.
Others b?co-e agricultural laborers and live in tourist camps, labor
camps, villages and other places not on farms.

Since the Bureau's figures deal only with people who move to
or from farms, they do not include the persons who mov.d from towns
and cities in the drought areas to towns 'an' cities elsewhere. More-
over, they io not indicate how many of the persons who left drought
area fsrms for towns ani cities went to some- nearby Ilace and how
many went to towns and citiAs in other States. The schedules, how-
ever, do indicate som-thing of the extent to -hich a catastrophe
like the droughts of recent years affects the movements of farm peo-
ple and affects other areas than those where rainfall is deficient.

Farms provide large share of population growth

The decline in th- farm population during 1936 was due to mi-
gration from farms. Had there been no movement from or to farms,
there would have been an increase of 367,000 persons during 1936,
for the births exceeded the deaths by that number.

If all persons who are born anm reared on farms remained on
farms, the farm population would. row nmch more rapidly than the
other parts of the total population of the United States. Farm fam-
ilies are usually larger than city families, and although only one-
fourth of the total population lives on farms, nearly one-third of
the babies each year are born to farm women. Seven hundred thousand
young people on farms reach maturity each year. For every .an engaged
in agriculture who dies or reaches retirement age there are two young
men on farms reaching maturity and ready to start for themselves.







-5-


Under existing conditions all f them :-1 net find places in agricul-
ture an. some of them =ve an.ny frcz far.s.

Uore and more, the rsited States, like a nuiter of other coun-
tries, is lc:kin' to the f-_rns to furnish the -hiliren who will be-
coe= the next generation of adults. So long as there is virtually no
i="-iTgrti- any po:r.rlation rouwth must came from within the country
a-n firms probably will, fcr some time, continue to provide more than
their share of this rrowth. If that is the case, it means that there
probably. will e a ccnti'Led movementt from farms to tcwns and cities;
a v~~C7ent of yo"-g people whs have been reared and educated on farms
t: in uastrial and urban e-l"oyment. It, therefore, bec:-_es a matter
of iportan-ce to -w f ro- which localities n-i rants come and where
they go, who t-hey are, rwhy they =roe, what they do at their destin-
ation, Shw many ret-irn, why they ret-rr., and what happens to the areas
which they leave as well as those t-o sIhich they go.


--""F- -""I






Tables

Note: The estimates given below are based upon the returns from questionnaires
mailed to farmers and are adjusted to Census figures. Because of difficulties
in beginning the series, the figures for the years 1920-1923 are considered less
reliable than those for later years. THESE TABLES SUPERSEDE ALL PREVIOUS
PUBLICATIONS OF THESE ESTIMATES.

Table 1. Farm Population in the United States


: umber of parsons : NuJmbdr of p-rsons
Year : on farms January 1 : Yeir on farms January 1

1910 : /1 32,076,960 1929 30,220,000 -C'
1920 : j 31,614,269 1*': 1930 /3 30,169,000
1921 : 31,765,000 1: 1931 : 30,497,000
1922 : 31,749,000 -(lq: 1932 : 30,971,000
1923 : 31,130,000-31': 1933 : 31,693,000
1924 : 30,917,000 I-': 1934 : 31,770,000
1925 : 30,830,000-I1 1': 1935 : 31,800,907
1926 : 30,619,000- .4-: 1936 : 31,309,000
1927 : 30,170,000 i9 V: 1937 : 31,729,000
1928 : 30,138,000 3L':


/1 Estimated, U. 3. Bureau of the Census
T2 Enumerated, U. S. Bureau of the Census
/3 Estimated, based on Census enumeration of April 1, 1930


Table 2. Recant Loasos and Gains in the F-rm
Population of the United Status


: Net loss of : Net gin in
During period or calendar yep-ar et los o N i
: farm population : farm population


1910 1919
1920 1924
1925 1929
1930 1934
i910 1934

1950
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936


463,000
784,000
661,000

276,000







80,000


1,632,000
r------

328,000
474,000
722,000
77,000
31,000
8,000







-8-


Table 3. Movement To and From Farms


: Persons : Persons : Net movement from
: arriving at : leaving : Cities, Farms
Year farms : farms for : towns, and : to cities,


1920
1921
1"22
1923
1924

1925
1926
1927
1928
1929

1930
1931
1932
1933
1934

1935
1936

1920 1924
1925 1929
1930 1934


from cities,
towns, and
villages

530,000
759,000
1,115,000
1,355,000
1,581,000

1,336,000
1,427,000
1,705,000
1,638,000
1,604,000

1,611,000
1,5-16,000
1,777,000
944,000
700,000

825,000
719,000

5,370,000
7,770,000
6,578,000


: cities, : v
:towns, and:
Villages :

: 896,000:
: 1,323,900;
2,252,000:
: 2,162,000:
: 2,068,000:

: 2,038,000:
: 2,334,000:
: 2,162,000:
: 2,120,000:
: 2,081,000:

: 1,823,000:
: 1,566,000:
S1,511,000: 2
S1,225,000:
: 1,051,000:


villages : towns,
to : and
farms : villages

S 336,000
: 564,000
: 1,137,000
S 807,000
: 487,000


66,000


1,211,000:
1,166,000:

8,701,000:
10,735,000:
7,176,000:


702,000
907,000
457,000
422,000
477,000

212,000
20,000

281,000
351,000

386,000
447,000

3,331,000
2,965,000
598,000









Table 4. Annual estimates of the farm population, births and deaths occurring
in the farm population, and number of persons moving to and from
farms for the United States and major geographic divisions,
1920 1937 /1


: :Increases in farm : Dcrease2 in farm : Gain or
: Farm :population during : population during :loss due
Division :population: the ynar due to: : th y-ar due to: : to farm
and : on : Arriv-ls: :Departures: to farm
year :January 1 : Births :from city,: Deaths : for city,: migra-
: : town, or : : town, or : tion /2
: : villqe : : village :
00i' s 000' s 000's 000'j s 000's 000's

UNITED STATES:
1937 31,729
1936 31,809 716 719 349 1,166 --
1935 .'3 31,801 727 825 333 1,211
1934 31,770 749 700 344 1,05. --
1933 31,693 721 944 326 1,225
1932 30,971 746 1,7,7 32.3 1,511
1931 30,497 741 1,546 334 1,566
1930 "4 30,169 742 1,611 344 1,823 --
1929 30,220 750 1,604 324 2,081 --
1928 30,188 757 1,693 303 2,120
1927 30,170 ?63 1,705 28 2,162 --
1926 30,619 782 1,427 324 2,354 --
1925 30,830 795 1,336 304 2,038
1924 30,817 801 1,581 301 2 ,068
1923 31,130 810 1,355 816 2,162
1922 51,749 826 1,115 309 2,252
1921 31,763 354 759 304 1,323 --
1920 /3 31,614 825 560 340 896--

New England:
1937 709
1936 708 10 33 9 34 1
1935 /3 712 10 29 9 36 1
1934 713 11 27 8 32 --
1933 698 10 32 8 26 -1
1932 660 10 56 8 33 4
1931 631 11 61 4 --
1930 /4 568 10 64 9 50
1929 583 10 45 8 62
1928 586 10 49 7 55 --
1927 589 10 55 7 61
1926 604 11 49 8 67 --
1925 610 11 41 51 --
1924 604 11 49 7 47
1923 608 11 41 7 9 --
1922 623 11 33 7 52
1921 629 12 31 4 --
1920 /3 626 11 4 8 4




-10-

Table 4. Annual estimates of the farm population, births and deaths ocourring
in the farm population, and number of persons moving to and-from
farms for the United States and major geographic divisions,
1920 1937 /i, continued.



: : Increases in farm :Decreases in farm : Gain or
Farm : population during :population during : loss due
Division :population: the year due to; : the year due to: : to farm
ard : on : : Arrivals: :Departures: to farm
year :January 1 : Births :from city,: Deaths : for city,: migra-
: town,or : : town,or : tion
: : : village : village : /2
000's 000's 000's QOs 00's 000's 000

Middle Atlantic:
1937 1,887
1936 1,900 25 51 23 68 2
1935 /3 1,904 25 61 22 88 20
1934 1,893 25 64 24 58 4
1933 1,850 26 95 24 70 7
1932 1,784 27 139 23 88 1
1931 1,751 28 101 24 90 1
1930 / 1,692 29 130 24 96 1
1929 1,714 29 112 23 140
1928 1,731 30 104 21 130 -
1927 1,748 30 97 20 124
1926 1,791 31 104 23 155
1925 1,807 31 102 21 12 -
1924 1,825 31 110 21 138
1923 1,852 32 103 22 140
1922 1,891 33 96 21 147
1921 1,912 33 36 21 69
1920 /3 1,893 32 45 24 34

East North Central:
1937 4,777
1936 4,790 80 135 52 187 11
1935 /3 4,769 81 139 51 190 42
1934 4,750 81 112 54 150 30
1933 4,695 83 181 51 188 21
1932 4,583 85 293 52 231 3
1931 4,508 85 236 53 211 2
1930 /4 4,442 86 259 53 246 4
1929 4,429 87 261 50 285
1928 4,487 88 214 47 313 -
1927 4,477 88 275 44 309
1926 4,550 90 211 50 324
1925 4,598 92 252 47 345
1924 4,587 93 297 47 332
1923 4,621 94 264 49 343
1922 4,698 96 229 47 355
1921 4,826 99 104 47 284
1920 /3 4,914 96 96 52 228





-11-


Table -. Annual estimates of the farm population, births and deaths occurring
in tha farm population, and number of persons moving to and from
farms for the United States aind major geographic divisions,
1920 1937 ,'L continued.


: :Increases in farm : Dccreasts in firm :Gain or
: Farm :population during : population during :loss due
Division :p-pulaticn: the year die to: : the year due to: :to farm
and : on : :Arrival: :Departures:to farm
year :Jarnuary : Births : from city, Deaths :for city, : migra-
: town,or : :town,or :tion
______ : village : village : /2
OOC' C00' S 0' 3 J' 0 s 000' s 000'

West North Central:
1937 4,940
1936 5,041 102 90 49 217 -27
1935 73 5,100 104 109 45 212 -22
1934 5,162 111 90 49 204 2
1933 5,149 109 125 46 175 2
1932 5,069 112 306 46 291 4
1931 5,005 114 300 40 293 ?
1930 _4 5,030 116 283 47 375 -10
1929 5,034 117 294 14 371 --
1928 5,019 118 311 41 73 --
1927 5,055 119 301 39 41 --
1926 5,098 122 249 44 370 --
1925 5,134 124 242 41 361 --
1924 5,133 125 278 41 61 --
1923 5,163 127 238 43 352
1922 5,223 129 191 42 330 --
1921 5,226 133 134 41 229 --
1920 /3 5,1 r 129 12- 47 151

South Atlantic:
1937 6,314
1936 6,275 164 98 75 174 26
1935 /3 6,204 164 139 72 162 2
1334 6,140 169 109 73 151 20
1933 6,131 157 138 66 207 8
1932 6,038 164 178 68 180 9
1931 5,947 159 170 70 196
1930 /4 5,864 160 172 72 207 --
1929 5,900 162 185 68 315
1928 5,910 163 19 6 308 --
1927 5,830 165 215 60 290 --
1926 6,013 168 155 68 38 --
1925 6,136 171 170 63 41 --
1924 6,125 173 2.1 63 318 --
1923 6,242 174 185 66 410 --
1922 6,474 178 146 65 491
1921 6,471 184 87 63 205
1920 /3 6,417 178 48 71 101





-12-


Table 4. Annual estimates of the farm population, births and deaths oocurritg
in the farm population, and number of persons moving to and from
farms for the United States and major geographic divisions,
1920 1037 /1, continued.


:Increases in farm : Decreases in farm : Gain or
: Farm : population during : population during :loss due
Division :population: the year due to: : the year due to: : to farm
and : on : Arrivals: :Departures: to farm
year :January 1 : Births :from city,: Deaths : for city,: migra-
: town,or : : town,or : tion


: _: : village :
000's 000's 000's


: village : /2
000's 000's 000's


East South Central:


193 C
1934

1932
1932
1931
1930 /:
1929
1928
1927
1926
1925
1924
1923
1922
1921
1920 /3


West South Central:


1937
195d
1335 /3
1934
1933
1932
1931
1930 A
1929
1928
1927
1920
1925
1324
1923
1922
1921
1920 /3


5,430
5,377
5,335
5,322
5,357
5,230
5,130
5,052
5,027
.1,992
'1,979
5,C30
5,089
5,0'Ct3
5,135
5,22'/
5,239
5,183


152
153
154
147
153
1-1G
14 6
148
149
150
154
157
133

1G2
168
162


94
109
75
105
191
153
169
160
195
194
120
100
1 bZ
118

.i
46


129
161
142
193
159
151
177
228
257
281
297
237
258
270
261
169
94


5,282
5,314
3,338
5,415
5.,464
5,293
5,249
5,275
5,230
5,243
5,245
5,345
5,302
5,305
5,338
5,392
5,270
5,228


-31
-51
-46
-36
2
-6
-6


112
138
131
157
308
305
264
281
300
278
261
217
235
209
188
215
131


222
221
199
235
233
346
378
393
355
385
4G2
285
349
351
356
213
198





-13-


Table 4. Annual estimates of the farm population, births and deaths occurring
in the farm population, ind number of persons moving to and from
farms for the United Stat-- and major geographic divisions,
1920 1937 /l continued.


: Increases in farm :Decreases in farm : Gain or
: Farm : population during population during : loss due
Division :population: the ye?.r due to: : the year due to: : to farm
and : on : : Arrivals : :Dopartures: to farm
year :January 1 : Births :from city,: Deaths : for city,: migra-
: :town, or :: town, or : tion
: : village : : village : /2
C0'0' 0 000' 000's 000's 000's 00's

Mountain:
1937 1,143
1936 1,164 23 42 12 79 --
1935 /3 1,188 30 42 13 81 -2
1934 1,207 30 43 13 72 -7
1933 1,202 29 47 12 69 8
1932 1,133 29 121 12 131 10
1931 1,140 30 97 12 86 9
1930 /4 1,122 31 113 13 123 3
1929 1,130 32 130 12 153 --
1928 1,112 32 164 12 166
.1927 1,109 32 143 11 161
1926 1,100 33 137 12 149
1925 1,108 33 106 12 135
1924 1,109 33 134 11 157
1923 1,124 34 107 12 144 --
1922 1,155 35 79 12 133 --
1921 1,152 36 49 12 70
1920 /3 1,168 35 26 13 64 --

Pacific:
1937 1,247
1936 1,210 20 64 14 56 23
1935 /3 1,193 19 60 11 60 12
1934 1,163 19 49 13 43 13
1933 1,147 18 64 13 62 12
1932 1,125 19 185 13 165 -8
1931 1,130 18 123 13 141 1
1930 /4 1,124 17 157 13 171 8
1929 1,113 16 136 12 129 --
1928 1,108 17 163 12 163
1927 1,088 18 147 11 134 --
1926 1,063 18 141 12 122
1925 1,046 18 106 12 95
1924 1,041 18 106 11 108 --
1923 1,047 19 90 12 103
1922 1,066 19 73 12 99
1921 1,038 20 62 12 42
.920 /3 1,014 19 40 13 22




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

-14- 3 1262 08589 7907


1 The farm population at the beginning of one year is equal to the
farm population at the beginning of the previous year plus the
births and arrivals at farms, minus deaths and departures from
farms, plus or minus the gain or loss due to farm to farm migra-
tion. For the years 1930 to 1934, inclusirc, certain allowances
are included, though not shown in the table. These allowances
are due to (a) changes to or from farming without change in resi-
dence and (b) changes ininterpretation of Census instructions.
It is not possible to separate the effects of these two factors.
Figures for. 1920 to 1929 have been revised in line with figures
for 1930 to. 1934 which were published previously.

/2 Persons who move from farms in onu geographic division to farns
in an-thcr division. For the Uni-ed States total these must bal-
ance. The fiurcs on farm to farm movement were not tabulated
separately before 1930.

3 Enumcrction, United States Bureau of the Census.

/4 Estirmtcd, based on Census enumeration of April 1, 1930.




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