National standards of apprenticeship for terrazzo workers

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Material Information

Title:
National standards of apprenticeship for terrazzo workers jointly formulated and adopted by the National Terrazzo and Mosaic Association, Inc., and Bricklayers', Masons' and Plasterers' International Union of America in accordance with standards of the Federal Committee on Apprenticeship
Physical Description:
24 p. : ; 20 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
National Terrazzo Workers Joint Apprenticeship Committee
National Terrazzo and Mosaic Association
Bricklayers, Masons, and Plasterers International Union of America
United States -- Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training
Publisher:
U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Apprenticeship
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Apprentices -- United States   ( lcsh )
Terrazzo   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004966577
oclc - 26848282
lccn - l 48000034
System ID:
AA00009248:00001


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NATIONAL TERRAZZO WORKERS JOINT
APPRENTICESHIP COMMITTEE


The National Terrazzo and
Mosaic Association, Inc.

HARRY N. CAFMEYER, President
THEODORE L. MEDFORD, Executive
Sen'etary


Bricklayers, Masons and
International Union of

HARRY C. BATES, President
R. J. GRAY


Plasterers'
America












FOREWORD

The ititricacies and high quality of work in the terrazzo trade re-
quires craftsmen with a background of training and experience in a
wide variety of tasks. When terrazzo work was first introduced in
this country in 1890, an ample supply of skilled workers could be ob-
tained from Italy where the craft originated and was developed.
Since then-and especially after the curtailment of immigration fol-
lowing World War I-there has been a gradual depletion in the ranks
of terrazzo craftsmen, due to retirement, death, and other causes.
With the growing popularity of terrazzo in the United States, the
need to expand the skilled working force greatly increased.
Although centuries old, terrazzo is recognized today as thoroughly
modern architecturally for a variety of purposes. It is being selected
by architects for floor finish, wall surfaces, bases, borders, wainscot-
ing, stair treads, plazas, bathroom decoration, and other uses. The
adaptability of terrazzo for unique, decorative design, its durability
and low maintenance cost, have made it especially popular for floor-
ing in foyers of office buildings, hotels and educational institutions;
in banks and churches; for plazas and other public places.
To provide for the craftsmen needed in the trade, and maintain
continuously an adequate skilled working force, the basic standards
of apprenticeship, set forth in the following pages, have been formu-
lated by a national employer-labor committee for the guidance of
those concerned with training. This committee is equally repre-
sentative of the National Terrazzo and Mosaic Association, and the
Bricklayers, Masons and Plasterers International Union of America.
These standards were formulated with the assistance of the Bureau
of Apprenticeship, U. S. Department of Labor. They are designed
to serve as a pattern for contractors and labor in every locality in
establishing adequate, uniform programs of apprenticeship, and in
organizing local committees to carry out the objectives of the pro-
grams. The training provisions outlined conform with practices and
procedures generally accepted in this country as the most effective


7765610-48---1






to enable apprentices to master the skills required for full-fledged
craftsmanship.
In addition to the guidance provided by these standards, con-
tractor and labor groups may take advantage of the assistance of rep-
resentatives of the Bureau of Apprenticeship and State Apprentice-
ship Agencies listed in the latter part of this pamphlet.
WILLIAM F. PATTERSON, Director,
Bureau of Apprenticeship.

































9






NATIONAL STANDARDS OF APPRENTICESHIP
FOR TERRAZZO WORKERS
In order to provide sufficient skilled mechanics for the natural in-
crease of the terrazzo trade, it is agreed to by both signatories to this
agreement that an apprentice system be established of such scope as
will meet the requirements both as to the number and the efficiency
of its workmen.
It is further agreed that in order to promote the institution and
execution of an apprentice system guaranteeing thorough training, the
following rules and regulations be adopted and made part of this
agreement, and both parties hereto bind themselves to carry them
into effect.

GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING
THE EMPLOYMENT, TRAINING AND INSTRUCTION
OF APPRENTICES
Applicants for apprenticeship must be at least 17 years of age. Each
local joint arbitration board or joint apprenticeship committee shall
have the right to determine the maximum age for apprentices. All
apprentices must be duly indentured. Applicants for apprenticeship
shall be approved by the local joint arbitration board or the local joint
apprenticeship committee of the B. M. & P. I. U. of A. and the
National Terrazzo and Mosaic Association, and be registered at the
B. M. & P. I. U. of A. headquarters.
Apprentices shall serve a term of three years at the terrazzo trade,
including school instruction, as directed by the local joint arbitration
board or local joint apprenticeship committee. The first three months
of apprenticeship term shall be recognized as a probationary period.
During this period the apprenticeship indenture may be annulled or
cancelled for cause by either party thereto. Under certain conditions
hereinafter set forth, the apprenticeship period may be reduced.
There may be two types of apprentices and the local joint arbitration
boards or local joint apprenticeship committees may utilize either or
both of these classifications in making apprentices: (i) the individual
who has had no previous experience in the terrazzo industry; (2) the
terrazzo workers' helper.






Helper apprentices shall serve for a term of two years after which,
if qualified, he shall receive his journeyman's card. His wages shall
start at the second-year rate provided hereinafter.
Veterans must be given preference for apprenticeship training by all
local joint arbitration boards or local joint apprenticeship committees.
The local joint arbitration boards or local joint apprenticeship commit-
tees may grant such other concessions to veterans in their localities
as the individual cases coming before them may warrant. All local
joint arbitration boards or local joint apprenticeship committees shall
familiarize themselves with the provisions of the G. I. "Bill of Rights"
in order that full advantage may be taken of any opportunities offered
by the Federal Government to aid in the furthering of this apprentice-
ship program.
Apprentices shall be given a thorough training in all work pertaining
to the preparing and installing of all work as is classified in Article 2
of the National Agreement between the B. M. & P. I. U. and the
National Terrazzo and Mosaic Association.
The rate of apprentice wages shall be as follows:
First year................60 percent of the mechanic's wage.
Second year............. 70 percent of the mechanic's wage.
Third year.............. 80 percent of the mechanic's wage.

Supervision of aprentices and the enforcement of a faithful per-
formance of the apprenticeship agreement by both parties hereto shall
be as follows:
(a) In States and Provinces having laws pertaining to ap-
prentices, by the laws of the State or Province.
(b) In cities having no State or Provincial laws, the regula-
tion of apprentices shall be by the joint arbitration board
or the local joint apprenticeship committee of the local
terrazo contractors and the local union.
All indentures must be executed in quadruplicate, one copy to the
apprentice, one retained by the employer, the third to be filed with
the Party of the First Part, and the fourth with the Party of the
Second Part of this agreement. *
Apprentices upon completion of their term shall be furnished
with a suitable certificate upon application for same to be issued
by the National Terrazzo and Mosaic Association and the Brick-






layers, Masons and Plasterers' International Union of America, ac-
companied with recommendations and certificates of qualifications
by the supervising boards.
Apprentices shall work with a mechanic for the first year of their
apprenticeship.
Helper apprentices shall work with a mechanic for the first six
months of their apprenticeship.
There shall be two methods under which apprentices may be
indentured:
(a) Any employer, subject to the approval of the local joint
arbitration board or the local joint apprenticeship com-
mittee, may indenture an apprentice and assume the
full responsibility of continuous employment and com-
plete training of this boy for the period of his ap-
"prenticeship.
(b) Apprentices may be indentured to the local joint arbitration
board or the local joint apprenticeship committee and such inden-
tures shall be known as the rotation system. The board assumes
full responsibility for the employment and training of such ap-
prentices. All rules governing the training of these men shall be
promulgated by the local joint arbitration board or the local joint
apprenticeship committee. It is agreed that apprentices may be
transferred from one contractor to another, and from operation to
operation in the shops of the terrazzo contractors who agree to
participate in the rotation plan and who have not personally in-
dentured an apprentice, and shall be, and remain, under the super-
vision and at the direction of the local union through the officials
selected for this duty. The employment of such apprentices shall
be provided for to the average of the employment for the journey-
man terrazzo worker within that jurisdiction.
In all cities that have a separate terrazzo workers' local union, the
local joint arbitration board or the local joint apprenticeship com-
mittee shall not indenture more than 5% in numbers of the number of
members in the local terrazzo workers' organization, and not more
than 5% each year thereafter: however, in localities in which there are
mixed local unions and the local joint arbitration board or the local
joint apprenticeship committee desire to use the rotating system, they
shall not indenture more than one apprentice to every two terrazzo






firms in the area participating in the rotation plan. However, there
is nothing to stop other terrazzo contractors in the area who, if they
so desire and who employ on the average of two or more journeymen
throughout the year may employ one apprentice, and when an average
of five mechanics is employed throughout the year by any one em-
ployer he may be entitled to two aprentices and assume full responsi-
bility for his employment and training heretofore mentioned, and these
firms shall not be counted for the purpose of determining the number
of apprentices that can be trained under the rotation.plan in that area.
Any employer having agreed to and participated in the rotation plan
shall not be eligible to indenture an individual apprentice until such
time as those apprentices indentured while such contractor was a
party to the rotation plan shall have finished the term of their
apprenticeship.
In the event there may be exceptional or extenuating circumstances
in any locality, the local joint arbitration board or the local joint
apprenticeship committee may appeal to the B. M. & P. I. U. of A. and
the National Terrazzo and Mosaic Association for permission to in-
crease the number of .apprentices over and above the maximums
established herein.
In the event there is a deadlock in the local joint arbitration board or
the local joint apprenticeship committee over any problems affecting
apprentices or the apprenticeship program, it must be referred to the
executive officers of the B. M. & P. I. U. of A. and the National
Terrazzo and Mosaic Association for settlement. Such settlement by
the executive officers of these two organizations shall be binding and
final on the local joint arbitration board or the local joint apprentice-
ship committee.


APPROVED BY: THE NATIONAL TERRAZZO WORKERS JOINT
APPRENTICESHIP COMMITTEE
NATIONAL TERRAZZO AND BRICKLAYERS, MASONS AND PLAS-
MOSAIc ASSOCIATION, INC. TERERS' INTERNATIONAL UNION
HARRY N. CAFMEYER, OF AMERICA,
President HARRY C. BATES, President
THEODORE L. MEDFORD, R. J. GRAY
Executive Secretary













REGISTRATION OF APPRENTICESHIP STANDARDS
AND AGREEMENTS
State apprenticeship councils and the Federal Committee on Ap-
prenticeship, the national policy-making body on apprentice train-
ing, provide for the registration of apprenticeship standards and in-
dividual apprenticeship agreements. Local joint apprenticeship com-
mittees should formally register apprenticeship standards and ap-
prenticeship agreements with these councils or with the Federal
Committee on Apprenticeship in States where no such council exists.
The apprenticeship standards should specify that it shall be the duty
of the local apprenticeship committee:
r. To request the appropriate State apprenticeship agency, recognized
by the Federal Committee on Apprenticeship, to register each ap-
prenticeship agreement (which automatically registers such agree-
ment with the Federal Committee). If no such State agency exists,
the Bureau of Apprenticeship, U. S. Department of Labor should
be requested to register the apprenticeship agreement with the
Federal Committee on Apprenticeship.
2. To notify the appropriate registration agency of all terminations
or cancellations of apprenticeship agreements.
3. To recommend that each apprentice be issued a Certificate of
Completion of Apprenticeship by the registration agency after the-
apprentice has completed his term of apprenticeship and an exam-
ination by the local joint apprenticeship committee.
4. After final approval of the local apprenticeship standards, the lo-
cal joint apprenticeship committee should send a copy of the stand-
ards to the National Terrazzo Workers Joint Apprenticeship Com-
mittee.
5. All joint apprenticeship committees should send periodic reports
to the National Terrazzo Workers Joint Apprenticeship Com-
mittee on the number of apprenticeship agreements that are reg-
istered, completed, and cancelled.






APPRENTICE SCHEDULE
FOR
TERRAZZO WORKERS

The following schedule of trade experience and training for ap-
prentices is based upon schedules in programs registered with the
Federal Committee on Apprenticeship, or State apprenticeship councils.
The schedule does not necessarily cover the entire jurisdiction of any
trade classification. If desired, 85% of the apprenticeship term may
be allocated to specific items of experience, leaving I5% of the time
for review or emphasis in some phase of the trade, in accordance with
local needs of the apprentice and the industry.
During his apprenticeship, the.apprentice shall receive instruction
and experience in all branches of terrazzo work as indentured, includ-
ing the preparation of material for assembly, as is necessary to develop
a practical and skilled craftsman, versed in the theory and practices
of the trade. He shall also perform such other duties in the shop and
on the job as are commonly related to a terrazzo apprenticeship. This
schedule is an example of the type of experience and training through
employment, considered necessary to develop a skilled worker in the
trade. The approximate training time should be established by the
local joint apprenticeship committee.


EXPERIENCE SCHEDULE
A. Shoot water levels
B. Lay screeds, rod off concrete
C. Lay out pattern designs from sketches or plans
D. Set grade strips (brass, metal, wood) set grounds
for terrazzo base and curbs
E. Put up terrazzo base, wainscot, and scratch coat
F. Lay top cement, rod off, mix and sprinkle terrazzo
G. Roll and trowel terrazzo fill to grade
H. Build terrazzo steps and curbs
I. Machine grinding and polishing, acid washing
]. Make pre-cast terrazzo base steps, floor, wainscot,
window stools, and partitions ,
K. Mix base concrete and top cement fill
L. Care, use and maintenance of all tools of the trade-
Total


APPROXIMATE
TRAINING TIME


............


............














APPRENTICESHIP AGREEMENT

THIS AGREEMENT, entered into this ....... day of ............, 194..,
betw een the parties to ............ ..... ...... ..........
(Name of local apprenticeship standards)
represented by the Joint Apprenticeship Committee, hereinafter referred to as the
COMMITTEE and ......... ........., born ................, herein-
(Name of apprentice) (Month) (Day) Year)
after referred to as the APPRENTICE, and (if a minor) ......................,
(Name of parent or guardian)
hereinafter referred to as his GUARDIAN.
WITNESSETH THAT:
The Committee agrees to be responsible for the placement and training of said
apprentice in the trade of .......... .... as work is available, and in considera-
tion said apprentice agrees diligently and faithfully to perform the work incidental
to the said trade during the period of apprenticeship, in accordance with the regu-
lations of the Committee. The Apprenticeship Standards referred to herein are
hereby incorporated in and made a part of this agreement.
Credit for previous experience Hours. Apprenticeship Hours.
at trade, if any ............ Years. remaining ........ Years.
Other conditions.....................................................


In witness whereof the parties hereunto set their hands and seals:
...... .......... ......... [SEAL] .................... [SEAL
(Apprentice) (Representative of Joint Apprenticeship Committee)

(Address) (Title)
. .. .. ..... ............ [SEAL], ] ............................. [SEAL
(Parent or Guardian) (Representative of Joint Apprenticeship Committee)

(Title)
Registered by the............. ......... ............................
(Name of registration agency)
By ................ Title ................ Date ................, 194..
The undersigned agrees to provide employment and training in accordance
with Standards named herein.
F irst ........................... Second ............. .............
(Employer) (Employer)
T hird .......................... F ourth ...........................
(Employer) a (Employer)
Available through Bureau of Apprenticeship, U. S. Department of Labor.
Washington, D. C.


776561"-48- 2










APPRENTICESHIP AGREEMENT

(Front View)
THIS AGREEMENT, entered into this ........ day of ............, 9 i....,
between ......................, hereinafter referred to as the EMPLOYER, and
(Name of employer)
.............. ........, born ...................., hereinafter referred to as
(Name of apprentice) (Month) (Day) (Year)
APPRENTICE, and (if a minor) ..............................., hereinafter
(Name of parent or guardian)
referred to as his GUARDIAN.
WITNESSETH that the EMPLOYER, the APPRENTICE, and his GUARDIAN de-
sire to enter into an agreement of apprenticeship and therefore, in consideration of
the premises and of the mutual covenants- herein contained, do hereby mutually
covenant and agree as follows:
That the EMPLOYER shall employ and teach the APPRENTICE the trade or
craft of .................. in conformity with the terms and conditions set
forth on the reverse side of this agreement and made a part hereof:
That the APPRENTICE shall perform diligently and faithfully the work of the
trade or craft during the period of apprenticeship, in conformity with the terms
and conditions set forth on the reverse side of this agreement and made a part
hereof;
That the GUARDIAN promises that the apprentice will duly perform all obliga-
tions undertaken herein;
That the apprenticeship term begins on the ....... day of ........... 19 ,
and terminates upon the completion by the apprentice of ...... (years or hours)
of employment for said employer in said trade or craft, as stipulated on the reverse
side of this agreement;
That this agreement is subject to approval by a recognized State Apprenticeship
Council in the State in which the apprentice is employed, or if no such council
exists in the State, by the Federal Committee on Apprenticeship, Bureau of
Apprenticeship, U. S. Department of Labor.
That either party may terminate the agreement by submitting written notification
of termination to the approving agency; but, if such notification is submitted after
completion of the probationary period (stipulated on the reverse side hereof), the
reasons for termination shall be given; and
That either party may at any time consult with the approving agency concerning
the interpretation of any part of this agreement over which there is a difference.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF the parties hereunto set their hands and seals:

(Apprentice) (Employer)
. .. . ... B y . . . .
(Address) (Officer)

(Guardian) (Address)
Approved on behalf of the.............. ............................
(Name of joint apprenticeship committee)
by .................. on .................. 19 .....
Registered by .................................................... ...
(Name of registration agency)
b y .................. on ................. 19 .....

10















APPRENTICESHIP AGREEMENT

(Back View)

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

I. Term of Apprenticeship and Period of Probation

2. Major Processes in Which the Apprentice is to Receive Instruction and Ex-
perience

(Under this heading state the different branches of the trade to be taught and the
approximate time the apprentice shall work at each branch.)



3. Graduated Scale of Wages to be Paid the Apprentice


4. Number of Hours Per Day and Total Number of Hours Per Week to be
Worked by the Apprentice


5. Number of Hours of School Instruction Per Year to be Attended by Ap-
prentice, and Name of School

(144 hours per year is the minimum requirement.)


6. Special Provisions
(Write here any terms and conditions not elsewhere stated in this agree-
ment.)

Prepared and distributed by Bureau of Apprenticeship, U. S. Department of
Labor, Washington, D. C.
9


















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or the Federal Committee on Apprenticeship in States in which no such agency
is established.
~~~~~d i -. ir ..




or the i~5 Feea o mte nApetcsi i*Sae nwihn uhae
is esalihd







STHE NATIONAL
TERRAZZOANDMOSAIC ASSOCIATION
INCORPORATED
1420 NEW YORK AVE. N.W.
THEODORE L MEDFQRD WASHINGTON 5, D. C.

To All Members of The National Terrazzo and Mosaic
Association, Inc.
It is essential that an adequate number of skilled
Terrazzo Workers be available in all areas of this
country to carry on the construction work in this
trade. Experience has proved that a good apprentice-
ship program operated by management and labor is the
best method to develop skilled Terrazzo Workers.
In order that each Terrazzo Contractor may do his
share in training apprentices, the National Terrazzo
and Mosaic Association, Inc., and the Bricklayers,
Masons & Plasterers' International Union have jointly
developed and approved National Apprenticeship Stand-
ards for Terrazzo Workers. These National Apprentice-
ship Standards are based on successful apprenticeship
experience in all parts of the country. They were for-
mulated by the National Joint Terrazzo Workers Appren-
ticeship Committee in accordance with standards of the
Federal Committee on Apprenticeship, the management-
labor policy committee of the Apprentice-Training Serv-
ice, U. S. Department of Labor.
The National Terrazzo and Mosaic Association, Inc.,
strongly urges all Terrazzo Contractors, in cooperation
with Labor, to place these national standards in opera-
tion in all local areas and to start training appren-
tices.
Write or call the nearest office of the Apprentice-
Training Service and request their help and consulting
assistance in order that your program may be placed in
operation as quickly as possible.
Sincerely yours,




Theodore L. Medford,
Executive Secretary

TO SERVE THE USERS AND PRODUCERS OF TERRAZZO
Seaeor Caslo5 in Sweaae







PRESIDENT EMERITUS
WM.J.BOWEN
615-23 15TH STREET, N. W.. WASHINGTON. D. C.
MEMBERS OF EXECUTIVE BOARD
PRESIDENT FIRST VICE.PRESIDENT
HARRY C. BATES A.J.CLELAND
015-23 IBTH STREET.. NW. 0 15-23 S1TH STREET. N. W.
WASHINGTON. 0. C. WASHINGTON. D.C.


VICE-PRESIDENTS f j VICE-PRESIDENTS

JOHN MCLEOD l l BLAINE C. SWAIN
FOURTH NINTH
JAMES FITTIN JAMES M. WHITE
ORANGE.N. J. anoK NEWYORK. m.
JOHN C. FITZMAURICE J. RAYMOND BRITTON
ST. LOUS, NO. SPRINPFIELD. MASS.
,T <^S.- i"c~i~ -17
BERNARD JOHNSON J-301,3
INDIANAPOLS. IND. HEADQUARTERS
BOWEN BUILDING WASHINGTON D.C.
IS- 23 15TH STREET. N. W.WA INGTON 5,D.C.


August 2, 1947




To Officers and Members of Subordinate Unions of the
B. M. & P. I. U. of A.

Dear Sirs and Brothers:
Enclosed please find a copy of the National Appren-
ticeship Standards for Terrazzo Workers to be operated
jointly by members of the local employers association
and local unions of the Bricklayers, Masons and Plas-
terers International Union of America.
These are basic standards and are subject to adjust-
ment through local agreements with your employers. Any
adjustments made should be held to a minimum and should
be for the purpose of adjusting these standards to meet
conditions existing in your particular locality.
We hope that this will provide a sound program for an
extensive apprentice-training system in this trade.



Fraternally yours,






DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

FEDERAL COMMITTEE ON APPRENTICESHIP
WASHINGTON 25 D. C.


August 10, 1947
National Terrazzo Workers
Joint Apprenticeship Committee

Gentlemen:
I am pleased to advise you that the National Stand-
ards of Apprenticeship for Terrazzo Workers, jointly
formulated and adopted by your national committee,
representing the National Terrazzo and Mosaic Associa-
tion and the Bricklayers', Masons', and Plasterers'
International Union of America, have been approved by
and registered with the Federal Committee on Appren-
ticeship.
In view of the increasing need for terrazzo crafts-
men, and the vital importance of thorough training to
master the skills in the craft, the adoption of these
national apprenticeship standards fills a long-felt
need. The circulation of these standards among con-
tractor and labor groups throughout the United States
will help greatly to promote the establishment of ade-
quate programs to develop the much needed skilled
workers.
The inclusion of provisions for registering programs
and apprentices will, in addition to the administrative
advantages, facilitate the compilation of current sta-
tistics on apprenticeship activities in all parts of
the country.
I sincerely hope that everyone engaged in the trade
who is concerned with training, will receive'a copy of
these standards for his guidance in setting up and con-
ducting apprenticeship programs. In planning programs
contractors and labor may also have the assistance of
field representatives of Apprentice-Training Service.

Very truly yours,



Wm. F. Patterson
Director
Apprentice-Training Service







STATE APPRENTICESHIP AGENCIES

(Including names of full-time directors)


Alaska Apprenticeship
Department of Labor,
Juneau, Alaska.


Council,


Arizona Apprenticeship Council,
Industrial Commission,
Phoenix, Ariz.*

Arkansas Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor,
Little Rock, Ark.*

Archie J. Mooney, Chief, Division
Apprenticeship Standards,
California Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Industrial Relations,
San Francisco, Calif.*


Tom Yoczik, Director of Apprentice-
ship,
Connecticut Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor and Factory In-
spection,
Hartford, Conn.

Gino J. Simi, Director of Apprentice-
ship,
District of Columbia Apprenticeship
Council,
District of Columbia Board of Com-
missioners,
Washington, D. C.*

Walter Rountree, Executive Secretary,
Florida Apprenticeship Council,
Industrial Commission,
Tallahassee, Fla.*

Abner N. Deane,
Director of Apprenticeship,
Hawaii Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor and Industrial
Relations,
Honolulu, T. H.*


Iowa Apprenticeship Council,
Bureau of Labor,
Des Moines, Iowa.
Kansas Apprenticeship Council,
Labor Department,
Topeka, Kans.


Kentucky Apprenticeship
Department of Industrial
Frankfort, Ky.*


Council,
Relations,


R. I. Conran, Director of Apprentice-
ship,
Louisiana Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor,
Baton Rouge 4, La.*
Maine Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor and Industry,
Augusta, Maine *
Hubert L. Connor, Director,
Division of Apprentice Training,
Massachusetts Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor and Industries,
Boston, Mass.*
Frank Musala, Director,
Division of Voluntary Apprenticeship,
Minnesota Apprenticeship Council,
Industrial Commission,
St. Paul, Minn.*
Montana Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Agriculture, Labor, and
Industry,
Helena, Mont.*
Nevada Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor,
Carson City, Nev.*

New Hampshire Apprenticeship Coun-
cil,*
Bureau of Labor,
Concord, N. H.*






New Mexico Apprenticeship Council,
Labor and Industrial Commission,
Albuquerque, N. Mex.*
John J. Sandler, Director of Appren-
ticeship,
New York State Apprenticeship Coun-
cil,
Department of Labor,
Albany, N. Y.*
Clarence L. Beddingfield, Director of
Apprenticeship,
North Carolina Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor,
Raleigh, N. C.*
Ohio Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Industrial Relations,
Columbus, Ohio
Norman O. Nilsen, Director of Appren-
ticeship,
Oregon Apprenticeship Council,
Bureau of Labor,
Portland, Oreg.*
Pennsylvania Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor and Industry,
Harrisburg, Pa.

* State apprenticeship law enacted.


Quintin Gonzalez Rodriguez, Director,
Apprenticeship Division,
Department of Labor,
San Juan, P. R.*


Rhode Island A;
Department of L;
Providence, R. I.


apprenticeship Council,
abor,


Vermont Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Industrial Relations,
Montpelier, Vt.*

J. Fred Kirchner, Executive Director,
Division of Apprenticeship Training,
Virginia Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor and Industry,
Richmond, Va.*

William Walker, Supervisor of Appren-
ticeship,
Washington Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor and Industries,
Seattle, Wash.*

Walter Simon, Director of Apprentice-
ship,
Wisconsin Industrial Commission,
Madison, Wis.*







REGIONAL AND FIELD OFFICES
BUREAU OF APPRENTICESHIP
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

For information regarding the services of field representatives of the Bureau of
Apprenticeship in the establishment of apprenticeship systems communicate with
the nearest office listed below:


REGION I
(Conn., Maine, Mass., N. H., R. I.,
and Vt.)
Regional Office
Joseph E. Johnson, Regional Supervisor
Bureau of Apprenticeship
Room 1148, 294 Washington St.,
Boston 8, Mass.
Field Offices
Connecticut:
Bridgeport: Room 310, Post Office
Bldg.
Hartford: Room 1005, 983 Main St.
New Haven: Room 48, 746 Chapel
St.
Stamford: Room 12, Post Office Bldg.
Waterbury: 195 Grove Street, % Vet-
eran Advisory Center.
Maine:
Portland: 303 Court House, 158 Fed-
eral St.
Waterville: % City Engineer's Office,
City Hall.
Massachusetts:
Andover: 2 Post Office Bldg.
Pittsfield: 210 Post Office Bldg.
Springfield: Room 404, 1694 Main St.
Worcester: Room 333, Post Office
Bldg.
New Hampshire:
Manchester: Room 613, 875 Elm St.
Rhode Island:
Providence: East Providence Post
Office Bldg.
Vermont:
Burlington: Room io, Union Station


REGION II
(New York State)
Regional Office
John R. Marion, Regional Supervisor
Bureau of Apprenticeship
Room 1318, 270 Broadway
New York 7, N. Y.
Field Offices
New York:
Albany: Room 711, 112 State St.
Binghamton: Room 203, U. S. Post
Office Bldg.
Buffalo: Room 230 Hurst Bldg. 47
West Huron St.
Jamestown: 114 East Third St.
Niagara Falls: Room 204, U. S. Post
Office Bldg.
Mineola: Room 203, Post Office
Bldg. Main and First St.
Rochester: Room 301, 70 Exchange
St.
Syracuse: 1roo Chimes Bldg. 500
South Salina St.
Troy: Room 210, 258 Broadway
Utica: Room 418, % N. Y. State
Department of Labor, 258 Genes-
see St.

REGION III
(Del., N. J., Pa.)
Regional Office
Thomas P. Kenney, Regional Supervisor
Bureau of Appftticeship
1505 Widener Bldg.
Juniper and Chestnut St.
Philadelphia 7, Pa.







REGION III-Continued


Field Offices
Delaware:
Wilmington: Room 103, U. S. Cus-
toms House. 6th and King Sts.
New Jersey:
Camden: 538 Broadway.
Newark: 930 Essex Bldg. 31 Clin-
ton St.
Trenton: Room 251-B Federal Bldg.
Pennsylvania:
Allentown: Room 20, U. S. Post Of-
fice Bldg. 5th and Hamilton Sts.
Altoona: % Pennsylvania State Em-
ployment Service, 1 lo9 i6th St.
Erie: 128 Federal Bldg.
Harrisburg: 6o0 Feller Bldg. Third
and Market Sts.
Oil City: % Pennsylvania State Em-
ployment Service, Drake Bldg.
325 Seneca St.
Pittsburgh: 404 Arrott Bldg. 4th
Ave. and Wood St.
Pottsville: % Pennsylvania State Em-
ployment Service, 394 South Cen-
tre St.
Reading: % Pennsylvania State Em-
ployment Service, Front and Penn
Sts.
Scranton: Room 331, U. S. Post
Office Bldg.
Wilkes-Barre: % Pennsylvania State
Employment Service, 5 East Mar-
ket St.
Williamsport: % Pennsylvania State
Employment Service, 228-230
Pine St.
REGION IV
(D. C., Md., N. C., Va., W. Va.)
Regional Office
Robert F. Handley, Regional Supervisor
Bureau of Apprenticeship
Room 2324, Temporary "U" Bldg.
12th and Constitution Ave. NW.
Washington 25, D. C.


District of Columbia: Washington:
Room 201, 470 Indiana Ave.
Maryland:
Baltimore: 316 Appraisers' Stores,
103 South Gay St.
Hagerstown: 11i South Potomac St.
Silver Spring: Service Aid Council
Building, Jessup Blair Park
North Carolina:
Charlotte: Room 315, Independence
Bldg. Raleigh: 509 Caswell Bldg.
Winston-Salem: 805 North Liberty
St.

Virginia:
Norfolk: 416 Royster Bldg.
Richmond: Room 301, 205 West
Grace St.
Roanoke: Room 301, School Admin-
istration Bldg.

West Virginia:
Charleston: No. 3 Federal Bldg. An-
nex
Clarksburg: Room 317, Post Office
Bldg.
Wheeling: 114 Fidelity Bldg.

REGION V

(Ky., Mich., Ohio)
Regional Office

John R. Newland, Regional Supervisor
Bureau of Apprenticeship
506 Ninth-Chester Bldg.
Cleveland 14, Ohio


Field Offices
Kentucky:
Lexington: 508 West Main
Louisville: 423 South Fifth


Michigan:
Battle Creek: 408 Michigan National
Bank Bldg., i West Michigan Ave.
Detroit: Room 304, Owen Bldg.


Field Offices







REGION V-Continued


Grand Rapids: 1208 Peoples Na-
tional Bank Bldg.
Lansing: 201 Leslie Ave.
Saginaw: 218 Graebner Bldg., 120
North Michigan Ave.
Sault Ste. Marie: 304 Central Savings
Bank Bkdg.
Ohio:
Akron: % O S. E. S., 3d Floor, 33
North Main St.
Canton: Room 215, Dime Savings
Bank Bldg.
Cincinnati: Room 411 B, Post Office
Bldg.
Columbus: 418 New Federal Bldg.
Dayton: 609 Municipal Bldg., 3d and
Ludlow Sts.
Lima: 205 Old Dominion Bldg.
Newark: 166 Quentin Road
Portsmouth: Room 4, Post Office Bldg.
Toledo: Room I -A, Old Federal
Bldg.
Youngstown: 515 Union National
Bank Bldg.

REGION VI
(I1., Ind., Wis.)


Regional Office
Cecil L. Utterback, Regional
Bureau of Apprenticeship
Room 404, 226 West Jackson
Chicago 6, 1ll.


Supervisor

Boulevard


Field Ofices
Illinois:
Alton: Post Office Bldg.
Joliet: Room 412, Morris Bldg., 58
North Chicago St.
Moline: 1630 Fifth Ave.
Mount Vernon: I18 '_ North Tenth
St.
Peoria: 731 First National Bank Bldg.
Rockford: 215 Walnut St.
Springfield: 514 /z East Monroe St.


Indiana:
Evansville: 310 Post Office Bldg.
Fort Wayne: 203 Paramount Bldg.
Gary: 25 East Sixth Ave.
Indianapolis: 313 Kresge Bldg.
Lafayette: 658 East Main St.
Marion: 316 East Fourth St.
South Bend: 216 North Michigan St.
Terre Haute: 307 Federal Bldg.
Wisconsin:
Green Bay: 302 Post Office Bldg.
Madison: Room 211, State Office
Bldg.
Milwaukee: % Industrial Commis-
sion, 623 North Second St.
Oshkosh: Room 204, Post Office
Bldg.
Racine: Room 319, Arcade Bldg.
423 Main St.

REGION VII
(Ala., Fla., Ga., Miss., S. C., Tenn.)
Regional Office
Charles N. Conner, Regional Supervisor
Bureau of Apprenticeship
Room 722, Grand Theater Bldg.
Atlanta 3, Ga.
Field Ofices
Alabama:
Birmingham: I212 Comer Bldg.
Mobile: 129 Federal Bldg.
Montgomery: 211 Old Post Office
Bldg.
Sheffield: % Alabama Employment
Service, State National Bank Bldg.
Florida:
Jacksonville: Room 443, Post Office
Bldg.
Miami: 716 Seybold Bldg.
Orlando: % U. S. E. S., 22 East Pine
t.
Tallahassee:r i i City Administration
Bldg.
Tampa: Room 904, Wallace S. Bldg.,
608 Tampa St.






REGION VII-Continued
Georgia:
Columbus: Room 203, loI4
Broadway
Savannah: 402 Blun Bldg.
Mississippi:
Jackson: 414 Deposit Guaranty Bank
Bldg.
Meridian: 221 Pythian Bldg.
South Carolina:
Charleston: Rooni 222, The Center
Columbia: 2065 Blossom St.
Spartanburg: 2 i Montgomery Bldg.
Tennessee:
Chattanooga: Room 217, Post Office
Bldg.
Knoxville: 600 Empire Building
% Department of Employment Se-
curity
Memphis: 3rd Floor, Dillard Bldg.
122 Union St.
Nashville: 401 Presbyterian Bldg.
152 4th Ave. N.
REGION VIII
(Iowa, Minn., Nebr., N. Dak., S. Dak.)
Regional Office
John F. Barrett, Regional Supervisor
Bureau of Apprenticeship
410 Pence Bldg.
730 Hennepin Ave.
Minneapolis 3, Minn.
Field Ofices
Iowa:
Burlington: Room 523, Tama Bldg.
Cedar Rapids: 509 3rd Ave. SE.
Davenport: Rooms 312-313, Post
Office Bldg., 131 East 4th St.
Des Moines: Room 31o, Ioni Lo-
cust St.
Mason City: Room 16, Post Office
Bldg.
Sioux City: 308 Federal Bldg..
Waterloo: % Veterans' Administra-
tion, Masonic Temple Bldg., East
Park and Mulberry


Minnesota:
Duluth: 212 Bradley Bldg.
Mankato: % U. S. E. S., 635 South
Front St.
St. Cloud: % U. S. E. S., 706 St. Ger-
main St.
St. Paul: Ashton Bldg.
1547 University Ave.
Nebraska:
Lincoln: % U. S. E. S., 1213 N. St.
Omaha: 201 Arthur Bldg.
210 South 18th St.

North Dakota:
Fargo: % U.S. E.S., 630 First Ave., N.

South Dakota:
Aberdeen: 503 Capitol Bldg.
417 South Main
Huron: 201 Post Office Bldg.
4Io Dakota, South.

REGION IX
(Ark., Kans., Mo., Okla.)
Regional Office
Taylor F. Custer, Regional Supervisor
Bureau of Apprenticeship
1509 Fidelity Bldg.
Kansas City 6, Mo.

Field Ofices
Arkansas:
Fort Smith: I I Federal Bldg., South
12th and A Sts.
Little Rock: 201 Old Post Office Bldg.
Kansas:
Topeka: 625 New England Bldg.
Wichita: 308 Derby Bldg.
325 West Broadway
Missouri:
St. Joseph: % U. S. E. S., 141/2 S.
Eighth St.
St. Louis: Room 507, New Federal
Bldg.
12th and Market St.
Springfield: 246 Wilhoit Bldg.







REGION IX-Continued


Oklahoma:
Muskogee: 312 Manhattan Bldg.
Oklahoma City: 41 -412 Oklahoma
Natural Bldg.
Third and Harvey Ave.
Tulsa: 916 Daniel Bldg.
103 East Third St.

REGION X
(La., N. Mex., Tex.)
Regional Office

Travis J. Lewis, Regional Supervisor,
Bureau of Apprenticeship,
Room 608, 1 14 Commerce St.,
Dallas 2, Tex.

Field Offices
Louisiana:
Baton Rouge: 329 Florida St.
Lake Charles: 432 Kirby St.
New Orleans: 127 Elk Place.
Shreveport: 327 Crockett St.
New Mexico:
Albuquerque: Room 413, Federal
Bldg.
Santa Fe: U. S. Court House, Room 5,
Basement.
Texas:
Austin: 301 West Sixth St.
Beaumont: 315 Federal Bldg.
El Paso: 508 N. Kansas St.
Fort Worth: Room 419, U. S. Court
House.
Houston: Room 505, Milam Bldg.
Longview: Room 213, Post Office
Bldg.
Lubbock: 1114 ioth Street
San Antonio: Room 592, Federal
Bldg.
Waco: 421 Columbus Ave.


(Colo., Idaho, Mont., Utah, Wyo.)

Regional Office
Clifford B. Noxon, Regional Supervisor,
Bureau of Apprenticeship,
521 Continental Oil Bldg.,
18th and Glenarm,
Denver 2, Colo.

Field Offices
Colorado:
Colorado Springs: 14 South Nevada
Avenue.
Grand Junction: Box 936, Post Office
Bldg.
Greely: Horace Mann School Bldg.
Pueblo: 409 Court St.


Idaho:
Boise: 209 Continental Bank
Coeur d'Alene: Room 207,
Bldg., 5th and Sherman.


Bldg.
Harding


Montana:
Great Falls: Ist Floor, City Hall
Helena: Room 422, State Capitol
Bldg.
Utah:
Ogden: 404 Eccles Bldg.
Provo: 45 North University Ave.
Salt Lake City: 420 Atlas Bldg.
Wyoming:
Casper: Room 223, 124 West 2d St.

REGION XII

(Ariz., Calif., Nev., Oreg., Wash.)

Regional Office
Broncel R. Mathis, Regional Supervisor
Bureau of Apprenticeship
Room 560, Federal Office Bldg.
CiviC Center, Fulton and Leavenworth
San Francisco, 2, Calif.


REGION XI






REGION XII-Continued


Field Ofices
Arizona:
Phoenix: 719 Security Bldg., 234
North Central Ave.
Tucson i80 North Meyer St.
California:
Fresno: 232 Holland Bldg.
Long Beach: 616 Jergins Trust Bldg.,
100-120 East Ocean Boulevard.
Los Angeles: 617 H. W. Hellman
Bldg., 354 South Spring St.
Oakland: Division of Apprenticeship
Standard, 144 13th St.
Sacramento: 631 Jay St.
San Diego: 3o0 West G St.
Nevada:
Reno: 255 South Virginia St.


Oregon:
Eugene: 6io West Willamette St.
Medford: Federal Office Bldg., 33
North Riverside Ave.
Portland: Room 307, U. S. Court
House (Old)
Washington:
Longview: % Washington State Em-
ployment Service. 1436 Commerce.
Seattle: 3303 White Bldg.
Spokane: 614 Empire State Bldg.,
West 905 Riverside Ave.
Tacoma: 519 Provident Bldg.
Yakima: 321-323 East Yakima Ave.,
406 Masonic Bldg.

TERRITORY
Hawaii:
Honolulu: 343 Federal Bldg.






OTHER PUBLICATIONS AVAILABLE
Copies of any of the following publications may be obtained by writing to the
nearest regional or field office listed in this pamphlet, or to Bureau of Apprenticeship,
U. S. Department of Labor, Washington 25, D. C.
THE NATIONAL APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM: Review of
development of apprenticeship in this country and how apprentice-
ship systems are established. Explanation of functions of Bureau of
Apprenticeship, Federal Committee on Apprenticeship, State appren-
ticeship agencies, National, State, and local apprenticeship committees.
APPRENTICE TRAINING FOR RETURNING SERVICE-
MEN.-Explains simply the essential points veterans want to know
about apprenticeship.
APPRENTICESHIP CREDIT FOR PREVIOUS EXPERI-
ENCE.-Discusses credit for previous experience given apprentices
on apprenticeship term, and how credit is determined. Of primary
interest to those directly concerned with this aspect of apprenticeship.
NATIONAL APPRENTICESHIP STANDARDS
NATIONAL BRIC K LAYER S' APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM AND
STANDARDS.
NATIONAL STANDARDS OF APPRENTICESHIP FOR THE CRAFTS OF THE
PLASTERING INDUSTRY.
NATIONAL APPRENTICESHIP AND TRAINING STANDARDS FOR THE
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY.
NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR CARPENTRY APPRENTICESHIP, Bulletin
No. 54.
NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR CEMENT, ASPHALT AND COMPOSITION
FINISHING APPRENTICESHIP.
BUILDING A NATIONAL PAINTING AND DECORATING APPRENTICESHIP
SYSTEM-Bulletin No. 23: A manual of procedure for establishing local painting
and decorating apprenticeship standards.
PUTTING NATIONAL PLUMBING APPRENTICESHIP STANDARDS TO
WORK, Bulletin No. 16: A manual of procedure for establishing local plumbing
apprenticeship standards.
NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR STEAM FITTING APPRENTICESHIP, Part
I, Bulletin No. 28: Includes suggestions for putting national standards into
operation in Local communities.
SUGGESTED LOCAL STANDARDS FOR TRAINING STEAM FITTING
APPRENTICES, Part 2, Bulletin No. 28: Based on The National Standards for
Steam Fitting Apprentices.
STANDARDS AND ORGANIZATION FOR APPRENTICESHIP IN THE
STAINED GLASS INDUSTRY.
NATIONAL PATTERN FOR LOCAL APPRENTICESHIP STANDARDS IN
THE ROOFING INDUSTRY.
NATIONAL STANDARDS OF APPRENTICESHIP FOR TILE SETTERS.


24 U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1948







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA "

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