National apprenticeship standards : photoengravers, commercial establishments

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Material Information

Title:
National apprenticeship standards : photoengravers, commercial establishments
Physical Description:
27 p. : ; 20 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
American Photoengravers Association
International Photo Engravers' Union of North America
Publisher:
U.S. Govt. Print. Off.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Apprentices -- United States   ( lcsh )
Photoengraving -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
"June 10, 1949."--Verso t.p.
Statement of Responsibility:
Formulated by the American Photoengravers Association and the International Photo-Engravers' Union of North America in cooperation with U.S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Apprenticeship.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004975553
oclc - 26734215
lccn - l 50000051
System ID:
AA00009238:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text







APPRENTICESHIP





SU.S. DEPOMSTORY


4. co AIAER


FORMULATED BY THE AMERICAN PHOTOENGRAVERS ASSOCIATION AND THE
INTERNATIONAL PHOTO-ENGRAVERS' UNION OF NORTH AMERICA
in cooperation with
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR BUREAU OF APPRENTICESHIP WASHINGTON, D. C.
















APPROVED BY


Executive Council Interna-
t i o n a I Photo-Engravers'
Union of North America
EDWARD J. VOLZ, President
MATTHEW WOLL, ist Vice President
FRED R. BALLBACH, 2d Vice President
FRANK D. SMITH, 3d Vice President
WILFRID T. CONNELL, 4th Vice President
WILLIAM H. GRAF, 5th Vice President
HENRY F. SCHMALL, Secretary-Treasurer
JUNE 10, 1949


American Photoengravers
Association

W. K. JAMES, President
D. H. MURNIK, ist Vice President
PETER SCHOTANUS, 2d Vice President
C. G. ROHRICH, Secretary-Treasurer
FRANK J. SCHREIBER, Executive Secretary
Executive Committee Members:
JOSEPH ROSENBERG
RICHARD DANZ
R. C. WALKER
EVERETT BIERMAN
A. P. REGITZ


JUNE 10, 1949


Program registered as incorporating
the basic standards of the
FEDERAL COMMITTEE ON APPRENTICESHIP

WILLIAM F. PATTERSON, Director
Bureau of Apprenticeship
U. S. Department of Labor











p


...







UNIV. OF FL LIB.




U.S. DEPOSITORY



FOREWORD

In view of the high quality workmanship required in the photoen-
graving industry and the necessity to maintain at all times an adequate
force of thoroughly trained craftsmen, the national standards of appren-
ticeship jointly sponsored and formulated by the American Photoen-
gravers Association and the International Photo-Engravers Union of
North America should meet a long-felt need.
The comprehensive, carefully planned standards adopted, which
are based on the long experience of employers and labor in training
apprentices in the wide variety of operations in the craft, should prove
indispensable as a pattern in every locality in establishing uniform, well
organized apprenticeship programs. The expansion of apprentice
training activities resulting will, I am sure, be invaluable to the photo-
engraving industry in building up and maintaining an ample supply of
competent, versatile craftsmen; and will provide opportunities for
careers in a highly skilled occupation to the young men selected for the
thorough training assured under the programs established.



MAURICE J. TOBIN,
Secretary of Labor.























































































































































I
if:
















A GUIDE IN ESTABLISHING
LOCAL APPRENTICESHIP SYSTEMS
The Art Preservative of All Arts-Printing-requires, among other
processes, photoengraving. This important part of allowing the people
to see as well as read requires workmen of the greatest skills. These
skills have been acquired and passed on from one workman to another
over the years. This method of acquainting new people in the industry
with the intricacies of the photoengraving trade is called apprenticeship.
The need for closer attention to the apprenticeship within the photo-
engraving industry is recognized by the memberships of the American
Photoengravers Association and the International Photo-Engravers'
Union of North America. Consequently, these two organizations have
joined cooperatively in the development of these National Standards of
Apprenticeship.
It is the intent of the organizations that this document be recognized
and used as a guide in the development of highly skilled journeymen
through the methods of apprenticeship in local communities.
It is hoped this system and basic fundamentals can be followed in all
communities. This is suggested with recognition that each and every
community is different and each and every plant is somewhat different.
Adjustments to meet local conditions can readily be made by a Joint
Apprenticeship Committee of employees and employers who are famil-
iar with such conditions.










NATIONAL APPRENTICESHIP STANDARDS

for COMMERCIAL ESTABLISHMENTS in

THE PHOTOENGRAVING INDUSTRY



DEFINITIONS

The term "Employer" shall mean any employer who subscribes to
the terms and conditions of standards prescribed by the Local Joint
Apprenticeship Committee and who has the facilities and equipment
to properly train apprentices.
The term "Union" shall mean any Local Union of the International
Photo-Engravers' Union of North America.
The term "Apprentice" shall mean a person who has signed an
Apprenticeship Agreement with an employer to learn the photo-
engraving trade as outlined in these standards.
The term "Apprenticeship Agreement" shall mean a written agree-
ment between an employer and the person employed as an apprentice,
which agreement shall be registered by the Registration Agency.
The term "Committee" shall mean the Local Joint Apprenticeship
Committee usually composed of three members representing the em-
ployer and three members representing the Union, plus one alternate
member from each group to act in the absence of a regular member
and the alternate shall be privileged to attend all meetings of the Com-
mittee.
The term "Registration Agency" shall mean the State Apprenticeship
Council, or in States where there are no councils, the Federal Commit-
tee on Apprenticeship, United States Department of Labor.
The term "Standards" shall mean the Apprenticeship Training
System.

ORGANIZATION OF THE COMMITTEE

The Committee shall determine the time and place of regular meet-
ings, or meet on call of the Chairman, who shall be required to issue
such call upon request of any two members of the Committee.







The Committee shall establish such rules and policies governing its
administrative procedure as are required.
Consultants-The Committee will utilize the services of individuals
and representatives of agencies or organizations specializing in appren-
ticeship.
DUTIES OF THE COMMITTEE

A. To determine the shop facilities available for acquiring the neces-
sary experience on the job.
B. To establish minimum standards required for shop experience and
related instruction for apprentices.
C. To establish standards for appraisals to determine progress of ap-
prentices in manipulative skills and technical knowledge.
D. To establish standards for examination of apprentices, and upon ap-
prentices passing such examination to recommend to the Registra-
tion Agency that Certificates of Completion of Apprenticeship be
awarded.
E. To prepare standards and agreements for submission to the Regis-
tration Agency.
F. To maintain a record-keeping system showing the progress of each
apprentice at his work on the job and in his related instruction, and
any other records that the Committee shall decide to keep.
G. In general, to be responsible for the successful operation of photo-
engraving apprenticeship under these standards, by performing the
duties listed above, by cooperating with public and private agencies
which can be of assistance, by obtaining publicity in order to develop
the support and interest of the public in apprenticeship and by keep-
ing in touch with all parties concerned.

QUALIFICATIONS FOR APPRENTICESHIP

Applicants for a photoengraving apprenticeship, not heretofore con-
nected with the trade, must be at least i8 years of age; provided, the
Committee may make exceptions to this age limit in exceptional and
unusual cases.
Education: Each applicant should have a high school education or
its equivalent; provided, the Committee may make exceptions to this
requirement for applicants who are war veterans, those with unusual
aptitude, previous experience, or other qualifications acceptable to the
Committee. The applicant should furnish the employer and the Com-
mittee a transcript of his high school courses and grades, if available,
for review.
Physical examination: Each applicant shall furnish the Committee
evidence of having passed an examination of physical fitness.






Applicants having experience in the trade may be admitted to ad-
vanced standing when they demonstrate their qualifications for such
credit in a manner satisfactory to the Committee.

TERM OF APPRENTICESHIP
The term of apprenticeship shall not be less than 5 years.

PROBATIONARY PERIOD
Apprentices shall be subject to a probationary period not exceeding 3
months of employment. During this probationary period cancellation
of the apprenticeship agreement will be made by the Committee upon
request of either party, but due notice shall be given the Registration
Agency.
CONTINUITY OF EMPLOYMENT
It shall be the duty and responsibility of the employer to provide,
insofar as possible, continuous employment for all apprentices.

APPRENTICESHIP AGREEMENT
All accepted applicants for apprenticeship shall sign an apprenticeship
agreement (countersigned by parent or guardian if a minor), which
shall also be signed by the employer and others if so decided by the
Joint Apprenticeship Committee. Every apprenticeship agreement
entered into under an apprenticeship should contain a clause making
the standards a part of the agreement with the same force and effect
as if written therein. For this reason every interested party shall be
furnished with a copy of the standards and given an opportunity to
read them before the agreement is signed. The number of copies of
an agreement to be signed shall be determined by the Joint Apprentice-
ship Committee who shall also decide how they are to be distributed.

IDENTIFICATION OF APPRENTICES
Each apprentice, upon signing an apprenticeship agreement, shall be
furnished with an identification card.

WORK EXPERIENCE
During his apprenticeship the apprentice shall receive such instruc-
tion and experience in the photoengraving process as is necessary to
develop a practical and skilled craftsman, versed in the theory and

4






practices of the craft. He shall also perform such other duties as are
commonly related to a photoengraving apprenticeship. The apprentice
shall have the right to appeal to the Committee if, in his opinion, he is
being given insufficient or improper training. It shall be the duty of
the Committee to arrange such adjustments as it deems necessary.
The agreement form furnished by the Registration Agency may be used
and shall include the schedule of processes.
The trade of Photoengraving embraces separate branches, any and
all of which are recognized as apprenticeable and require a minimum
of 5 years to learn. These apprenticeship standards take within their
scope these branches which are as follows: Photographing, stripping,
etching-copper and zinc, finishing, routing, blocking, proofing, tint-
laying, masking, and such other branches of work as may be employed.
Apprentices under agreement to learn any one of the above branches
of the trade will be taught how to perform all phases of work in that
branch as well as a theoretical knowledge of the other branches suf-
ficient to enable the apprentice to understand them.
Following is a break-down of the work processes that come within
the scope of each branch. The apprentice shall receive instruction in
all phases of the trade sufficient to insure him of becoming a competent
craftsman at the completion of his apprenticeship. However, in de-
veloping work processes, consideration should be given to the type of
work being done and the facilities available for training. The follow-
ing work processes will be taught apprentices but not necessarily in
this order:
PHOTOGRAPHER


Work experiences to be learned
on the job
Camera operation.
Camera preparation.
Copy preparation.
Preparation of sheet film and roll film.
Light adjustments.
Camera adjustments.
Making of line and halftone negatives
using film, wet plate and dry plate.
Use of screens and filters.
Mixing and use of chemicals.
Use of light meters.
Dark-room developing.
Care and handling of film and nega-
tives.
Making color process negatives-from
Kodachrome, Carbro prints, and Illus-
trations.
Drop-out and stunt photography.
Making highlight overlays and masks.
Reworking poor and damaged negatives.


Related instruction in and out
of plant
General fundamental knowledge of all
processes in all branches of photoen-
graving.
Study of manufacturers' manuals and
data on camera, film, emulsions, and
plates.
Studying formulas and proper mixing
of chemicals. Camera adjustments
and finished results.
Length of exposure and development.
Types of films used.
Types of screens used.
Care of screens.
Types of filters.
Care of art work and copy.
Knowledge of copy and color values.






PHIOTOCRAPH LR--Continued


Work experiences to be learned
on the job
Rudiments of stripping, printing, and
etching.


Related instruction in and out
of plant
Working with journeymen in these
branches to evaluate a keener sense of
photo-mechanical science.


STRIPPER-PRINTER


Use of printing frames.
Use of arc lamps.
Use of plate whirler.
Preparation of wet plate, emulsion, and
film.
Setting up nonstrip film.
Cutting and squaring of negatives.
Stripping straight flats.
Stripping combinations.
Stripping for double prints or surprints.
Stripping to register with overlays or
blue prints.
Making blue prints.
Opaquing for drop-outs.
Opaquing for color separation.
Mixing enamels and ink print solutions.
Preparation of copper and zinc for
coating.
Coating and whirling metals.
Printing straight flats.
Printing double prints and printing-in
tints.
Developing of exposed zinc and copper
plates.
Drying and burning of coatings.
Contact printing of glass negatives on
metal.
Rudiments of photography, copper
etching, and zinc etching.


General fundamental knowledge of all
processes in all branches of photo-
engraving.
Study of manufacturers' manuals and
data on lamps, whirler, printing
frames, films and plates.


Study of basic characteristics of copper
and zinc.
Use and care of opaquing brushes and
solutions.

Knowledge of arc lamps.
Length of exposure time and results.
Knowledge of enamels and printing
solutions.
Methods of cleaning glass and metals.


Working with journeymen in
branches to evaluate a keener
of photo-mechanical science.


these
sense


ZINC ETCHER


Judging negatives.
Preparation of plate for etching.
Preparation of acid for etching.
Checking prints to determine satisfac-
tory for etching.
Painting up solids and dead metal.
Application of topping powder.
Burning in, painting, and cooling of
zinc plates.
Use of etching machines.
Etching in tub and machine-line, half-
tone, and Ben Day.
Scum removal.
Polishing plates.
Painting up for drop-outs.


Fundamental knowledge of all branches
of photoengraving and all processes.
Study manufacturers' manuals and data
on metals and etching solutions.


Judging tonal values of tints and
highlights.
Problems of shrinkage and undercutting
and reasons to avoid.



Iasic knowledge of painting solutions.
InformatioA on methods of saving plates
partially etched.







ZINC ETCHER-continucd


Work experiences to be learned
on the job
Re-etching.
Making zinc halftones.
Burning in and etching combination
copper plates.
Rudiments of photography, stripping,
printing, and finishing.


Related instruction in and out
of plant

Safety information.


Working with journeymen in these
branches to evaluate a keener sense of
photo-mechanical science.


COPPER ETCHER


Analyzing print on metal for the proper
etching for tone and depth.
Cleaning plates.
Preparation of plates for etching, remov-
ing scum, etc.
Staging.
Spotting and retouching.
Use of hydrometer.
Judgment of negatives.
Care and use of electric etching ma-
chines.
Preparation of etching solutions.
Stopping-out unetched portions of plates.
Flat etching for depth and tone.
Dipping plates.
Brushing plates.
Action of chemicals and acids.
Determine time needed in solution.
Determine proper depth and size of dot.
Burning in enamels.
Removal of shoulders.
Use of magnesium chalk to determine
tonal value.
Staging for tone values and tone sepa-
ration.
Use of crayon.
Blending edges.
Burning-in of enamels.
Use of chalk remover solution.
Short etch bath.
Fine etching of highlights.
Etching for proper color values of color
process plates.
Rolling up plates for re-etching.
Rudiments of photography, stripping,
printing, and proofing.


Knowledge of various types of plates,
sizes and gage.
Study of manufacturers' manuals and
data on copper and etching machines.
Knowledge of chemical formulas and
uses.
Causes of scum and elimination.




Etching solutions, their characteristics
and graded strength.
Etching by multiple bath.
Measuring instruments and their use.






Proper use and care of staging brushes.
Proper use of crayon to produce hard
and soft effects.
Study of plates relative to copy.
Judging for tonal value, highlights, and
color value.






Working with journeymen in these
branches to evaluate a keener sense
of photo-mechanical science.


FINISHER


Care and sharpening of tools.
Selection of proper tool.
Checking etched plates with
copy.


original


General knowledge of all processes in
all branches of photoengraving.
Methods of sharpening tools and how
to properly care for them.


857963*-49--2







F INISHER-continued


Work experiences to be learned
on the job
Trimming line plates.
Repairing damaged plates.
Removing imperfections from halftone
plates.
Trimming copper plates.
Burnishing.
Removal of enamel from plates.
Outlining.
Draw tooling and ruling.
Use of screen tools and cross liners.
Vignetting.
Transferring and cutting for register.
Re-engraving.
Finishing color process plates to various
publication standards.
Rudiments of photography, etching and
proofing.


Related instruction in and out
of plant


Operation of hand press for transferring
and cutting.
Study information on all types of metal
used in plant.

Publication specifications and color se-
quences.






Working with journeymen in these
branches to evaluate a keener sense of
photo-mechanical science.


TINT LAYER (Ben Day)


Use and care of Ben Day screens.
Cleaning and preparation for mechanical
dot application.
Checking prints with copy.
Painting in.
Gumming and opaquing.
Tint laying.
Tint removing.
Analysis of tonal values to be applied
to plate for best practical printing
results.
Applying Ben Day screens and other
shading mediums to secure tone
values required.
Care and use of rollers used in inking
screen.
Further skill in application of Ben Day
screens and other shading mediums
for faster operation.
Ben Day tint laying on proper angle in
two or more colors.
Reversing prints.
Rudiments of stripping, printing and
proofing.


Knowledge of Ben Day screens and pos-
sible uses.
Knowledge of tone values and their
relations.
Knowledge of color values and best
uses.

Types and proper use of brushes and
inks for painting up.







Fundamental knowledge of all processes
of all branches of photoengraving.




Working with journeymen in these
branches to evaluate a keener sense of
photo-mechanical science.


ROUTER AND BLOCKER


Operation and care of equipment.
Sharpening and resetting tools.
Routing zinc.


Knowledge of all types of
machines, planers, saws,
machines and cutting tools.


routing
beveling






ROU'TIR AND BLOCKER---cntinlucl


Work experiences to be learned
on the job
Beveling and lining plates.
Making tint blocks.
Routing copper, brass and otllcr alloys.
Patching various plates.
Soldering and welding.
Mounting line and halftone plates.
Assembling plates on blocks.
Registering color plates on blocks.
Squaring and trimming blocks planing
for type high.
Soldering and patching.


Rudiments of etching and finishing.


Related instruction in and out
of plant
Knowlclgc of zinc and working qual-
itics.
Kn, wlcdgc of metals used and welding
qualities.

Study requirements of different mechan-
ical standards by publications.
Study of manufacturers' manuals on
machines and metals.
Types of nailing machines.
Types of woods and care in handling
and storage.
Study of other types of mounting.
Working with journeymen in these
branches to evaluate a keener sense of
photo-mechanical science.


PROOFER


Operation and care of presses.
Care of rollers and printing inks.
Use of overlays and underlays.
Checking proofs with copy.
Single color proofing.
Color proofing and ink sequences.
Registering plates on and off the block.
Marking proofs for re-etching and addi-
tional finishing.
Mixing and matching colors.
Proofing of process color plates-mount-
ed and unmounted with bearers.
Making and use of friskets and masks.



Rudiments of etching, finishing and
final printing.


Study of manufacturers' manuals on
presses, paper, and inks.
Types of inks and paper.
Publication specifications.
Proper packing for press.
Relation of various papers and various
types of ink.
Transparent and opaque printing inks.


Study of color and color values.
Amount and type of inks for best results.
Specifications and color sequences for
wet and dry proofs.
Study and full observance of publication
standards.
Working with journeymen in these
branches to evaluate a keener sense of
photo-mechanical science.


RELATED INSTRUCTION

Where possible and practical, provision shall be made for schoolroom
instruction of apprentices. Each apprentice shall enroll and attend
classes not less than 144 hours per year. Time spent in related instruc-
tion shall not be classed as hours of work.
Where no suitable classroom instruction is available or where the
number of apprentices is not adequate, the necessary technical instruc-
tion will be provided apprentices on the job during the term of
apprenticeship.





The Committee shall cooperate upon request with educational au-
thorities in working out courses of study for the apprentices.
The most recent technical publication on photoengraving is Modern
Photoengraving by Flader and Mertle, both of whom are well known
in the industry. In this book there is reference to a number of other
publications dealing with the technical phases of photoengraving.
The use of all such publications will be found useful for text and
reference material for those engaged in the photoengraving industry.
The local standards should provide:
In case of failure on the part of any apprentice to fulfill his obliga-
tions as to school attendance, the Committee may suspend or cancel his
agreement; and
The employer agrees to carry out the instructions of the Committee
in this respect, and the apprentice and his parent or guardian agree to
abide by any such determination of said Committee; and
Each apprentice shall be requested to present his registration and
school attendance record as evidence of faithful performance of duty.
This record shall be presented to the Committee before each promotion
period.
INSTRUCTORS

Apprentices shall be supervised at school by such staff as the educa-
tional authorities may provide for them.
The Committee shall recommend the names of men who, in their
opinion, are qualified to instruct the apprentice classes, as a means of
assisting in the selection of an instructor.

PERIODIC EXAMINATIONS

An examination of apprentices shall be given at such times as are
determined by the Committee. In these examinations consideration
shall be given to school attendance and daily employment records of
the apprentice.
HOURS OF WORK

Work hours for apprentices shall be the same as for the journeymen
of the craft who are employed in the shop, and they shall be subject
to the other general conditions of employment applicable to journey-
men.
WAGE RATES

Apprentice wage rates shall be in accordance with collective bargain-
ing agreements where such apply. Ip other instances apprentice wage
rates shall be in accordance with standards prevailing in the industry
in the particular section involved.

10
.1;
'I





RATIO OF APPRENTICES TO JOURNEYMEN
In establishments covered by bargaining agreements the apprentice
ratio contained therein shall apply; in other cases the Committee shall
determine the ratio in accordance with that generally recognized in
the locality involved.

SUPERVISION
The Committee and the employer shall cooperate in designating a
particular person (this may be shop superintendent, foreman, or a
journeyman) to be known as Supervisor of Apprentices. He shall be
responsible for carrying out the apprenticeship and, in collaboration
with the foreman, shall arrange for apprentices to be moved from one
process to another so they may be given all-around work experience.

GRANTING OF CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION OF
APPRENTICESHIP
The Committee will request the Registration Agency to award Cer-
tificates of Completion of Apprenticeship to apprentices who success-
fully complete the apprenticeship, pass all tests and otherwise 'fulfill
the requirements of these standards.

ADJUSTMENT OF DIFFERENCES
Any disagreement between the parties hereto shall be referred to the
Committee whose decision shall be final and conclusive. It is under-
stood this provision applies to apprenticeship problems only.

MODIFICATION OF STANDARDS
These standards may be modified at any time by action of the Com-
mittee, subject to approval by participating parties. Such modifications
shall not alter apprenticeship agreements in effect at the time of the
change without the express consent of the parties to such agreements.
Such modifications are to be approved by the Registration Agency.

BARGAINING AGREEMENT

These standards are signed with the understanding that if any dif-
ference with the bargaining agreement and these standards should
arise, the bargaining agreement shall be paramount.






APPRENTICESHIP AGREEMENT
(Front view)
THIs AGREEMENT, entered into this .. day of ..........., 1. between
..............................., hereinafter referred to as the EMPLOYER, and
(Name of employer)
. . . .. b o rn .. . . ..
(Name of apprentice) (Month) (Day) (Year)
hereinafter referred to as APPRENTICE, and (if a minor) .......................
(Name of parent or guardian)
hereinafter referred to as his GUARDIAN.
WITNESSETH that the EMPLOYER, the APPRENTICE, and his GUARDIAN desire to
enter into an agreement of apprenticeship and therefore, in consideration of the
premises and of the mutual covenants herein contained, do hereby mutually
covenant and agree as follows:
That the EMPLOYER shall employ and teach the APPRENTICE the trade or craft
of .............................. in conformity with the terms and conditions
set forth on the reverse side of this agreement and made a part hereof;
That the APPRENTICE shall perform diligently and faithfully the work of the trade
or craft during the period of apprenticeship, in conformity with the terms and
conditions set forth on the reverse side of this agreement and made a part hereof;
That the GUARDIAN promises that the apprentice will duly perform all obliga-
tions undertaken herein;
That the apprenticeship term begins on the .... day of .........., 19. ...., and
terminates upon the completion by the apprentice of .......... (years or hours) of
employment for said employer in said trade or craft, as stipulated on the reverse
side of this agreement;
That this agreement is subject to approval by a recognized State Apprenticeship
Council in the State in which the apprentice is employed, or if no such council
exists in the State, by the Federal Committee on Apprenticeship, Bureau of Ap-
prenticeship, U. S. Department of Labor;
That either party may terminate the agreement by submitting written notifica-
tion of termination to the approving agency; but, if such notification is submitted
after completion of the probationary period (stipulated on the reverse side hereof),
the reasons for termination shall be given; and
That either party may at any time consult with the approving agency concerning
the interpretation of any part of this agreement over which there is a difference.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF the parties hereunto set their hands and seals:

(Apprentice) (Employer)
. . . . .. B y . . . .
(Address) (Officer)

(Guardian) (Address)
A approved on behalf of the ............................................
(Name of joint apprenticeship committee)
b y .. .. . .. .. .. o n .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 19 ...
Registered by...................... ...............................
(Name of registration agency)
by ........................... on ............ .......... .... 9 ....






APPRENTICESHIP AGREEMENT
(Back view)

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

i. Term of Apprenticeship and Period of Probation











2. Major Processes in Which the Apprentice Is To Receive Instruction and
Experience
(Under this heading state the different branches of the trade to be taught and
the approximate time the apprentice shall work at each branch.)










3. Graduated Scale of Wages To Be Paid the Apprentice










4. Number of Hours Per Day and Total Number of Hours Per Week To Be Worked
by the Apprentice

5. Number of Hours of School Instruction Per Year To Be Attended by Apprentice,
and Name of School
(144 hours per year is the minimum requirement.)

6. Special Provisions
(Write here any terms and conditions not elsewhere stated in this agreement.)

Prepared and distributed by Bureau of Appreuticeship, U. S. Department of
Labor, Washington, D. C.

13











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4,. 4,














Certificates of Con)pl etion of Apprenticeship, awarded to apprentices when they have
comnpl eted their training, are issued by the State apprenticeship agency or the Federal
Committee on Apprenticeship in States in A'hic/z no such agency is established.
~~~~~ -. ,... .. ., ...






COpee their trai1t. ng, I"_are l.. ,su by the State aprniehpaenyo-h eea
Comte on Apretiesi in State :i, <','.,.,cgecyietalshd












i-f"


r


i, W. K. JAMES. Preidnt
D H. MURNIK, hFir V,,e-Pra.
PETE- SCHOTANUS, Srron.d V1i.Pr. t
C G IOHRICH, Scy.-Treal.


AMERICAN PHOTOENGRAVERS ASSOCIATION
GENERAL OFFICES 166 WEST VAN BUREN STREET CHICAGO 4 ILLINOIS
w. K. JAMES. Pnridact
29 North Sixth Saect
Philadelphia 6. Pa.




TO ALL EMPLOYERS IN THE PHOTOENGRAVING INDUSTRY:

The American Photoengravers Association has collabo-
rated with the International Photoengravers' Union
of North America in preparing National Standards of
Apprenticeship for the Commercial Photoengraving In-
dustry. The purpose of these National Standards is
to bring about some uniformity within the industry
on this important matter. It is anticipated that
these standards, as a guide, will be of assistance
to everybody concerned in the development of compe-
tent craftsmen to staff our plants.

Ours is an industry which involves, now more than
ever before, considerable investment in expensive
machinery, equipment and materials, and one in which
technological advancements are constantly taking
place. So that we may operate our plants profitably
we must have proficient craftsmen to perform the
high skills of the trade. It is essential that both
employers and craftsmen keep abreast of the trends
in the industry so that we may uniformally produce
the high quality products demanded of us and requir-
ed by our customers.

We are convinced that a sound apprenticeship system
is necessary for our continued success and that the
establishment of such a system as outlined herein
will redound to the benefit of the Commercial Photo-
engraving Industry and every person employed in the
production of photoengravings for letterpress print-
ing.

Very truly yours,




Wallaston K. James, President


'I


AA











EDWARD J. VOLZ. PuseBIuENT
MATTHEW WOLL. IST VICE-P.IS.
FRED R. BALLBACH. END VICE.PRES.
FRANK D. SMITH, am VICE-PREa.
WILFRID T CONNELL. e4Tn Vie-PRo.
S|WILLIAM H. GRAF. *TH VICE-PRES.
HENRY F. SCHMAL. EGCV.TREAS


It IA g OFFICE OF PRESIDENT
292 MADISON AVENUE **NEW YORK 17. N.1
TELEPHONE LEXINGTON 2-4208

CH.... D ... ... MA '"0 Tune 3 1949
ROaNIZED OCT. 1. flo, June 3, 1949



To Officers and Members of Local Unions,
International Photo-Engravers' Union of N. A.

Greetings:

Within a few days we plan forwarding copies of NATIONAL
APPRENTICESHIP STANDARDS for the COMMERCIAL BRANCH of
the PHOTO-ENGRAVING INDUSTRY. These Standards were joint-
ly formulated by the Executive Committee of the American
Photo Engravers Association and the Executive Council of
this International Union in cooperation with the Bureau
of Apprenticeship of the United States Department of Labor,
which has given its approval.

These are basic Standards and subject to modification thr-
ough local agreement. They are presented for consideration
by local unions and employer groups in the industry inter-
ested in the adoption of joint apprentice-training programs.
Likewise in instances where previously adopted Standards are
to be reconsidered or revised.

The Standards as submitted, will where adopted prove a sound
and progressive procedure for apprentice training.

With best wishes, I remain

Fraternally yours,




Edward J. olz, resident
EJV:MO INTERNATIONAL PHOTO-ENGRAVERS' UNION OF N. A.
OEIU
#153








16












*cr -E -










REGIONAL AND FIELD OFFICES
BUREAU OF APPRENTICESHIP
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

For information regarding the services of field representatives of the Bureau of
Apprenticeship in the establishment of apprenticeship systems communicate with
the nearest office listed below:


REGION I


Massachusetts,-Continued


(Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts,
New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and
Vermont.)

Regional Office


Joseph E. Johnson, Regional
Bureau of Apprenticeship,
Room 501, 18 Oliver Street,
Boston o10, Mass.


Supervisor,


Field Offices

Connecticut:
Bridgeport: Room 310, Post Office
Building.
Hartford: Room 1005, 983 Main
Street.
New Haven: Room 408, 746 Chapel
Street.
New London: Room 310, Post Office
Building.
Stamford: -Room 12, Post Office
Building.
Waterbury: Room 210, Post Office
Building.
Maine:
Portland: 303 Courthouse, 156 Fed-
eral Street.
Waterville: Wein Building, 137 Main
Street.
Massachusetts:
Lawrence: Room 36, Gleason Build-
ing, 349-353 Essex Street.
Pittsfield: 210 Post Office Building.


Springfield: Room
Street.
Worcester: Room
Building.
New Hampshire:
Manchester: Room
Street.
Rhode Island:
Providence: East
Office Building.
Vermont:


404, 1694 Main

333, Post Office


613, 875 Elm


Providence


Post


Burlington: Room Io, Union Station.

REGION II

(New York State)
Regional Office
John M. Marion, Regional Supervisor,
Bureau of Apprenticeship,
Room 1318, 270 Broadway,
New York 7, N. Y.

Field Offices
New York:
Albany: Room 711, 112 State Street.
Binghamton: Room 203, U. S. Post
Office Building.
Buffalo: Room 230 Hurst Building,
47 West Huron Street.
Jamestown: 311 East Second Street.
Mineola: Room 203, Post Office
Building, Main and First Streets.
Niagara Falls: Room 204, U. S. Post
Office Building.





New York--Cuntinucd
Rochester: Room 401, 70 Exchange
Street.
Syracuse: iolo Chimes Building. 5no
South Salina Street.
Troy: 213 Fifth Avenue.
Utica: Room 418, % N. Y. State
Department of Labor, 258 Genes-
see Street.
REGION III
(Delaware, New Jersey, Pennsylvania)

Regional Office
Thomas P. Kenney, Regional Super-
visor,
Bureau of Apprenticeship,
Room 712, Widener Building,
Juniper and Chestnut Streets,
Philadelphia 7, Pa.

Field Offices
Delaware:
Wilmington: Room 103, U. S. Cus-
toms House, Sixth and King Streets.
New Jersey:
Camden: 538 Broadway.
Newark: 930 Essex Building, 3 1 Clin-
ton Street.
Trenton: Room 251-B Federal Build-
ing.
Pennsylvania:
Allentown: Room 20, U. S. Post Of-
fice Building, Fifth and Hamilton
Streets.
Altoona: % Pennsylvania State Em-
ployment Service, 1709 Union Ave-
nue.
Erie: 128 Federal Building.
Harrisburg: 6oi Feller Building,
Third and Market Streets.
Oil City: % Pennsylvania State Em-
ployment Service, Drake Building,
325 Seneca Street.
Pittsburgh: 404 Arrott Building,
Fourth Avenue and Wood Street.


Pcnnsy an ia--Co,,ntinued
Pottsville: % Pennsylvania State Em-
ployment Service, 394 South Cen-
tre Street.
Reading: % Pennsylvania State Em-
ployment Service, Front and Penn
Streets.
Scranton: Room 331, U. S. Post Of-
fice Building.
Wilkes-Barre: % Pennsylvania State
Employment Service, 5 East Mar-
ket Street.
Williamsport: % Pennsylvania State
Employment Service, 228-230 Pine
Street.
York: 239 North George Street, %
P. S. E. S.

REGION IV
(District of Columbia, Maryland, North
Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia)
Regional Office
Robert F. Handle, Regional Supervisor,
Bureau of Apprenticeship,
Room 1450, Temporary "U" Building,
Twelfth and Constitution Avenue NW.,
Washington 25, D. C.

Field Offices
District of Columbia: Washington:
Room 416, 499 Pennsylvania Avenue,
NW.
Maryland:
Baltimore: Room 316, Appraisers'
Stores, 103 South Gay Street.
Hagerstown: IIi South Potomac
Street.
Silver Spring: American Legion
Home, 903 Sligo Avenue.
North Carolina:
Charlotte: Room 1316, Independence
Building.
Raleigh: 509 Caswell Building.
Winston-Salem: 805 North Liberty
Street. *






Virginia:
Norfolk: 416 Royster Building.
Richmond: Room 301, 205 West
Grace Street.
Roanoke: Room 301, School Admin-
istration Building.
West Virginia:
Charleston: Room 102, Federal
Building.
Clarksburg: Room 317, Post Office
Building.
Wheeling: 14 Fidelity Building.
REGION V
(Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio)
Regional Office
John R. Newland, Regional Supervisor,
Bureau of Apprenticeship,
506 Ninth-Chester Building,
Cleveland i4, Ohio.

Field Offices
Kentucky:
Lexington: 176 North Mill Street.
Louisville: 423 South Fifth Street.
Michigan:
Battle Creek: 408 Michigan National
Bank Building, i West Michigan
Avenue.
Detroit: Room 304, Owens Building,
250 West Lafayette Boulevard.
Grand Rapids: 1208 Peoples National
Bank Building.
Lansing: Room 208, 602 North Wash-
ington Avenue.
Saginaw: 218 Graebner Building, 120
North Michigan Avenue.
Sault Ste. Marie: 304 Central Savings
Bank Building.
Ohio:
Akron: % 0. S. E. S., Third Floor, 33
North Main Street.
Canton: Room 215, Dime Savings
Bank Building.
Cincinnati: Room 411 B, Post Office
Building and Court House.


Ohio--Continued
Cleveland: 830 Standard Building.
Columbus: 418 New Federal Build-
ing.
Dayton: 609 Municipal Building,
Third and Ludlow Streets.
Lima: 205 Old Dominion Building.
Newark: Room io0 o, Newark Trust
Building.
Portsmouth: Room 4, Post Office
Building.
Toledo: Room I I-A, Old Federal
Building.
Youngstown: 515 Union National
Bank Building.
REGION VI
(Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin)
Regional Office
Cecil L. Utterback, Regional Supervisor,
Bureau of Apprenticeship,
Room 404, 226 West Jackson Boulevard,
Chicago 6, Ill.
Field Offices
Illinois:
Alton: Post Office Building.
Joliet: Room 412 Morris Building, 58
North Chicago Street.
Moline: 1630 Fifth Avenue.
Mount Vernon: 118 Vz North Tenth
Street.
Peoria: 731 First National Bank
Building.
Rockford: Room 201 Gateway Build-
ing, 121 Seventh Street.
Springfield: 51434 East Monroe
Street.
Indiana:
Evansville: 310 Post .Office Building.
Fort Wayne: 203 Purdue University
Center, 220 East Jefferson Street.
Gary: 307 East Fifth Avenue.
Indianapolis: 911 North Pennsylvania
Street.,
Lafayette: 658 East Main Street.


20






Indiana--Continued
Marion: 316 East Fourth Street.
South Bend: 216 North Michigan
Street.
Terre Haute: 307 Federal Building.
Wisconsin:
Green Bay: 302 Post Office Building.
La Crosse: 216 Post Office Building.
Madison: Room 211 State Office
Building.
Milwaukee: % Industrial Commis-
sion, 623 North Second Street.
Oshkosh: Room 204, Post Office
Building.
Racine: Room 405, Arcade Building,
423 Main Street.
Wausau: Bluhm Building, 124 Wash-
ington Street.
REGION VII

(Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi,
South Carolina, Tennessee)
Regional Office
Charles N. Conner, Regional Supervisor,
Bureau of Apprenticeship,
Room 921, Grant Building.
Atlanta 3, Ga.
Field Offices
Alabama:
Birmingham: 1212 Comer Building.
Mobile: 129 Federal Building.
Montgomery: 303 Old Post Office
Building.
Sheffield: 414 2 Montgomery Ave-
nue.
Florida:
Jacksonville: Room 443, Post Office
Building.
Miami: 716 Seybold Building.
Orlando: 42 East Central Ave., Old
Post Office Building.
Tallahassee: Room 121, Caldwell
Building, Madison Street.
Tampa: Room 904, Wallace S Build-
ing, 608 Tampa Street.


Georgia:
Atlanta: Room 1oi8, Grant Building.
Columbus: Room 243, Martin Build-
ing, 132o Broadway.
Savannah: 402 Blun Building.
Mississippi:
Jackson: 425 /2 South State Street.
Meridian: 221 Pythian Building.
South Carolina:
Charleston: Room 222, The Center.
Columbia: 208 Owen Building.
Spartanburg: 211 Montgomery Build-
ing.
Tennessee:
Chattanooga: Room 217, Federal
Building.
Knoxville: Room 308, Cherokee
Building, 400 West Church Ave-
nue.
Memphis: Third Floor, Dillard Build-
ing, 122 Union Street.
Nashville: 401 Presbyterian Building,
152 Fourth Avenue North.

REGION VIII
(Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North
Dakota, South Dakota)
Regional Office
Cecil L. Utterback, Regional Supervisor,
Bureau of Apprenticeship,
410 Pence Building,
730 Hennepin Avenue,
Minneapolis 3, Minn.
Field Offices
Iowa:
Burlington: Room 523, Tama Build-
ing.
Cedar Rapids: 209 Post Office Build-
ing.
Davenport: Rooms 312-313, Post
Office Building, 131 East Fourth
Street.
Des Moines: Room 310, ioi1 Locust
Street.







Iowa-Continued
Mason City: Room 16, Post Office
Building.
Sioux City: 308 Federal Building.
Waterloo: % Veterans' Administra-
tion, Masonic Temple Building,
East Park and Mulberry Streets.
Minnesota:
Duluth: 212 Bradley Building.
Mankato: % M. S. E. S., 635 South
Front Street.
St. Cloud: % M. S. E. S., 706 St.
Germain Street.
St. Paul: Ashton Building, 1547 Uni-
versity Avenue.
Nebraska:
Lincoln: % N. S. E. S., 1213 North
Street.
Omaha: 201 Two-Ten Building.
North Dakota:
Fargo: % N. D. S. E. S., 630 First
Avenue, North.
South Dakota:
Aberdeen: 503 Capitol Building, 417
South Main Street.
Huron: 201 Post Office Building, 410
Dakota, South.

REGION IX
(Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma)
Regional Office
Taylor F. Custer, Regional Supervisor,
Bureau of Apprenticeship,
1509 Fidelity Building,
Kansas City 6, Mo.
Field Offices
Arkansas:
Fort Smith: Room i i Federal Build-
ing.
Little Rock: 201 Post Office Building.
Kansas:
Topeka: 642 New England Building.
Wichita: 308 Derby Building, 352
North Broadway.


Missouri:
Kansas City: 1510 Fidelity Building,
911 Walnut St.
St. Joseph: % M. S. E. S., 114 V2 South
Eighth Street.
St. Louis: Room 507, New Federal
Building, Twelfth and Market
Streets.
Springfield: 246 Wilhoit Building.
Oklahoma:
Oklahoma City: 411-412 Oklahoma
Natural Building, Third and Har-
vey Avenue.
Tulsa: 916 Daniel Building, 103 East
Third Street.

REGION X

(Louisiana, New Mexico, Texas)

Regional Office
Travis J. Lewis, Regional Supervisor,
Bureau of Apprenticeship,
Room i 806, I I 4 Commerce Street,
Dallas 2, Tex.

Field Offices
Louisiana:
Baton Rouge: 618 Third Street.
Lake Charles: 432 Kirby Street.
New Orleans: 127 Elk Place.
Shreveport: 327 Crockett Street.
New Mexico:
Albuquerque: Room 413, Federal
Building.
Santa Fe: U. S. Court House, Room
5, Basement.
Texas:
Austin: 1709 San Antonio Street.
Beaumont: 315 Federal Building.
Corpus Christi: Room 307 Old Fed-
eral Building, 521 Starr Street.
Dallas: Room 226, 1114 Commerce St.
Nl Paso: 508 North Kansas Street.
Fort Worth: Room 419, U. S. Court
House.


22






Texas-Continued
Houston: Room 301o, Milam Building.
Longview: Room 213, Post Office
Building.
Lubbock: 215 Post Office Building.
San Antonio: Room 592, Federal
Building.
Waco: 421 Columbus Avenue.

REGION XI
(Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Utah,
Wyoming)

Regional Office
Clifford B. Noxon, Regional Supervisor,
Bureau of Apprenticeship,
Room 322-328, Commonwealth Build-
ing,
Fifteenth and Stout Streets.
Denver 2, Coln.

Field Offices
Colorado:
Colorado Springs: 14 South Nevada
Avenue.
Grand Junction: Box 936, Post Office
Building.
Greeley: % Colorado State Employ-
ment Service, 615 Eighth Avenue.
Pueblo: 409 Court Street.
Idaho:
Boise: 209 Continental Bank Build-
ing.
Coeur d'Alene: Room 207, Harding
Building, Fifth and Sherman
Streets.
Montana:
Great Falls: First Floor, City Hall.
Helena: 102 East Sixth Avenue.
Utah:
Ogden: 404 Eccles Building.
Provo: 45 North University Avenue.
Salt Lake City: Room 215 Terminal
Building, 222 Southwest Temple
Street.


Wyoming:
Casper: Room 223, 124 West Second
Street.

REGION XII
(Arizona, Califoirnia, Nevada, Oregon,
Washington)
Regional Office
Broncel R. Mathis, Regional Supervisor,
Bureau of Apprenticeship,
Room 417, Frderal Office Building,
Civic Center, Fulton and Leavenworth
Streets,
San Francisco 2, Calif.

Field Offices
Arizona:
Phoenix: Room 511, Heard Building,
112-120 North Central Avenue.
Tucson: 90 North Church Street,
Room 0o.
California:
Fresno: 2308 Ventura Avenue.
Long Beach: 617 Jergins Trust Build-


ing, 1oo East
Los Angeles:
Santee Street.
Oakland: Room
Street.
Sacramento: 631
San Diego: 301
San Francisco:


Ocean Boulevard.
Room 1107, 1206

520, 577 Fourteenth

Jay Street.
West G Street.
Room 421, Federal


Office Building.
Santa Monica: 1920 Main Street.
Nevada:
Reno: Room 218, Professional Build-
ing.
Oregon:
Eugene: 61o Willamette Street.
Medford: Federal Office Building, 33
North Riverside Avenue.
Pendleton: 142 Southeast First Street.






Oregon-Continued
Portland: Room 307, U. S. Court
House (Old).
Washington:
Longvicw: Room 216, P. 0. Building.
Seattle: 602 American Building, Sec-
ond Avenue and Madison Street.
Spokane: 614 Empire State Building.
West 905 Riverside Avenue.
Tacoma: 519 Provident Building.


Washington---Continued
Yakima: 321-323 East Yakima Ave-
nue, 406 Masonic Temple Building.

TERRITORY
Alaska:
Juneau: 409-41 Territorial Post Office
Building, P. 0. Box 1030.
Hawaii:
Honolulu: 343 Federal Building.


NATIONAL CONSULTANT ON APPRENTICESHIP IN
PHOTOENGRAVING INDUSTRY

EDWARD E. GOSHEN, Assistant Director
BUREAU OF APPRENTICESHIP
U. S. Department of Labor
Washington 25, D. C.


24







STATE APPRENTICESHIP AGENCIES

(Including names of full-time directors)


Alaska Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor,
Juneau, Alaska.


Arizona Apprenticeship Council,
Industrial Commission,
Phoenix, Arizona.*
Archie J. Mooney, Chief. Division of
Apprenticeship Standards,
California Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Industrial Relations,
San Francisco, Calif.*
Tom Yoczik, Chief, Apprentice Train-
ing Division,
Connecticut Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor and Factory In-
spection,
Hartford, Conn.
Gino J. Simi, Director of Apprentice-
ship,
District of Columbia Apprenticeship
Council,
District of Columbia Board of Commis-
sioners,
Washington, D. C.*
John Vandillon, Executive Secretary,
Florida Apprenticeship Council,
Industrial Commission,
Tallahassee, Fla.*
Abner N. Deane,
Director of Apprenticeship,
Hawaii Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor and Industrial
Relations,
Honolulu, T. H.*
Iowa Apprenticeship Council,
Bureau of Labor,
Des Moines, Iowa.

*State apprenticeship law enacted.


Kansas Apprenticeship Council,
Labor Department,
Topeka, Kans.
Kentucky Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Industrial Relations,
Frankfort, Ky.*
R. I. Conran, Director Apprenticeship
Division,
Louisiana Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor,
Baton Rouge 4, La.*
Maine Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor and Industry,
Augusta, Maine.*
Hubert L. Connor, Director,
Division of Apprentice Training,
Massachusetts Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor and Industries,
Boston, Mass.*
Frank Musala, Director,
Division of Voluntary Apprenticeship,
Minnesota Apprenticeship Council,
Industrial Commission,
St. Paul, Minn.*
Montana Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Agriculture, Labor, and
Industry,
Helena, Mont.*
Nevada Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor,
Carson City, Nev.*
New Hampshire Apprenticeship Coun-
cil,
Bureau of Labor,
Concord, N. H.*
New Mexico Apprenticeship Council,
Labor and Industrial Commission,
Albuquerque, N. Mex.*







John J. Sandier, Director of Apprentice-
ship,
New York State Apprenticeship Coun-
cil,
Department of Labor,
New York, N. Y.*
Clarence L. Beddingfield, Director of
Apprenticeship,
North Carolina Apprenticeship Coun-
cil,
Department of Labor,
Raleigh, N. C.*
Ohio Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Industrial Relations,
Columbus, Ohio.
Norman 0. Nilsen, Director of Appren-
ticeship,
Oregon Apprenticeship Council,
Bureau of Labor,
Portland, Oreg.*
Pennsylvania Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor and Industry,
Harrisburg, Pa.
Quintin Gonzales Rodriguez, Director,
Apprenticeship Division,
Department of Labor,
San Juan, P. R.*

*State apprenticeship law enacted.


Rhode Island Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor,

Providence, R. I.

Utah Apprenticeship Council,
Utah Industrial Commission,
Salt Lake City, Utah.*
Vermont Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Industrial Relations,
Montpelier, Vt.*

Robert H. Wilson, Director,
Division of Apprenticeship Training,
Virginia Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor and Industry,
Richmond, Va.*
John E. Vance, Supervisor of Apprentice-
ship,
Washington Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor and Industries,
Seattle, Wash.*

Walter Simon, Supervisor of Apprentice-
ship Department,
Wisconsin Industrial Commission,
Madison, Wis.*

















9


26






OTHER PUBLICATIONS AVAILABLE


Copies of any of the following publications may be obtained by writing to the
nearest regional or field office listed in this pamphlet, or to Bureau of Apprentice-
ship, U. S. Department of Labor, Washington 25, D. C.
NATIONAL APPRENTICESHIP STANDARDS FOR PHOTO-
ENGRAVERS IN THE NEWSPAPER PUBLISHING BUSINESS:
28-page booklet containing national apprenticeship standards for the
guidance of employers and labor in the newspaper publishing business
in establishing and conducting systems of apprentice training. In-
cludes provisions of an apprenticeship program, and functions of local
joint apprenticeship committees.
THE NATIONAL APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM: Review of
development of apprenticeship in this country and how apprenticeship
systems are established. Explanation of functions of Bureau of Ap-
prenticeship, Federal Committee on Apprenticeship, State apprentice-
ship agencies, National, State and local apprenticeship committees.
APPRENTICE TRAINING FOR RETURNING SERVICE-
MEN: Explains simply the essential points veterans want to know
about apprenticeship.
APPRENTICESHIP CREDIT FOR PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE:
Discusses credit for previous experience given apprentices on appren-
ticeship term, and how credit is determined. Of primary interest to
those directly concerned with this aspect of apprenticeship.
EVALUATING APPRENTICES: A 20-page technical booklet con-
taining two articles entitled, respectively, "The Cost of Training and
Value of Production of Apprentices," and "Apprentice Record Cards."
Of special interest to training directors and others directly in charge
of apprentice training.
CRAFT TRAINING-YESTERDAY AND TODAY: The de-
velopment of apprenticeship in the United States since Colonial days
is reviewed in this 4-page review which contrasts the early apprentice
indentures with today's apprenticeship agreement, the modern version
of the original indentures. Explained in the article are the transitions
in methods and practices of apprentice training prior to and following
the industrial revolution, and since the enactment by Congress in 1937
of the national apprenticeship law. Reprinted from the American
Vocational Journal.
OCCUPATION STATISTICS OF REGISTERED APPREN-
TICES: 12-page statistical study of 233,300 apprentices employed in
each skilled trade in the beginning of 1949 in programs registered with
State apprenticeship agencies or the Bureau of Apprenticeship. Occu-
pation data are presented in a series of tables under major and minor
trade groupings.

27


U. S GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICEi 1949






















































































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