Research abstracts

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Title:
Research abstracts
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93 v. : ; 27 cm.
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English
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United States -- National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics
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National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics
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Washington, D.C
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completely irregular

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Aeronautics -- Abstracts -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Aeronautics -- Research -- Abstracts -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
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federal government publication   ( marcgt )
abstract or summary   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Abstracts no. 1 (June 15, 1951)-no. 93 (Nov. 30, 1955).

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001469326
notis - AGY1019
oclc - 01471285
lccn - 86657025
issn - 0499-9274
Classification:
lcc - TL501 .U5895
System ID:
AA00009235:00059

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National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics


Research Abstracts


NO.39


MARCH 18, 1953


CURRENT NACA REPORTS


NACA Rept. 1072 :N

INELASTIC COLUMN BEHAVIOR. John E Du rg
and Thomas W. Wilder, In. 1952. iii, I.
(NACA Rept. 1072. Formerly TN 2267)

This paper presents the significant findingT of a
theoretical study of column behavior in the plastic
stress range that shows the tangent-modulus4oad to
be the load at which bending can start for a straight -
column. Load-deflection analyses are made for 1-w
column models one model having a concentrated
flexibility and the other having its flexibility distri-
buted along its length. Results are presented which
relate the maximum load to the stress-strain curve
of the material.


NACA Rept. 1079

SOUND FROM A TWO-BLADE PROPELLER AT
SUPERSONIC TIP SPEEDS. Harvey H. Hubbard
and Leslie W. Lassiter. 1952. ii, 9p. diagrs.,
photos. (NACA Rept. 1079. Formerly RM L51C27)

Propeller sound measurements at static conditions
have been extended to a tip Mach number of 1. 30.
Spectrums have been obtained at both subsonic and
supersonic tip speeds for comparison, and the
measured data are compared with calculations by
the Gutin theory. At supersonic tip speeds, the
maximum intensities were measured in the plane of
rotation and the spectrums are noted to contain a
large high-frequency content. At supersonic tip
speeds the over-all sound pressures, at a given
power to the propeller, were noted to be independent
of tip speed. The Gutin theory was found to be ade-
quate for predicting the intensities of the lower-
order harmonics but overestimates the intensities
of the higher-order ones at supersonic tip speeds.


NACA Rept. 1084

COMPARISON OF HIGH-SPEED OPERATING CHAR-
ACTERISTICS OF SIZE 215 CYLINDRICAL-ROLLER
BEARINGS AS DETERMINED IN TURBOJET ENGINE
AND IN LABORATORY TEST RIG. E. Fred Macks
and Zolton N. Nemeth 1952. it, 12p. diagrs.,
photos., tab. (NACA Rept. 1084. Formerly
RM E51I05)

Inner- and outer-race cooling-correlation curves
were obtained for the turbojet-engine turbine-roller
bearing with the same inner- and outer-race cooling-


AVAILABLE ON LOAN ONLY
ADDRESS REQUESTS FOR DOCUMENTS TO NACA, 1724 F ST., NW
THE REPORT TITLE AND AUTHOR.

LZ. /f 02o


correlation parameters and exponents as those deter-
mined for the test-rig bearing. The inner- and
outer-race turbine roller-bearing temperatures may
be predicted from a single curve regardless of vari-
h.' tons in speed, load, oil flow, oil inlet temperatures,
"oinlet viscosity, oil-jet diameter, or any combina-
tien\of these parameters.
-;55 \
NACA TN 2892
/
SA RAPID METHOD FOR ESTIMATING THE SEPA-
RATION POINT OF A COMPRESSIBLE LAMINAR
S'BOUNDARY LAYER. Laurence K. Loftin, Jr. and
Homer B. Wilson, Jr. February 1953. 19p.
diagrs. INACA TN 2892)

A method which permits the rapid estimation of the
separation point of a compressible laminar boundary
layer has been developed. The method is generally
applicable to any two-dimensional flow which satis-
fies the classical boundary-layer assumptions. Cal-
culations made with the use of the method indicate
that the amount of velocity recovery possible before
laminar separation occurs decreases as the Mach
number increases


NACA TN 2893

THEORETICAL AND MEASURED ATTENUATION OF
MUFFLERS AT ROOM TEMPERATURE WITHOUT
FLOW, WITH COMMENTS ON ENGINE-EXHAUST
MUFFLER DESIGN. Don D. Davis, Jr., George L.
Stevens, Jr., Dewey Moore and George M. Stokes.
February 1953. ni, Illp. diagrs., photos., 4 tabs.
(NACA TN 2893)

Equations are presented for the attenuation charac-
teristics of several types of mufflers Experimen-
tal curves of attenuation plotted against frequency
are presented for 77 different mufflers and the re-
suits are compared with theory. The experiments
were made at room temperature without flow and the
sound source was a loud-speaker. A method is
given for including the tail pipe in the calculations.
The application of the theory to the design of engine-
exhaust mufflers is discussed, and charts have been
included for the assistance of the designer.


NACA TN 2895

EFFECT OF VARIABLE VISCOSITY AND THERMAL
CONDUCTIVITY ON HIGH-SPEED SLIP FLOW BE-
TWEEN CONCENTRIC CYLINDERS. T. C. Lin and
R E Street, Universty of Washington. February
1953. 122p. dlagrs. (NACA TN 2895)


WASHINGTON 25. D. C, CITING CODE NUMBER ABOVE EACH TITLE;








2


The differential equations of slip flow, including the
Burnett terms, were first solved by Schamberg as-
suming that the coefficients of viscosity and heat con-
duction of the gas were constants. The problem is
solved herein for variable coefficients of viscosity
and thermal conductivity by applying a transformation
leading to an iteration method. The method, starting
with the solution for constant coefficients, enables
one to approximate the solution for variable coeffi-
cients very closely after one or two steps. Satis-
factory results are shown to follow from Schamberg's
solution by using his values of the constant coeffi-
cients multiplied by a constant factor 7i, leading to
what are denoted as the effective coefficients of vis-
cosity and thermal conductivity


NACA TN 2897

EVALUATION OF GUST RESPONSE CHARACTER-
ISTICS OF SOME EXISTING AIRCRAFT WITH WING
BENDING FLEXIBILITY INCLUDED. Eldon E.
Kordes and John C. Houbolt. February 1953. 31p.
diagrs., 2 tabs. (NACA TN 2897)

Calculation studies made by means of the analysis
presented in NACA TN 2763 to evaluate the influence
that wing bending flexibility has on the structural re-
sponse due to gust are reported for three twin-engine
transports and one four-engine bomber. The manner
in which dynamic response factors for acceleration
and bending moment vary with various assumed op-
erational factors is shown. Factors investigated in-
clude gust-gradient distance, gust shape, spanwise
mass distribution, forward velocity, altitude, and
compressibility and aspect-ratio corrections. A
limited correlation of some of the calculated results
with flight data is also presented.


NACA TN 2898

THEORETICAL CALCULATION OF THE PRESSURE
DISTRIBUTION, SPAN LOADING, AND ROLLING
MOMENT DUE TO SIDESLIP AT SUPERSONIC
SPEEDS FOR THIN SWEPTBACK TAPERED WINGS
WITH SUPERSONIC TRAILING EDGES AND WING
TIPS PARALLEL TO THE AXIS OF WING SYMME-
TRY. Kenneth Margolis, Windsor L. Sherman and
Margery E. Hannah. February 1953. 70p. diagrs.,
tab. (NACA TN 2898)

On the basis of linearized supersonic-flow theory,
equations for the pressure distribution have been
derived for thin, sweptback, tapered wings sideslip-
ping at a constant angle of attack. The analysis is
applicable to plan forms for which the wing tips are
parallel to the axis of wing symmetry and at super-
sonic speeds for which the wing trailing edge is
supersonic. A minor restriction is that the Mach
cones emanating from the opposite side edges may
not intersect on the wing. The plan form with both
leading edges subsonic has been analyzed in detail.
Equations for the span loading, rolling moment, and
the corresponding stability derivative Ci have been
obtained. Illustrative span loadings and variations


NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS N0.39



of the derivative Ci with Mach number are pre- -
sented for a number of wings.


NACA TN 2899

MEASUREMENTS OF FLYING QUALITIES OF AN
F-47D-30 AIRPLANE TO DETERMINE LONGITU-
DINAL STABILITY AND CONTROL AND STALLING
CHARACTERISTICS. Christopher C. Kraft, Jr.,
R. Fabian Goranson and John P. Reeder. February
1953. 75p. photos., diagrs., 2 tabs. (NACA
TN 2899)

Flight tests were made of the flying qualities of an
F-47D-30 airplane to determine the longitudinal
stability and control and stalling characteristics.



NACA TN 2900

THE CALCULATION OF PRESSURE ON SLENDER
AIRPLANES IN SUBSONIC AND SUPERSONIC FLOW.
Max. A. Heaslet and Harvard Lomax. March 1953.
25p. diagrs. (NACA TN 2900)

Under the assumption that a wing, body, or wing-
body combination is slender or flying at near sonic
velocity, expressions are given which permit the
calculation of pressure in the immediate vicinity of
the configuration. The disturbance field, in both
subsonic and supersonic flight, is shown to consist
of two-dimensional disturbance fields extending
laterally and a longitudinal field that depends on the
streamwise growth of cross-sectional area. A dis-
cussion is also given of couplings, between lifting
and thickness effects, that necessarily arise as a
result of the quadratic dependence of pressure on the
induced velocity components.


NACA TN 2901

AN ANALYSIS OF THE FACTORS AFFECTING THE
LOSS IN LIFT AND SHIFT IN AERODYNAMIC
CENTER PRODUCED BY THE DISTORTION OF A
SWEPT WING UNDER AERODYNAMIC LOAD.
Charles W. Mathews and Max C. Kurbjun. March
1953. 65p. diagrs. (NACA TN 2901)

Results of a simplified analysis of the factors affect-
ing the loss in lift and shift in aerodynamic center of
a swept wing due to its bending under aerodynamic
load are presented as charts which relate the stress
and aeroelastic effects considered to the wing struc-
tural weight, external geometry, material, and
flight condition. Illustrative examples of the magni-
tudes of the aeroelastic effects to be expected are
presented for typical swept wings. The manner in
which these aeroelastic effects influence the longitu-
dinal stability of an airplane is also considered.







NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO.319


NACA TN 2906

AN AIRBORNE INDICATOR FOR MEASURING VER-
TICAL VELOCITY OF AIRPLANES AT WHEEL
CONTACT. Robert C. Dreher. February 1953.
19p. diagrs., photos. (NACA TN 2906)

An investigation has been made with an airborne
vertical- velocity indicator in order to determine the
accuracy and practicability of such an indicator. A
prototype installation was tested under controlled
conditions in the Langley impact basin and by means
of flight tests with a small trainer-type airplane. A
second more compact installation which is retract-
able was developed for use on a high-speed jet bomb-
er. A description of the operation of the indicator
Is given. The data obtained and an evaluation of the
indicator are presented and show that this type of
vertical-velocity indicator is accurate and practical
for obtaining vertical velocities at the instant of air-
plane wheel contact.


NACA TN 2907

EFFECT OF HORIZONTAL-TAIL SPAN AND VER-
TICAL LOCATION ON THE AERODYNAMIC CHAR-
ACTERISTICS OF AN UNSWEPT TAIL ASSEMBLY
IN SIDESLIP. Donald R. Riley. February 1953.
39p. diagrs., photos., tab. (NACA TN 2907)

Wind-tunnel results on the effect of horizontal-tail
span and vertical location of the horizontal tail rela-
tive to the vertical tail on the aerodynamic charac-
teristics of an unswept vertical-tail assembly in
sideslip are presented. By applying the well-known
discrete-horseshoe-vortex method used for wings to
the problem of intersecting surfaces, theoretical
span loadings were obtained for each of the config-
urations tested. Calculated values obtained from
the span loadings are compared with experimental
results.


NACA TN 2909

STUDY OF SECONDARY-FLOW PATTERNS IN AN
ANNULAR CASCADE OF TURBINE NOZZLE
BLADES WITH VORTEX DESIGN. Harold E. Rohlik,
Hubert W. Allen and Howard Z. Herzig. March
1953. 29p. diagrs., photos. (NACA TN 2909)

In order to increase understanding of the origin of
losses in a turbine, the secondary-flow components
in the boundary layers and the blade wakes of an
annular cascade of turbine nozzle blades (vortex
design) were investigated. A detailed study was
made of the total-pressure contours and, particu-
larly, of the inner-wall loss cores downstream of
the blades. The inner-wall loss core associated
with a blade of the turbine-nozzle cascade is largely
the accumulation of low-momentum fluids originating
elsewhere in the cascade. This accumulation is
effected by the secondary-flow mechanism which acts
to transport the low-momentum fluids across the
channels on the walls and radially in the blade wakes
and boundary layers. The patterns of secondary flow
were determined by use of hydrogen sulfide traces,


3


paint, flow fences, and total-pressure surveys. At
one flow condition investigated, the radial transport
of low-momentum fluid in the blade wake and on the
suction surface near the trailing edge accounted for
65 percent of the loss core; 30 percent resulted from
flow in the thickened boundary layer on the suction
surface and 35 percent from flow in the blade wake.


NACA RM E52L05

PRELIMINARY COMPARISON OF 17- AND 75-
MILLIMETER-BORE CAGELESS CYLINDRICAL
ROLLER BEARINGS WITH CONVENTIONAL CYLIN-
DRICAL ROLLER BEARINGS AT HIGH SPEEDS. E.
Fred Macks, W. J. Anderson and Zolton N. Nemeth.
March 1953. 39p. diagrs., photos., tab. (NACA
RM E52L05)

Preliminary results at high speeds indicate lower
bearing temperatures, less internal bearing wear,
and greater reliability of the conventional, cage-type
cylindrical roller bearings than of either full-
complement or special cageless roller bearings of
the types investigated, although the latter bearing
types have been operated successfully to DN values
of 1.0 x 106.


NACA RM E52L24a

SMOKE STUDIES OF SECONDARY FLOWS IN
BENDS, TANDEM CASCADES, AND HIGH-TURNING
CONFIGURATIONS. Arthur G. Hansen, Howard Z.
Herzig and George R. Costello. March 1953. 33p.
photos., diagr. (NACA RM E52L24a)

Flow-visualization studies, using smoke, were made
of the secondary flows in rectangular bends, tandem
cascades, and high-turning configurations. The
roll-up of the wall boundary layer of a rectangular
bend forms a passage vortex near the suction surface
similar to that previously observed for cascades.
The vortex so formed then shifts out into the main
stream. Because of leading-edge effects, the
boundary-layer flows in bends were found to be suf-
ficiently different from the flows in blade rows to
make direct application of bend results to blade rows
inadvisable. Passage vortices are shown, in the
tandem-cascade study, to resist turning with the
main stream through which they pass and to disturb
the flow in subsequent blade rows. This disturbance
may explain in part the appreciable size of the losses
sometimes attributed to secondary flows in turbo-
machines despite the fact that the energy involvement
in vortex formation is slight. Tip-flow studies of
high-turning blades with relative motion between
blades and end wall indicated that if the relative
sizes of the passage vortex forces, the tip clearance
forces, and the blade-scraping effects are properly
controlled, it may be possible to improve the blade-
tip loading characteristics in turbomachine.







4


NACA RM E53A22

AN ANALYTICAL STUDY OF HEAT REQUIRE-
MENTS FOR ICING PROTECTION OF RANDOMES.
James P. Lewis. March 1953. 20p. diagrs.
(NACA RM E53A22)

The heat requirements for the icing protection of two
radome configurations have been studied over a range
of design icing conditions. Both the protection limits
of a typical thermal protection system and the rela-
tive effects of the various icing variables have been
determined. For full evaporation of all impinging
water, an effective heat density of 14 watts per
square inch was required. When a combination of
the full evaporation and running wet surface systems
was employed, a heat requirement of 5 watts per
square inch provided protection at severe icing and
operating conditions.


BRITISH REPORTS


N-13437*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
THE BOUNDARY LAYER WITH DISTRIBUTED SUC-
TION. M. R. Head. April 2, 1951. 118p. diagrs.,
photos., 4 tabs. (ARC 13, 897; FM 1547; Perf. 771)

Experiments performed in flight at Reynolds num-
bers in the region of 3 x 106 have clearly demon-
strated the stabilizing effect of small amounts of
distributed suction on the laminar boundary layer.
In the absence of a pressure gradient and in adverse
gradients similar to those occurring on a normal
airfoil, transition of the boundary layer to the tur-
bulent form has been prevented by the use of such
suction quantities as may be expected to lead to very
considerable reductions in effective drag. It ap-
pears, however, that for extensive laminar flow to
be achieved in this way, the surface must be free
from such excrescences as would cause transition in
the absence of suction. Laminar boundary-layer
velocity profiles obtained with suction in the absence
of a pressure gradient are found to be in good agree-
ment with those calculated for the flat plate, and the
suction quantities required to maintain laminar flow
are similar to those suggested by stability theory.


N-16313*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
CHARTS OF THE WAVE DRAG OF WINGS AT ZERO
LIFT. T. Lawrence. November 1952. 22p. diagrs.
(RAE Tech.Note Aero 2139, rev.)

Theoretical calculations of the wave drag at super-
sonic speeds of nonlifting wings of double wedge and
biconvex section are reviewed, and the best method
of presenting the results considered. Using this
method, a representative selection of the available
numerical evaluations of the theory is presented.
These should be of value for wing drag estimation
purposes.


NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO.39


N-20663 *

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
SOME PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM V-G
RECORDERS INSTALLED IN MILITARY AND CIVIL
AIRCRAFT. R. Hain Taylor. 1952. 43p. diagrs.,
5 tabs. (ARC R& M 2610; ARC 10,433. Formerly
RAE SME 3393; RAE Tech. Note SME 188; ARC
7266; RAE Tech. Note SME 204; ARC 7475; RAE
Tech. Note SME 232; ARC 7887; RAE Tech. Note
SME 303; ARC 8621; RAE Tech. Note SME 368;
ARC 9940)

During the latter half of the 1939-45 war, V-g re-
corder slides were collected from a number of oper-
ational and training aircraft types, and about April
1944, the scope was widened to include some com-
mercial transport aircraft. A number of the results
has been given limited circulation as Aeronautical
Research Council papers, from heavy bombers in
October 1943, from fighters in January 1944, and
from twin-engined aircraft in April 1944, and a sum-
mary of readings from commercial aircraft in 1946;
this report collects these scattered results into one
body. Part I outlines the method of collection of the
slides, describes the nature of the readings obtained,
and their method of presentation, and discusses the
results. These are grouped roughly into classes, as
heavy bombers, fighters, twin-engined aircraft,
training aircraft and commercial transport aircraft,
and the possibilities of comparison between different
types performing the same role, and between
different roles performed by the same basic type,
are indicated. Part II is a theoretical consideration
of possible methods of analysis and extrapolation; it
is pointed out that as the work has developed, first
ideas have been enlarged or superseded, and finality
is still far off. The advantages and disadvantages of
several methods used up to 1946 are discussed, and
suggestions are made for subsequent work.


N-20917*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
INVESTIGATIONS ON SWEPT AND UNSWEPT WINGS
AT HIGH SUBSONIC SPEEDS. J. Ackeret, M.
Degen and N. Rott. February 16, 1951. 12p.
diagrs. (ARC 13, 788; FM 1525; Perf. 894)

In the high-speed wind tunnel of the Institue of Aero-
dynamics, E.T.H., Zurich, straight and sweptback
wings have been tested at high subsonic speeds.
Drag measurements at zero incidence were made on
a series of geometrically similar models at the same
Reynolds number, which was maintained constant by
varying the air density. In this way the theoretical
tunnel correction formulas could be checked and an
extrapolation made to vanishing tunnel influence;
straight and sweptback wings were compared after
the corrections had been applied. Two different
profile thicknesses (9 percent and 12 percent) were
used. The transonic drag Mach number relation
for different thicknesses was found to be in very
satisfactory agreement with von Karmin's similarity
law.





NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO.39


N-20919

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
NOTE ON THE EFFECT OF SWEEP AND INTER-
FERENCE ON THE OVERALL DRAG COEFFICIENT
OF AN AIRCRAFT AT SUBCRITICAL MACH NUM-
BERS. J. H. Preston. March 22, 1951. 6p.
(ARC 13,875; Perf. 769)

The influence of sweep and interference on the over-
all drag coefficient of an aircraft is discussed. I
is concluded that the induced drag need only slightly
exceed the ideal minimum for practical sweptback
plan forms. The part of the profile drag coefficient
independent of CL may be slightly reduced by sweep,
and the part proportional to CL2 may be considerably
increased and may be sensitive to the spanwise vari-
ation of CL from the mean value. The drag incre-
ments due to interference at junctions can be split
into two parts a profile loss such as would be
obtained from a pitot traverse, and an induced loss
arising from the secondary flows set up in the junc-
tion. This latter does not seem to have been studied
in connection with aircraft. Both parts of the inter-
ference drag may rise steeply with increase of CL.
Correct design of the fairing and the use of boundary-
layer suction would assist in reducing the inter-
ference drag.


N-20954 *

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
DYNAMICALLY EQUIVALENT CIRCUITS OF
TRANSDUCTORS FEEDING INDUCTIVE RESIST-
ANCE LOADS. D. O. Burns. August, 1952. 26p.
diagrs. (RAE Tech. Note EL. 41)

The dynamic relationship between the input voltage
and the input current of series self-excited trans-
ductors has been reported on by various authorities,
notably Milnes. However, amplifier designers in
general, and servomechanics in particular, are more
concerned with the dynamic relationship between in-
put voltage and output current, especially when feed-
ing inductive loads such as relays, motor windings,
etc. In the case of the electronic amplifier, equiv-
alent circuits, involving the parameters of the
vacuum tube and the load resistance and inductance,
which enable the dynamic response of the amplifier
to be calculated, are now well known. As an exten-
sion of this field, this report gives the dynamically
equivalent circuits for transductors, which may be
used for calculating the dynamic responses of
magnetic amplifiers feeding inductive resistance
loads.


N-20960*

Marine Aircraft Experimental Establishment
(Gt. Brit.) THE FULL SCALE HYDRODYNAMIC
PERFORMANCE OF A LARGE FOUR-ENGINED
FLYING BOAT AT OVERLOAD IN CALM WATER
AND SWELL. J. A. Hamilton and R. V. Gigg.
August 1952. 63p. diagrs., photos., 2 tabs.
(MAEE F/Res/225)


5


Tests have been made on a large four-engined flying
boat (Solent Mk. 3) to determine the hydrodynamic
performance in sheltered water and in open sea
swells. The results of general research interest are
considered in this report. The sheltered water
characteristics were investigated over a range of
weights between 72, 000 and 84, 000 lb. The perform-
ance in swell covered weights up to 82, 000 lb, and
swell heights up to 5 feet.


N-20964*

Forest Products Research Lab. (Gt. Brit.)
INVESTIGATIONS INTO GLUES AND GLUING,
PROGRESS REPORT SEVENTY-TWO NOVEMBER
1952. THE BONDING OF PRESERVATIVE
TREATED VENEERS WITH PHENOLIC RESIN.
R. A. G. Knight, L. S. Doman and G. E. Soane.
6p. 2 tabs. (Forest Products Research Lab.)

This report describes tests made on phenolic-bonded
plywood with preservatives applied to the individual
veneers prior to their being bonded together. These
tests were conducted in order to determine if these
preservatives interfered with the phenolic resin
either in its setting action or subsequently.



N-21005 *

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
PHYSICAL ENTROPY AND THE ENTROPY OF
INFORMATION THEORY. G. F. Cawsey.
February, 1952. 36p. (RAE Tech. Note GW 169)

This note briefly outlines some of the definitions of
entropy in physics, and considers the interrelations
of entropy and information in physical and communi-
cation systems as discussed by Szilard, Brillouin,
and Shannon. In conclusion, some suggestions are
offered as to the associations to be made in observa-
tional and communication systems with the words
"entropy" and "information."



N-21029*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
THE PRODUCTION OF TRANSDUCER, ACCELERA-
TION (TELEMETRY) TYPE IT 1-16. October 1951.
4p. (RAE Specif. IT. 163)

This report presents the RAE specifications for the
construction, adjustment, testing, marking and
packing of an acceleration transducer.



N-21034*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
THE EFFECT OF STOVE-ENAMELLING TEMPER-
ATURES ON ALUMINIUM ALLOYS. G. Meikle and
J. Thompson. August, 1952. 9p. diagrs. (RAE
Tech. Note Met. 166)








6


The effect of heating the D. T.D. 603 type of alloy at
1200, 1650 and 1850 C was inresti,-aed as these
temperatures are liable to be used either for stove-
enamelling or for "curing" synthetic resin adhesives.
Tests were also made at 1200 C on D. T.D. 687
aluminum alloy. Stoving at 1200 C is liable to cause
a drop of 2 tons/sq in. in proof stress and ultimate
tensile stress in D. T.D. 603 and this is not regained
except by prolonged heating at 1200 C. At 1650 C,
the improvement due to artificial aging is apparent
after 2 hours heating. A temperature of 1850 C for
an hour is not likely to have much deleterious effect
on fully aged D. T.D. 603 (D. T.D. 646) or D. T.D.
610 (D.T.D. 546). Heating D. T.D. 687 at 1200 C
for a few hours has only a slight deleterious effect.


N-21035*

Marine Aircraft Experimental Establishment
(Gt. Brit.) 50 FT. REFUELLER MARK 2 NO. 2133
PERFORMANCE. November 1952. 14p. diagrs.
(MAEE F/181, pt. 2)

Full performance measurements were made on 50-ft
Refueller Mark 2, No. 2133, fitted with two Perkins
S. 6M. engines. The top speed of the craft fully
laden is 10 knots, at a fuel consumption of 0. 65 nau-
tical m. p. g. The turning circle is about 2-1/4 boat
lengths under most conditions, and the emergency
stopping distance from full throttle also about 2-1/4
boat lengths. Fuel pumping rates are about the same
as for the Mark 1 craft, that is, 20 gallons per min-
ute per 1-1/2 in. hose. The fuel meter is, however,
liable to give false indications of the quantity pumped,
due to air entering the system. The fuel delivery
rates of the craft are much lower than the rating of
the pump. The compressed air starting system is
barely adequate. Higher pressure cylinders and a
larger compressor are desirable.


N-21036*
Marine Aircraft Experimental Establishment
(Gt. Brit.) PRELIMINARY PRESSURE MEASURE-
MENTS DURING THE LANDING OF A SUNDERLAND
MARK 5 FLYING BOAT IN ROUGH WATER CONDI-
TIONS INCLUDING ONE ON WHICH THE FOREBODY
WAS SEVERELY DAMAGED. R. Parker. Appendix
I by W. McClymont. Appendix II by R. Parker.
September 1952. 40p. diagrs., photos., 5 tabs.
(MAEE F/Res/227)
A series of 11 exploratory landings were carried out
on a Sunderland Mark 5 flying boat in rough water
conditions, during which pressures at various posi-
tions on the planing bottom and the c. g. acceleration
were measured. Detailed investigations were to be
carried out, based on these tests, but the aircraft
was severely damaged and this report presents these
first results. Analysis of these results shows that
pressures occurring in the bow region are of the
same order of magnitude as those in the main step
region which, in turn, are similar in magnitude to
those encountered in high rate of descent landings in
calm water conditions. Pressures recorded on the
afterbody are invariably much lower than those on
the forebody. The greatest risk of damaging the


NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO.39



aircraft occurs when, a short time after touchdown,..
the aircraft still has considerable forward speed and
the pilot little or no control.


N-21044*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
GERMAN WIND TUNNEL TESTS ON TRAILING
EDGE SPOILERS AT SUBSONIC AND SUPERSONIC
SPEEDS. H. Voepel. November, 1952. 21p.
diagrs., 3 tabs. (RAE Tech. Note Aero 2214)

During the war, Herbert Wagner introduced a new
aerodynamic controlling device in the form of
trailing-edge spoilers, which are especially suitable
for guided missiles. Considerable tunnel develop-
ment of the control was done, but the work has not
previously been reported in an accessible form, nor
has any analysis of the results been attempted.
Such presentation and analysis is given here.


N-21055*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
THE PRODUCTION OF TRANSDUCER, ACCELERA-
TION TYPE IT. 1-22. October 1951. 6p. (RAE
Specif. IT. 164)

This report presents a description and RAE specifi-
cations for the adjustment, testing, marking, and
packing of acceleration transducers.


N-21056*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
THE PRODUCTION OF GYRO, ANGULAR VELOCITY
TRANSMITTING TYPE IT.3-1. January 1952. 5p.
(RAE Specif. IT. 114)

This report presents the RAE specifications for an
angular velocity transmitting gyroscope to be used
in conjunction with telemetering equipment, for
measuring the rate of angular movement of falling
bodies.


N-21057 *

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
THE PRODUCTION OF PICK-UP, PRESSURE
DIFFERENTIAL (VARIABLE INDUCTANCE) TYPE
IT. 1-2. April 1949. 5p. diagr. (RAE Specif.
IT. 99)

This report contains the RAE specifications for
pressure units to be used for the measurement of
steady and fluctuating air pressures.



N-21058*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
GYRO, RATE, REMOTE INDICATING TYPE IT. 2-1.
April 1947. 5p. (RAE Specif.IT.80)







NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO.39



This report presents the RAE specifications for a
remote indicating gyroscope to be used in aircraft
in conjunction with a desynn indicator to measure
rates of rotation of the aircraft.


N-21074*

Royal Aircraft Estaolishment (Gt. Brit.)
THE BASIC NOTIONS OF INFORMATION THEORY.
D J. Richardson October, 1952. 27p. (RAE
Tech. Note GW 214)

A study of available literature on the theory of infor-
mation has been made. The various notions and
terms employed in the theory are gathered together
and explained or defined in the text. A list of refer-
ences is appended.


MISCELLANEOUS


NACA Rept 1054

Errata No. I on "INTEGRALS AND INTEGRAL
EQUATIONS IN LINEARIZED WING THEORY."
Harvard Lomas. Max. A. Heaslet and Franklyn B.
Fuller. 1951.


NACA Rept. 1062

Errata No. 1 on "INVESTIGATION OF WEAR AND
FRICTION PROPERTIES UNDER SLIDING CONDI-
TIONS OF SOME MATERIALS SUITABLE FOR
CAGES OF ROLLING-CONTACT BEARINGS. "
Robert L. Johnson, Max. A. Swikert and Edmond
E. Bisson 1952.


NACA Rept. 1083

Errata No. I on "AXISYMMETRIC SUPERSONIC
FLOW IN ROTATING IMPELLERS." Arthur W.
Goldstein. 1952.


NACA RM L8H23

Errata No. I on "EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINA-
TION OF THE LATERAL STABILITY OF A GLIDER
TOWED BY A SINGLE TOWLINE AND CORRELA-
TION WITH AN APPROXIMATE THEORY." Bernard
Maggin and Robert E. Shanks. November 12, 1948.


7




UNPUBLISHED PAPERS



N-15503

Armour Research Foundation.
STRESS CORROSION IN AIRCRAFT ALLOYS.
Joseph B. McAndrew and Howard T. Francis.
(Final rept.) May 29, 1952. i, 24p. photos.
(Armour Research Foundation)

An attempt has been made to verify the existing the-
ory for the stress corrosion cracking of aluminum
4-percent copper alloy. The approach used has em-
ployed a scanning device, called a "corroscope, "
which permits a two-dimensional picture to be ob-
served on an oscilloscope, in which is shown the po-
tential distribution in the electrolyte immediately
adjacent to the corroding metal surface. Since this
potential field is directly related to the current lines
flowing from point to point on the specimen, the pic-
ture allows direct observation of the location of
anodic and cathodic regions on the surface.



N-19882*

Battelle Memorial Inst.
THE PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF SINGLE CRYS-
TALS OF ALUMINUM. R. D. Johnson, A. P. Young,
W. B. Wilson and A. D. Schwope. (Summary rept.)
October 10, 1952. i, 59p. photos., diagrs., tab.
(Battelle Memorial Inst.)

This report describes a portion of the work per-
formed in a fundamental investigation of creep in
metals. The creep of single crystals of high-purity
aluminum has been studied in the temperature range
from 7000 F to 11000 F. Experiments were car-
ried out to investigate the possible effect of small
amounts of restraining by various methods on the
creep properties of these aluminum single crystals.
An experimental survey was conducted with various
high-resolution X-ray diffraction techniques to deter-
mine the feasibility of studying the nature of plastic
deformation in this manner.


NACA-Langley 3-18-53 -4000




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08153 275 5
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