Research abstracts

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Title:
Research abstracts
Physical Description:
93 v. : ; 27 cm.
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English
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United States -- National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics
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National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
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irregular
completely irregular

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Subjects / Keywords:
Aeronautics -- Abstracts -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Aeronautics -- Research -- Abstracts -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
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serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
abstract or summary   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Abstracts no. 1 (June 15, 1951)-no. 93 (Nov. 30, 1955).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001469326
notis - AGY1019
oclc - 01471285
lccn - 86657025
issn - 0499-9274
Classification:
lcc - TL501 .U5895
System ID:
AA00009235:00051

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National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics



Research Abstracts ---
NO.87 AUGUST 2, 1955


CURRENT NACA REPORTS

NACA RM E55E17a

PRELIMINARY DATA ON RAIN DEFLECTION FROM
AIRCRAFT WINDSHIELDS BY MEANS OF HIGH-
VELOCITY JET-AIR BLAST. Robert S. Ruggeri.
July 1955. 17p. diagrs., photos. (NACA
RM E55E17a)

Results indicate that rain deflection by jet-air blast
appears feasible for flight speeds comparable with
landing and take-off; however, visibility through the
mist generated by raindrop breakup presents a prob-
lem. For the simulated windshield used, air-flow
rates of about 3.3 lb. min-in. of span were required
for adequate rain deflection at an airspeed of 135
mph. A method was devised whereby large-diameter
water drops (1000 to 1500 4) can be produced in a
moving air stream, without breakup, at speeds in
excess of 175 mph.



NACA RM L55E13c

A STUDY OF THE RESPONSE OF PANELS TO
RANDOM ACOUSTIC EXCITATION. Robert W. Hess,
- Leslie W. Lassiter and Harvey H. Hubbard. July
1955. 9p. diagrs. (NACA RM L55E13c)

An application is made of the method of generalized
harmonic analysis to the problem of prediction of
:stresses in airplane-skin panels due to excitation by
'jet noise. The concepts of the theory are reviewed
briefly and some of the significant parameters are
evaluated in the tests. Measurements of stresses in
some panels due to random acoustic excitation are
presented and are found to be in general agreement
with calculated results.



NACA RM L55E20c

BEHAVIOR OF A CANTILEVER PLATE UNDER
RAPID-HEATING CONDITIONS. Lotus F. Vosteen
and Kenneth E. Fuller. July 1955. 17p. diagrs.
(NACA RM L55E20c)

The temperature distributions encountered in thin
solid wings subjected to aerodynamic heating induce
thermal stresses that nlay effectively reduce the
stiffness of the wing. The effects of this reduction
in stiffness were investigated experimentally by
rapidly heating the edges of a cantilever plate. The
niidplane tlermal stresses imposed by the nonuniform
temperature distribution caused the plate to buckle
torsionally, increased the deformations of the plate
.under a constant applied torque, and reduced the
frequency of the first two natural modes of vibration.


By using small-deflection theory and employing
energy methods, the effect of nonuniform heating on
the plate stiffness was calculated. The theory
predicts the general effects of the thermal stresses,
but becomes inadequate as the temperature did-
ference increases and plate deflections become
la rge.

r, --,
NACA RM L55F10 IO *

SOME EFFECTS OF FLUID *'PLON-MOcTED .)
TANKS ON FLUTTER. Jam R., eS-J.ulyA96.
7p. diagrs., tab. (NACA RM L ) 3O) '

Fluid-dynamics studies were made of a tank of fine-
ness ratio 7.0 which was pylon mounted on a simpli-
fied two-dimensional flutter model in order to deter-
mine the effects of the fluid on flutter. The flutter
speed was found experimentally for three cases as
follows: with various amounts of water in the tank,
with weights having the same mass and moment of
inertia as the fluid considered to oe a frozen solid,
and with weights having the same mass and moment
of inertia as the actual illud. The results of the two
methods of fuel representation were compared with
the actual-fluid case, and it was concluded that, in
flutter analyses and tests, the fuel in wing tanks
must be represented by the effective-moment-of-
inertia values. The damping action of the fluid was
also studied, and it was found that sufficient damping
was present to limit the amplitude of the flutter and
that, at a frequency ratio near 1.0, the fluid damping
may produce an increase in the flutter speed.



NACA TM 1390

ON THE MECHANISM OF BUCKLING OF A CIRCU-
LAR CYLINDRICAL SHELL UNDER AXIAL COM-
PRESSION. Y. Yoshimura. July 1955. 46p.
diagrs., tab. (NACA TM 1390)
The present paper deals with the buckling of a cir-
cular cylindrical shell under axial compression from
the viewpoint of energy and the characteristics of
deformation. It is shown first, both theoretically
and experimentally, that the reason why the buckling
of a cylindrical shell is quite different from that of a
flat plate is attributable to the existence of a nearly
developable surface far apart from the original
cylindrical surface, which is equivalent to the exis-
tence of an approximately inextensional finite defor-
mation. Based upon this result, the experimental
fact that the buckling is really not general but local,
that is, that the buckled region is limited axially to
a range of 1.5 times the wave length of the lobe, is
explained by the theoretical result that the minimum
buckling load is smaller in the local buckkling than in
the general buckling case. The occurrence of local


*AVAILABLE ON LOAN ONLY.
'ADDRESS REQUESTS FOR DOCUMENTS TO NACA, 1512 H ST., NW., WASHINGTON 2s, D. C, CITING CODE NUMBER ABOVE EACH TITLE
THE REPORT TITLE AND AUTHOR.
0 ov/^0


I






2

buckling is affirmed also from the viewpoint of the
energy barrier to be jumped over during buckling,
and from a comparison of the theoretical post-
buckling state with the experimental results. Final-
ly, the local buckling with the load applied by a
spring is analyzed, and it is proved that the minimum
buckling load increases with an increase of rigidity
of the spring.



NACA TN 3218

FLIGHT DETERMINATION OF THE DRAG AND
PRESSURE RECOVERY OF AN NACA 1-40-250 NOSE
INLET AT MACH NUMBERS FROM 0.9 TO 1.8.
R. I. Sears and C. F. Merlet. July 1955. 30p.
diagrs., photos., 2 tabs. (NACA TN 3218. Formerly
RM L50L18)

External-drag and pressure-recovery data are pre-
sented for the.NACA 1-40-250 nose inlet.s The tests
were made using rocket-propelled models in free
flight at Mach numbers from 0.9 to 1.8. The
Reynolds number based on body diameter varied
from 4 x 106 to 10 x 106.



NACA TN 3384

EFFECT OF HYDROCARBON STRUCTURE ON
REACTION PROCESSES LEADING TO SPONTANE-
CUS IGNITION. Donald E. Swarts and Charles E.
Frank, University of Cincinnati. July 1955. 23p.
diagrs., 6 tabs. (NACA TN 3384)

The present study compares the reaction processes
of other aliphatic hydrocarbons with tnose of the
heptane and isooctane previously studied. A study
of the behavior of olefins and some exploratory work
on the effect of the ratio of surface to volume on the
extent of oxidation in the early stages was also
included.




NACA TN 3419

NACA MODEL INVESTIGATIONS OF SEAPLANES
IN WAVES. John B. Parkinson. (Presented at
Conference on Ships and Waves, Stevens Institute of
Technology, Oct. 25-27, 1954) July 1955. 28p.
diagrs., photos. (NACA TN 3419)

The models, apparatus, and instrumentation develop-
ed for investigations of the rough-water characteris-
tics of seaplanes in the Langley tanks are described
briefly. The results of several investigations to
improve these characteristics are combined and
summarized. The large effect of waves in take-off
resistance is illustrated. The general relationship
of the measured quantities of importance to wave
length and height are also illustrated.




NACA TN 3422

NOISE SURVEY OF A 10-FOOT FOUR-BLADE
TURBINE-DRIVEN PROPELLER UNDER STATIC
CONDITIONS. Max C. Kurbjun. July 1955. 25p.
diagrs., photo. (NACA TN 3422)


NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO.87

Overall sound-level measurements and tape record-
ings of the noise emitted from a 10-ioot-diameter,
four-blade propeller mounted on a propeller-
research vehicle have been made under static
conditions at stations spaced on a 75-foot-radius
circle about the propeller. The tape recordings
were analyzed to obtain the frequency spectra at
each station and comparisons of the results are made
with theory. The effects of microphone position
above the ground are also given.



NACA TN 3460

TABLES OF COEFFICIENTS FOR THE ANALYSIS
OF STRESSES ABOUT CUTOUTS IN CIRCULAR
SEMIMONOCOQUE CYLINDERS WITH FLEXIBLE
RINGS. Harvey G. McComb, Jr. and Emmet F.
Low, Jr. July 1955. 98p. diagrs., 30 tabs. (NACA
TN 3460)

Tables of coefficients are presented which facilitate
the stress analysis of circular semimonocoque cylin-
ders with cutouts by the method published in NACA
TN 3200. When the values of two simple structural
parameters are known, use of these coefficients
enables shear flows and stringer loads in the neigh-
borhood of a cutout to be calculated. The effect of
bending flexibility of the rings in their planes has
been taken into consideration in the computation of
the coefficients. Included as a limiting case are the
tables from NACA TN 3200 whichh were computed on
the assumption that tnere is no distortion of the rings
in their planes.



NACA TN 3462

TENSILE PROPERTIES OF 7075-T6 AND 2024-T3
ALUMINUM-ALLOY SHEET HEATED AT UNIFORM
TEMPERATURE RATES UNDER CONSTANT LOAD.
George J. Heimerl and John E. Inge. July 1955.
46p. diagrs., photos., 4 labs. (NACA TN 3462)

Results are presented of tests to determine the effect
of heating at uniform temperature rates from 0.20 to
1000 F per second on the tensile properties of
7075-T6 (75S-T6) and 2024-T3 (24S-T3) aluminum.,,
alloy sheet under constant-load conditions. Yield
and rupture stresses, obtained under rapid-heatmng
conditions, are compared with results of elevated-
temperature stress-strain tests for 1,2-hour ex-
posure. Master yield- and rupture-stress curves
based on a linear temperature-rate parameter are
presented. Yield and rupture stresses and tempera-
tures may be predicted by means of master curves
and the parameter.



NACA TN 3465

THEORETICAL INVESTIGATION OF FLUTTER OF
TWO-DIMENSIONAL FLAT PANELS WITH ONE
SURFACE EXPOSED TO SUPERSONIC POTENTIAL
FLOW. Herbert C. Nelson and Herbert J.
Cunningham. July 1955. 60p. diagrs., tab. (NACA
TN 3465)

A Rayleigh type analysis is used to treat the flutter
of a tvo-diniensional flat panel supported at its
leading and trailing edges and subjected to a niddle-






NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 87

plane tensile force, with a supersonic stream over
its upper surface and still air belo.. Numerical
results in the form of stability boundaries are pre-
sented for determining some effects of number of
modes, Mach number, densities of the supersonic
stream and still air, panel mass and stiffness, edge
fixity, structural darrping, and middle-plane tensile
force.


NACA TN 3466

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE DISCHARGE AND
DRAG CHARACTERISTICS OF AUXILIARY-AIR
OUTLETS DISCHARGING INTO A TRANSONIC
STREAM. Paul E. Dewey and Alien R. Vick. July
1955. 38p. diagrs., photos. (NACA TN 3466)

The aerodynamic characteristics of auxiliary-air
outlets of rectangular cross section discharging into
a transonic stream have been investigated. The
effects of aspect ratio, inclination, curvature, and
recess depth upon the discharge coefficients have
been determined for thin-plate and ducted-approach
outlets. Surface pressure distributions in the
vicinity of ducted outlets and vent pressures with
no discharge are also presented. In addition, force
coefficients have been measured for a few of the
ducted-approach models.



NACA TN 3468

EFFECTS OF SWEEP ON THE MAXIMUM-LIFT
CHARACTERISTICS OF FOUR ASPECT-RATIO-4
WINGS AT TRANSONIC SPEEDS. Thomas R. Turner.
July 1955. 25p. diagrs. (NACA TN 3468. Formerly
RM L50H11)

An investigation at transonic speeds has been made
to determine the effect of wing s*eep on the maxi-
mum lift characteristics of a series of wings having
an aspect ratio of 4, a taper ratio of 0.6, and the
quarter-chord line swept back 00, 350, 450, and60o.
The Mach number varied from 0.61 to 1.20 with a
Reynolds number variation from 380,000 to 460,000.
Lift data are presented from approximately zero lift
to beyond maximum lift. Drag and pitching-moment
dactlrPe-alb presented.


NACA TN 3472

FLOW STUDIES ON FLAT-PLATE DELTA WINGS
AT SUPERSONIC SPEED. William H. Michael, Jr.
July 1955. 40p. diagrs., photos. (NACA TN 3472)

An experimental study has been made to investigate
some aspects of the nature of the flow around flat-
plate delta wings. Vapor-screen, pressure-
distribution, and ink-flow studies were made at a
Mach number of 1.9 on a series of semispan delta-
wing n.odels with slender wedge airfoil sections and
very sharp Leading edges. The models had semi-
apex angles ranging from 50 to 31.750*


NACA TN 3509

A STUDY OF BOUNDARY-LAYER TRANSITION AND
SURFACE TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTIONS AT
MACH 3.12. Paul F. Brinich. July 1955. 39p.
diagrs., photo. (NACA TN 3509)


3


Surface temperature distributions and high-speed
schlieren motion pictures were used to study transi-
tion with and without single roughness elements on a
hollow cylinder at various wind-tunnel Reynolds
numbers. Increasing the sharpness of the leading
edge increased the abruptness of the recovery
temperature rise near the transition point and de-
creased the transition Reynolds number. Single
roughness elements in the laminar boundary layer
moved transition upstream and produced slight local
changes in temperature distributions. Roughness
elements in transitional and turbulent boundary
layers produced large perturbations in temperature
distributions.


NACA TN 3511

EXTRAPOLATION TECHNIQUES APPLIED TO
MATRIX METHODS IN NEUTRON DIFFUSION
PROBLEMS. Robert R. McCready. July 1955. 32p.
diagrs. (NACA TN 3511)

An iterative scheme is developed for the matrix
solution of the type of characteristic-value problem
arising from homogeneous linear equations. The
scheme is shown to minimize a suitable form at
each step. Extrapolation techniques for speeding
convergence are developed and refined. An example
from nuclear-reactor theory is presented.



NACA TN 3512

EFFECT OF SOME SELECTED HEAT TREATMENTS
ON THE OPERATING LIFE OF CAST HS-21 TUR-
BINE BLADES. Francis J. Clauss, Floyd B.
Garrett and John W. Neeton. July 1955. 39p.
diagrs., photos. (NACA TN 3512)

Effects of heat treatment depend upon initial micro-
structure of cast blades. Blades from one manufac-
turer performed best in the as-cast condition; blades
from a second manufacturer performed best after
aging 48 hours at 15000 F. Solution treatments at
20500 F and above often caused damage by eutectic
melting. Before the full benefits of heat treatment
can be realized, casting conditions must ue con-
trolled to produce uniform structures with finely
distributed carbides and a minimum of nterdendritic
segregation.





BRITISH REPORTS


N-38175"

Forest Products Research Lab. (Gt.Brit.)
INVESTIGATIONS INTO GLUES AND GLUING.
PROGRESS REPORT EIGHTY-TWO OCTOBER
1954. DURABILITY OF ASSEMBLY GLUES -
SERIES B. SEVENTH-YEAR REPORT ON
LAMINATED BEAMS. R. J. Newall and J. E.
Grosert. 8p. diagrs. (Supersedes Progress
Report 67, September 1952) (Forest Products
Research Lab.)

The durability of animal, casein, urea-formaldehyde
and phenol-formaldehyde glues is being investigated
in laminated beams 7 feet long, 6 inches thick and







4

2 inches, 4 inches, and 6 inches wide when fully
exposed to the weather and when stored in an
unheated shed. Controls are stored in a building
air-conditioned at 8-10 percent moisture content.
Results are available up to 84 months.



N-38176'

Forest Products Research Lab. (Gt.Brit.)
INVESTIGATIONS INTO GLUES AND GLUING.
PROGRESS REPORT EIGHTY-FOUR FEBRUARY
1955. THE COLD GLUING OF OAK AND AFRICAN
MAHOGANY LAMINATES. PART L R. J. Newall
and J. E. Grosert. 6p., 2 tabs. (Forest Products
Research Lab.)

Laminated blocks made with a pure resorcinol and
an acid catalysed phenolic resin and having 10-12
percent, 15 percent, and 18 percent moisture content
were cured at 500 F, 800 F, and 1000 F. Double and
single spreading have been compared. The quality of
adhesion has been tested by a cyclical treatment of
vacuum-pressure wetting followed by drying at an
equilibrium moisture content of 7 percent.



N-38177*

Forest Products Research Lab. (Gt.Brit.)
INVESTIGATIONS INTO GLUES AND GLUING.
PROGRESS REPORT EIGHTY-EIGHT MARCH
1955. THE COMPARATIVE DURABILITY OF
ASSEMBLY GLUES IN ENGLAND AND IN NIGERIA.
ANALYSIS AFTER THIRTY MONTHS EXPOSURE.
J. F. S. Carruthers. 9p., 4 tabs. (Supersedes
Progress Report 79, December 1953) (Forest
Products Research Lab.)

Animal, casein, urea-formaldehyde, phenol-formalde-
hyde and resorcinol formaldehyde were investigated
in two types of joints (grain directions at right angles
or parallel). A glue was considered as having failed
when seven out of ten glue lines displayed delamina-
tion of a defined amount. On this basis the results
of 30 months exposure were assessed.



N-38241*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
LOADING CONDITIONS OF TAILED AIRCRAFT IN
LONGITUDINAL MANOEUVRES. T. Czaykowski.
February 1955. 80p. diagrs., tab.' (RAE
Structures 177)

This analysis of aircraft response and loading con-
ditions in symmetrical maneuvers is based on the
theory of aircraft response to elevator induced lon-
gitudinal maneuvers. Basic response functions have
been derived for the chosen, exponential type of eleva-
tor motion, and from these, general expressions
have been obtained for various derived response
quantities, such as tail plane loads, elevator hinge
moments, normal accelerations at the tail, etc. A
computational method is given in the appendix which
allows the evaluation of the complete time histories
of response quantities or, alternatively, their sig-
nificant maxima. The simplifying assumptions
underlying the analysis are critically reviewed and
possible limitations oi the method are discussed.


NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 87

N-38242*

Nat. Gas Turbine Establishment (Gl. Brit.)
THE PERFORMANCE TESTING OF AIRCRA FT GAS
TURBINE COMBUSTION CHAMBERS UNDER
ALTITUDE CONDITIONS. P. Martin and M. V.
Herbert. November 1954. 24p. diagrs.. 3 tabs.
(NGTE Memo. M. 231)

Combustion chamber test conditions chosen accord-
ing to Ashwood's method of standardization are too
limited for current general use. The inlet condi-
tions found in existing engines have been investigated,
and the overall range of temperature and pressure
has been defined. A standard division of this range
Q fTZ
is proposed. The constancy of over the
P2
-subsonic working range of an engine enables air
mass flow to be determined for any combination of
temperature and pressure, and variation of this
parameter at supersonic speeds is considered. Test
results may be presented as a chamber characteris-
tic, offering easy comparison between individual
combustion systems.




N-38244*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
SOME MICROSCOPICAL OBSERVATIONS ON THE
EFFECT OF FATIGUE AND CORROSION FATIGUE
STRESSES ON D.T.D. 683. C. A. Stubbingon and
P. J. E. Forsyth. February 1955. lip. photos.
(RAE Tech. Note Met. 211)

It has been found that D.T.D. 683 shows transcrystal-
line failure and slip-band exudation when subjected to
cyclic stress except under conditions of corrosion
fatigue when some intercrystalline cracking has been
observed. The tendency to produce Intercrystalline
corrosion fatigue failure was found to be greatest in
certain conditions of heat treatment. Some observa-
tions have also been made on the microstructure of
D.T.D. 683 after various heat treatments and sug-
gestions are made for modification of existing heat
treatments to obtain improved corrosion fatigue
properties.



N-38251*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
COMPRESSOR CASCADE FLUTTER TESTS 200
CAMBER BLADES, MEDIUM AND HIGH STAGGER
CASCADES. D. A. Kilpatrick and J. Ritchie. 1955.
19p. diagrs., photos. (ARC CP 187)

The tests reported show the existence of three main
zones of flutter at high stress: stalling flutter,
shock-stalling flutter, and choking flutter. These
zones are similarly located (with reference to the
aerodynamic characteristics) for both the medium
and the high stagger cascades tested, and they
extend over a wide range of incidence. Good cor-
relation between the zones of flutter and the experi-
mentally measured blade force derivatives, with
respect to Mach number and incidence, has been
obtained. More experimental data are, however,
required before a quantitative analysts of the prob-
lem can be achieved.






NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 87

N-38252'
Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit. I
SOME VISUAL OBSERVATIONS OF THE FLOW
OVER A SWEPT-BACK .V NG IN A WATER TUNNEL.
WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO HIGH IN-
CIDENCES. N. C. Lambourne and P. S. Pusey.
1955. 20p. diagrs., photos. (ARC CP 192)

These tests were restricted to low Reynolds numbers
(about 105 based on mean chord). Visualization was
effected by tvo techniques, namely, 11) the addition
ol snall aluminum particles to the water, and (2)
the introduction of air into the stream close to the
model. In addition, the surface patterns produced
by the flow alter the wing had been coated with oil
were obtained. Attention has been concentrated on
the flow that exists at high incidence rich is char-
acterized o;y a flat horn-shaped region of separated
flow expanding in extent over the suction surface
from a position inboard near the leading edge. A
part-span trailing vortex has oeen revealed and
appears to be a continuation of a discrete vortex
situated in the separated region.




MISCELLANEOUS


N-37714

Advisory Group for Aeronautical Research and
Development. PROCEEDINGS OF THE FOURTH
AGARD GENERAL ASSEMBLY, MAY 5 AND 6, 1954:
HUMAN FACTORS IN AIRCRAFT DESIGN. Morley
Gray Whillans, Defence Research Board, Canada.
SUBJECTIVE EXPERIENCES AND REACTIONS
DURING FLIGHT TESTING IN THE TRANSONIC
REGION. (Test Pilots Round Table Discussion).
LOW TEMPERATURE OPERATION OF AIRCRAFT.
R. M. Aldwinckle. RCAF. THE USE OF PERSONAL
EQUIPMENT IN ARCTIC SURVIVAL. F. Vogt
Lorentzen, Royal Norwegian Air Force. SOME
PROBLEMS IN CANADIAN AERONAUTICAL RE-
SEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT. D. C. MacPhail,
National Aeronautical Establishment, Canada.
SOME ASPECTS OF THE LIGHT INTERCEPTOR
PROBLEM. Sergio Stefanutti. SELECTED AERO-
DYNAMIC PROBLEMS OF HIGH-SPEED FLIGHT.
K. E. van Every, Douglas Aircraft Company.
LAMINARISATION THROUGH BOUNDARY LAYER
CONTROL. G. V. Lachmann, Handley Page, Ltd.
AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS. Lucio
Lazzarino, University of Pisa. SOME ASPECTS
OF AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH. Pol Duwez,
California Institute of Technology. AIRBORNE
ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT. M. Desirant, Physics
Research Laboratory, Belgium. SOME STUDIES OF
LABORATORY MANAGEMENT. Herbert A. Shepard,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 160p. diagrs.,
photos. (Advisory Group (or Aeronautical Research
and Development. AG 14 'P5)



N-37721'

Advisory Group for Aeronautical Research and
Development. INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF
CHEMICAL REACTIONS IN FLOW SYSTEMS. S. S.
Penner, California Institute of Technology. 1955.
viii, 86p. diagrs., tabs. (AGARDograph 7)


5

This manuscript is comprised of four chapters which
contain the following: a resume of classical chemi-
cal kinetics with special reference to the limitations
of the steady-state approximation for chain reactions;
a sunimary of the conservation laws lor reacting
fluids and suitable expressions for the determination
of transport coefficients; an analysis of chemical
reactions during adiabatic flow through a de Laval
nozzle; a discussion of heterogeneous chemical
reactions which includes stationary, isothermal,
gas-solid systems and diffusion flames.
(May be purchased from Butterworth's
Publications Ltd.. 88 hkingsaay. London.
W. C. 2, England at F2.50.)



N-37722'

Advisory Group for Aeronautical Research and
Development. COMBUSTION RESEARCHES AND
REVIEWS: DIFFUSION FLAMES IN THE LABORA-
TORY. J. Barr. SOME PROBLEMS PERTINENT
TO THE COMBUSTION OF SPRAYS. M. Gerstein.
SOME ASPECTS OF COMBUSTION OF LIQUID
FUEL. C. C. Graves and M. Gerstein. LA
FORMATION ET L'EVOLUTION DES BROUILLARDS
COMBUSTIBLES. R. Klng. SOME NOTES ON
SPRAY COMBUSTION. J. R. Joyce. THE CORRE-
LATION OF COMBUSTION EFFICIENCY AND
INJECTOR CHARACTERISTICS UNDER SIMULATED
ALTITUDE CONDITIONS. Staff of NGTE. FLAME
STABILIZATION AND FLAME PROPAGATION IN
RAMJET COMBUSTORS. J. P. Longwell. ETUDE
DES LIMITS DE STABILITY EN RELATION AVEC
LA, RESISTANCE DES OBSTACLES A
L'ECOULEMENT. A. Mestre. A SPONTANEOUS
IGNITION THEORY OF COMBUSTION INTENSITY
AND COMBUSTION STABILITY BEHIND A BAFFLE.
B. P. Mullins. THE MECHANISM OF CARBOIY
FORMATION. G. Porter. FORMATION ET DEPOT
DE CARBON DANS LES FOYERS DE TURBO-
MACHINES D'AVIATION. C. Four. SIMILARITY
ANALYSIS FOR CHEMICAL REACTORS AND THE
SCALING OF LIQUID FUEL ROCKET ENGINES.
S. S. Penner. RAYONNEMENT DES FLAMES ET
SIMILITUDE. C. Codegone. THE ROLE OF WAKE
TRANSITION IN THE PROCESS OF FLAME STABI-
LIZATION ON BLUFF BODIES. E. E. Zukoski and
F. E. Marble. (Invited papers presented at the 6th
and 7th AGARD Combustion Panel Meetings held
respectively in Scheveningen, the Netherlands, May
1954 and in Paris, France. November 1954). 1955.
xv, 187p. diagrs., photos., tabs. (AGARDograph 9)

(May be purchased from Buttervorth's
Publications Ltd., 88 Ktngsway, London,
W. C. 2, England at 4.25.)



































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F NACA



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B._Will supply when --ment requested.
ame released. C. Classified document.
C._Not an NACA document. Request through m:li-
rganization Request from tary project officer.
D. Available on loan only. H-Withdrawn from cir-
treet address E.Photocopies available at culation.
Photoduplication Service, I.-Not available for cir-
Library of Congress. rulation.
ity. Zone No., and State Documents on loan to be returned by
HECK HERE IF LOAN COPY IS DESIRED WHERE RETENTION COPY IS NOT AVAILABLE [

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Signature
POLICY OF NACA ON DISTRIBUTION OF THEIR PUBLICATIONS
NACA Reports, Technical Notes, and Technical Memorandums are available for a period of 5 years,
after that, most of them can be had only on a loan basis. All Wartime Reports are in this category.
All loan material should be returned promptly at the expiration of the loan period to the following address:
Langley Aeronautical Laboratory, Langley Field, Virginia ATTENTION: Mr. Walter H. Lee.
British publications currently listed on the Research Abstracts are available only on loan. However,
should a British paper be of particular interest and if you will so advise this office, your name will be
placed on our waiting list to receive a copy if and when retention copies can be furnished.

Please fill in the requested information below since the above part of this form will be returned with the
documents requested.

Date 19- Do Not Write in This Space


anization

let address


Zone No.. and State
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