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Title:
Research abstracts
Physical Description:
93 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
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United States -- National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics
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National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
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irregular
completely irregular

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Subjects / Keywords:
Aeronautics -- Abstracts -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Aeronautics -- Research -- Abstracts -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
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serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
abstract or summary   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Abstracts no. 1 (June 15, 1951)-no. 93 (Nov. 30, 1955).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001469326
notis - AGY1019
oclc - 01471285
lccn - 86657025
issn - 0499-9274
Classification:
lcc - TL501 .U5895
System ID:
AA00009235:00047

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National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics


Research Abstracts


N0.83

I C:i CURRENT NACA REPORTS
**ACA Rept. 1173

I iO TRAVELING WAVES IN BEAMS. Robert W.
Le:onard and Bernard Budiansky. 1954. iii, 27p.
:diagrs. (NACA Rept. 1173. Formerly TN 2874)
The basic equations of Timoshenko for the motion of
vibrating nonuniform beams, which allow for effects
.:. of transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia,
:' are presented in several forms; the propagation of
sharp disturbances is discussed. Numerical
traveling-wave solutions are obtained for some ele. -
S.mentary problems of finite uniform beamnj rQiTch
the propagation velocities of shear an bendihg dis-
on: tinuities are equal. Comparisons re nthLe' itW"a
modal solutions and, in some cases. th exact .
ly., osed solutions.

C. MACA Rept. 1177 ,

i': :COMPARISON OF PERFORMANCE OF E PE
Vi MENTAL AND CONVENTIONAL CAGE D GNS
S AND MATERIALS FOR 75-MILLIMETER-BORE
CYLINDRICAL ROLLER BEARINGS AT HIGH
SPEEDS. William J. Anderson, E. Fred Macks and
Zoltn N. Nemeth. 1954. ii, 15p. diagrs., 6 tabs.
( ACA Rept. 1177. Formerly TN 3001; TN 3002)
I Studies are reported of four experimental bearings
.outer-race-riding cages and inner-race-guided
i ..lers operated at lower temperatures and to higher
v: "::: values (product of bearing bore in mm and shaft
ipe" d. '"i.6d in rpm) than conventional inner- and outer-
I; '"ice-riding cage-type bearings. The experimental
:: cages were designed to allow maximum cooling with
minimum oil entrapment. In an investigation of four
outer-race-riding cage-type bearings (two with bronze
and two with nodular iron cages), heavy wear was
foundto accompany cage slip. Cage slip and, conse-
liqutly, wear were found higher with nodular iron
than with bronze at high speeds.

itA CA Rept. 1185
THE CALCULATION OF PRESSURE ON SLENDER
AIRPLANES IN SUBSONIC AND SUPERSONIC FLOW.
Max. A. Heaslet and Harvard Lomax. 1954. ii.
11p. diagrs. (NACA Rept. 1185. Formerly TN 2900)

Under the assumption that a wing, body, or wing-
body combination is slender or flying at near sonic
velocity, expressions are given which permit the
calculation of pressure in the immediate vicinity of
the configuration. The disturbance field, in both
subsonic and supersonic flight, is shown to consist
of two-dimensional disturbance fields extending
laterally and a longitudinal field that depends on the
streamwise growth of cross-sectional area. A dis-
cussion is also given of couplings, between lifting

*AVAILABLE ON LOAN ONLY.
,ADDRESS REQUESTS FOR DOCUMENTS TO NACA, 1512
i.THE REPORT TITLE AND AUTHOR. f

C41A43of iOUN1

jt J13r


MAY 25, 1955


and thickness effects, that necessarily arise as a
result of the quadratic dependence of pressure on
the induced velocity components.

NACA Rept. 1186

FORMATION AND COMBUSTION OF SMOKE IN
LAMINAR FLAMES. Rose L. Schalla, Thomas P.
Clark and Glen E. McDonald. 1954. i, 21p.
diagrs., photos. (NACA Rept. 1186. Formerly
RM E51E15; RM E52G24; RM E52122; RM E52126;
RM E5?E05; RM E53J12; RM E54E03)

The nature and formation of smoke and its combus-
Sto we investigated. Factors affecting smoke
f. for atio were studied in both diffusion flames and
Spremixe Bunsen flames. The variables investigated
werl (1) fel type, (2) external air-flow rate, (3)
oxygen-erfrichment of external air, (4) substitution
S r r nitrogen in external oxidant, (5) fuel
erature or primary mixture temperature, and
(6) pressure. The ability of a flame to burn smoke
admitted from an exterior source was also studied.
A critical survey was made of the literature pertain-
ing to the mechanism of smoke formation.

NACA TN 3295

EFFECT OF PRESSURE ON THERMAL CONDUC-
TANCE OF CONTACT JOINTS. Martin E.
Barzelay, Kin Nee Tong and George F. Holloway,
Syracuse University. May 1955. 52p. diagrs.,
2 tabs. (NACA TN 3295)

As an extension of previous experimental work
further tests were conducted to determine the factors
influencing the thermal conductance across the inter-
face formed between stationary plane surfaces of
75S-T6 aluminum alloy and AISI Type 416 stainless-
steel blocks. The types of joints investigated in-
cluded bare metal-to-metal contact, contact sur-
faces separated by a good conductor (brass shim
stock), and contact surfaces separated by a thin
sheet of insulation (asbestos).

NACA TN 3297

EFFECT OF OXYGEN CONTENT OF FURNACE
ATMOSPHERE ON ADHERENCE OF VITREOUS
COATINGS TO IRON. A. G. Eubanks and D. G.
Moore, National Bureau of Standards. May 1955.
17p. diagrs., photos., 2 tabs. (NACA TN 3297)

A series of vitreous coatings of the same basic com-
position, but with cobalt-oxide contents varying from
0 to 6.4 percent by weight, was fired on ingot iron in
atmospheres consisting of various oxygen-nitrogen
mixtures. The effect of the oxygen content of the
atmosphere on adherence was determined by sub-








jecting each specimen to the American Society for
Testing Materials adherence test, and the effect on
interface roughness was estimated from examination
of metallographic sections.


NACA TN 3381

HEAT-LOSS CHARACTERISTICS OF HOT-WIRE
ANEMOMETERS AT VARIOUS DENSITIES IN
TRANSONIC AND SUPERSONIC FLOW. W. G.
Spangenberg, National Bureau of Standards. May
1955. 82p. diagrs., photos., 14 tabs. (NACA
TN 3381)

An experimental investigation was made of the heat-
loss characteristics of heated fine wires suitable for
use as anemometers in turbulence research. Speeds
ranged from low subsonic to Mach number 1. 9.
Density and temperature loading were varied over
wide limits, and wire diameters ranged from
0.00005 to 0.0015 inch. The effects of each of the
several variables on the heat-loss characteristics of
both normally oriented and swept wires were meas-
ured.


NACA TN 3385

THEORY OF THE JET SYPHON. B. Szczeniowski.
University of Montreal. May 1955. 49p. diagrs.,
3 tabs. (NACA TN 3385)

A new approach to the theory of the mixing of two
currents in an injector is presented, dealing with an
incompressible ideal fluid. The theory shows new
potentialities in an appropriate shaping of the form
of the walls of the mixing zone so as to improve the
jet-syphon efficiency beyond that heretofore predicted
theoretically. Some examples of ways to improve
jet-syphon efficiency are indicated.



NACA TN 3418

THE ZERO-LIFT WAVE DRAG OF A PARTICULAR
FAMILY OF UNSWEPT, TAPERED WINGS WITH
LINEARLY VARYING THICKNESS RATIO. Arthur
Henderson, Jr. and Julia M. Goodwin. May 1955.
28p. diagrs. (NACA TN 3418)

On the basis of linear theory, the zero-lift wave drag
of a particular family of unswept, tapered wings with
linearly varying thickness ratio and symmetrical
parabolic-arc sections has been calculated. By
comparing the drag for these wings with that for a
corresponding constant-thickness-ratio wing with
rhombic sections, it is found that the variable-
thickness-ratio wings can be used to advantage with
no serious structural penalties if the wings are as-
sumed to have the same given root thickness ratio or
the same internal volume.



NACA TN 3436

AN INVESTIGATION OF SEVERAL NACA I-SERIES
NOSE INLETS WITH AND WITHOUT PROTRUDING
CENTRAL BODIES AT HIGH-SUBSONIC MACH
NUMBERS AND AT A MACH NUMBER OF 1.2.
Robert E. Pendley and Harold L. Robinson. May
1955. 51p. diagrs., photos. (NACA TN 3436.
Formerly RM L9L23a)


NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 83

Measurements of pressure distribution, drag, and
internal-flow pressure loss are presented for three
NACA I-series nose inlets, two of which were filled
with protruded central bodies. Test Mach number
and inlet-velocity ratio ranged from 0.4 to 1.2 and
from 0 to 1.34, respectively. The nose-inlet pressure
drag at a Mach number of 1.2 and the central-body
effects on subcritical drag, the supercritical drag
rise. and the inlet total-pressure loss are discussed.



NACA TN 3450

PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION OF PROPERTIES
OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE BRAZED JOINTS PRO-
CESSED IN VACUUM OR [N MOLTEN SALT. C. A.
Gyorgak and A. C. Francisco. May 1955. 29p.
diagrs., photos., 7 tabs. (NACA TN 3450)

An investigation was conducted to determine the
effect of the variables temperature, time at tempera-
ture, and nickel addition to the braze alloy on the
shear strength of high-temperature-alloy brazed
joints processed in vacuum or in molten salt. Both
brazing methods produced shear strengths greater
than those of joints processed in dry hydrogen.
Vacuum brazing was superior to salt-bath brazing,
average shear strengths being on the order of
63.000 and 48.000 psi. respectively.




NACA TN 3451

ANALYSIS OF FULLY DEVELOPED TURBULENT
HEAT TRANSFER AND FLOW IN AN ANNULUS
WITH VARIOUS ECCENTRICITIES. Robert G.
Deissler and Maynard F. Taylor. May 1955. 42p.
diagrs. (NACA TN 3451)

A previous analysis for turbulent heat transfer and
low in tubes was generalized and applied to an an-
nulus with various eccentricities. Expressions for
eddy dllusivity which were verified for flow and heat
transfer in tubes were assumed to apply in general
along Lines normal to a wall. Velocity distributions,
wall shear-stress distributions, and friction factors,
as well as wall heat-transfer distributions, wall
temperature distributions, and average heat-transfer
coefficients, were calculated for an annulus having a
radius ratio of 3.5 at various eccentricities.




NACA TN 3452

INVESTIGATION OF JET-ENGINE NOISE REDUC-
TION BY SCREENS LOCATED TRANSVERSELY
ACROSS THE JET. Edmund E. Callaghan and
Willard D. Coles. May 1955. 27p. diagrs., photos.,
tab. (NACA TN 3452)

An investigation of screens located transversely
across a jet as a noise-reduction device was con-
ducted on a full-scale turbojet engine. The screens
lowered the sound pressure levels rearward and in-
creased them in front resulting in a nearly circular,
nondirectional sound field. The sound power level
was lowered by as much as 7.5 db by the proper
screen choice and location, and, in addition, the
maximum sound pressure level was decreased ap-
proximately 12 db over that of the engie alone.





NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 83

NACA TN 3453

LONGITUDINAL TURBULENT SPECTRUM SURVEY
OF BOUNDARY LAYERS IN ADVERSE PRESSURE
GRADIENTS. Virgil A. Sandborn and Raymond J.
Slogar. May 1955. 40p. diagrs., tab. (NACA
TN 3453)
Results of measurements of the longitudinal velocity-
component spectra at various positions through the
boundary layer for four stations in increasing adverse
pressure gradients are presented in tabular form. A
comparison is presented between longitudinal turbu-
lence spectra in zero pressure gradient and in mod-
erate adverse pressure gradients (reasonably lar
from separation). The effect of pressure gradient
was found to be small. The measured spectra are
also compared with the predicted variations derived
from the hypothesis of statistical equilibrium.
Longitudinal-turbulence scales and microscales
evaluated from spectrum measurements are given.




BRITISH REPORTS


N-36607*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
A STUDY OF THE LONGITUDINAL RESPONSE OF
AIRCRAFT TO TURBULENT AIR. J. K. Zbrozek.
January 1955. 31p. diagrs., tab. (RAE Aero 2530)

A method of calculating the aircraft dynamic behav-
ior in turbulent air is presented. It is suggested
that the assessment of the aircraft dynamic stability
should include the study of aircraft behavior in tur-
bulent air in addition to the present practice of eval-
uating the dynamic characteristics for perfectly
smooth conditions. The dynamic behavior of aircraft
in continuous turbulence is examined theoretically,
investigating the influence of the following param-
eters: static margin (changing c. g. position), damp-
ing in pitch, lift slope, wing loading, and aircraft
size. The theory outlined in the present paper pro-
vides the information required in gunnery and bomb-
ing problems and should be useful in the studies of
automatic stabilization and gun- and bomb-sight
design.'-Some results regarding gust loads in con-
tinuous turbulence are also obtained, which may have
application in studies of the fatigue life of aircraft
structures.





N-36608'

RoyalAircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
TROPICAL EXPOSURE TESTSON WOODASSEMBLY
ADHESIVES AT T. T. E., NIGERIA. A. Baker and
M. G. D. Hockney. January 1955. lip. 3 tabs.
(RAE Tech. Note Chem. 1244)

Tropical trials of assembly adhesives by the boxed
test-piece technique have been proceeding for 3
years. Specimens have been withdrawn for strength
testing, in comparison with temperate controls, at
suitable periods. The results are discussed in the
light of contemporary F. P. R. L sponsored trials of
plywood and wood assembly adhesives.


3


N-36609'

Nat. Gas Turbine Establishment (Gt.Brit.)
CALCULATED WEAK LIMIT FLAME TEMPERA-
TURES OF HYDROCARBON-AIR-DILUENT MIX-
TURES. B. P. Mullins and J. M. Marley. March'
1955. 20p. diagrs., 7 tabs. (NGTE Memo. M. 235)

Weak limit flame temperatures (TL) have been cal-
culated for hydrocarbon-air-diluent systems using
the known experimental values of the ternary
compositions at the weak limit of inflammability.
The effectiveness of five gaseous diluents in causing
TL to increase lies in the ascending order: argon,
nitrogen, water vapor, carbon dioxide, and carbon
tetrachloride.




N-36611'

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
THE LOAD DISTRIBUTION AT SONIC SPEED OVER
A FAMILY OF LINEARLY TWISTED WINGS WITH
STRAIGHT-EDGED PLANFORMS. D. G. Randall.
January 1955. 42p. diagrs.. 3 tabs. (RAE
Aero 2531)

The method for the calculation of the load distribu-
tion over a wing at sonic speed described by K. W.
Mangler, which is based on linearized potential
flow, is applied to a family of linearly twisted wings
with straight-edged plan forms. The results ob-
tained are plotted against the following three param-
eters: A the aspect ratio, 1 //l + A, where A is
the taper ratio, and A tan ', 1/2, where /. 1,2 is
the sweepback angle of the half-chord line. The
results obtained in previous work for the same fam-
ily of plan forms at incidence are plotted against the
same parameters. In addition a particular wing is
studied in detail; chordwise pressure distributions,
spanwise loading, etc. are presented for the plane
wing at incidence and the twisted wing at zero inci-
dence.




N-36616'

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt.Brit.)
THE INTERACTION BETWEEN SHOCK WAVES AND
BOUNDARY LAYERS. D. W. Holder, H. H. P
Pearcey and G. E. Gadd. WITH A NOTE ON THE
EFFECTS OF THE INTERACTION ON THE PER-
FORMANCE OF SUPERSONIC INTAKES. J. Seddon.
1955. 101p. diagrs., photos., 2 Labs. (ARC CP 180)

The interaction between shock waves and boundary
layers has important effects in many problems of
high-speed flow. This paper has been written as a
guide to the literature on the subject, and as a
critical review of the present state of knowledge con-
cerning both the underlying physical processes and
the practical applications. Part I of the paper des-
cribes experiments on comparatively simple types of
flow designed to provide fundamental information and
to assist in the development of the theory. Many of
the features found in the fundamental experiments
appear also in practical applications and these are
considered in Parts II and III. Some notes on the
further work that is required are given in Part IV.





J


N-36617

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
REPORT OF THE DEFINITIONS PANEL ON THE
DEFINITIONS OF THE THRUST OF A JET ENGINE
AND OF THE INTERNAL DRAG OF A DUCTED
BODY. 1955. 28p. diagrs. (ARC CP 190)

The problems which occur in defining the thrust of
a jet engine and the internal drag of a ducted body
are considered, and formal definitions and names
are given for the concepts considered to be of
importance.



N-36618'

Aeronautical Research Council (CG. Brit.)
SHADOWGRAPHS OF MODEL PROJECTILES FIRED
AT HIGH MACH NUMBERS AND NEAR M = 1 IN THE
N. P. L. BALLISTIC RANGE. W. F. Cope. 1955.
49p. diagrs., photos. (ARC CP 189)

Snadowgraphs of 20 mm projectiles fired at Mach
numbers above 3 are shown and the important fea-
tures are discussed. Shadowgraphs of three rounds
which passed through M = 1 are also shown. In all
three cases the drag coefficient was determined, and
for one, all of the aerodynamic coefficients were
found. The effect of the retardation is discussed and
it is concluded that the effect is probably small
enough to be negligible except perhaps on the drag.
These rounds were stable. The unstable region for
a projectile is at a lower Mach number (about 0.75).
To illustrate this, the analysis of some earlier
rounds is included.



N-36619'

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
NOTE ON THE FLOW NEAR THE TAIL OF A TWO-
DIMENSIONAL AEROFOIL MOVING AT A FREE-
STREAM MACH NUMBER CLOSE TO UNITY. D. W.
Holder. 1955. lIp. diagrs., photos. (ARC CP188)

A qualitative argument, which is supported by exper-
imental evidence, suggests that the local Mach num-
ber downstream of the trailing-edge shock waves is
approximately independent of free-stream Mach num-
ber, airfoil geometry, and angle of attack. Thus,
there is a unique relationship between the flow de-
flection angle at the trailing edge and the local Mach
number just upstream of the trailing-edge shock
waves. This relationship is determined from wind-
tunnel experiments on RAE series airfoils and may
be used to give rapid estimates of the local Mach
number at the trailing-edge of an airfoil in terms of
the tralling-edge angle, angle of attack, and control
angle. The characteristics of straight-sided con-
trols are considered for an example.



N-36621*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
INTEGRATION OF THE BOUNDARY LAYER EQUA-
TIONS FOR A PLANE IN COMPRESSIBLE FLOW BY
THE METHOD OF STEEPEST DESCENT. D.
Meksyn. July 31, 1954. lip. tab. (ARC 16,961;
FM 2098)


NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 83

In a former paper the author found the asymptotic
integrals of the equations of motion for the flow past
a semi-infinite plane for supersonic speed, for the
case when the coefficients of viscosity and conduc-
tivity (Iepeald 1 or are independent of temperature,
and has shown that the results obtained are in close
agreement with those found by numerical integration.
The integration was carried out for the case of no
heat transfer and for a particular value of Prandtl
number o = 0.733. The aim of the present paper is
to extend the integration of the equations to the gen-
eral case of heat transfer and arbitrary o (close to
unity).

N-36622'

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
SURFACE NOISE FROM A PLANE TURBULENT
BOUNDARY LAYER. O. M. Phillips. August 4,
1954. 15p. diagr. (ARC 16,963; FM 2099)

A study is made of the properties of the viscous sub-
layer in a turbulent flow past a solid boundary, from
which the surface noise produced by the distribution
of fluctuating stresses on a plane boundary can be
estimated. The intensity of the surface noise per
unit area is compared with the expression given by
Lighthill for the aerodynamic quadrupole noise of a
turbulent boundary layer. It appears that for Mach
numbers less than about unity, the dipole radiation
from the surface is more efficient than the quad-
rupole radiation from the turbulent boundary layer
itself.


N -36625'

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
THE DISTRIBUTION OF PRESSURE ON AN AERO-
FOIL, IN A STREAM WITH A SPANWISE VELOCITY
GRADIENT. W. A. Mair. July 13, 1954. 16p.
diagrs., 3 tabs. (ARC 16,937; FM 2093)

Pressure measurements were made at one section of
an airfoil of constant chord spanning a wind tunnel.
A flat plate was mounted in the tunnel upstream of
the airfoil so that the wake from the plate produced
a spanwise velocity gradient at the airfoil. By
traversing the plate across the tunnel, the position
of the wake could be altered relative to the pressure
holes in the airfoil so that the complete pressure
distribution over the airfoil in the neighborhood of
the wake could be found. The results showed that,
because of the secondary flow produced by the inter-
action between the airfoil and the wake, the variation
of the pressure across the wake for a given chord-
wise position was very small, except close to the
leading edge. The lift coefficient was nearly con-
stant across the wake. The form drag coefficient
was considerably reduced in the wake.


N-36626*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gl. Brit.)
ON THE EFFECT OF WING BENDING ON THE
ACCELERATION DUE TO LANDING IMPACT. A. R.
Collar. June 1954. 6p. diagrs. (ARC 16,960;
. 729)

Some previously recorded measurements of the nor-
mal accelerations due to landing of a seaplane at
varying vertical velocities are compared with ac-
celerations theoretically predicted. While good





NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 83

agreement is obtained on the magnitude of the peak
acceleration, this peak occurs in all cases about
twice as long after impact as is predicted by theory.
Various explanations have been considered, includ-
ing that of wing bending; however, this had been
discarded. The present author believes that the
flexibility of the structure might cushion the impact.
Since all the vertical momentum must be destroyed,
whether the wings are flexible or not, it is to be
expected that the peak acceleration will be about the
same, but it will occur later if the wings flex than
if they are rigid. A simple mathematical model is
discussed.

N-36638*

Ministry of Supply (Gt. Brit.)
EXPERIENCE OF FATIGUE AT WEYBRIDGE.
Part 2: AN INVESTIGATION INTO THE FATIGUE
STRENGTH OF ALUMINIUM ALLOY TO SPECIFI-
CATION. D. T. D. 364. (Part 2 of final report
prepared by Vickers-Armstrong, Ltd., Weybridge)
March 1955. iii, 31p. diagrs., 15 tabs. (Ministry
of Supply. S & TM 2/55)

This report presents the results of a series of direct
stress fatigue tests on aluminum alloy D. T. D. 364
(2014). The work described in this report shows
clearly the difficulty of establshing for a given
material allowable fatigue stresses on simple
specimens. It is considered that much more work
is necessary on other light alloy specifications, and
that more work should be undertaken to establish
precisely the calibration ol fatigue testing
machines.

N-36639*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
SOME PROPELLER NOISE CALCULATIONS SHOW-
ING THE EFFECT OF THICKNESS AND PLANFORM.
K. V. Diprose. January 1955. 16p. diagrs., 4 tabs.
(RAE Tech. Note MS 19)

Sound pressures have been calculated for a propeller
designed for a high-speed airplane (Mach 0.77). The
contribution to the noise due to the blade thickness
was much larger than expected; reasons are given
for doubting the validity of the formulas used, and
ways"f iiTiijroving them suggested. Tapering the
plan form, to move the main sources of noise further
inboard to regions of lower Mach number was found
to produce only small relief in the calculated noise.


N-36641

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
WIND TUNNEL OBSERVATIONS OF BOUNDARY
LAYER TRANSITION ON TWO SWEPTBACK WINGS
AT A MACH NUMBER OF 1.61. J. B. Scott-Wilson
and D. S. Capps. December 1954. 12p. diagrs.,
photos. (RAE Tech. Note Aero 2347)

Visual observations of transition were made on two
sweptback wings at a Mach number of 1.61. Laminar
boundary-layer instability which resulted in the for-
mation of streamwise vortices, was found on these
wings. At zero incidence the Reynolds number,
based on the mean chord of the wing, at which this
instability occurred, 1.9 x 106, was very much
lower than the critical value predicted by low-speed
theory. At incidence the laminar boundary layer on


5


the wing was found to be more stable on the upper
surface, but less stable on the lower surface than at
zero incidence.




N-36642'

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt.Brit.)
THE MECHANISM OF FATIGUE FAILURE IN SOME
BINARY AND TERNARY ALUMINIUM ALLOYS.
P. J. E. Forsyth and C. A. Stubbington. December
1954. 27p. diagrs., photos., tab. (RAE Met. 81)

The fatigue process in a number of aluminum alloys
was found to be one of depletion of solute atoms in
localized regions under the action of cyclic stresses.
This depletion or overageing provided soft spots in
the structure in which most of the subsequent plastic
deformation was concentrated. Depending on tem-
perature, these depleted zones were trans or inter-
crystalline, and the subsequent fatigue crack fol-
lowed these paths. A crack once started, might, by
virtue of the heavy stress concentration, produce its
own depleted zone ahead of the root, and could thus
progress without particular reference to existing
soft spots.






MISCELLANEOUS


NACA TN 3152

Errata on 'TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS IN A
CYLINDRICAL COMBUSTION CHAMBER."
Franklin K. Moore and Stephen H. Maslen. October
1954.



N-37041

Advisory Group for Aeronautical Research and
Development. PROCEEDINGS OF THE THIRD
AGARD GENERAL ASSEMBLY, SEPTEMBER 7 AND
10, 1953: ROLE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOP-
MENT IN AVIATION DURING THE LAST TEN
YEARS. Harry Garner, Ministry of Supply. SOME
TASKS FOR AGARD. O. H. Wansbrough-Jones,
Ministry of Supply. THE REVIEW OF ICING RE-
SEARCH. (Problemes poses par le givrage des
avions). Edmond A. Brun, National Council of
Scientific Research. THOUGHTS ON FUTURE
NOISE SUPPRESSION RESEARCH. E. J. Richards,
University of Southampton. THE STRUCTURAL EF-
FECTS OF AERODYNAMIC HEATING. N. J. Hoff,
Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn; APPENDIX I:
THERMAL CONDITIONS ASSOCIATED WITH AIR-
CRAFT IN FLIGHT. Martin Bloom, Polytechnic
Institute of Brooklyn; APPENDIX 1I: SIMULATION
OF AERODYNAMIC HEATING IN STRUCTURAL
TESTING. Joseph Kempner, Polytechnic Institute
of Brooklyn. FOUNDATIONS OF OPERATIONAL
RESEARCH. Theodore von Karman. OPERATION-
AL RESEARCH. B. G. Dickins, Air Ministry.
AEROMEDICAL INTERESTS LOOKING FORWARD.
Otis O. Benson, Jr., USAF. EXAMPLES OF NATO









N-37041

EXCHANGE OF SCIENTIFIC PERSONNEL.
M. Brull, University of Michigan. A TOUR OF
WESTERN EUROPE: APRIL, 1953. Edited by
L. H. G. Sterne. (Presented at London AGARD
Conference, September 3-11, 1953). 115p. diagrs.,
photos. (Advisory Group for Aeronautical Research
and Development. AG6/P3)




N-37086*

Advisory Group for Aeronautical Research and
Development. SPONTANEOUS IGNITION OF
LIQUID FUELS. B. P. Mullins. 1955. xi, 117p.
diagrs. (AGARDograph 4)

This book is a survey and review of the present
status of knowledge in that area of the combustion
field concerned with spontaneous ignition. The test
methods used to obtain spontaneous ignition temper-
ature are described in detail and spontaneous igni-
tion temperature data are presented for 433 substan-
ces. Additional information is given on general
theoretical considerations, fuel additives, and
applications of spontaneous ignition data.

(May be purchased from Butterworth's -
Publications,Ltd., 88 Kingsway, London,
W. C. 2, England at $2. 75.)




N-37087*

Advisory Group for Aeronautical Research and
Development. ANTHROPOMETRY AND HUMAN
ENGINEERING: BODY MEASUREMENTS IN RELA-
TION TO WORK SPACES IN AIRCRAFT. G. M.
Morant. STATISTICS OF ELEMENTARY MEDICAL
BIOMETRY RELATIVE TO PILOTS OF THE
FRENCH AIR FORCE. (STATISTIQUES DE
BIOMETRIE MEDICAL ELEMENTAIRE RELA-
TIVES AU PERSONNEL NAVIGANT DE L'ARMEE
DE L'AIR FRANCHISE). E. Ducros. SHELDON
TYPES AND SUCCESS IN FLIGHT PERFORMANCE.
Johs. Dossing. ADAPTING THE AEROPLANE TO
THE PILOT. W. K. Stewart. INSTRUMENTDIALS,
INSTRUMENT ARRANGEMENT AND COCKPIT
DESIGN. Walter F. Grether. A METHODOLOGY
FOR INSTRUMENT DISPLAY DESIGN. George W.
Hoover. FACTORS AFFECTING THE VALIDITY
AND UTILITY OF AEROMEDICAL RESEARCH DATA.
Robert B. Payne. THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A
LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF THE MEDICAL AND
PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF THE U. S. NAVAL
AVIATOR. Ashton Graybiel. SOMATOTYPING.
P. M. Van Wulfften Palthe. HUMAN FACTORS IN
AIRCRAFT DESIGN. Morley Gray Whillans.
(Symposium held May 3-4, 1954, Scheverungen,
Netherlands). 1955. 123p. diagrs., photos., tabs.
(AGARDograph 5)

(May be purchased from Butterworth's
Publications, Ltd.. 88 Kingsway,
London. W. C. 2. England ua ;3.00.)


NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 83



DECLASSIFIED NACA REPORTS


NACA RM'A51E16

A FLIGHT STUDY OF REQUIREMENTS FOR SATIS-
FACTORY LATERAL OSCILLATORY CHARACTER-
ISTICS OF FIGHTER AIRCRAFT. Charles J.
Liddell, Jr., Brent Y. Creer and Rudolph D.
Van Dyke, Jr. July 1951. 39p. diagrs., photo.,
2 tabs. (NACA RM A51E16) (Declassified from
Confidential, 5/10'55)
A conventional, propeller-driven fighter, fitted with
servo devices for varying in flight the dihedral ef-
fect, the static directional stability, and the direc-
tional damping was used in a pilot-opinion survey to
determine the lateral-oscillatory characteristics
which go to make up satisfactory lateral flying qual-
ities. In addition, the lateral periodic motions en-
countered during the investigation and their relations
to the pilots' opinions are discussed.




NACA RM E52E16

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF AIR-FLOW
UNIFORMITY AND PRESSURE LEVEL ON WIRE
CLOTH FOR TRANSPIRATION-COOLING APPLICA-
TIONS. Patrick L. Donoughe and Roy A. McKinnon.
July 1952. 28p. diagrs., photos., tao. (NACA
RM E52E16) (Declassified from Confidential,
5/10/55)

An experimental investigation was conducted to ob-
tain information on air-flow uniformity and pressure-
level effects for various meshes of stainless-steel
corduroy wire cloth, and permeability and strength
data for a 20- by 20-mesh stainless-steel wire cloth.
It was found that close control of the wire cloth thick-
ness yielded sufficiently uniform air flow and that
available methods may be used to predict the effect
of pressure level. Permeability and strengths of the
20- by 20-mesh wire cloth were similar to those
already available from other meshes. The reduced
tensile strength of the 20- by 20-mesh wire cloth in
the direction of the primary stresses is one and a
half to three times as great as the strength of the
best porous sintered materials presently available.




NACA RM L52E07

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE LOW-SPEED LONGI-
TUDINAL STABILITY CHARACTERISTICS OF A
SWEPT-WING AIRPLANE MODEL WITH TWO MODI-
FICATIONS TO THE WING-ROOT PLAN FORM.
William B. Kemp, Jr. July 1952. 17p. diagrs.,
tab. (NACA RM L52E07) (Declassified from
Confidential, 5 10 '55)

An investigation has been conducted in the Langley
300-mph 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the effects
of two wing-root leading-edge plan-form modifica-
tions on the low-speed longitudinal stability charac-
teristics of a complete airplane model having a 50.70
sweptback wing.





NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 83


NACA RM L53E1

EFFECTS OF RATE OF FLAP DEFLECTION ON
FLAP HINGE MOMENT AND WING LIFT THROUGH
THE MACH NUMBER RANGE FROM 0.32 TO 0.87.
Thomas R. Turner. June 1953. 29p. diagrs.,
photos. (NACA RM L53E11) (Declassafied from
Confidential, 5 10. 55)

An investigation at Mach numbers from 0.32 to 0.87
has been made to determine the effect of rate of flap
deflection on flap hinge moment and wing lilt. Rate
of flap deflection varied from 00 to 1.170 per chord
length of travel. The Reynolds number varied from
approximately 1.0 to 2.3 x 106. The wing had an
aspect ratio of 4, a taper ratio of 0.6, and zero
sweep of the 75-percent-chord line. The wing was
fitted with a full-span 25-percent-chord plain flap.


7



NACA RM L53E15

SOME OBSERVATIONS ON STALL FLUTTER AND
BUFFETING. A. Gerald Rainey. June 1953. lip.
diagrs. (NACA RM L53E15) (Declassified from
Confidential, 5, 10 55)

An attempt is n.ade to describe the phenomenological
differences between stall flutter and buffeting. Some
experimental results are presented concerning both
the boundaries at which these phenomena occur and
the stresses involved.


NACA-Langley 5-25-55 4M





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08153 253 2




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