Research abstracts

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Title:
Research abstracts
Physical Description:
93 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics
Publisher:
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
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irregular
completely irregular

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Subjects / Keywords:
Aeronautics -- Abstracts -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Aeronautics -- Research -- Abstracts -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
abstract or summary   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Abstracts no. 1 (June 15, 1951)-no. 93 (Nov. 30, 1955).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001469326
notis - AGY1019
oclc - 01471285
lccn - 86657025
issn - 0499-9274
Classification:
lcc - TL501 .U5895
System ID:
AA00009235:00030

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National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics


Research Abstracts


NO.68


AUGUST 17, 1954


CURRENT NACA REPORTS

NACA Rept. 1121

DIRECT MEASUREMENTS OF SKIN FRICTION.
Satish Dhawan, California Institute of Technology.
1953. ii, 20p. diagrs., photos. (NACA Rept. 1121.
Formerly TN 2567)

A device was developed to measure local skin fric-
tion on a flat plate by measuring the force exerted on
a very small movable part of the flat plate. The ap-
paratus was applied to measurements in the low-
speed range, for both laminar and turbulent boundary
layers, and the measured skin-friction coefficients
show excellent agreement with Blasius' and Von
Karman's results. Measurements were made in
high-speed subsonic flow and turbulent-skin-friction
coefficients were determined up to a Mach number
of about 0.8. A few measurements were also made
in supersonic flow.



NACA Rept. 1122

SURVEY OF PORTIONS OF THE CHROMIUM-
COBALT-NICKEL-MOLYBDENUM QUATERNARY
SYSTEM AT 12000 C. Sheldon Paul Rideout and
Paul A. Beck, University of Notre Dame. 1953. ii,
38p. diagrs., photos., 20 tabs. (NACA Rept. 1122.
Formerly TN 2683)

A survey was made of portions of the chromium-
cobalt-nickel-molybdenum quaternary system at
12000 C by means of microscopic and X-ray diffrac-
tion studies. Since the face-centered cubic (alpha)
solid solutions form the matrix of almost all practi-
cally useful high-temperature alloys, the solid solu-
bility limits of the quaternary alpha phase were de-
termined up to 20 percent molybdenum. The com-
ponent cobalt-nickel-molybdenum, chromium-cobalt -
molybdenum, and chromium-nickel-molybdenum
ternary systems were also studied. The survey of
these systems was confined to the determination of
the boundaries of the face-centered cubic (alpha)
solid solutions and of the phases coexisting with
alpha at 12000 C.



NACA RM E54E19

EFFECTS OF ADDITIVES ON CORROSION AND
MASS TRANSFER IN SODIUM HYDROXIDE -
NICKEL SYSTEMS UNDER FREE-CONVECTION
CONDITIONS. Americo F. Forestieri. August 1954.
13p. diagrs., photos., 6 tabs. (NACA RM E54E19)


Experiments were carried out under free-convection
conditions in sodium hydroxide "L" nickel systems.
Nickel crucibles half full of sodium hydroxide were
heated for 24 hours at 15000 F with a temperature
difference of 450 F. The effect of additives such as
metals, salts, oxides, and nitrides oni.Mrekxtent-ol
corrosion and mass transfer %as eind.
measurement of the weight chang oi speciim4 n
the hot zone, and by metallogr tu examination o' 0 :
the specimen cross section. eb tion in mass
transfer occurred with additi es powde.oe co- 7,
mium and aluminum. pC <



NACA RM E54F10 '

PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION OF STRESS-
RUPTURE AND TENSILE STRENGTH OF
THERMENOL, AN IRON-ALUMINUM ALLOY.
Charles A. Gyorgak. August 1954. lip. diagrs.,
3 tabs. (NACA RM E54F10)

An investigation determined the stress-rupture life
at 11000 and 12000 F, the room-temperature tensile
strength, and the bend ductility of the oxidation-
resistant iron-aluminum alloy Thermenol. Stress-
rupture strengths for 100-hour life were 19,300 psi
at 12000 F and 35,500 psi at 11000 F. The room-
temperature tensile strength was 62,050 psi with 3-
percent elongation in a 3/4-inch-gage length. Angles
of bend to cause failure in the longitudinal and
transverse directions ranged from 340 to 560 and
were approximately equal.




NACA TN 3155

IMPINGEMENT OF WATER DROPLETS ON NACA
65A004 AIRFOIL AT 80 ANGLE OF ATTACK.
Rinaldo J. Brun, Helen M. Gallagher and Dorothea
E. Vogt. July 1954. 27p. diagrs. (NACA TN 3155)

The trajectories of droplets in the air flowing past an
NACA 65A004 airfoil at an angle of attack of 80 were
determined. The amount of water in droplet form
impinging on the airfoil, the area of droplet impinge-
ment, and the rate of droplet impingement per unit
area on the airfoil surface were calculated from the
trajectories and presented to cover a large range of
flight and atmospheric conditions. These impinge-
ment characteristics are compared briefly with those
previously reported for the same airfoil at an angle
of attack of 40.


*AVAILABLE ON LOAN ONLY.
ADDRESS REQUESTS FOR DOCUMENTS TO NACA, 1512 H ST., NW., WASHINGTON 25, D.C., CITING CODE NUMBER ABOVE EACH TITLE;
THE REPORT TITLE AND AUTHOR.

(P -f. /130 2






NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 68


NACA TN 3178

CHARACTERISTICS OF TURBULENCE IN A BOUND-
ARY LAYER WITH ZERO PRESSURE GRADIENT.
P. S. Klebanoff, National Bureau of Standards. July
1954. 56p. diagrs. (NACA TN 3178)

The results of an experimental investigation of a tur-
bulent boundary layer with zero pressure gradient
are presented. Measurements with the hot-wire
anemometer were made of turbulent energy and tur-
bulent shear stress, probability density and flattening
factor of u-fluctuation, spectra of turbulent energy
and shear stress, and turbulent dissipation. The im-
portance of the region near the wall and the inadequa-
cy of the concept of local isotropy are demonstrated.
Attention is given to the energy balance and the inter-
mittent character of the outer region of the boundary
layer. Also several interesting features of the
spectral distribution of the turbulent motions are
discussed.







NACA TN 3209

HIGH-RESOLUTION AUTORADIOGRAPHY. George
C. Towe, Henry J. Gomberg and J. W. Freeman,
University of Michigan. July 1954. ii, 138p.
diagrs., photos., 9 tabs. (NACA TN 3209)

This investigation was made to adapt wet-process
autoradiography to metallurgical samples to obtain
high resolution of segregated radioactive elements
in microstructures. Results are confined to devel-
opment of the technique, which was perfected to a
resolution of less than 10 microns. The radioactive
samples included carbon-14 carburized iron and
steel, nickel-63 electroplated samples, a powder
product containing nickel-63, and tungsten-185 in
N-155 alloy.








NACA TN 3269

ADDITIONAL STATIC AND FATIGUE TESTS OF
HIGH-STRENGTH ALUMINUM-ALLOY BOLTED
JOINTS. E. C. Hartmann, Marshall Holt and I. D.
Eaton, Aluminum Company of America. July 1954.
42p. diagrs., photos., 7 tabs. (NACA TN 3269)

Additional static and fatigue tests were made on a
few types of joints in 75S-T6, 24S-T4, and 14S-T6
high-strength aluminum-alloy extruded bar in order
to supplement the data in NACA Technical Note 2276.
Comparisons are made with the results of these
earlier tests.


BRITISH REPORTS

N-32203*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOME D.T.D.
COMMERCIAL ALUMINIUM ALLOY SHEET MA-
TERIALS. D. C. Hayward. March 1954. 26p.
diagrs., 5 tabs. (RAE Tech. Note Met. 195)

Compressive and tensile tests on aluminum alloy
sheet D.T.D. 603, 646, 546, 610, and 687 were
made longitudinally and transversely to the rolling
direction. Tables of proof-strength values and the
tangent-moduli graphs derived are given. Artificial
aging was found for small plastic deformation, to
raise the stress level of the compressive tangent-
moduli curves more than the tensile tangent-moduli
curves. The effect of sheet thickness on strength
values, investigated for D.T.D. 546 only, showed
progressive increase of tensile proof-stress with
increase in thickness but under compression,
strength varied irregularly with sheet thickness.



N-32204*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
AIRCRAFT POWER SUPPLY CABLES. D. B.
McKenzie. March 1954. 12p., 4 tabs. (RAE
Tech. Note EL. 66)

This note deals with the modern types of aircraft
cables used for the power supply circuits. It covers
the pren, nypren, glasil, glasef and fire types de-
scribing their uses and limitations, and also includes
a section giving the equivalent United States cables
which will enable users to service N.A.T.O. air-
craft with either British or American cables.




MISCELLANEOUS


NACA TN 3120

Errata No. 1 on "SPAN LOAD DISTRIBUTIONS
RESULTING FROM CONSTANT VERTICAL ACCEL-
ERATION FOR THIN SWEPTBACK TAPERED WINGS
WITH STREAMWISE TIPS. SUPERSONIC LEADING
AND TRAILING EDGES.' Isabella J. Cole and
Kenneth Margolis. January 1954.





DECLASSIFIED NACA REPORTS


THE FOLLOWING REPORT HAS
BEEN DECLASSIFIED FROM
CONFIDENTIAL, 7/29/54.


RM L52C21







NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 68


NACA RM A9E05

THE AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS THROUGH-
OUT THE SUBSONIC SPEED RANGE OF A THIN,
SHARP-EDGED HORIZONTAL TAIL OF ASPECT
RATIO 4 EQUIPPED WITH A CONSTANT-CHORD
ELEVATOR. Angelo Bandettini and Verlin D. Reed.
June 30, 1949. 50p. diagrs., photo. (NACA
RM A9E05) (Declassified from Confidential, 7/29/54)

The report presents results of tests at Mach numbers
from 0.20 to 0.94 of a thin horizontal tail without
sweep having an aspect ratio of 4 and taper ratio of
0.5 and equipped with a constant-chord elevator. The
tail profile was a sharp-edged, faired double wedge
having a thickness-chord ratio of 0.042. The investi-
gation was made at a constant Reynolds number of
2,000,000. The effect of compressibility on the ef-
fectiveness of the elevator in producing lift at small
angles of attack and elevator deflections was small at
Mach numbers less than 0.60; there was a gradual in-
crease in effectiveness between 0.60 and 0.90 Mach
numbers and a slight decrease between Mach num-
bers of 0.90 and 0.94.






NACA RM A9K18

THE EFFECT OF ASPECT RATIO ON THE SUB-
SONIC AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF
WINGS WITH NACA 65i-210 SECTIONS. Warren H.
Nelson and Albert L. Erickson. February 3, 1950.
31p. diagrs., photos., tab. (NACA RM A9K18)
(Declassified from Confidential, 7/29/54)

The lift, drag, and pitching-moment characteristics
of four model wings of aspect ratios 1, 2, 4, and 6 are
presented. The wings all had NACA 651-210 sec-
tions, taper ratios of 0.4, and 30 dihedral. The 25-
percent-chord lines had no sweep. Data were ob-
tained for a Mach number range of 0.4 to 0.9, and an
angle-of-attack range of -40 to 200. The transition
location and its effect on drag are studied.







NACA RM A53101

APPLICATIONS OF AUXILIARY AIR INJECTORS TO
SUPERSONIC WIND TUNNELS. Joseph M. Spiegel,
Robert U. Hofstetter and Donald M. Kuehn.
November 1953. 53p. diagrs., photos. (NACA
RM A53101) (Declassified from Confidential,
7/29/54)

The use of an air injector as an auxiliary device for
reducing starting and running compression ratios of
wind tunnels is discussed. A one-dimensional
analysis and experimental data are presented to dem-
onstrate the advantages of the device. A design
procedure is included for application of the method to
existing or proposed wind tunnels.


NACA RM A53L18

EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF BOUNDARY-
LAYER TRANSITION ON A BODY OF REVOLUTION
AT M = 3.5. James R. Jedlicka, Max E. Wilkins
and Alvin Seiff. March 1954. 56p. diagrs., photos.
(NACA RM A53L18) (Declassified from Confidential,
7/29/54)

Boundary-layer-transition tests were made in free
flight through still air on a small-scale fin-stabilized
body of revolution of fineness ratio 30 at a Mach num-
ber of 3.5 and length Reynolds numbers of 12 and 24
million. Three types of surfaces were tested and
the transition Reynolds number was found to depend
critically on the surface smoothness. Angle of attack
was found to influence transition strongly. This ef-
fect was correlated in terms of pressure rise along
streamlines and led to a prediction of the effect of
varying the body shape on sheltered-side transition.
In general, the transition points were time dependent,
fluctuating in one case over a range of Reynolds num-
bers from 4 to 20 million. Steady laminar flow was
observed to a length Reynolds number of 11 million.
Transition due to roughness and adverse pressure
gradient occurred even though the tests were within
the region of theoretical infinite laminar stability to
small disturbances.




NACA RM E50F22

FABRICATION AND PROPERTIES OF HOT-
PRESSED MOLYBDENUM DISILICIDE. Roger A.
Long. August 24, 1950. 34p. diagrs., photos., tab.
(NACA RM E50F22) (Declassified from Confidential,
7/29/54)

Hot-pressed molybdenum disilicide bodies produced
by industrial methods and sources were evaluated.
The outstanding characteristics reported are an
elevated-temperature (24000 F) short-time tensile
strength of 41,070 pounds per square inch and a 100-
hour rupture stress at 18000 F in excess of 30,000
pounds per square inch, as indicated in a preliminary
evaluation. The material evaluated was extremely
resistant to air corrosion up to 28500 F and generally
brittle at temperatures below 22000 F.




NACA RM E51D27

INSTRUMENTATION FOR RECORDING TRANSIENT
PERFORMANCE OF GAS-TURBINE ENGINES AND
CONTROL SYSTEMS. Gene J. Delio and Glennon V.
Schwent. June 27, 1951. 27p. diagrs., photos.
(NACA RM E51D27) (Declassified from Confidential,
7/29/54)

Design features are presented for the instrumenta-
tion used in a study of the transient performance of
gas-turbine engines and control systems. The
dynamic characteristics of the instrumentation are
discussed and examples are given of typical data on
the acceleration of a controlled and an uncontrolled
engine.







NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 68


NACA RM E51K26

PRESSURE DISTRIBUTION AND AERODYNAMIC
COEFFICIENTS ASSOCIATED WITH HEAT ADDI-
TION TO SUPERSONIC AIR STREAM ADJACENT TO
TWO-DIMENSIONAL SUPERSONIC WING. I. Irving
Pinkel, John S. Serafini and John L. Gregg. February
1952. 33p. diagrs., tab. (NACA RM E51K26) (De-
classified from Confidential, 7/29/54)

The modifications in the pressure distributions and
the aerodynamic coefficients associated with addi-
tions of heat to the two-dimensional supersonic in-
viscid flow field adjacent to the lower surface of a
5-percent-thickness symmetrical circular-arc wing
are presented in this report. The pressure distribu-
tions are obtained by the use of a graphical method
which gives the two-dimensional supersonic inviscid
flow field obtained with moderate heat addition. The
variation is given of the lift-drag ratio and of the
aerodynamic coefficients of lift, drag, and moment
with free stream Mach number, angle of attack, and
parameters defining extent and amount of heat addi-
tion. The six graphical solutions used in this study
included Mach numbers of 3.0 and 5.0 and angles of
attack of 00 and 20.



NACA RM E52A17

PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION OF THE HEAT-
SHOCK RESISTANT PROPERTIES OF MOLYBDE-
NUM DISILICIDE BLADES UNDER CENTRIFUGAL
LOAD. Roger A. Long and John C. Freche. May
1952. 15p. diagrs., photos., tab. (NACA
RM E52A17) (Declassified from Confidential,
7/29/54)

An investigation to determine the heat-shock resist-
ant properties of two molybdenum disilicide turbine
blades under centrifugal loads imposed by turbine
rotation is presented. Molybdenum disilicide turbine
blades fabricated by hot-pressing techniques with-
stood heat-shock conditions under blade centrifugal
stresses up to 5350 pounds per square inch. Addi-
tional development is required before the heat-shock
resistant properties of molybdenum disilicide are
satisfactory for turbine-blade application.




NACA RM E52B06

SOME FACTORS AFFECTING FABRICATION AND
HIGH-TEMPERATURE STRENGTH OF MOLYB-
DENUM DISILICIDE. W. A. Maxwell. April 1952.
25p. diagrs., photos., 3 tabs. (NACA RM E52B06)
(Declassified from Confidential, 7/29/54)

It has been demonstrated that the short-time high-
temperature strength of sintered molybdenum disili-
cide can be greatly improved by carbon addition.
Improved long-time deformation properties and de-
creased high-temperature plasticity accompany the
carbon additions. These changes are attributed to
partial deoxidation by the carbon. Large-grain, hot-
pressed molybdenum disilicide having a low oxygen
content was found to have superior long-time prop-
erties. Hardness and other properties were found to
be variable over a wide range.


NACA RM E52D09

SOME STRESS-RUPTURE AND CREEP PROPER-
TIES OF MOLYBDENUM DISILICIDE IN THE RANGE
16000 TO 20000 F. W. A. Maxwell. June 1952. 19p,
diagrs., photos., 2 tabs. (NACA RM E52D09) (De-
classified from Confidential, 7/29/54)

An investigation of the stress-rupture and creep
properties of hot-pressed molybdenum disilicide has
produced the following results: 1. The long-time
strength of molybdenum disilicide at high tempera-
tures is superior to that of the high-temperature
alloys and titanium carbide ceramals. 2. The use
of molybdenum disilicide above 18000 F may be
limited by the creep rate rather than by the stress-
rupture life. 3. A comparatively convenient and
satisfactory method for creep and stress-rupture
testing to 20000 F has been developed.





NACA RM L9B24a

AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF A GYRO-
ACTUATED ROLL CONTROL SYSTEM INSTALLED
IN A SUBSONIC TEST VEHICLE. Jerome M.
Teitelbaum and Ernest C. Seaberg. April 20, 1949.
26p. diagrs., photos., tab. (NACA RM L9B24a)
(Declassified from Confidential, 7/29/54)

Contains the results of wind-tunnel and flight tests of
a gyro-actuated, roll control system installed in a
sweptback four-wing subsonic test vehicle. This con-
trol system links the control surface directly to the
displacement gyroscope and employs a torque motor
to limit gyroscope precession. The linking of the
control surfaces in this manner results in an auto-
pilot system which gives a no-lag control response to
a model displacement without resorting to velocity or
acceleration-sensitive devices.





NACA RM L9F15a

LABORATORY INVESTIGATION OF AN AUTOPILOT
UTILIZING A MECHANICAL LINKAGE WITH A DEAD
SPOT TO OBTAIN AN EFFECTIVE RATE SIGNAL.
Ernest C. Seaberg. August 17, 1949. 29p. diagrs.,
photos., tab. (NACA RM L9F15a) (Declassified
irom Confidential, 7/29/54)

The results of a laboratory investigation of a front-
lash autopilot are presented in this analysis. The
operation of this autopilot is based on the nonlinear
principle of utilizing a dead spot in the servomotor
feedback linkage to the gyroscope base reference as
a means of obtaining a leading control signal. The
investigation consists of oscillating-table tests in
order to determine the effect of frontlash on the
amplitude and phase responses of the system. Roll-
simulator tests were also conducted in order to con-
firm the possibility of stabilization of pilotless air-
craft with this type of automatic pilot, and an attempt
to bracket the usable range of this autopilot was made
by plotting the degree of stability as a function of the
aerodynamic roll parameters.







NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 68


NACA RM L50B13

INVESTIGATION AT HIGH SUBSONIC SPEEDS OF A
450 SWEPTBACK HORIZONTAL TAIL WITH PLAIN
AND HORN-BALANCED CONTROL SURFACES.
Harold S. Johnson and Robert F. Thompson.
March 31, 1950. 44p. diagrs., photo., tab. (NACA
RM L50B13) (Declassified from Confidential,
7/29/54)

A wind-tunnel investigation of a horizontal tail sur-
face having 450 of sweepback was made through a
speed range to a Mach number of 0.89. The 0.25-
chord plain flap was tested with and without a horn
balance. A comparison is made with the results of
a previous investigation of the same model equipped
with a larger horn balance. Presented are lift, drag,
pitching-moment, and hinge-moment data and lift and
hinge-moment parameters.




NACA RM L50F29

STATIC DIRECTIONAL STABILITY OF A TANDEM-
HELICOPTER FUSELAGE. Charles C. Smith, Jr.
August 9, 1950. 23p. diagrs., photo. (NACA
RM L50F29) (Declassified from Confidential,
7/29/54)

An investigation has been made to determine the
static directional stability of a fuselage typical of
tandem helicopters. The model consisted mainly of
an elliptical-cross-section body and a rear rotor
pylon faired to form a large vertical tall with a very
thick airfoil section. The investigation included a
study of the effect of various modifications to the
vertical tail surface on the directional stability of
the model.





NACA RM L50119

THEORETICAL INVESTIGATION OF A
PROPORTIONAL-PLUS-FLICKER AUTOMATIC
PILOT. Ernest C. Seaberg. October 19, 1950.
54p. diagrs., photo., tab. (NACA RM L50119) (De-
classified from Confidential, 7/29/54)

An analysis has been made of the stability of a super-
sonic canard airframe and a proportional-plus-
flicker autopilot. Essentially, this autopilot main-
tains a zero reference about which the output is pro-
portional to the input and a flicker response over-
rides this proportional response at a fixed angle of


gimbal displacement on either side of the zero gyro-
scope reference. The analysis consists of an inves-
tigation of the calculated transient responses based
on the variation of the autopilot and aerodynamic
parameters. The calculations are based on the
assumption that the proportional part of the system
either contains a zero-phase-lag proportional auto-
pilot or is the actual autopilot frequency response
approximated by mathematical transfer function.




NACA RM L501I21

DESCRIPTION AND INVESTIGATION OF A
DYNAMIC MODEL OF THE XH-17 TWO-BLADE
JET-DRIVEN HELICOPTER. George W. Brooks and
Maurice A. Sylvester. March 14, 1951. 49p.
diagrs., photos., 6 tabs. (NACA RM L50121) (De-
classified from Confidential, 7/29/54)

A description of the NACA 1/10-scale dynamic model
of the XH-17 two-blade jet-powered helicopter is
presented and the investigation of the model flutter
and ground-vibrations characteristics reported. At
design values, rotor-blade flutter of the classical
bending-torsion type was observed at speeds corre-
sponding to full-scale tip speeds near the over-speed
limit of 800 feet per second. The flutter speed could
be raised by increasing the torsional frequencies of
the blades and changing the blade chordwise mass
distribution. The type of flutter mode depended on
whether the model was externally excited. No un-
stable ground vibrations could be excited on the
model.





NACA RM L51F06

EXPLORATORY INVESTIGATION AT HIGH AND
LOW SUBSONIC MACH NUMBERS OF TWO EXPERI-
MENTAL 6-PERCENT-THICK AIRFOIL SECTIONS
DESIGNED TO HAVE HIGH MAXIMUM LIFT COEF-
FICIENTS. Laurence K. Loftin, Jr. and Albert E.
von Doenhoff. December 1951. 48p. diagrs., photo.,
2 tabs. (NACA RM L51F06) (Declassified from
Confidential, 7/29/54)

The development of a method for deriving thin airfoil
sections to have high values of the low-speed maxi-
mum lift coefficient is described and the results of
an experimental investigation at high and low sub-
sonic Mach numbers of two new symmetrical airfoils
of 6-percent thickness are presented. Maximum lift
coefficients of about 1.3 were obtained for the two
airfoils at low speeds.


NACA-Langley 8-17-54 4M



































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AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES