Research abstracts

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Title:
Research abstracts
Physical Description:
93 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics
Publisher:
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
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irregular
completely irregular

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Subjects / Keywords:
Aeronautics -- Abstracts -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Aeronautics -- Research -- Abstracts -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
abstract or summary   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Abstracts no. 1 (June 15, 1951)-no. 93 (Nov. 30, 1955).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001469326
notis - AGY1019
oclc - 01471285
lccn - 86657025
issn - 0499-9274
Classification:
lcc - TL501 .U5895
System ID:
AA00009235:00026

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National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics


Research Abstracts


NO.64


JUjES, I954


CURRENT NACA REPORTS


NACA Rept. 1126

THE EFFECT OF BLADE-SECTION THICKNESS
RATIOS ON THE AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERIS-
TICS OF RELATED FULL-SCALE PROPELLERS
AT MACH NUMBERS UP TO 0.65. Julian D.
Maynard and Seymour Steinberg. 1953. ii, 55p.
diagrs., photos., tab. (NACA Rept. 1126. For-
merly RM L9D29)

Results of an investigation of two full-scale NACA
propellers are presented for a range of blade angles
from 200 to 550 at airspeeds up to 500 miles per
hour. These results are compared with the re-
sults from previous tests of five related NACA pro-
pellers to evaluate the effects of blade-section
thickness ratios on propeller aerodynamic charac-
teristics.




NACA Rept. 1136

ESTIMATION OF THE MAXIMUM ANGLE OF SIDE-
SLIP FOR DETERMINATION OF VERTICAL-TAIL
LOADS IN ROLLING MANEUVERS. Ralph W.
Stone, Jr. 1953. ii, 12p. diagrs., 5 tabs. (NACA
Rept. 1136. Formerly TN 2633)

This paper presents the results of a study, by a
step-by-step integration of the equations of motion,
of the variations of angle of sideslip and angle of
attack in rolling maneuvers, particularly for air-
planes with mass distributed mainly along the fuse-
lage. The results are compared with those of
existing methods for estimating angles of sideslip
for determining vertical-tail loads in rolling
maneuvers.




NACA RM 54D01

DEVELOPMENT OF METAL-BONDING ADHESIVES
WITH IMPROVED HEAT-RESISTANT PROPERTIES.
John M. Black and R. F. Blomquist, Forest Products
Laboratory. May 1954. 12p., 3 tabs. (NACA
RM 54D01)

Results are reported of current studies at the Forest
Products Laboratory to develop a metal-bonding
adhesive with greater resistance to temperatures up
to 6000 F that is easier to use than present ones.


NACA TN 3080

MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF WING AND
TAIL BUFFETING LOADS ON A FIGHTER-TYPE
AIRPLANE. Wilber B. Huston and T. H. Skopinski.
May 1954. i, 86p. diagrs., photo., 8 tabs. (NACA
TN 3080)

Wing and tai'buffeting loads measured in 194 runs
with a fightertlype airplane are tabulated with the
associnatedjlight conditions. Measurements were
mayt- at altitude of 30,000 to 10,000 feet and at Mach
L numbers up tc018. Preliminary analysis indicates
thai the loads vdry with the square root of the dy-
nanic pressure and shows the effects of aerodynamic
Sdamping,' duration of buffeting, maneuver abruptness,
peneTration beyond the buffet boundary, and reduction
of ihe wing natural frequency in bending through addi-
tion of wing-tip weights.



NACA TN 3083

DETERMINATION OF LATERAL-STABILITY DE-
RIVATIVES AND TRANSFER-FUNCTION COEFFI-
CIENTS FROM FREQUENCY-RESPONSE DATA FOR
LATERAL MOTIONS. James J. Donegan, Samuel W.
Robinson, Jr. and Ordway B. Gates, Jr. May 1954.
61p. diagrs., 12 tabs. (NACA TN 3083)

A method is presented for calculating the lateral-
stability derivatives and lateral transfer-function
coefficients from frequency-response data for a
rigid airplane. Two examples are used to illustrate
the method. Accurate lateral-stability derivatives
can be obtained only when accurate frequency-
response data are available.



NACA TN 3148

EVALUATION OF ALLOYS FOR VACUUM BRAZING
OF SINTERED WROUGHT MOLYBDENUM FOR
ELEVATED-TEMPERATURE APPLICATIONS.
Kenneth C. Dike. May 1954. 13p. diagrs., photos.,
2 tabs. (NACA TN 3148)

The brazing characteristics of 28 alloys, with
liquidus temperatures in the range 20000 to 25000 F,
were established in vacuum. The tensile strength of
butt-brazed molybdenum joints of 10 of the alloys
ranged from 21,000 to 49,000 pounds per square inch
at room temperature and 0 to 18,900 pounds per
square inch at 18000 F. The three alloys having
18000 F bonding strengths greater than 17,000 pounds
per square inch were heated in vacuum for 24 hours
at 18000 F to determine the effect on tensile strength.


*AVAILABLE ON LOAN ONLY.
ADDRESS REQUESTS FOR DOCUMENTS TO NACA, 1724 F ST., NW., WASHINGTON 25, D. C., CITING CODE NUMBER ABOVE EACH TITLE-
THE REPORT TITLE AND AUTHOR.
&Z9, 13072..

us4-8;-







2


This treatment lowered the strength of one consider-
ably but did not seem to affect the 84 percent nickel -
16 percent titanium and 52 percent niobium 48 per-
cent nickel alloy bonds. Therefore, these two
alloys may be potentially useful for brazing
molybdenum.




NACA TN 3156

CHARTS FOR ESTIMATING TAIL-ROTOR CONTRI-
BUTION TO HELICOPTER DIRECTIONAL STA-
BILITY AND CONTROL IN LOW-SPEED FLIGHT.
Kenneth B. Amer and Alfred Gessow. May 1954.
54p. diagrs., photo., 2 tabs. (NACA TN 3156)

Theoretically derived charts and equations are pre-
sented by which tail-rotor design studies of direc-
tional trim and control response at low forward
speed can be conveniently made. Comparisons be-
tween theoretical and experimental results are pre-
sented. The charts indicate and flight tests confirm
that, under certain flight conditions, a region of
vortex roughness is encountered by the tail rotor,
making prolonged operation difficult in this region.



NACA TN 3173

A STUDY OF HYPERSONIC SMALL-DISTURBANCE
THEORY. Milton D. Van Dyke. May 1954. 51p.
diagrs. (NACA TN 3173)

The small-disturbance equations are derived for in-
viscid flow past thin bodies at high supersonic speeds
Reinterpreted, they apply throughout the supersonic
range. The theory is used to find pressures on
cones and wedges, initial gradients on ogives, and
initial pressure curvatures on ogives of revolution.
Additional approximations from existing theories
are discussed.



NACA TN 3175

DOWNWASH CHARACTERISTICS AND VORTEX-
SHEET SHAPE BEHIND A 630 SWEPT-BACK WING-
FUSELAGE COMBINATION AT A REYNOLDS NUM-
BER OF 6.1 x 106. William H. Tolhurst, Jr. May
1954. 45p. diagrs., photo. (NACA TN 3175. For-
merly RM A52J08)

Downwash-angle contour maps are presented for
nine vertical transverse planes located between 0.57
and 2.71 semispans aft of the 0.25 mean aerodynamic
chord point for three angles of attack. The shape of
the vortex sheet is presented for the various survey
planes and angles of attack. Theoretical and experi-
mental downwash angles are compared.



NACA TN 3176

WALL INTERFERENCE IN WIND TUNNELS WITH
SLOTTED AND POROUS BOUNDARIES AT SUB-
SONIC SPEEDS. Barrett S. Baldwin, Jr., John B.
Turner and Earl D. Knechtel. May 1954. 42p.
diagrs. (NACA TN 3176. Formerly RM A53E29)


NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO.64

Linearized compressible-flow analysis is applied to
the study of wind-tunnel-wall interference for sub-
sonic flow in either two-dimensional or circular test
sections having slotted or porous walls. Expres-
sions are developed for evaluating blockage and lift
interference.


NACA TN 3181

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF HEAT-
TRANSFER AND FLUID-FRICTION CHARACTERIS-
TICS OF WHITE FUMING NITRIC ACID. Bruce A.
Reese and Robert W. Graham, Purdue University.
May 1954. 46p. diagrs., tab. (NACA TN 3181)

Experiments have been conducted to determine the
heat-transfer and fluid-friction characteristics of
white fuming nitric acid over a wide range of condi-
tions. A satisfactory equation for relating the
Fanning friction coefficient with heat transfer and
the isothermal friction coefficient measured at the
same Reynolds number is presented. An equation
is also presented for correlating the heat-transfer
results. Some preliminary results are presented
for the regime of forced convection with nucleate
boiling.


NACA TN 3182

MANUAL OF THE ICAO STANDARD ATMOSPHERE.
CALCULATIONS BY THE NACA. International Civil
Aviation Organization, Montreal, Canada and Langley
Aeronautical Laboratory, Langley Field, Va., U.S.A.
May 1954. iii, 132p. incl. 102p. tabs., diagrs.
(NACA TN 3182. Supersedes and extends NACA
Rept. 218)

The physical constants and basic equations defining
the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO)
Standard Atmosphere are presented together with
tables and diagrams of the properties of the ICAO
Standard Atmosphere computed by the National
Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in both metric
and English units for altitudes from -5,000 meters to
20,000 meters and from -16,500 feet to 65,800 feet.



NACA TN 3186

EVALUATION OF THE ACCURACY OF AN AIR-
CRAFT RADIO ALTIMETER FOR USE IN A METHOD
OF AIRSPEED CALIBRATION. Jim Rogers
Thompson and Max C. Kurbjun. May 1954. 15p.
diagrs., photos., tab. (NACA TN 3186)

A method which may provide a rapid and convenient
means for calibrating the airspeed systems of high-
performance aircraft is proposed and discussed.
The accuracy of the method is comparable with that
of the NACA radar phototheodolite method (NACA
Rep. 985), but the tests must be performed over a
large body of water.


NACA TN 3201

DIRECTIONAL STABILITY CHARACTERISTICS OF
TWO TYPES OF TANDEM HELICOPTER FUSELAGE
MODELS. James L. Williams. May 1954. 44p.
diagrs., photos. (NACA TN 3201)







NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 64


The results of a low-speed wind-tunnel investigation
of the directional stability characteristics of an
overlap-type fuselage as affected by fuselage and
pylon (vertical tail) modifications and of a nonover-
lap type fuselage as influenced by spoilers and
vertical-tail changes are presented in this report.
Tuft-grid pictures of the air flow behind the non-
overlap type fuselage are also presented.


NACA TN 3210

THE ROLE OF TRIPLE COLLISIONS IN EXCITA-
TION OF MOLECULAR VIBRATIONS IN NITROUS
OXIDE. Richard A. Walker, Thomas D. Rossing
and Sam Legvold, Iowa State College. May 1954.
24p. diagrs., photo., 3 tabs. (NACA TN 3210)

Results are presented of an investigation to determine
the importance of triple collisions in the thermal re-
laxation process (heat capacity lag) of gaseous mix-
tures. The experimental work involved the meas-
urement at ultrasonic frequencies of the velocity of
sound in mixtures of the basic dispersive gas nitrous
oxide and impurity gases nitrogen, helium, and
argon. Wide ranges of pressures and concentrations
for the gas mixtures were required in the experi-
ments to ascertain the possible effects of triple
collisions. The rudiments of the theory of sound
dispersion and relaxation phenomena are presented
along with an analysis of the manner in which the ef-
fects of triple collisions might be determined.



BRITISH REPORTS


N-30425*

Forest Products Research Lab. (Gt. Brit.)
INVESTIGATIONS INTO GLUES AND GLUING.
PROGRESS REPORT SEVENTY-NINE DECEMBER,
1953. THE COMPARATIVE DURABILITY OF AS-
SEMBLY GLUES IN ENGLAND AND IN NIGERIA.
ANALYSIS AFTER EIGHTEEN MONTHS EXPOSURE.
J. F. S. Carruthers and M. S. Burridge. lip.
photos., 4 tabs. (Forest Products Research Lab.)

This report gives the comparative durability of
various adhesives used in the wood-working indus-
tries after exposure experiments in England and
Nigeria. Results are given on the following glue
types: animal, casein, urea formaldehyde, phenol
formaldehyde, and resorcenol formaldehyde.



N-30446*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
EXPERIMENTS ON THE FLOW PAST A POROUS
CIRCULAR CYLINDER FITTED WITH A THWAITES
FLAP. R. C. Pankhurst and B. Thwaites.
APPENDIX II SMOKE VISUALIZATION OF FLOW
PAST CIRCULAR CYLINDER WITH THWAITES
FLAP. W. S. Walker. 1953. 28p. diagrs., photos.
(ARC R & M 2787. Formerly ARC 13,447; FM 1486;
13,507; FM 1496)

This paper describes wind-tunnel experiments on a
porous circular cylinder of 3-inch diameter fitted
with a Thwaites flap. Measurements were made of


3


the pressure distribution at midspan, together with
a number of wake traverses, over a range of suc-
tion quantity, flap size,wind speed, and flap setting.
The distributed suction effectively prevented bound-
ary layer separation and enabled a close approxima-
tion to potential flow to be achieved. The flap was
essential to the attainment of steady flow conditions
with suction.



N-30447*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
RECORDS OF MAJOR STRENGTH TESTS. P. B.
Walker. 1954. 5p. diagrs., tab. (ARC R & M
2790; ARC 12,601. Formerly RAE Structures 44)

The strength attained in major strength tests, made
over a period of 10 years, is given for 24 wing sys-
tems and 10 fuselages. A preliminary analysis is
also presented from the standpoints of safety and de-
sign efficiency. One third of all the wing systems
tested are found to be seriously understrength as
originally designed, and it is concluded that wing and
fuselage testing for all new types is essential for
safety. The majority of understrength aircraft,
however, were brought up to the required standard
by local strengthening, and it is concluded that this
has an important bearing on design efficiency.



N-30448*

Aeronautical Research Council (GL. Brit.)
THE EFFECT OF SWEEPBACK ON THE FUNDA-
MENTAL DERIVATIVE COEFFICIENT FOR
FLEXURAL MOTION. J. B. Bratt and K. C. Wight.
1953. 22p. diagrs., photos., 5 tabs. (ARC R & M
2774. Formerly ARC 13,452; 0.898; S & C 2438)

Measurements have been made with new equipment
for derivative tests in a 9- by 7-foot tunnel, to deter-
mine the effect of sweepback on the derivatives X0
and x0 for a rectangular airfoil of aspect ratio 6.
A numerical reduction was observed in each case.
Values of Xg and Ag for the swept model were ob-
tained from measurements relating to oscillation
about an axis perpendicular to the leading edge. A
comparison of a and XA with available theoretical
results for finite aspect ratio is made and good
agreement observed in the case of the former. The
less satisfactory agreement with Ag is thought to be
due to lower accuracy of the theoretical values.




N-30449*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
AN INVESTIGATION OF HIGH-ALTITUDE CLEAR-
AIR TURBULENCE OVER EUROPE USING
MOSQUITO AIRCRAFT. G. S. Hislop and D. M.
Davies. 1953. 39p. diagrs., 3 tabs. (ARC R & M
2737; ARC 13,316. Formerly Brit. European Air-
ways Corp. RSD Rept. 15)

Some 20 areas of turbulence were actually investi-
gated, the greatest vertical gust velocity encountered
was 26 ft/sec E.A.S. The results were examined







4


from the passenger comfort and structural aspect,
and from the meteorological aspect. More data are
needed before a forecasting technique can be
established. It has been found that severe turbu-
lence may be found in a jet stream and that turbu-
lence is frequently found near the tropopause.




N-30454*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
THE PERFORMANCE AFTER POWER FAILURE OF
A HELICOPTER WITH BLADE PITCH CONTROL.
PARTS I AND II. F. O'Hara and H. A. Mather.
1953. 16p. diagrs. (ARC R & M 2797; ARC 12,892;
ARC 13,867. Formerly Airborne Forces Exp.
Establishment AFEE Rept. Rota 1; AFEE Rept.
Rota 6)

In part I, a review is made of helicopter performance
after engine failure. Transition from powered opera-
tion to autorotation is discussed and a theoretical
analysis of the motion is given for a single-rotor
helicopter with blade-pitch control. In part II, tests
are made to investigate the performance of a
Hoverfly I in the transition to autorotation following
power cut in level flight.




N-30455*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
A SURVEY OF PERFORMANCE REDUCTION, WITH
PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO TURBO-
PROPELLER AIRCRAFT. K. J. Lush. 1954. 7p.
(ARC R & M 2757; ARC 12,951. Formerly AAEE/
Res/247)

A survey of the methods available for performance
reduction, with particular reference to turbo-
propelled aircraft, has been made. The purpose of
performance reduction is briefly examined. Methods
in use are classified into experimental methods,
which require no advance numerical data, and
analytical methods, which require such data. The
latter class if subdivided into methods based on
small corrections and methods based on performance
analyses. The suitability of each class of method is
discussed.



N-30456*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
SOME ADDITIONAL NOTES ON THE DERIVATION
OF AIRWORTHINESS PERFORMANCE CLIMB
STANDARDS. A. K. Weaver. 1953. 12p. diagr.
(ARC R & M 2769; ARC 13.500. Formerly
AAEE/Tech/61)

After the publication of a report (R & M 2631) on the
derivation of airworthiness performance climb
standards, various subsidiary points raised in the
course of discussions were examined. Some of these
have been collected together in the present note.
They are in the nature of elaborations of the original
method and include a refined method of deriving the
take-off climb standard, a method of treating inter-


NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 64


dependence of engine failure and a method for in-
cluding the effect of sideslip in the margin allowed
for pilotage errors. The main principles set forth
in the earlier report remain unaffected.



N-30457*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
THE CALCULATED PERFORMANCE OF ETHYL
ALCOHOL-WATER MIXTURES AS ROCKET FUELS
WITH LIQUID OXYGEN. A. B. P. Beeton. 1953.
8p. diagrs. (ARC R & M 2816; ARC 11, 534.
Formerly RAE Tech.Note Aero 1943; SD 75)

Specific impulses and combustion temperatures have
been calculated for rocket propellants consisting of
liquid oxygen and ethyl alcohol-water mixtures.
This system appears to have a number of advantages
compared with the corresponding liquid oxygen and
petrol system.




N-30458*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
WATER PERFORMANCE OF A FOUR-ENGINED
FLYING BOAT WITH STEP FAIRINGS OF LENGTH
3, 6 AND 9 TIMES THE STEP DEPTH. G. J. Evans,
A. G. Smith, R. A. Shaw, and W. Morris. Edited by
A. G. Smith. 1953. 28p. diagrs., photos., 2 tabs.
(ARC R & M 2868. Formerly MAEE H/Res/140;
H/Res/142)

Two reports thought to be of interest in that the re-
sults first demonstrated the importance of the possi-
ble interference between the water wake from the
forebody and the afterbody bottom on porpoising in-
stability are combined in this report. The report
also gives an outline of the mechanism of the water
flow over the forebody and clearance from the after-
body in the course of take-offs and landings, both
with and without the various forms of porpoising
instability.




N-30520*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
PRESSURE DISTRIBUTION AND BOUNDARY LAYER
INVESTIGATIONS ON 44 DEGREE SWEPT-BACK
TAPERED WING. PART I THREE-DIMENSIONAL
TESTS ON THE WING. PART II TWO-
DIMENSIONAL PRESSURE DISTRIBUTION TESTS
ON 10 PER CENT THICK SYMMETRICAL AERO-
FOIL SECTION. Joseph Black. 1953. 52p. diagrs.,
photos., 2 tabs. (ARC CP 137)

Chordwise pressure distributions at a number of
spanwise locations were measured over a range of
incidence. Attention was given to investigating the
boundary layer, quantitative measurements being
made with a novel form of yawmeter head. A tech-
nique for revealing the direction of flow and forma-
tion of vortices in the layer was developed. One of
the most important results established was the rela-
tion of the unstable break in the pitching-moment
curve to the initiation of stalling at the tip.








NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 64




N-30521*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
A REVIEW AND ASSESSMENT OF VARIOUS
FORMULAE FOR TURBULENT SKIN FRICTION IN
COMPRESSIBLE FLOW. R. J. Monaghan. 1953.
52p. diagrs. (ARC CP 142)

An extended comparison is made of available formu-
las which have been developed for the variation of
turbulent skin friction on a flat plate in compressible
flow, with and without heat transfer. Assumptions
made in their development are examined and are
checked against experimental evidence where possi-
ble. A formula is given which should be sufficiently
accurate in application probably up to M = 4 until
further experimental evidence may make refinement
possible.







N-30522*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
AN INVESTIGATION INTO THE PITOT RAKE
METHOD OF MEASURING TURBO JET ENGINE
THRUST IN FLIGHT. J. Stephenson, R. T. Shields
and D. W. Bottle. 1954. 60p. diagrs., 9 tabs.
(ARC CP 143)

Tests were made to find whether a pitot rake could
be used as an absolute measure of the thrust of a jet
engine on the ground and in flight. The tests were
made on Derwent 5 engines installed in Meteor 4 air-
craft. The test covered a wide range of flight condi-
tions and included test bed measurements on bare
engines and later, measurements of exit static
pressure. The same final nozzle was used in all the
main tests. The tests were also planned to check the
generally nondimensional thrust relationship for jet
engines.









N-30536*

TRIALS OF TIMBERS FOR PLYWOOD MANUFAC-
TURE. R. A. G. Knight, Forest Products Research
Laboratory. (Reprint from Wood, v. 19, February
1954, p. 76-80)

This report summarizes in tabular form the results
of the pilot tests on 44 species of timber for plywood
manufacture. Of the species dealt with, some are
already well known to the British plywood industry
and have been used to provide basic comparative
data. Other timbers are new for plywood and have
been tested on request.


N-30589*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
EXPERIMENTAL WORK ON THE ELECTROSTATIC
CHARGES FORMED ON AIRCRAFT CAMERA FILM.
J. A. Wells. October 1953. 50p. diagrs., photos.,
4 tabs. (RAE Tech. Note Ph. 479)

The note gives a survey of the existing information on
frictional electricity with particular reference to its
application to "static" on aircraft camera film.
Suitable equipment for the measurement of frictional
charges is described. Some limited experimental
work on the distribution of charge which occurs when
a dielectric rubs continuously over a fixed surface
and a method of assessing films for liability to static
discharge are described. Recommendations are
made for methods of reducing the occurrence of
discharges.






N-30590*

National Gas Turbine Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
SOME EXPERIMENTS ON THE MEASUREMENT OF
AIR FLOW BY TRAVERSING A DUCT. H. A.
Knight. November 1953. 51p. diagrs. (NGTE
Memo. M. 178)

Experiments to obtain a reliable aerodynamic cali-
brating technique in a measuring duct are summa-
rized. The final result was only partly successful
and the method has been postponed while an alterna-
tive is tried. The tests resulted from attempts to
reduce errors as they were discovered. The prin-
ciple source of inaccuracy with the original method
was the static pressure variation across the meas-
uring plane. Features of the experiments which
are applicable to general flow measurements are
listed. Three untried improvements are listed.






N-30606*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
FURTHER EXTRACTS FROM CURRENT LITERA-
TURE ON THE DILASTRAIN METHOD OF DETER-
MINING THE ENDURANCE LIMIT OF MATERIALS.
ENDURANCE LIMIT TEST, Reprint from
Mechanical Engineering, Jan., 1952, p. 25-26. THE
DILASTRAIN METHOD OF FATIGUE TESTING, Re-
print from Engineer, v. 195, no. 5079, May 29, 1953,
p.767. October 12, 1953. 4p. diagrs. (ARC
16,203; Strut. 1649)

A rapid and accurate method for determining the
endurance limit of steels and other metals has been
developed. Called the R/S Dialstrain Methud. the
test requires only 2 hours in itself. The endurance
limit of any particular material is found under
present methods of testing by subjecting test bars
to varying loads of stresses and vibrating them until
they fracture or prove enduring.








6



N-30611*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
THE INFLUENCE OF THE EXIT VELOCITY PRO-
FILE ON THE NOISE OF A JET. Alan Powell.
September 22, 1953. 20p. diagrs., 4 tabs. (ARC
16,156; FM 1952. Formerly ARC 15,473; FM 1837)

The noise levels of a jet issuing from a long pipe
are compared with those of a jet having a square
velocity profile at the exit. On comparison with a
jet of smaller diameter which has an equal thrust
for the same maximum jet velocity, it is found that
the changes in noise level are smaller. For jets of
equal diameters the effects on the subsonic aero-
dynamic noise generated by a reduction of velocity
gradient near the boundary are more than offset by
the increased velocities necessary near the center
of the jet to obtain equal thrust.




N-30692*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
THE SLIP BAND EXTRUSION EFFECT OBSERVED
IN SOME ALUMINIUM ALLOYS SUBJECTED TO
CYCLIC STRESSES. P. J. E. Forsyth and C. A.
Stubbington. January 1954. 19p. diagrs., photos.
(RAE Met. 78)

Extrusion of crystal material from slip bands has
been observed during the final stages of fatiguing of
a number of solution heat treated materials. The
extruded material is in the form of ribbon, the thick-
ness of which is estimated as less than 0.1 g. It
appears suddenly after a period of cyclic stressing,
and leaves behind a crevasse which represents the
initial crack. The effect may be associated with a
segregation or ordering of the solute atoms in the
lattice. This ordering may to a certain extent al-
ready exist in the solution heat treated material, but
is mainly caused by the action of the cyclic stresses
on the metastable matrix.







MISCELLANEOUS



N-25045*

Advisory Group for Aeronautical Research and
Development. SOME FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO
SCALE EFFECT AT SUPERSONIC SPEEDS. Ira H.
Abbott. (Presented at London AGARD conference,
September 3-11, 1953) 26p. diagrs., photos.
(Advisory Group for Aeronautical Research and
Development. AG8/M4)

Information is included on the Reynolds number ef-
fects at supersonic speeds on skin friction, transi-
tion and separation. Some of the effects of air-
stream turbulence, weak shock waves from the walls,
and heat transfer are considered briefly.


NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 64


N-30426*

Advisory Group for Aeronautical Research and
Development. TECHNICAL PRESENTATIONS BE-
FORE THE AGARD COMBUSTION PANEL: INTRO-
DUCTION TO CHEMICAL KINETICS FOR AERO-
NAUTICAL ENGINEERS. S. S. Penner, California
Institute of Technology. EXPERIMENTAL INVES-
TIGATION OF INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF FLAMES
J. W. Linnett, Oxford University. IGNITION DE-
LAY MEASUREMENTS ON GAS TURBINE FUELS
BY THE N.G.T.E. METHOD. B. P. Mullins,
National Gas Turbine Establishment. COMBUS-
TION INSTABILITY IN ROCKET MOTORS. Luigi
Crocco, Princeton University. COMBUSTION
PROBLEMS IN TURBOJETS. Jean Surugue, Office
National d'Etudes et de Recherches Ae'ronautiques.
REPORT ON COMBUSTION SYMPOSIUM. COM-
BUSTION CHAMBER PROBLEMS. Jean Fabri,
Office National d'Etudes et de Recherches
Ae'ronautiques. COMBUSTION PROBLEMS IN RAM-
JETS. Raymond Siestrunck. Office National d'Etudes
et de Recherches A6ronautiques. (Presented at
Rome AGARD conference, December 12-19, 1952)
90p. diagrs., photos. (Advisory Group for Aero-
nautical Research and Development. AG5/P2)




N-31356

Advisory Group for Aeronautical Research and
Development. SELECTED COMBUSTION PROB-
LEMS: FUNDAMENTAL AND AERONAUTICAL
APPLICATIONS. Edited by W. R. Hawthorne and
J. Fabri. (Combustion colloquim, Cambridge
University, England, December 7 to 11, 1953) viii,
534p. diagrs., photos., tabs. (Advisory Group for
Aeronautical Research and Development)

Contents include 18 articles: Fundamental approach
to laminar flame propagation, by Theodore von
Karman and S. S. Penner. Aerothermodynamic
study of combustion, by Jean Fabri. Diffusion pro-
cesses as rate-controlling steps in laminar flame
propagation, by Dorothy M. Simon. Some experi-
mental results relating to laminar flame propagation,
by J. W. Linnett. Ignition and combustion in a
laminar mixing zone, by Frank E. Marble and
Thomas C. Adamson, Jr. Use of spectroscopy in
elucidating reaction mechanism, by A. G. Gaydon.
Spectroscopic studies of premixed laminar flames,
by S. S. Penner. A few results and classical
methods of study for turbulent flows, by Jean-J.
Bernard. Experimental studies on turbulent flames,
by Arch C. Scurlock and John H. Grover. A turbu-
lent flame theory derived from experiments, by Bela
Karlovitz. The combustion of double-base pro-
pellants, by Gordon K. Adams and Leonard A.
Wiseman. The mechanism of combustion of solid
propellants, by Richard D. Geckler. Combustion of
a single droplet and of a fuel spray, by D. B.
Spalding. Combustion instability in liquid-propellant
rocket motors a survey, by Chandler C. Ross and
Paul P. Datner. The problem of combustion at high
altitude, by Peter Lloyd and Brian P. Mullins.
Flame stabilization by bluff bodies, by M. Barrere
and A. Mestre. Combustion in vitiated air, by
Brian P. Mullins. Some properties of pulsating
combustion: the pulse jet, action of doped fuels, by
J. Bertin.








NACA 7
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 64



UNPUBLISHED PAPERS


N-19025*

THE DIVIDED-FLOW "ASPIN I" TURBOJET. (Le
reacteur a double flux). M. Faury. May 1954.
25p. diagrs., photo., 3 tabs. (See also Docaero,
no. 6, Nov., 1950, p. 19-38)

The propulsive efficiency of propellers, even of the
most modern type, drops rapidly at speeds above
700/km/h, while that of jet engines is not important
at speeds below 900 km/h. The range between
these two limits, that of the heavy airplanes of
tomorrow, demands a new propeller. The divided-
flow turbojet, midway between turbojet and simple
jet, seems best suited for this purpose.


NACA-Langley 6-8-54 4M






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08153t 112 0




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