Research abstracts

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Title:
Research abstracts
Physical Description:
93 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics
Publisher:
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
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irregular
completely irregular

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Subjects / Keywords:
Aeronautics -- Abstracts -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Aeronautics -- Research -- Abstracts -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
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serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
abstract or summary   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Abstracts no. 1 (June 15, 1951)-no. 93 (Nov. 30, 1955).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001469326
notis - AGY1019
oclc - 01471285
lccn - 86657025
issn - 0499-9274
Classification:
lcc - TL501 .U5895
System ID:
AA00009235:00025

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National Advisory Comm



ReStarCh A
NO.63

CURRENT NACA REPORTS

NACA Rept. 1125

DYNAMICS OF MECHANICAL FEEDBACK-TYPE
HYDRAULIC SERVOMOTORS UNDER INERTIA
LOADS. Harold Gold, Edward W. Otto and Victor L.
Ransom. 1953. ii, 21p. diagrs., photos. (NACA
Rept. 1125. Formerly TN 2767)

An analysts of the dynamics of mechanical feedback-
type hydraulic servomotors under Inertia loads is de-
veloped and experimental verification Is presented.
This analysis, which is developed In terms of two
physical parameters, yields direct excpressions for
the following dynamic responses: (1) the transient
response to a step input and the maximum cylinder
pressure during the transient and (2) the variation of
amplitude attenuation and phase shift with the fre-
quency of sinusoldally varying Input. Close agree-
ment was obtained between analytically determined
responses and measured responses.




NACA Rept. 1128

CALCULATIONS ON THE FORCES AND MOM ENTS
FOR AN OSCILLATING WING-AILERON COMBINA-
TION IN TWO-DIMENSIONAL POTENTIAL FDW
AT SONIC SPEED. Herbert C. Nelson and Julian H.
Berman. 1953. 1I, 16p. dlagrs., 2 tabs. (NACA
Rept. 1128. Formerly TN 2590)

The linearized theory for compressible unsteady flow
is used, as suggested In recent contributions to the
subject, to obtain the velocity potential and the I~ft
and moment for a thin, harmonically oseilliating, two-
dimensional wing-alleron combination moving at son-
in speed. The velocity potential Is derived by con-
sidering the somec case as the limit of the Ilnearlzed
supersonic theory. The paper provides extensive
tables of numerical values for the coefficients con-
tained in the expressrone for i~ft and moment, for
various values of the reduced frequency k(0 k 13.5)
and aileron hange position (from 10 to 90 percent of
the wing chord).




NACA Rept. 1129

TRANSVERSE VIBRATIONS OF HOLLOW THIN-
WALLED CYLINDRICAL BEAMS. Bernard
Budiansky and Edwin T. Kruszewsks. 1953. t11 10p.
diagrs. (NACA Rept. 1129. Formerly TN 2682)

The varlatlonal principle, dlfferentlal equations, and
boundary conditions considered appropriate to the


* AVAILABLE ON LOAN ONLY.
ADDRESS REQUESTS FOR DOCUMENTS TO NACA, 17P4 F ST, NW., WASHINGTON 1s D. C. CITING CODE NUMBER ABOVE EACH TITLE;
THE REPORT TITLE AND AUTHOR

& J.9JSOPL
L( 57


ittee For Aerong ~t



bstracts orY ln a ~ I
MA .4\8, 1954 'I

analysis of transverse vibrations of Piplo laCndrj
cal beams are shown. General soluts Iot ei~ 4,
modes and frequencies of cantilever and
drical beams of arbitrary cross section but of unl-
form thickness are given. The combined influence of
the secondary effects of transverse shear deforma-
tron, shear lag, and longitudinal inertia Is shown In
the form of curveil for cylinders of rectangular cross
section and uniform thickness. The contrptiation of
each of the secondary effects to t apdcini
the actual frequency Is also indica ed.rlo in



NACA RM E54BO8

APPLICATION OF PULSE TECHNI UES TO STRAl_L. ..--"
GAGES. Newell D. Sanders and Gebc~ge-N:-B-oae.
May 1954. 17p. diagrs. (NACA RM E54808)

Pulse techniques have been applied to strain gages
for increasing the output level and extending the
usable range. Bonded and unbonded strain gages
which normally operate with exciting potentials be-
tween 3.5 and 14 volts were operated satisfactorily
with 200-volt pulses of 1-microsecond duration and
a repetition rate of 350 per second. Outputs 15 times
greater than normal outputs were measured. A
pulse-generating circuit and a pulse-detecting cir-
crut are described. An analysts of pulsed operation
of strain gages is given.



NACA RM E54Bl5

EFFECTS OF SOME METAL ADDITIONS ON
PROPERTIES OF MOLYBDENUM DISILICIDE. H. A.
DeVincentis and W. E. Russell. May 1954. 22p.
diagrs., photos., 6 tabs. (NACA RM E54Bl5)


The effect of the addition of approximately 6 percent
nickel, cobalt, or platinum on some properties of
molybdenum disilicide was Investigated. These addl-
rions resulted an appreezably lowering the mlodulus-of-
rupture strength from that of unalloyed molybdenum
disilicide. The thermal shock resistance was unim-
proved. The resistance to oxudation was decreased
at higher temperatures. It as believed that above
20000 and 24000 F the nickel and cobalt alloys,
respectively, formed low~-melting Intermetallics and
possibly eutecracs between these intermetalllcs.
This resulted In considerable porosity. No uncom-
bined metal could be detected In either hot-pressed
or heat-treated material. In the platinum-contamning
bodies, uncombined metal was detected after hot
pressing. The concentration of uncombined metal
decreased as a result of heat treatment, and after
treatment at the higher temperatures, could not be
detected.






NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO.63


to formulate a method for analyzing the aeroglastic
behavior In roll at supersonic speeds of a reclkngular
wing mounted on a cylindrical body. Rolling effec-
tIveness and aileron reversal speed are computed by
using a numerical solution which Incorporates
matrices. Results obtained for an example configura-
tion by using this method are compared with the re-
aults obtained by using slnmpinfled methods of analysts
For the particular configuration considered, the
variation of rolling effectiveness with Mach number
is found for two c~onstant-altitude flights.



NACA TrN 3086

MANEUVER ACCELERATIONS EXPERIENCED BY
FIVE TYPES OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT AIR-
PLANES DURING ROUTINE OPERATIONS. Thomas
L. Coleman and Martin R. Copp. April 1954. 26p.
diagrs., 3 tabs. (NACA TN 3086)

The magnitude and frequency of occurrence of
mianeuverr accelerations experienced by five types of
commercial transport airplanes during routine opera-
tions obtained from time-hlstory IVGH) records are
presented. The results are compared wlth available
gust-acceleration data for the operations considered.



NACA TN 3141

COMBINED NATURAL- AND FORCED-CONVECTION
LAMINAR FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER OF FLUIDS
WITH AND WITHOUT HEAT SOURCES IN CHANNELS
WITH LINEARLY VARYING WALL TEMPERATURES.
Simon Ostrach. April 1954. 74p. diagrs., 2 abs.
(NACA TN 31411

The flow of fluids warh and without heal sources and
subject to? body forces between two plane parallel sur-
faces which are oriented In the direction of the gen-
erating body force Is analyzed under the condltion
that the temperature vary lImearly along these sur-
faces. Solutions of this problem are obtained In
terms of universall" functions whrch are tabulated
for simple application to specific cases. Representa-
tive velcrlty and temperature distributions from
which detailed study of the heat transfer Is made are
then computed. 11 Is found that under certain condi-
lions the effects of aerodynamic or friersonal heating
can be appreelable. Asymptouic solutions (for large
values of the Rayleigh number) which render the
computations simple are also presented. Comparison
of the results from the method given herein walh
those obtained elsewhere In an approximate manner
for a special case slmulating the natural-convection
flow of flulds w trh heat sources In a completely en-
closed region show's that the approxrmate method rs
sufficiently accurate for problems In which the
modified Raylelgh number Is less than 104.



NACA. TN 3145

ANALYSIS OF TURBULENT HEAT TRANSFER,
MASS TRANSFER, AND FRICTION IN SMOOTH
TUBES AT HIGH PRANDTL AND SCHMIDT NUM-
BERS. Robert G. Delsler. May 1954. 53p. diagre.
(NACA ~TN 3145)


NAA RM E54B19

VARIATION OF SPONTANEOUS IGNTION DELAYS
WITH TEMPERATURE AND COMPOSITION FOR
PROPANE -OX YGEN -NITROGEN MIKTURES AT
ATOISPHERIC PRESSURE. Joseph L. Jackson
and Richard S. Brokaw~. May 1954. 29p. diagrs.,
4 tabs. (NACA RM E54Bl9)

The ignition delays of prop ne -oxygen narogen mix-
tures as a function of temperature and composition
have been determined in a flow system. The varia-
tion of the agnallon lag T at constant temperature
can be represented by the equation

1/r = k~lg C3Hd d /4
where k is constant. The temperature depend-
ence of this equation over the range Invesligated
(5250 to 7400 C) is given within 30 percent by the
empirical equation:

C 3HSd Od21/4 = 0.030 + 5.4 x 0410"e4500~/T

with concentrations expressed as mole fractions and
temperature as degrees Kelvin.



NACA RM E54C05

EFFECT OF CHANNEL GEOMETRY ON THE
QUENCHING OF LAMIINAR FLAMES. A. L. Berlad
and A.E. Potter, Jr. May 1954. 32p. diagrs., tab.
(NACA RM E54C05)

The effect of channel geometry on flame quenching,
as calculated on the basis of average active particle
chain lengths, is related among six different geome-
tries: plane parallel plates of infinite extent, cylin-
drical tubes, rectangular slots, cylindrical annual,
and tubes of elllptacal and equllaterally triangular
shape. Experimental determination of the quenching
behavior of propane-air flames over an equivalence-
ratio range of 0.82 to 1.30 was made for a series of
rectangular slois, cylindrical annuli, and cylindrical
tubes in the pressure range 0.08 to 1.0 atmosphere,
Ten rectangular-slot geometries covering a length-
to-width ratio range of 1:1 to 33.3:1, nine cyllndrlcal
annulus geometries covering a diameter-ratio range
of 1.33:1 to 25:1, and four cylinder diameters were
investigated. Generally good agreement between
theory and experiment was found for both rich and
lean flames. The average deviation of the predicted
quenching distances from the observed ones is 4.3
percent for equivalence ratios less than or equal to
unity and 8.6 percent for equivalence ratios greater
than unity. These deviations are generally systemat-
ie, rather than random. It was also found that rela-
tively small cold surfaces may, when flame
immersed, exhibit very large quenching effects.



NACA TN 3067

ROLLING EFFECTIVENESS AND AILERON REVER-
SAL OF RECTANGULAR WINGS AT SUPERSONIC
SPEEDS. John MI. Hedgepeth and Robert J. Kell.
April 1954. 79p. diagrs., 4 tabs. (NACA TN 3067)

Linearized supersonic lItIlng-surface theory is used
in conljunction with structural influence coefficients






NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO.63

The expression for eddy diffusivity from a previous
analysts was modified In order to account for the ef-
fect of kinemnatic viscosity In reducing the turbulence
In the region close to a wall. By using the modified
expression, good agreements was obtained between
predicted and experamental results for heat and mass
Iransfer at Prandlt and Schmldt numbers between
0.5 and 3000. The ef fects of length-to-diameter
rat io and of va rlable viscosity were also investigated
for a wide range of Prandtl numbers.



NACA TN 3147

IMPINGEMENrT OF WATER DROPLETS ON AN
ELLIPSOID WITH FINENESS RATIO 10 IN AXI-
SYMMETRIC FLOW. Rinaldo J. Brun and Robert
G. Dorsch. May 1954. 3lp. diagrs., tab. (NACA
TN 31471

The presence of radomes and instruments that are
sensitive to water films or ice formations in the nose
section of all-weather aircraft and missiles necessi-
taies a knowledge of the droplet impingement char-
acteristics of bodies of revolution. Because it is
possible to approximate many of these bodies with an
ellipsoid of revolution, droplet trajectories about an
ellipsoid of revolution with a fineness ratio of 10 were
computed for incompressible axisymmetric air flow.
From the computed droplet trajectories, the following
impingement characteristics of the ellipsoid surface
were obtained and are presented in terms of dimen-
sionless parameters: (1) total rate of water impinge-
ment, (2) extent of droplet impingement zone, and
(3) local rate of water impingement. These impinge-
ment characterlstics are compared briefly with those
for an ellipsoid of revolution with a fineness ratio of
5 reported in NACA TN 3099.



NACA TN 3160

A CALCULATION STUDY OF WING-AILERON
FLUTTER IN TWO DEGREES OF FREEDOM FOR
TWO-DIMENSIONAL SUPERSONIC FLOW. Donald
S. Woolston and Vera Huckel. April 1954. 26p.
diagrs., tab. (NACA TN 3160)

Resullts are presented of some sample calculations
made for the bending-aileron and torsion-aileron
flutter of a wing-aileron system of infinite aspect
ratio for several values of Mach number in super-
sonic flow and also for some subsonic Mach numbers.
It is pointed out that the results are subject to vari-
ous limitations and are nrot intended to be applicable
to a particular configuration. They may serve, ho~w-
ever, to provide a preliminary knowledge of the in-
fluence of variations in certain parameters and to
indicate some! of the differences in trends exhibited by
the calculations for high speeds and those known to
exist for low speeds.



NACA TN 3179

A THEORETICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE
ElEATING-UP PERIOD OF INJECTED FUEL D)ROP-
LETS VAPORIZING IN AIR. M. M. El Wakil, O. A.
Uyehara and P. B. Myers, Univecrsity of Wisconsin.
May 1954. 83p. diagrs., tab. (NACA TN 379)


Theoretical calculations were performed to deter-
mine whether the unsteady state, or the time during
which the droplet is heating up or cooling down to the
wet-bulb temperature, is of importance when single
f~uel droplets are vaporizing under conditions of
interest in jet engines. The calculations were per-
formed for droplets of different size and fuel compo-
sition under different ambient air conditions and the
results are presented in the form of temperature-,
mass-, and penetration-time histories as well as heat
and mass transfer histories of single droplets. Ex-
perimental apparatus set up in an attempt to verify
the importance of the unsteady state is described and
a few experimental curves are presented.



NACA TN 3183

MINIMUM-WA;VE-DRAG AIRFOIL, SECTION FOR
ARROW WINGS. Morton Cooper and Frederick C.
Grant. Mzy 1954. 26p. diagrs., 5tabs. (NACA
TN 3183)

A linearized theoretical analysis has been made to
determine minimum-wave-drag airfoil sections for
arrow wings at supersonic speeds. The drag was
minimized subject to the conditions of either a given
thickness ratio at a specified chordwise location or a
given volume. Numerical computations were per-
formed for a delta wing and an arrow wing having a
ratio of the tangent of the trailing-edge sweep angle
to the tangent of the leading-edge sweep angle of 0.4.



NACA TN 3184

BUCKLING OF LONG SQUARE TUBES IN COMBINED
COMPRESSION AND TORSION AND COMPARISON
WITH FLAT-PLATE BUCKLING THEORIES. Roger
W. Peters. May 1954. 15p. diagrs., photo.
(N~ACA TN 3184)

The results of buckling tests of long square tubes
loaded in compression, torsion, and combined com-
pression and torsion are compared with theoretical
compression and shear buckling curves and with
theoretical interaction curves for the buckling of
simply supported flat plates. A compression buck-
ling curve previously compared with experiment is
again shown to be in good agreement with experi-
mental results; the shear buckling curves derived
from compressive stress-strain data by the secant
modulus method is in good agreement with experi-
mental results; and theoretical interaction curves
previously presented are in good agreement with the
results of the combined-load buckling tests. The
direction of the loading path is shown to have little or
no effect on the shape of the interaction curve.




NACA TN 3189

MINIMUM-DRAG DUCTED AND POINTED BODIES
OF REVOLUTION BASED ON LINEARIZED SUPER-
SONIC THEORY. Hermon M. Parker. May 1954.
30p. diagrs. (NACA TN 3189)

The linearized-drag integral for bodies of revolution
at supersonic speeds is presented in a double-integral
form which is not based on slende~r-body approxima-






NACA
4 RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO.63


tions but which reduces to the usual slender-body ex-
pression in the proper limit. With the aid of a suit-
ably chosen auxiliary condition, the minimum-
external-wave-drag problem, is solved for a transition
section connecting two semi-infinite cylinders. The
projectile tip is a special case and is compared with
the Von IC~jrman projectile tip. Calculations are
presented which indicate that the method of analysis
gives good first-order results in the moderate super-
sonic range.



NACA TN 3211

STATISTICAL STUDY OF OVERSTRESSING IN
STEEL. G. E. Dieter, G. T. Horne and R. F.
Mehl, Carnegie Institute of Technology. April 1954.
34lp. diagrs., photos., 7 tabs. (NACA TN 3211)

The effect of overstressing on the fatigue properties
of SAE: 4340 steel has been studied statistically. In
the first part of the study the effect of microstructure
on the fatigue damage produced by overstressing was
investigated. Fatigue damage was measured by the
percentage~ decrease in fatigue life at the test stress
for specimens subjected to varying cycle ratios of
fatigue damage at the prestress. The second part of
the study was an investigation of the effect of a cer-
tain amount of overstressing on the endurance limit
and its statistics.



BRITISH REPORTS



1111. 4-122*

Ministry of Aircraft Production (Gt. Brit.)
ON THE INFLUENCE OF SINKS ON THE LIFT AND
PRESSURE DISTRIBUTION OF AIRFOILS WITH
SUCTION BLOTS. F. Ehlers. September 1, 1946.
45p. diagrs., photos. (MAP VG 67; MAP Reports
& Translations 189)

The lift and the pressure distribution of an airfoil
with suction slots are calculated by the potential
theory under special consideration of the trailing-
edge suction. The alteration of the lift is shown to
be only a function of the sucked-off quantity, if the
suction slot is sufficiently distant from the trailing
edge; if the suction is applied at the trailing edlge, it
is moreover dependent on the profile shape, the
width of the suction slot, and, to a higher degree, on
the angle of incidence. The maximum lift attainable
by suction depends on the profile shape according to
an estimate. .In order to attain higher lift values by
trailing-edge suction, it is advantageous to employ
thick profiles.



N-3045(P

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
TWO-DIMENSIONAL WIND-TUNNEL INTERF'ER-
ENCE. L. G.Whitehead. 1954. 15p. diagram.
(ARC R & M~ 2802. Formerly ARC 13,198; FM 1451)

Exact solutions are given for the inviscid flow past
two cylindrical profiles in the center of a stream of


limited depth. The first of these relates to a nearly
circular cylinder and the second to a thin sechiqn
giving a constant pressure drop over the greater past
of its surface. The stream has either parallel
walls, constant pressure walls, or the boundaries
may be partly parallel and partly of the constant
pressure type. ]For the thin profiles, rhe changes of
thickness ratio required to give the same pressure
distribution as in an unlimited flow are found.


N-3045 1*

Aeronautical Research Council (Glt. Brit.)
CHEMICAL, SOLIDS AS DIFFUSIBLE COATING
FILMS FOR VISUAL INDICATIONS OF BOUNDARY-
LAYER TRANSITION IN AIR AND WATER. J. D.
Main-Smith. 1954. 16p. diagrs., photos., 2 tabs.
(ARC R & Mi 2755; ARC 13,115. Formerly RAE
Chem. 466)

Experimental investigations have been made on vani-
ous chemical solids as diffusible coating hilms for
visual indication of boundary-layer transition in air
and water. Originally, the method was applicable
only at low speeds in wind tunnels and water tanks,
and the indications were somewhat transient. More
durable coating materials have nowr been made avail-
able, admitting of use at subsonic and supersonic
wind-tunnel speeds from 30 to 1350 mph, and at shlp-
hull speeds from 2-1/2 to 20 kt. The method has
also proved capable of extension to aircraft in flight
at speeds from, 100 to 445 mph at temperatures down
to -22o C and at altitudes up to 20,000 ft. The
diffusible-solid-coating method. with its advantages
of autographic indication and simplicity and rapadlty
of operation, has thus become a versatile technique
in investigations on fluid flow in aerodynamles and
hydrodynamics.



N-30452*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
RESONANT VIBRATION OF HELICOPTER ROTOR
BLADES. J. Morris. 1954. 4lp. diagr. (ARC
R & M 2801; ARC 13,485. Formerly RAE SME
4042)

The blades of the operative rotors of helicopters are
usually hinged both in the lift and rotational planes
and it is because of this articulation that the blades
in the course of rotation are akin dynamically to
"pendulum vibration datrpers. If the fundamental
frequency of this species of pendulum vibration is
numerically equal to nN where n is the numer of
blades and N is the frequency of rotation of the rotor
then serious resonant forced vibration may ensue and
it would appear that this is quite 1skely to occur in
practical cases with the blades in vibration an the
plane of rotation of the rotor.



N-30453*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
A NEW RELAXATIONAL TREATMENT OF THE
COMPRESSIBLE TW-DIMENSIONAL FLOW ABOUT
AN AEROFOIL WITH CMRCULATIN. L. C. Woods
and A. Thomn. 1954. 17lp. diagrs., 2 abs. (ARC
R & M 2727. Formerly ARC 13,034; FM 1429;
Oxford Univ., Engineering Lab. No. 35)






NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 63


The method appears to be satisfactory treatment of
the compressible flow of an inviscid fluid about an
airfoil. Discrepanexes with experiment appear at
high Mach numbers due to the movement of the
velocity peak towards the trailing edge where the
boundary layer cannot be ignored. The airfoil used
presented a difficult case for calculation as the nose
was very sharp.



N-30471'

Department of Supply (Australia)
SOME CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE STUDY OF THE
TURBULENT BOUNDARY-LAYER NEAR SEPARA-
TION. B. G. Newman. March 1951. 40p. diagrs,
photos. (Department ofSupply. ACA-53)

An experimental and theoretical study is made of the
turbulent boundary layer near separation in subsonic
Incompressible flow. A hot wire anemnometer was
developed and tested by measuring the shearing
stress in turbulent flow down a circular pipe. The
instrument was used in two series of measurements
of turbulent boundary -layer flow near separation and
some qualitative conclusions on turbulent separation
are drawn. The use of the von Karman momentum
equation as a means of determining the skin friction
near separation is examined. Simple analysis of the
flow in the laminar sublayer leads to estimation of
skin fraction in a turbulent boundary layer.




N-30494*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
THE UNSTEADY BURNING OF CORDITE. J. D.
Huffington. February 1954. 23p. diagrs., photos*
(RAE Tech. Note RPD) 95)

By burning cordite charges in small vented vessels
an investigation has been made of chuffing (sporadic
burning with the pressure falling to atmospheric be-
tween peaks) and of the continuous but oscillatory
burning into which chuffing is transformed when the
nozzle size is reduced. The observations lead to
the postulate that burning during chuffing is thermal-
explosive in nature. During a chuff, the surface
layer of the propellant is first liquified and then
immediately burns explosively down to a certain
critical depth, the process being repeated during
subsequent chuffs. Some information is given on
steady oscillatory burning.




N-30498'

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
CALIBRATION OF THE R.A.E. NO.18 (9 IN. x 9 IN.)
SUPERSONIC WIND TUNNEL. PART II TESTS AT
ATMOSPHERIC STAGNATION PRESSURE. W. T*
Lord, G. K. Hunt, R. J. Pallant and J. Turner*
September 1953. 25p. diagrs., 3tabs. (RAE Tech.
Note Aero 2236)

This report presents distribution of Mach number in
the empty working section of the R.A.E. No. 18 (9- by
9-lnch) supersonic wind tunnel at nominal Mach num-
bers of 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.8, and 1.0, for condensation-
free flow at atmospheric stagnation pressure and at a


stagnation temperature of 35o C. The mean meas-
ured Mach numbers are 1.41, 1.61, 1.81, and 1.01
when calculated from values of pitot and stagnation
pressures. The major contributions to the nonuni-
formity of the flow are from the disturbances which
arise from the junctions of the windows with the side
walls of the tunnels.




N-30502*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF GLASS.
M. Dyke. January 1954. 18p. (RAE Library
Bibliog. 111)

This bibliography is arranged under two main head-
ings "Glass" and "Glass ]Fibres. Within these
headings references are arranged first by form, that
is under Books, Articles in journals, Reports and
Patents, and then by date with the most recent last.
The sources consulted were the Library subject in-
dex, Chemical Abstracts 1937-53, Engineering Index
1942-43, 45-52, Journal of the Society of Glass
Technology 1951-3, and British Ceramic Abstracts.




N-30505*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
NOTE ON SAMPLINGr AN PHOTOGRAPHING
CLOUD DROPLETS IN FLIGHT. F. J. Bigg and
G. C. Abel. September 1953. 27p. diagrs., photos.,
tab. (RAE Tech.Note Mlech.Eng. 156)

This note describes the progress made at R.A.E. and
A. & A.E.E, in the development of a satisfactory
means for determining the size and distribution of
supercooled water droplets in icing clouds. The sys-
tem is at present adequate for measuring in flight
the median droplet diameter of liquid cloud droplets
up to a speed of 220 knots. The system should be
capable of development to a stage where with a possi-
ble flight speed limitation the liquid water content,
total water content, and liquid median droplet diam-
eter can be obtained under any type of icing condi-
tion.




N-30506*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
CALIBRATION OF THE R.A.E. NO.18 (9 IN. x 9 IN.)
SUPERSONIC WIND TUNN~EL. PART I PRE-
LIMINARY INVESTIGATIONS. W. T. Lord and D.
Beastall. September 1953. 45p. diagrs., 6 tabs.
(RAE Tech. Note Aero 2235)

A detailed account is given of the investigation per-
formed in the R.A.E. No. 18 (9- by 9L-inch, continu-
ous flow, variable density) supersonic wind tunnel
prior to an extensive calibration of the tunnel. Vari-
ables affecting the behavior of the flow are discussed,
and preliminary experiments to determine their
significance are described. The! calibration program
is outlined: Part II will deal with tests at atmospher-
ic stagnation pressure, and further tests at various
stagnation pressures are proposed.






NACA
6 RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO.63


N-29996*

Iowa State College, Iowa Engineering Experiment4
Station. HEAT CAPACITY LAG OF GAS MIXTURES.
ThomasD. Rossing and Sam Legvoid. August 31,
1953. (i), 49p, diagrs., 4 tabs. (lowa State College,
Iowa Engineering Experiment Station)

The vibrational relaxation time has been measured in
monochlorodifluoromethane (Freon 22) and Its mix-
tures with argon and helium. The addition of argon
or helium is found to reduce slightly the time
necessary to excite molecular vabrations. Freon 22
is found to have a single relaxation time, and binary
collisions are responsible for Its vibrational excita-
tion. The interferometer has been calibrated for
absorption measurements. Absorption measurements
are reported for Freon 22, argon, and a 9:1 mixture
of the latter t~wo.



N-20997*

Calif. Institute of Technology, Pasadena.
Guggenheim Aeronautical Lab. THE LIFT OF THIN
AIRFOILS AT HIGH-8UBSONIC SPEEDS. Wilizam W.
Willmarth. September 1953. v~, 87p. diagrs.,
photos. (Calif. Institute of Technology, Pasadena.
Guggenheim Aeronautical Lab.)

Experimental results are presented for the lift char-
acteristics of thin, two-dimensional airfoils at high-
subsonic speeds and small angles of attack. Sym-
metrical airfoils ~with different locations of maxfi-
mum thickness were investigated. Flow fields over
each airfoil are discussed and the quantltative re-
sults for the lift and location of the center of lift are
compared with theory. The effects of flow separa-
tion caused by boundary-layer shock-wave inter-
action are noted and discussed. The possibility of
the forced oscillation of control surfaces due to
boundary-layer separation is mentioned.




N-29998*

Univ. of Fla., Engineering and Industrial Experi-
ment Station. HEAT TRANSFER TO CLOUDS OF
PARTICLES AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES.
Robert B. Bennett, C. M. Oktay and B. G. Kyle.
February 10, 1954. (iii), 81p. dlagrs., photos., 34
tabs. (Univ. of Fla., Engineering and Industrral
Experiment Station)

Sand and glass beads were dropped at various rates
through still air at various temperatures. Overall
heat-transfer coeffi c e nts a nd the radlat ion component
of heat transfer were calculated. Experimental re-
sults show that heat transmission takes place prin-
cipally by convection at low temperatures, and by
radiation to an increasing extent at high tempera-
tures. Of all the variables tried, the feed rate had
the greatest effect on the overall coefficient of heat
transfer. Presumably this was due to the shiedig
effect of the increase in cloud concent ration,


N-30508*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
A ROOT MEAN SQUARE MEASURING INSTRUMENT
FOR NONPERIODIC VOLTAGES. D. E. Vlerrian.
February 1954. 14p. diagrs. (RAE Tech.Note
GW 297)

A description is given of an instrument which may be
used to measure the rms value of alternating volt-
ages. It is primarily designed for measuring the
rms values of random noise voltages. It may be
used to measure voltages of from 0.2 volts to 50
volts, over time intervals up to 100 seconds, with an
error not exceeding 2 percent of the maximum scale
reading.


N-30507*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
INTERIM NOTE ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF A
MAGNETIC POWDER CLUTCH. F. L. West.
January 1954. 18lp. diagrs. (RAE Tech.Note IAP
1028)

The most important test results obtained during the
course of work on experimental magnetic powder
clutches and iron powder materials in JAP Dept.,
RAE have been collected to illustrate difficulties
being encountered with magnetic media for the guid-
ance of future workers. The note covers an investi-
gation of shear forces transmitted to a flat steel
plate by magnetized iron powder media, and outlines
phenomena observed during tests on experimental
clutches of disk and cylinder rotor construction. The
development and performance of a small cylinder
clutch designed for use with an aircraft autopilot
servoactuator is dealt with in some detail up to the
stage of small quantity reproduction.




UNPUBLISHED PAPERS



N- 15881*

ON A FEW METHODS OF RELAXATION CALCULA-
TION. (ijer einige Methoden der Relaxation-
arechnung). Eduard Stiefel. April 1954. 50p.
diagrs. (Trans. from Zeitschrift fiir angewandte
Mathematik und Physik, v. 3, no.1i, 1952, p. 1-33)

The general outlines of the so-called relaxation
technique are developed. After a short discussion of
the trial methods developed by Southwell and his
school, allowing full leeway to the intuition of the
computing person, the general mathematical back-
ground is treated. After a study of the gradient
method, it is shown that relaxation methods are not
necessarily successive approximations taking an
infinite number of steps but that it is possible to
speed up convergence such that the desired result
is reached in a finite number of steps. These
methods may be suitable for use on a sequence-
controlled computing machine.






NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO.63 7


Conventional wind-tunnel balances permit measure-
ment of the forces as a function of the components of
the velocity of the center of gravity. Complementary
methods must be employed for the mleasurement of
forces as a function of the rotation of the axes fixed
in the airplane. The procedure described has per-
matted measurement of the forces due to the rolling
component (the reduced rolling velocity) in subsonic
and supersonic wind tunnels.





N-31005*

WINrD-TUNEL MEASUREMENT OF THE AERO-
DYNAMIC DERIVATIIVES OF A MODEL BY A
METHOD OF SUSTAINED OSCILLATIONS. (Mesure
an soufflerie des dkrivdes derodynamiques d'une
maquette par une mithode d'oseillations entretenues).
M. Scherer. April 1954. 10p. diagr, photos., tab.
(Trans. from. Recherche Adronautique, no. 30, 1952,
p. 15-18)

A method of measurement is described which permits
a relatively simple and rapid determination of the
derivatives of the two linearized stability problems
in a wind tunnel of conventional form.


NACA-Langley 5-18-54 I[


N-29999'

Univ. of Fla., Engineering and Industrial Experiment
Station. A SPECIAL ANALYTICAL STUDY OF HEAT
TRANSFER PHENOMENA WITH CLOUDS OF SMALL
PARTICLES IN AIR AT ELEVATED TEMPERA-
TURES. H. M. Hawkins, Y. S. Tang, J. H. Gary and
A. O. Wlkman. December 1, 1950. (11), 85p*
diagrs. (Univ. of Fla., Engineering and Industrial
Experiment Station)

An analytical study is made of heal-transfer phenom-
ena which occur when clouds of small solid particles
in air are surrounded by hot surfaces. Radiation
from two infinite parallel walls to stationary and
moving clouds between the walls is considered.
Some study was done on the convective heat transfer
at the surfaces of particles. The combined effect of
radiation and convection on particles In enclosed
spaces has been Investigated. A bibliography of
Literature of interest In the study of this problem has
been compiled.


N -31117'

STATIC MEASUREMENT OF AERODYNAMIC
ROLLING DERIVATIVES. (Mesure starique des
diravies adrodynamlques de roulls). M. Blsmut*
April 1954. 17lp. diagrs., photo. (Trans. from
Recherche Aeronautlque, no.30, 1952, p.9-13)





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