Research abstracts

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Title:
Research abstracts
Physical Description:
93 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics
Publisher:
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
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irregular
completely irregular

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Subjects / Keywords:
Aeronautics -- Abstracts -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Aeronautics -- Research -- Abstracts -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
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serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
abstract or summary   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Abstracts no. 1 (June 15, 1951)-no. 93 (Nov. 30, 1955).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001469326
notis - AGY1019
oclc - 01471285
lccn - 86657025
issn - 0499-9274
Classification:
lcc - TL501 .U5895
System ID:
AA00009235:00022

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e

National Advisory Committee for Aer i utics
q MoY 19 aj,


Research Abstracts -
NO.61 APRIL 44/


CURRENT NACA REPORTS



NACA TN 3023

RESULTS OF EDGE-COMPRESSION TESTS ON
STIFFENED FLAT-SHEET PANELS OF ALCLAD
AND NONCLAD 14S-T6, 245-T3, AND 75S-T6
ALUMINUM ALLOYS. Marshall Holt, Aluminum
Company of America. April 1954. 18p. diagrs.,
photos., 2 tabs. (NACA TN 3023)

This investigation was made to augment data pre-
viously obtained on [he compressive strengths of
stiffened flat-sheet panels to include the range where
ultimate strengths approach the compressive yield
strengths of the materials. The sheet materials used
were alclad and nonclad 14S-T6, 24S-T3, and 75S-T6.
The ultimate strengths of the panels tested varied
from 93.3 to 118.0 percent of the compressive yield
strengths of the materials from which they were con-
structed. The ultimate strengths of these panels
appear to be limited by the strengths of the rivets.
Higher ultimate strengths might have resulted from
the use of larger or stronger rivets or a smaller
rivet spacing.




NACA TN 3070

EFFECTS OF PANEL FLEXIBILITY ON NATURAL
VIBRATION FREQUENCIES OF BOX BEAMS.
Bernard Budiansky and Robert W. Fralich. March
1954. 55p. diagrs. (NACA TN 3070)

Effects of local- panel oscillations on bending and
torsional vibrations of box beams with flexible covers
and webs are investigated. Theoretical analyses of
simplified models are made in order to shed light on
the mechanism of coupling between local and overall
vibrations and to derive results that can be used to
estimate the coupling effects in box beams.




NACA TN 3071

THEORETICAL SUPERSONIC FORCE AND MOMENT
COEFFICIENTS ON A SIDESLIPPING VERTICAL-
AND HORIZONTAL-TAIL COMBINATION WITH SUB-
SONIC LEADING EDGES AND SUPERSONIC TRAIL-
ING EDGES. Frank S. Malvestuto, Jr. March 1954.
69p. diagrs., 2 tabs. (NACA TN 3071)


Formulas are obtained by means of linearized flob
theory [or the lateral force due to sideslip, the
yawing moment due to sideslip, and the rolling
moment due to sideslip for a tail arrangement cnom-
posed of a vertical triangular surface attached to a
horizontal triangular surface. The leading edges of
the surfaces are subsonic: the trailing edges, super-
sonic. A series of design charts are presented for
rapid estimates of the stability derivatives con-
sidered.


-



NACA TN 3077

THE EFFECT OF DYNAMICLC6ADILTL44+ -L-
STRENGTH OF AN INELASTC COLUMN. William
A. Brooks. Jr. and Thomas W. Wilder, III[. March
1954. 29p. diagrs.. 2 tabs. (NACA TN 3077)

The maximum loads of idealized inelastic H-section
columns whose pinned ends approach each other at a
constant rate are presented. The solutions indicate
that as the rate of end displacement becomnies smaller
the dynamic buckling solutions approach the static
solution as a lower limit. For all rates of end dis-
placement investigated the static mnj trfnum-te d may
be employed as a conservative BnZ4na!.a ".flT li I-
n.um column load.



U-'' 1dbb '
,',


NACA TN 3079

THE HYDRODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF
MODIFIED RECTANGULAR FLAT PLATES HAVING
ASPECT RATIOS OF 1.00 AND 0.25 AND OPERAT-
ING NEAR A FREE WATER SURFACE. Kenneth L.
Wadlin, John A. Ramsen and Victor L. Vaughan, Jr.
March 1954. 64p. diagrs., photos. (NACA TN 30791

Results are presented from an investigation of the
hydrodynamic forces and moments acting on modified
rectangular flat plates with aspect ratios of 1.00 and
0.25 mounted on a single strut and operating near the
free water surface. A simplified method of obtaining


* AVAILABLE ON LOAN ONLY
ADDRESS REQUESTS FOR DOCUMENTS TO NACA. 1724 F ST., NW, WASHINGTON 25. D C, CITING CODE NUMBER ABOVE EACH TITLE;
THE REPORT TITLE AND AUTHOR

v29. f30?o2

2/S v-








2



the lift characteristics in unseparated flow at large
depths is presented. This method shows very good
agreement with the data. The experimental effects
of changing the angle of attack, depth of submersion,
and aspect ratio are presented. The effects of cavi-
tation and two different types of high-angle leading-
edge separation are also presented.




NACA TN 3081

THE ZERO-LIFT DRAG OF A 600 DELTA-WING-
BODY COMBINATION (AGARD MODEL 2) OB-
TAINED FROM FREE-FLIGHT TESTS BETWEEN
MACH NUMBERS OF 0.8 AND 1.7. Robert 0. Piland.
April 1954. lip. diagrs., 2 tabs. (NACA TN 3081)

The zero-lift drag of a 600 delta-wing-body combina-
tion (designated AGARD model 2) has been deter-
mined by free-flight tests of two models between
Mach numbers of 0.8 and 1.7. These Mach numbers
correspond to Reynolds numbers, based on body
length, of 4 x 106 and 12 x 106, respectively. An
estimate of the drag of the configuration was made by
summing the estimates of the drag of the various
components. The agreement between measured and
estimated drag is good.




NACA TN 3082

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF THE PURE-
BENDING STRENGTH OF 75S-T6 ALUMINUM-
ALLOY MULTIWEB BEAMS WITH FORMED-
CHANNEL WEBS. Richard A. Pride and Melvin S.
Anderson. March 1954. 30p. diagrs., photo., tab.
(NACA TN 3082)

Experimental results are presented for the pure-
bending strength of 53 multiweb beams of various
proportions. The beams were fabricated from
75S-T6 aluminum-alloy sheet material and had
channel-type webs which had been cold formed with
bend radii of four times the web thickness. Local
and wrinkling modes of buckling were observed prior
to failure. All failures occurred with the formation
of a trough in the compression skin extending across
the web attachment flanges. The stress levels
achieved at buckling and failure are discussed in
terms of existing theory. Based upon the failure
stresses, design charts are presented which permit
rapid selection of the most efficient proportions for
given values of an appropriate structural index.




NACA TN 3142

A FURTHER INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECT OF
SURFACE FINISH ON FATIGUE PROPERTIES AT
ELEVATED TEMPERATURES. Robert L. Ferguson.
March 1954. 27p. diagrs., photos., 3 tabs. (NACA
TN 3142)


NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 61


An investigation was conducted to evaluate the effects
of surface roughness on fatigue properties oNow car-.
bon N-155 alloy with a grain size of A.S.T.M. 6 a1h.
of S-816 alloy with a grain size of A.S.T M. 6 to 7.
Fatigue studies were conducted at 8O0. 12000, 13500.
and 15000 F. In addition, an investigation of the ef-
fect of surface abrasion upon the character of residu-
al stresses and of the effect of time and temperature
upon the relief of these stresses was conducted.
Compressive stresses were produced at right angles
to the direction of abrasion. These residual com-
pressive stresses, if of sufficient magnitude, in the
surface of fatigue specimens improved fatigue
strength at low temperatures. At elevated tempera-
tures, however, these beneficial surface compressive
effects were relieved and only the detrimental stress
concentration effects produced by abrasion remained
and reduced fatigue strength.








NACA TN 3144

COEFFICIENT OF FRICTION AND DAMAGE TO
CONTACT AREA DURING THE EARLY STAGES OF
FRETTING. II STEEL. [RON, IRON OXIDE. AND
GLASS COMBINATIONS. John M. Bailey and
Douglas Godfrey. April 1954. 26p. diagrs., 4 tabs.
(NACA TN 3144)

Experiments were conducted to study the early stages
(up to 400 cycles) of fretting of steel-steel combina-
tions at constant frequency, amplitude, load, and
humidity. Pure iron, glass, and iron oxide powder
compacts were used in supplementary experiments.
The results of microscopic observation of the contact
area, chemical analyses of fretting debris, and
measurement of coeflicient of friction are presented
and lead to these conclusions: 1. Fretting starts
with severe adhesion. The adhesion varies with [he
material combination, but is of primary importance
because it precedes and initiates the other phenomena
observed. 2. In the early stages of fretting, several
other wear phenomena in addition to adhesion occur:
plowing by protruding transferred material; forma-
tion of metallic and oxide debris; formation of films
by compacting small particles into clearances in the
contact area.







NACA TM 1362

ON THE SOUND FIELD OF A POINT-SHAPED
SOUND SOURCE IN UNIFORM TRANSLATOR
MOTION. tUber das Schallfeld einer gleichf6rmig-
translatorisch bewegten punkfdrmigen Schallquelle).
H. Honl. April 1954. 44p. diagrs. (NACA
TM 1362. Trans. from Annalen der Physik,
issue 5, v.43, 1943, p. 437-4641.







NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 61



A rigorous analysis presented oi the excitation of
sound by point sources moving in uniform trans-
latory motion at subsonic or supersonic velocities
through a two- or three-dimensional medium at
rest. The construction of surfaces of constant
phase is based upon Huyghens' principle in such a
manner that the propagation in the medium at rest
of the elementary waves emanating from the sound
source is independent of the momentary state of
motion of the sound source, hence, characteristic
traits of the sound propagation may be understood
even on the basis of simple geometric constructions.





NACA TM 1367

HEAT TRANSFER, DIFFUSION, AtND EVAPORA-
TION. (Warmeubergang, Diffusion und Verdunstung).
Wilhelm Nusselt. March 1954. 37p. diagrs. (NACA
TM 1367. Trans. from Zeitschrift frr angewandte
Mathematik und Mechanik. v. 10. nu. 2, April 1930,
p. 105-121).

The general similarity of heat and mass transfer
(diffusion) processes is discussed, with particular
reference to the lack of complete identity of the rela-
tions governing the two phenomena. It is indicated
that, for example, the boundary conditions in the two
cases at the surface of a body will not be the same.
The correct equation of diffusion is given for various
simple cases. Generalized relations for combined
heat and mass transfer are then evolved for particu-
lar situations, comparisons being made among
several different approaches to the problem. Finally,
the effect of a buoyancy force field on the generalized
relations is considered, with special reference to
the evaporation of water.






NACA RM E54B01

TOOTH-TYPE NOISE-SUPPRESSION DEVICES ON
A FULL-SCALE AXIAL-FLOW TURBOJET ENGINE.
Edmund E. Callaghan, Walton Howes and Warren
North. March 1954. 16p. diagrs., photos. (NACA
RM E54B01)

A study of two jet-noise-suppression devices con-
sisting of teeth projecting into the air stream was
conducted on a current axial-flow turbojet engine.
The sound fields obtained with both noise-suppression
devices were similar and, when compared with a
standard nozzle, showed a reduction in maximum
sound pressure level downstream of the jet and in-
creased levels on the sides and rear. The reduction
in maximum sound pressure level was only 2 decibels,
and the total radiated power from the toothed and
standard nozzles was almost identical (1l db). It
was concluded, therefore, that the toothed devices
investigated do not represent a satisfactory solution
of the jet-noise problem.


BRITISH REPORTS







N-28936*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
THE 9 x 3 IN. INDUCED-FLOW HIGH-SPEED WIND
TUNNEL AT THE NATIONAL PHYSICAL LABORA-
TORY. D. W. Holder and R. J. North. 1953. 23p.
diagrs., photos., 9 tabs. (ARC R & M 2781.
Formerly ARC 12,387; TP 285)

A 9 x 3 inch high-speed wind tunnel driven by a
compressed-air injector has been built in the
Aerodynamics Division of the National Physical Lab-
oratory. The tunnel operates at roughly atmospheric
stagnation pressure and has so far been used to give
Mach numbers up to 1.8. The general arrangement
of the tunnel and the preliminary calibration, which is
generally satisfactory, are described.







N-28937*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
BRITISH PERFORMANCE REDUCTION METHODS
FOR MODERN AIRCRAFT. D. Cameron. 1953.
32p., diagrs., 5 tabs. (ARC R & M 2447;
ARC 6445. Formerly AAEE/Res/170)

The methods of reduction of performance measure-
ments to standard conditions applicable to aircraft
with highly supercharged engines and constant-speed
propellers are the subject of this report. The
theory of the agreed methods is summarized in
brief form, tables are given from which the neces-
sary charts can be constructed, and the practical
method of applying the corrections is described.
The report does not include methods appropriate to
certain aircraft and engines of later development
(turbosuperchargers, turbine engines, and high-
speed aircraft).







N-28938*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
THE THEORETICAL EFFECT OF FLIGHT PATH
ANGLE ON THE LATERAL STABILITY AND RE-
SPONSE OF AN AIRCRAFT. E. M. Frayn and M. V.
Parnell. 1954. 28p. diagrs., 8 tabs. (ARC R & M
2529; ARC 9360. Formerly RAE Aero 2097)








4A





The response of a typical aircraft of the dive-bomber
class to various disturbances has been calculated at
four angles of dive covering the range 00 to 900 and
for four pairs of values of iy, nv. The most notable
effect on stability is the marked increase in spiral
damping with increasing dive angle at the same T.A.S.
This has little effect on the response, since in most
components, this mode is scarcely excited. For dive
angles up to 300, the variations in response are so
slight as to be negligible, while for larger angles of
dive, the variation is small for the first 2 airsecs.
Calculations of response in level flight, which slightly,
underestimate the response in a dive, can thus be
assumed to give a sufficiently accurate picture of the
behavior at small flight path angles for most require-
ments.






N-28939*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
INVESTIGATION OF LATERAL AND DIRECTIONAL
BEHAVIOUR OF SINGLE ROTOR HELICOPTER
(HOVERFLY MK. I). J. Zbrozek. 1953. 20p.
diagrs., tab. (ARC R & M 2509; ARC 11,701.
Formerly RAE Aero 2268)

This note gives an elementary theory of the lateral
and directional stability and control of the single
rotor helicopter with particular reference to the
Sikorsky R4-B. The results of the analysis give
good qualitative agreement with flight tests. Pre-
liminary flight tests show higher damping and higher
frequency of oscillations than predicted by theory.
A theoretical investigation of the lateral stability of
the helicopter by Hohenemser, although made for a
side-by-side twin-rotor helicopter, is in good agree-
ment with the results of this note.







N-28940*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
EFFECTS OF AIR HUMIDITY IN SUPERSONIC WIND
TUNNELS. Julius Lukasiewicz and J. K. Royle.
1953. 35p. diagrs., photos., 7 tabs. (ARC R & M
2563; ARC 10,977; ARC 12,374. Formerly RAE
Aero 2211; SD 20; Tech.Note Aero 1982; SD 89)

The available theoretical and experimental informa-
tion on condensation of water vapor in the supersonic
flow of air is reviewed and the influence of condensa-
tion on operation of supersonic tunnels is considered.
The mechanism of condensation in supersonic flow is
of molecular nature and does not depend on the
presence of solid condensation nuclei in the air. As
estimated by Oswatitsch and confirmed by experi-
mental results, the condensation in supersonic flow of


NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 61




air is primarily a function of the adiabatic suer- _
cooling ATk to ad which determines the conditions-
at which the condensation shock occurs. For
medium-sized supersonic tunnels (say 1-foot square
working section) the adiabatic supercooling is of the
order of 500 C. For most test purposes, it is
essential to eliminate the detrimental effects of con-
densation on flow distribution in the tunnel working
section. The usual method is to use highly dried
air, and the question of the required dryness is con-
sidered. Other methods, which do not rely on the
dryness of air, are discussed. It is shown that by
increasing stagnation temperature condensation can
be avoided usually only at Mach numbers smaller
than 1.5. Alternatively, condensation can be elimi-
nated from the tunnel nozzle by pre-expansion in an
auxiliary nozzle, as verified experimentally.






N-28941*

Aeronautical Research Council tGt. Brit.)
SUPERSONIC THEORY FOR OSCILLATING WINGS
OF ANY PLAN FORM. W. P. Jones. 1953. 1Ip.
diagrs. (ARC R &M 2655. Formerly ARC 11,559;
0.730; FM 1254)

A theory for thin wings of any plan form describing
simple harmonic oscillations of small amplitude in a
supersonic airstream is developed. It is based on
the use of the generalized Green's Theorem in con-
junction with particular solutions which vanish over
the characteristic cone with vertex at any point in the
field of flow. The theory can be used to calculate the
aerodynamic forces acting on fluttering wings when
the modes of distortion are known.







N-28942*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
FLIGHT TESTS ON SWINGING DURING TAKE-OFF
ON A SINGLE-ENGINED FIGHTER-BOMBER
(TYPHOON Ib). W. Stewarl. 1953. 29p. diagrs.,
tab. (ARC R & M 2660; ARC 11,725. Formerly
RAE Aero 2261)

Values of the aerodynamic side forces and yawing
moments during take-off are compared with wind-
tunnel measurements. Various methods of estimating
the rudder angles required to trim during take-off are
compared also. Results show very good agreement
with wind-tunnel tests. It was not possible to obtain
smooth application of the rudder and records show
considerable over-correction by the pilot. This over-
correction by the pilot is quite general and as a re-
sult some considerable margin of control must be
available in excess of that required for trim.








NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO.61



N-28943*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
CORRECTIONS FOR SYMMETRICAL SWEPT AND
TAPERED WINGS IN RECTANGULAR WIND TUN-
NELS. W. E. A. Acum. 1953. 33p. diagrs., 41
tabs. (ARC R & M 2777. Formerly ARC 13,050;
Perf. 649; ARC 14,159; Perf. 815)

In the case of wings with straight leading and trailing
edges, the interference upwash due to the images of
the wing in the wind-tunnel walls may be determined
in terms of three functions of the parameters defining
the size of the wing and tunnel. These functions have
been tabulated and used to estimate the effect on CL
and CM, for wings of a variety of sizes and shapes.
The variation of mean induced incidence with sweep
and taper was found to be small. A formula is given
for computing the residual correction to CM for
each special case.





N-28944

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
THE PRESSURE DISTRIBUTION, AT SUPERSONIC
SPEEDS AND ZERO LIFT, ON SOME SWEPT-BACK
WINGS HAVING SYMMETRICAL SECTIONS WITH
ROUNDED LEADING EDGES. G. M. Roper. 1954.
20p. diagrs. (ARC R & M 2700; ARC 12,364.
Formerly RAE Aero 2312)

Formulas are found for the pressure distribution at
supersonic speeds and at zero incidence for certain
symmetrical surfaces of small finite thickness, with
sweptback leading edges. The surfaces are set
symmetrically to the wind direction. The solution is
only valid if the surfaces lie wholly within the Mach
cone of the apex. Solutions are applied to give the
pressure distribution for wings of small finite thick-
ness with straight leading edges and a hyperbolic or
parabolic trailing edge. Some calculations for wing
drag have also been made for sweptback wings.





N-28945*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
AN APPROXIMATE SOLUTION OF THE COMPRESS-
IBLE LAMINAR BOUNDARY LAYER ON A FLAT
PLATE. R. J. Monaghan. 1953. 24p. diagrs., 2
tabs. (ARC R & M 2760; ARC 12,963. Formerly
RAE Tech. Note Aero 2025, sup. 96)

The flat plate problem has received the attention of
many workers, but as yet all solutions have been
purely numerical for special cases. In this paper,
an approximate, analytical solution is presented
which is more general and has the merits of simplic-
ity. The equations are algebraic in form whereas
previous results have involved complex numerical
integral ions for individual cases. The solution given
shows clearly the effects of changes in working con-
ditions.


N-30183*

Aeroplane and Armament Experimental Establish-
ment (Gt. Brit.) FLIGHT TESTS OF A YOUNGMAN-
HUGHES STALL WARNING DEVICE ON A NENE
VIKING AIRCRAFT. D. A. Lang. November 23,
1953. 22p. diagrs., 4 tabs. (AAEE/Inst/91)

A Youngman-Hughes stall Warning device was tested
on a Nene Viking. The device depends for operation
on the changes in pressure distribution around the
lower surface of the leading edge of the wing as the
stall is approached. The installation operated satis-
factorily. Though it was tested on the Nene Viking,
the device should be applicable to other aircraft. It
should give suitable warning of the low altitude, slow
speed stall, that is for the condition where adequate
warning is imperative.





N-30184*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
THE DETERMINATION OF SIZE ON GLASS
FABRICS: A STATISTICAL ANALYSIS. A. A. Fyall
and E. W. Russell. December 1953. 21p. 23 tabs.
(RAE Tech.Note Chem. 1212)

The apparently simple determination of organic size
on glass fabrics for the preparation of polyester
laminates was examined in a statistical experiment
after interlaboratory disagreements. Five observers
at three different laboratories examined six fabric
samples including both low and high alkali glasses.
The results are analyzed and recommendations are
made for improving the test procedure.







UNPUBLISHED PAPERS



N-29532*


RECORDED PRESSURE DISTRIBUTION IN THE
OUTER PORTION OF A TORNADO VORTEX.
William Lewis and Porter J. Perkins. (Reprint
from Monthly Weather Review, v.81, no. 12,
December 1953, p. 379-385)

This tornado took place on June 8, 1953 and passed
through a portion of the Lewis Flight Propulsion
Laboratory. Eight barographs were in operation at
various locations within the laboratory at the time.
Records are presented from nine barographs located
in a small area close to the path of a tornado. The
pressure profile in the range from 720 to 2 300 feet
from the path of the tornado center as determined
from the barograph records was found to be in good
agreement with calculations based on a simple model
consisting of a frictionless vortex with in-flow.







6




N-29586*

Clarkson College of Technology.
THE SIZE AND SHAPE OF COLLOIDAL PARTICLES
BY LIGHT SCATTERING. Milton Kerker.
December 31, 1953. 58p. diagrs., photos., 10 tabs.
(Clarkson College of Technology)

Results are given of an experimental investigation of
the scattering and absorption of light by a system of
nonspherical particles. The sol used was the hydro-
sol of vanadium pentoxide. Besides, being non-
spherical, these particles are further characterized
by their appreciable absorption of light. The sols
were also studied by electron microscopy in order to
correlate the scattering and absorption with the size
and shape of the particles.





N-29587*

HEAT CONDUCTION IN LAMINATED SPHERICAL
AND CYLINDRICAL BODIES. (Wirmeleitung in
geschichteten kugel- und zylinderkorpern). V.
Vodicka. 24p. (Trans. from Schweizer Archiv,
Annales Suisses, v. 16, no. 10, October 1950,
p. 297-304).

The problem of unsteady heat flow within spherical
and cylindrical bodies each consisting of an indefinite
number of concentric spherical or cylindrical
laminae is solved. The postulated conditions are:
that the successive laminae are in perfect thermal
contact; that the innermost surface (which may have
a zero radius) is impermeable to heat; that a fixed,
finite heat-transfer coefficient exists at the outer
surface; and that an arbitrary known temperature
distribution exists in the body initially. All of the
necessary mathematical relations are worked out,
including relations required to determine the coeffi-
cients appearing in the solution equations, but no
numerical examples are given.






N-29598*

VORTEX FLOW IN AXIAL MACHINES. (Ecoulements
tourbillonnaires dans les machines axiales). R.
Siestrunck and J. Fabri. 83p. diagrs. (Trans. from
Office National d'Etudes et de Recherches
A6ronautiques. Pub. 45).

Properties of rotational motion in axial machines and
of an incompressible fluid in a cylindrical duct are
discussed. The stream function describing the evolu-
tion of the fluid motion is used systematically. The
Prandtl reduction of the blades to lifting lines is re-
tained. Several linearized solutions for a compressi-
ble fluid are given which show that the general equa-
tions for incompressible flow, linearized, do not lead
to inextricable calculations. Examples given are for
cylindrical and convergent ducts.


NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 61







DECLASSIFIED REPORTS







NACA RM E50D10

AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF NACA
RM-10 MISSILE IN 8- BY 6-FOOT SUPERSONIC
WIND TUNNEL AT MACH NUMBERS FROM 1.49 TO
1.98. I PRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF PRES-
SURE MEASUREMENTS (STABILIZING FINS RE-
MOVED). Roger W. Luidens and Paul C. Simnion.
July 20, 1950. 53p. diagrs.. photos. kNACA
RM E50D10) (Declassified from Confidential,
3/10/54)

Experimental investigation of flow about a slender
body of revolution (NACA RM-10 missile) alined and
inclined to a supersonic stream was conducted at
Mach numbers from 1.49 to 1.98 at a Reynolds num-
ber of approximately 30,000,000. Boundary-layer
measurements at zero angle of attack are correlated
with subsonic formulations for predicting boundary-
layer thickness and profile. Comparison of pressure
coefficients predicted by theory u iLth experimental
values showed close agreement at zero angle of
attack and angle of attack except over the aft leeward
side of body. At angle of attack, pitot pressure
measurements in plane of model base indicated a
pair of symmetrically disposed vortices on leeward
side of body.






NACA RM L50L13

A FINITE-STEP METHOD FOR THE CALCULATION
OF SPAN LOADINGS OF UNUSUAL PLAN FORMS.
George S. Campbell. July 16, 1951. 34p. diagrs., 4
tabs. (NACA RM L50L13) (Declassified from
Confidential. 3/10/54)

The applicability of a finite-step method to the calcu-
lation of subsonic spanwise load distribution, lift-
curve slope, lateral center of pressure, and aerody-
namic center of unusual plan forms has been investi-
gated. Computing forms are presented to simplify
calculation of span loadings for conventional swept,
M plan-form, and W plan-form %ings. Tables oi the
downwash in the plane of a yawed vortex are pre-
sented. Span loadings have been compared with those
obtained by Falkner and Weissinger for several plan
forms. The effect of an extra vortex located near the
tip, the use of yawed vortices, and the number of
steps necessary are discussed in the light of calcu-
lated results.








NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO. 61




NACA RM L51E29

CALCULATED AERODYNAMIC LOADINGS OF M,
W, AND .. WINGS IN INCOMPRESSIBLE FLOW.
Franklin W. Diederich and W. Owen Latham.
August 30, 1951. 58p. diagrs. tab. (NACA
RM L51E29) iDeclassified Ironm Confidential,
3 10 54)

Presented are the results of theoretical incompress-
ible float calculations of the spanaise lilt distribu-
tions and some associated aerodrnamrnic parameters
of 20 M. W. and .. uings. These results are com-
pared with similarly calculated results for ordinary
swept and uns'Aept wings.






NACA RM L51E31

PRELIMINARY EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION
OF FLUTTER CHARACTERISTICS OF M AND W
WINGS. Robert W. Herr. August 8, 1951. 31p.
diagrs.. photos., tab. INACA RMNI L51E31) (De-
classified from Confidential. 3/10 54)

Results of nine experimental flutter tests are pre-
sented to give a comparison of the letter character-
istics of wings havi'.'ng M anrid W type plan forms. A
technique is also presented %hereby the natural vi-
bration mode shapes of the model 'sA ings are obtained
photographically.


NACA-Langley 4-13-54 -4M






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08153 097 3
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