Research abstracts

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Title:
Research abstracts
Physical Description:
93 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics
Publisher:
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
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Frequency:
irregular
completely irregular

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Subjects / Keywords:
Aeronautics -- Abstracts -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Aeronautics -- Research -- Abstracts -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
abstract or summary   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Abstracts no. 1 (June 15, 1951)-no. 93 (Nov. 30, 1955).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001469326
notis - AGY1019
oclc - 01471285
lccn - 86657025
issn - 0499-9274
Classification:
lcc - TL501 .U5895
System ID:
AA00009235:00015

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National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics



Research Abstracts
NO.54 DECEMBER 14, 1953


CURRENT NACA REPORTS

NACA Rept. 1117

A STUDY OF ELASTIC AND PLASTIC STRESS CON-
CENTRATION FACTORS DUE TO NOTCHES AND
FILLETS IN FLAT PLATES. Herbert F. Hardrath
and Lachlan Ohman. 1953. ii, lOp. diagrs., tab.
(NACA Rept. 1117. Formerly TN 2566)

Six large 24S-T3 aluminum-alloy-sheet specimens
containing various notches or fillets were tested in
tension to determine their stress concentration fac-
tors in the elastic and plastic ranges. The elastic
stress concentration factors were found to be slightly
higher than those predicted by other methods. A
generalization of a relation presented by Stowell gave
good agreement with the plastic stress concentration
factors as they decreased with increasing plastic
strain.
NACA TN 3029

A FUNDAMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF FRETTING
CORROSION. H. H. Uhlig, I. Ming Feng, W. D.
Tierney, and A. McClellan, Massachusetts Institute
of Technology. December 1953. 52p. diagrs..
photos., 2 tabs. (NACA TN 3029) 1

This report summarizes all phases of an \nfe~taga-
(ion of fretting corrosion which has been chnduted
over a period of several years. The presentiion f---'_
the information is made in three parts. Part -.-
describes a test machine for measuring fretting
damage under controlled experimental conditions.
Part UI presents data for mild steel fretted against
itself. Consideration is given to the effects of
humidity, temperature, test duration, atmosphere,
relative slip, pressure, and frequency. Part IDT
suggests a mechanism for the fretting process.
NACA TN 3047

IMPINGEMENT OF WATER DROPLETS ON NACA
65A004 AIRFOIL AND EFFECT OF CHANGE IN
AIRFOIL THICKNESS FROM 12 TO 4 PERCENT AT
40 ANGLE OF ATTACK. Rinaldo J. Brun, Helen M.
Gallagher and Dorothea E. Vogt. November 1953.
45p. diagrs., tab. (NACA TN 3047)

The trajectories of droplets in the air flowing past an
NACA 65A004 airfoil at an angle of attack of 40 were
determined. The amount of water in droplet form
impinging on the airfoil, the area of droplet impinge-
ment, and the rate of droplet impingement per unit
area on the airfoil surface were calculated from the
trajectories and presented to cover a large range ol
flight and atmospheric conditions. The effect of a


change in airfoil thickness from 12 to 4 percent at 40
angle of attack is presented by comparing the im-
pingement calculations for the NACA 65A004 airfoil
with those for the NACA 651-208 and 651-212 air-
foils. The rearward limit of impingement on the
upper surface decreases as the airfoil thickness de-
creases. The rearward limit of impingement on the
lower surface increases with a decrease in airfoil
thickness. The total water intercepted decreases as
the airfoil thickness is decreased.


NACA TN 3049

AN ANALYTICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE EF-
FECT OF THE RATE OF INCREASE OF TURBU-
LENT KINETIC ENERGY IN THE STREAM DIREC-
TION ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF TURBULENT
BOUNDARY LAYERS IN ADVERSE PRESSURE
GRADIENTS. Bernard Rashis. November 1953.
. 30p. diagrs., 2 tabs. INACA TN 3049)

SAeneral integral form of the boundary,-layer equa-
qp which includes the Reynolds normal-stress
j is derived. TAo special equations are obtained
Sthe general form. They are the modified mo-
ntun equation and the modified kinetic-energy
nation. In addition, the parameters shich control
he dissipation of mean-flo.& kinetic energy by the
shearing stress and the Reynolds normal stress are
suggested.


NACA TN 3056

A FLIGHT INVESTIGATION OF LAMINAR AND
TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYERS PASSING
THROUGH SHOCK WAVES AT FULL-SCALE
REYNOLDS NUMBERS. Eziaslav N. Harrin.
December 1953. 20p. diagrs., photos. INACA
TN 3056)

An investigation was made in flight at free-stream
Mach numbers up to about 0.76 and Reyr-lds numbers
up tu about 26 x 106 to determine the behauiotr -A
laminar and turbulent boundary layers passing
through shock waves. Boundary-layer and pressure-
disti ibution measurements were made on a short-
span airfoil built around a wing of a fighter airplane.
The free-stream Mach numbers reached in the tests
were sufficiently high to give extensi.e regions of
local supersonic flow. Comparison is made with re-
sults of tests at low Reynolds numbers up to 1, 10-
scale) of other investigations.


* AVAILABLE ON LOAN ONLY
ADDRESS REQUESTS FOR DOCUMENTS TO NACA, 1724 F ST. NW., WASHINGTON 25, D. C., CITING CODE NUMBER ABOVE EACH TITLE;
THE REPORT TITLE AND AUTHOR.
&zV.f) r I -






2

BRITISH REPORTS

N-27007*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
THE CALCULATION OF THE PRESSURE DISTRI-
BUTION OVER THE SURFACE OF TWO-
DIMENSIONAL AND SWEPT WINGS WITH SYMMET-
RICAL AEROFOIL SECTIONS. J. Weber. July 1953.
84p. diagrs., 13 tabs. (RAE Aero 2497. Rewritten
and amended version of RAE Aero 2391)

A simple method is described for calculating the
pressure distribution on the surface of a thick two-
dimensional airfoil section, at any incidence, in in-
compressible potential flow. It is particularly suit-
able for practical applications, since knowledge of
the section ordinates only is required. This paper
gives a complete derivation of the theory including a
detailed discussion of the approximations made and
their effect on the accuracy of the results. The
pressure distributions calculated by the present
method are identical with the exact values for air-
foils of elliptic cross section, and the numerical
values for Joukowsky airfoils agree well with the
exact solutions.

N-27056*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
DESIGN AND CALIBRATION AT LOW SPEEDS OF A
STATIC TUBE AND A PITOT-STATIC TUBE WITH
SEMI-ELLIPSOIDAL NOSE SHAPES. D. J. Kettle.
May 1953. 31p. diagrs., 5 tabs. (RAE Tech. Note
Aero 2247)

A new static tube and a new pitot-static tube have
been designed and calibrated in the No. 1 and the
No. 2 11-1/2 foot by 8-1/2 foot wind tunnels of the
R. A. E., using a long static tube, the error of which
is believed to be very small, as a standard for com-
parison. The results show that the static pressure
measured by these tubes is in error due to the sup-
porting strut and to the nose shape of the tube by an
amount which may be calculated for positions of the
static slot, or holes, greater than 10 tube diameters
ahead of the strut. The readings show no measurable
scale effect in the speed range 100-230 ft/sec. The
static tube is insensitive to yaw in the range 10 with
a square-edged slot and is even less sensitive to yaw
when the slot edges are rounded. The turbulence of
the tunnel has an effect on the static-pressure read-
ing.
N-27057*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gt. Brit.)
COMPRESSIBILITY EFFECT ON GUST LOADS.
J. K. Zbrozek. August 1953. 20p. diagrs. (RAE
Tech. Note Aero 2254)

Theoretical calculations of the gust alleviation
factor for a range of Mach numbers show an appreci-
able decrease in its value with Increasing Mach
number. The reduction in the value of the gust
factor at M = 0. 7 is about 10 percent for sharp-
edged gusts and lightly loaded aircraft (ig = 20) and
decreases to about 5 percent for gust lenglh of 10
chords and heavy aircraft (gg = 100). The analysis
of existing flight records indicates that the gust
loads at high Mach numbers can be estimated satis-
factorily if the gust factor and the lift slope are
corrected for compressibility.


NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO.54

N-27058*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gi. Brit.)
WIDE RANGE AMPLIFIER FOR TURBULENCE
MEASUREMENTS WITH ADJUSTABLE UPPER
FREQUENCY LIMIT. H. Schuh and D. Walker.
August 1953. 42p. diagrs. (RAE Aero 2492)

The amplifier described in this report was originally
planned for turbulence work at supersonic speeds; it
was soon apparent that with some modifications, the
same equipment could be used also at subsonic
speeds. In its final version, it is suitable for meas-
uring subsonic wind-tunnel turbulence of low
intensity.

N-27059*

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Gi. Brit.)
THE TIME VECTOR METHOD FOR STABILITY
INVESTIGATIONS. K. H. Doetsch. August 1953.
50p. diagrs., tab. (RAE Aero 2495)

A semigraphical method for the analysis of aircraft
stability oscillations is described. It is based on the
concept of rotating time vectors representing the
forces and moments acting on the aircraft. Rules
are developed for the application to damped and
divergent oscillations. The method is iterative,
simple and rapid. Close correlation with the physi-
cal facts of the motion is maintained and the contri-
bution of each force and moment can be visualized.
The immediate deduction of approximate formulas
and their limitations is demonstrated and the applica-
tion of the method to automatic control is discussed.

N-27126*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
THE FLOW AT THE MOUTH OF A STANTON
PITOT. A. Thom. October 2, 1952. 9p. diagrs.
(ARC 15,228; FM 1796; Oxford Univ., Engineering
Lab. No.61)

An arithmetical calculation is made of the flow at the
mouth of a Stanton pitot as the Reynolds number
tends to zero. A stationary eddy is found under the
lip of the pitot. A figure is found for the height of
the effective center of the pitot rather greater than
the experimental value determined by Sir Geoffrey
Taylor.

N-27127*

Aeronautical Research Council IGI. Brit.)
INTEGRATION OF THE EQUATIONS OF TRANSONIC
FLOW IN TWO DIMENSIONS. D. Meksyn.
November 25, 1952. 23p. 2 tabs. (ARC 15,412;
FM 1819)

The problem of integration of the equations of com-
pressible flow past a solid body has been considered
in numerous papers. The solutions have been quite
laborious. In this paper, a method is given in which
the integration leads to an algebraic equation of the
fifth degree which can be evaluated at any given point.
The critical point of this equation determines the
critical Mach number when a shock wave first
appears. The method is applied to the motion past a
circular cylinder and to the flow past an airfoil of
thickness 1, 10 consisting of two arcs with cusps at
the leading and trailing edges. The results agree
with Kaplan's calculations.






NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO.54
N-27128"

Aeronautical Researcn Council (Gt. Brit.)
THE ARITHMETIC OF FIELD EQUATIONS.
A. Thorn. November 26, 1952. 29p. diagrs.
(ARC 15, 419; FM 1821; Oxford Univ., Engineering
Lab. No. 63)

The paper describes in detail an older and more
rapid method than relaxation of approximating to the
solution of equations of the Laplace and Poisson
type. The corresponding fourth order equations are
also discussed. A description is given of the propa-
gation of errors in the fields due to various causes.

N-27129'

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
ON THE ENERGY SCATTERED FROM THE INTER-
ACTION OF TURBULENCE WITH SOUND OR SHOCK
WAVES. M. J. Lighthill. December 1, 1952. 24p.
diagrs., tab. (ARC 15,432; FM 1825)


3
The energy scattered when a sound wave passes
through turbulent fluid flow is studied by means of
the author's general theory of sound generated aero-
dynamically. Energy freely scattered when turbu-
lence is convected through the stationary shock wave
pattern in a supersonic jet may form an important
part of the sound field of the jet.



MISCELLANEOUS


NACA TN 2893

Errata No. 1 on "THEORETICAL AND MEASURED
ATTENUATION OF MUFFLERS AT ROOM TEM-
PERATURE WITHOUT FLOW, WITH COMMENTS
ON ENGINE-EXHAUST MUFFLER DESIGN."
Don D. Davis, Jr., George L. Stevens, Jr.,
Dewey Moore and George M. Stokes. February
1953.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
A ii 11311111111111111111111 111


1 1 11 i 1 1 I


4 3 l1262

DECLASSIFIED NACA kmroRTS

THE FOLLOWING REPORT HAS BEEN
DECLASSIFIED FROM SECRET TO UNCLASSIFIED,
11/10/53.

NACA RM L52E22

NOTES ON THE GUST PROBLEM FOR HIGH-SPEED
LOW-ALTITUDE BOMBERS. Langley Gust Loads
Branch. June 5, 1952. 23p. diagrs., 3 tabs.
(NACA RM L52E22)


Available information pertaining to the gust problem
for the high-speed low-altitude bomber has been
collected and coordinated. Gust data of interest in
this special problem have been presented and the
general information for design has been indicated.


THE FOLLOWING REPORTS HAVE BEEN
DECLASSIFIED FROM CONFIDENTIAL TO
UNCLASSIFIED, 11/10 '53.


NACA RM L6J14

DRAG MEASUREMENTS OF SYMMETRICAL
CIRCULAR-ARC AND NACA 65-009 RECTANGULAR
AIRFOILS HAVING AN ASPECT RATIO OF 2.7 AS
DETERMINED BY FLIGHT TESTS AT SUPERSONIC
SPEEDS. Sidney R. Alexander. March 7, 1947.
10p. diagrs., photo. (NACA RM L6J14)


Flight tests have been conducted at supersonic speeds
to determine the drag characteristics at zero lift of
a wing having a circular-arc airfoil section with a
maximum thickness of 9 percent chord. The wing
plan form was rectangular and had an aspect ratio of
2.7. Included for comparison are results of similar
tests previously conducted on an NACA 65-009 air-
foil. For the Mach number range investigated (0.85
to 1.22), the NACA 65-009 airfoil produced lower
values of drag coefficient than the circular-arc air-
foil.

NACA RM L6J23

RESULTS OF PRELIMINARY FLIGHT INVESTIGA-
TION OF AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF
THE NACA TWO-STAGE SUPERSONIC RESEARCH
MODEL RM-1 STABILIZED IN ROLL AT TRAN-
SONIC AND SUPERSONIC VELOCITIES. Marvin
Pitkin, William N. Gardner and Howard J. Curfman,
Jr. March 19, 1947. 55p. diagrs., photos.
(NACA RM L6J23)


The design of a two-stage, solid-fuel, rocket pro-
pelled, general research pilotless aircraft (RM-1)
suitable for investigating stability and control at
supersonic velocities is discussed. The flight-test
investigation conducted thus far is discussed and in-
formation is presented on zero-length launchers and
operational flight-test techniques of two-stage
rockets.


0


|111111111| W B I 1 ACA
81530627 RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO.54

NACA RM L6K08c

DRAG MEASUREMENTS AT TRANSONIC SPEEDS
OF NACA 65-009 AIRFOILS MOUNTED ON A
FREELY FALLING BODY TO DETERMINE THE
EFFECTS OF SWEEPBACK AND ASPECT RATIO.
Charles W. Mathews and Jim Rogers Thompson.
January 22. 1947. 14p. diagrs., photos. (NACA
RM L6K08c)


Drag measurements at transonic speeds on rectangu-
lar airfoils and on airfoils swept back 450 are re-
ported. These airfoils, which were mounted on
cylindrical test bodies, are part of a series being
tested in free drops from high altitude to determine
the effect of variation ol basic airfoil parameters on
airfoil drag characteristics at transonic speeds.
These rectangular and swepiback airfoils had the
same span, airfoil section (NACA 65-009), and chord
perpendicular to the leading edge. The tests were
made to compare the drag of rectangular and swept-
back airfoils at a higher aspect ratio than had been
used in a similar comparison reported previously.



NACA RM L52E05

PRELIMINARY EXPERIMENTS ON THE ELASTIC
COMPRESSIVE BUCKLING OF PLATES WITH
INTEGRAL WAFFLE-LIKE STIFFENING. Norris F.
Dow and William A. Hickman. July 1952. 13p.
diagrs photo tab INACA RM L52E05)


An experimental investigation 'as made of the elastic
compressive oucklirng strength of plates having vari-
ous configurations of integral stillening Configura-
tions tested included ribbing that was longitudinal,
transverse, longitudinal and transverse, and skewed
at various angles to the sides of the plates to form a
diamond or waffle-like pattern. The 450 waffle
stiffening -as found to be the most effective of all
those considered, eimng a buckling load nearly
double that for the same waffle pattern with the
ribbing lonitudirinal and transverse


NACA RM L53E13a

FORMULAS FOR THE ELASTIC CONSTANTS OF
PLATES WITH INTEGRAL WAFFLE-LIKE
STIFFENING. Norris F. Dow, Charles Libove and
Ralph E. Hubka. Ausust 1953. 67p. diagrs., tab.
(NACA RM L53E13a)

Formulas are derived for the elastic constants of
plates with integral ribbing. The constants, whiLh
include the effectiveness of the ribs for resisting
deformations other than bending and stretching in
their longitudinal directions, are defined in terms
of four coefficients, and methods for the evaluation
of these coefficients are discussed. Four of the
more important elastic constants are predicted by
these formulas and are compared with test results.


NACA-Langley 12-14-53 4M




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