Research abstracts

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Research abstracts
Physical Description:
93 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics
Publisher:
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
irregular
completely irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Aeronautics -- Abstracts -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Aeronautics -- Research -- Abstracts -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
abstract or summary   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Abstracts no. 1 (June 15, 1951)-no. 93 (Nov. 30, 1955).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001469326
notis - AGY1019
oclc - 01471285
lccn - 86657025
issn - 0499-9274
Classification:
lcc - TL501 .U5895
System ID:
AA00009235:00014

Related Items

Preceded by:
Monthly list of documents released by the NACA ...
Succeeded by:
Research abstracts and reclassification notice


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text








Research 1
NO.S3


*AVAILABLE ON LOAN ONLY.
ADDRESS REQUESTS FOR DOCUMENTS TO NACA, 17n4 F ST., NW., WASHINGTON ns, D. C., CITING CODE NUMBER ABOVE EACH TITLE,
THE REPORT TITLE AND AUTHOR.


Abstracts -
DEc~CE BtylT,, 1 5

An investigation has been conducted to find the
approximate variation of the drag coefficient with
Reynolds number of cylinders. Data were obtained
for circular cylinders, elliptical cylinders of two
fineness ratios, rectangular and diamond cylinders
Iftire fineness ra io, and two isosceles trian uar
different core r1 du werestes ed. Data{0 aee b

hiio sas 2h3e000 wreue cuie dof fflsueuctua-

bylanf'ders,

TN 3039
5ls 3\
EB RIMENTAL STRESS ANALYSIS OF STIFFENED
ESWITHCITTOUTS. PURE TORSION.
R. Schlechte and Richard Rosecrans.
mbr 1953. 41p. diagrs., 7 tabs. (NACA
3039)

Toreson tests were made on a cylindrical semi-
monocoque shell of circular cross section. The
cylinder was first tested without a cutout, and then
with a rectangular cutout which was successively
enlarged through six sizes varying from 300 to 1300
in circumference and from 1 to 2 bays in length.
Strain measurements were made with resistance-
type wire strain gages near the cutout on the
stringers, the skin, and the rings for each size of
cutout, and the stresses obtained are presented in
tables.


NACA TN 3040

USE OF TWO-DIMIENSIONAL DATA IN EST~IMATING
LOADS ON A 450 SWEPTBACK WING WITH SLATS
AND PARTIAL-SPAN FLAPS. Lynn W. Hunton and
Harry A. James. November 1953. 400p.diagrs.,
photo., tab. (NACA TN 3040)

A study has been made of the application of two-
dimensional data and span-loading theory for estimatl-
Ing the local loading characteristics on a swept wing
with flaps. Estimated results, including local pres-
sure distributions, span loadings, and the nonlinear
local lift characteristics, are compared with similar
results measured at a Reynolds number of 8 million
on a 450 sweptback wing of aspect ratio 6 having a
0.4 span double-slotted flap both with and without a
full-span stat. Two-dimensional pressure distribu-
tioras when corrected for sweep were found to agree
closely with the wing pressures for most local sec-
tions either on or off the flap, this agreement con-
tinuing to lift coefficients approaching those for stall.


C


National Advisory Committee For A


rsiibitics


I


CURRENT NACA REPORTS

NACA Rept. 1106

THE LANGLEY ANNULAR TRANSONIC TUNNEL.
MLo arW. H bel, James H. Henders r and Maso~nAF.
Rept. 1106. Formerly RM L8A23; RM L50E18)

Tse development ofthe LangleyM aular t anonic -

0.6 to slightly over 1.0 are achieved by rtt h
test model in an annular passage between twcoly-
centric cylinders, is described. Data ob d or
twoe-dimensional airfoil models in the La '
annular transonic tunnel at subsonic and s sp L
are shown to be in reasonable agreement wh ec-
perimental data from other sources and wat itheory
when comparisons are made for nonlifting t a
or for equal normal-force coefficients rather -
for equal angles of attack. The trends of rs
distributions obtained from measurements in the
Langley annular transonic tunnel are consistent with
distributions calculated for Prandtl-Meyer flow.

NACA Rept. 1110

SOME FEATURES OF ARTIFTCIALLY THICKENED
FULLY DEVELOPED TURBULENT BOUNDARY
LAYERS WIHH ZERO PRESSURE GRADIENT.
P. S. Klebanoff and Z. W. Diehl, National Bureau
of Standards. 1952. 27lp. diagrs., photos.
(NACA Rept.1310. Formerly TN 2475)

Results are presented of tests to determine the fea-
sibility of artificially thickening a Lurbulent boundary
layer on a flat plate. It is shown that it is possible
to do substantial thickening and obtain a fully devel-
oped turbulent boundary layer which Is free from any
distortions introduced by the thickening process.
Measurements of mean velocity, spectrum oi u-
fluctuation, and intensity of u-fluctuation are pre-
sented. Some features of the fully developed turbu-
lent boundary layer with eero pressure gradient are
discussed. The mean flow in the boundary layer is
compared with the logarithmic laws of mean-velocity
distribution derived for pipes and channels, and the
existing theories dealing with the shape of the spec-
trum in isotropic turbulence are applied to the spec-
trum measured in the outer portion of the boundary
layer*


NACA TN 3038

LOWT-8PEED DRAG OF CYLINDERS OF VARIOUS
SHAPES. Noel K. Delany and Norman E. Borensen.
November 1953. 22p. diagram photos., tab. (NACA
TN 3038)




NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO.53

By means of the expressions derived in NACA
Technical Note 2898, the span load distributions for
families of thin sweptback wings sideslipping at an
angle of attack have been calculated. Variatibitp of
the rolling-moment coefficient C1 with sideaip. A
angle and of the corresponding stability derivative
Cllj with Mach number are also presented. The re-
suits are applicable to plan forms for which the wing
tips are parallel to the wing axis of symmetry and,
in general, at supersonic speeds for which the
trailing edge is supersonic.

NACA TN 3048

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF THE EF-
FECTS OF COOLING ON FRICTION AND ON
BOUNDARY-LAYER TRANSITION FOR LOW-SPEED
GAS FLOW AT THE ENTRY OF A TUBE. Stephen J.
Kline and Aseher H. Shapiro, Massachusetts Institute
of Technology. November 1053. 65p. diagrs., tab.
(NACA TN 3048)

The effect of cooling on boundary-layer transition in
the steady flow of air in the entrance of a smooth
round tube was investigated experimentally. Runs
were made at diameter Reynolds numbers varying
from 50,000 to 106,000. The levels of disturbance
were such as to yield adiabatic length Reynolds num-
bers, based on the length to the start of transition,
ranging from 500,000 to 1,800,000. Temperature
differences between the wall and the free stream up
to 270o F were applied, but no algnificant effect of
cooling on the point of transition was found. Precise
data for local and mean apparent friction factors are
presented for the adiabatic and cooled cases. For
the laminar portion of the flow, the apparent friction
factors are correlated and compared with simple
theories.

NACA TN 3051

GUST LOADS AND OPERATING AIRSPEEDS OF ONE
TYPE OF FOUR-ENGINE TRANSPORT AIRPLANE
ON THREE ROUTES FROM 1949 TO 1953. Walter
G. Walker. November 1953. 34p. dlagrs., 4 taba.
(NACA TN 3051)

V-G data obtained from a four-engine civil transport
airplane are analyzed to determine the magnitude and
frequency of occurrence of gust loads and gusts.
The influence of the gusts and operating speeds in
rough air on the gust loads experienced is shown.
Variations in roughness on the different routes due
to changes in seasonal weather conditions are indi-
cated. The results of the analysis are in general
agreement with those from similar operations of
other civil transports recently investigated.

NACA TN 3052

THE EFFECT OF VERTICAL CHINE STRIPS ON
THE PLANING CHARACTERISfflCS OF V-8HAPED
PRISMATIC SURFACES HAVING ANGLES OF DEAD
RISE OF 200 AND 400. Walter J. Kapryan and
George M. Boyd, Jr. November 1953. 38p. diagrs.,
photo., 2 Labs. (NACA TN 3052)


ThIeH efe o oetca cle tis on the pln e -

mined as part of a general research investigation on
playing surfaces. Wetted Lengths, resistance, and


NACA TN 3041

SUMMlARY OF REVISED GUST-VELOCITY DATA
OBTAINED FROM V-G RECORDS TAKEN ON CIVIL
TRANSPORT AIRPLANES FROM 1933 TO 1950.
Walter G. Walker. November 1953. 16p. diagrs.'
4 tabs. (NACA TN 3041)

TIhis paper summarizes gust-velocaty data obtained
by reevaluating the normal accelerations and air-
speeds from V-G records taken on cavil transport
airplanes from 1933 to 1950. The reevaluation was
made on the basis of a derivedd" gust velocity
Udp which as related to the "effective' gust
ve obcity Ue by a conversion factor that Is a func-
tron of the type of airplane and operating alitunde.
Although the value of the conversion factor varies
from about 1.6 to 2.0 for the data presented, the
conclusions drawn from the previously presented
data based on U (in particular the relative levels
of turbulence Indecated between different routes)
remain essentially unchanged.

NACA TN 3043

APPLICATION OF SILVER CHLORIDE IN INVESTI-
GATIONS OF ELASTO-PLAffflC STATES OF
STRESS. L. E. Goodman and J. G. Sutherland,
University of Illinois. November 1953. 55p. diagrs.,
photos., 4 tabs. (NACA TN 3043)

Quantitative relationships between the state of elastic
or plastic stress in a specimen and the observed
relative retardation and extinction angle were devel-
oped from a general theory of stress birefringence,
according to a stress-dependent hypothesis. The re-
lationships were verified extperimentally by measure-
ments on single-crystal specimens of silver chloride
tested in simple tension in the elastic and plastic
stress ranges. Studies were also made of stress
states in bicrystal tension specimens, in simple
polycrystalline tension specimens, and in single-
crystal and polycrystal teneson specimens with holes
and notches. Silver chloride appears to be a sulltable
medium for photoelastic studies of effects of plastic
yielding on the state of stress in a crystalline
specimen.


NACA TN 3044

EFFECT OF A RAPID BLADE-PITCH INCREASE
ON THE THRUST AND INDUCED-VELOCITY
RESPONSE OF A FULL-SCALE HELICOPTER
ROTOR. Paul J. Carpenter and Bernard Frldovich.
November 1953. 26p. diagrs., photos. (NACA
TN 3044)

A method is developed for calculating the response
of a helicopter rotor and its induced velocity buildup
following a rapid blade-pitch increase. The cal-
culated and experimental results are In good agree-
ment for various rates of pitch increase of 6o to 2000
per second.

NACA TN 3046

THEORETICAL CALCULATIONS OF THE EFFECTS



AT AN ANGLE OF ATTACK. Wmdsor L. Sherman
ad K~enneth M rgoli~s.TNN30ember 1953. 53p.





NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO.53

center-of-pressure location were determined at
speed coefficients up to 25.0, load coefficients up to
apporoxmately 80.0, and trims up to 300. In addition,
comparisons of the more important planing charac-
teristics are made with those for related surfaces
having angles of dead rise of 00, 20o, and 400, and for
surfaces having angles of dead rise of 200 and 400
with horizontal chine flare. These comparisons
show that vertical chine strips are a more effective
means of increasing the lift of a given surface than
horizontal chine flare is. This increase in lift, hor-
ever, is accompanied by a substantial Increase in
drag so that the lifting efficiency of the vertically
flared surface is comparable to one having horizontal
chine flare,


NACA RM E51F21

RESISTANCE OF VARIOUS MATERIALS TO ATTACK
BY MOLTEN BISMUTH-LEAD EITTECTIC AT
ELEVATED TEMPERATURES. James J. Gangler
and Walter J. Engel. September 1951. 14p. diagrs.,
photos., 2 Labs. (NACA RM E51F21)

The resistance of 40 materials Ineluding alloys.
ceramics, ceramals, and pure metals to attack by
bismuth-lead eutectic at temperatures between 15000
and 20000 F was investigated. A velocity of 15 feet
per second was maintained between the material sur-
face and the bismuth-lead eutectic. Those materials
found to be resistant to this attack Included 17 of the
ceramals and ceramics, gr'aphate, and arc-cast
molybdenum. All other materials investigated were
appreciably attacked by the eutectic in the form of
uniform attack, cavitation, or pitting, as indicated by
metallographlc analysis. No evidence of intergranu-
lar corrosion was observed in any of the materials
studied in this investigation. Disintegration rates
were estimated in mils per year from linear meas-
nrements taken before and after the specimens were
subjected to attack by the molten eutectic.

NACA RM E53Il4

EVAPORATION AND SPREADING OF ISOOCTANE
SPRAYS IN HIGH-VEOC~ITY AIR STREAMS.
Donald W. Bahr. November 1953. 35p. diagram ,
tab. (NACA RM E53Il4)

The evaporation and spreading an isooctane sprays
were investigated over a range of air-flow and fuel-
injection conditions common in ram-jet engines.
The fuel was injected contrastream from a simple-
orifice fuel injector into air flowing through a duct
8 inches in diameter. The measurements were made
over the following ranges: air temperatures, 800 to
3000 R; air velocities, 100 to 350 feet per second;
air static pressures, 18 to 35 inches of mercury
absolute; fuel-injection pressure drops, 25 to 85
pounds per square inch; dlameters of fuel injector
orifice, 0.024 to 0.041 Inch; and axial distances from
fuel Injector, 5 to 18 inches. Over these ranges,
expressions were obtained which related the evapora-
tion and spreading of the sprays to the exrperimental
variables.


NACA TM 1363

A NEW SIMPLE INITERFEROIMETER FOR OBTAIN-
ING QUANTITATIVELY VALUABLE FLOW
PATTERNS. (Ein Neues, Sehr Emnfaches Inter-
ferometer zum Erhalt Quantitatly Auswertbarer


Striimungshilder). S. F. Erdmann. November 1953.
62p. diagrs., photos. (NACA TM 1363. Trans.
from Applied Scientific Research, v. B2)

The method described us this report makes it possi-
ble to obtain Interferometer records with the aid of
available schlieren optics by the addition of very
simple expedrents. Under certain conditions, the
interferograme need not be inferior to those obtained
by other methods. (However, one fundamental draw-
back of the method compared to the Mach-Zehnder
interferometer lies in a relatively very poor light
output:) The method Is based on the fundamental con-
cept of the phase-contrast process developed by
Zernike but which has been enlarged to such an ex-
tent that it practically represents an independent
interference method. The two light beams causing
the interference are not separated until immediately
before photographing and up to that point are subject
to the same effects. The theory is explained on a
purely physical basis and illuerrated and proved by
experimental data. A number of typical cases are
cited and some quantitative results reported.


NACA TM 1368

SUIPERSATURATION IN THE SPONTANEOUS
FORMATION OF NUCLEI IN WATER VAPOR.
Jhbersattagung bei der spontanen Keimblldung an
Wasserdampf). Adolf Sander and Gerhard
Damkiihler. November 1953. 19p. diagrs. (NACA
TM 1368. Trans. from Naturwissenschaften, v.31,
no.39 40, September 24, 1943. p. 460-465).

The supersaturation of water vapor required for
spontaneous formation ofnucles was measured in the
temperature range between +350 and -750 C. The
influence of the presence of tons on the condensation
process was found to disappear and a break in the
critical supersaturation as a function of temperature
curve was found at -62o C. In addltlon, the con-
densate particles were observed to scintillate at
-62o C or lower. A modified form of the Volmer
and the Becker-Di~ring equations tor rate of nucleus
formation is presented and compared with the
experimental data. The temperature range of
droplet-nucleus formation and crystal-nucleus
formation are considered as two distinct (not
overlapping) temperature regions separated by the
melting point (-620 C) of a two-dimensional surface
phase.


BRITISH REPORTS

N-26750*

Forest Products Research Lab. (Gt. Brit.)
TRIALS OF TIMBER FOR PLYWOOD MANUFAC-
TURE. SMALL SCALE TESTS ON: SCOTS PINE -
PINUS SYLVE~STRIS L HOME GROWN. (33
POUNDS PER CUBIC FOOT AT 15 PER CENT
MOISTURE CONTENT); SITKA SPRUCE PICEA
SITCHENSIS CARR HOME GROWN (25 POUNDS
PER CUBIC FO{YT AT 15 PER CENT MOISTURE
CONTENT) PROGRESS REPORT TIWENTY-ONE.
July 1953. 11p. 3 tabs. (Forest Products Research
Lab.)
Two varieties of home grown timber were tested for
use as plywood. The Scots Pine was considered un-
suitable owaing to many loose knots. The Sitka
Spruce was also unsuitable because large numbers





NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO.53

N-26850*

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.) i
THE DIFFUSION OF LOAD INTO A SEMI-INNFIFI'E A
SHEET. PARTS IAND II. E. H. Mansfield.
1953. 61p. diagrs. (ARC R &M 2670; ARC 11,268;
ARC 11,747. Formerly RAE Structures 11; RAE
Strucruree 27)

In Part I, the rigorous and the "stringer-sheet"
stress solutions are given for a point load applied in
the plane of a semi-infinite sheet and at a finite
distance from the boundary which is assumed to be
free. From these are derived, by integration, some
of the stresses produced by distributed loads applied
along line normal to the free boundary; attention is
concentrated on the stresses along the line of action
of the applied loads. The problem of finding the
shear stresses adjacent to a load-carrying boom
attached t'o the sheet and normal to the free edge is
also investigated and integral equations for the shear
stresses are derited. In Part II, a theoretical in-
vestigation is made into the problem of stillening a
sheet to relieve the high stresses near usre free edge
and adjacent to a direct load-carrying boom attached
to the sheet. For boomer of constant cross-section
the stress distribution depends, with certain assump-
tions on two nondimensional parameters, and curves
are included for determining the peak stressed in the
sheet and the loads in the stiffening structure over the
practical range of these parameters.


N-268511

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
MEASUREMENTS OF MAXIMUM LIFT ON 26 AERO-
FOIL SECTIONS AT HIGH MACH NUMBER. Part I.
TESTS ON 19 AEROFOLS. J. A. Beavan, R.
Sargent, R. J. North and P. M. Burrows. Part II.
TESTS ON A FURTHER 7 AEROFOILS. R. J. North
and P. M. Burrows. 1953. 31p. diagrs., 2 tabs.
(ARC R& M 2678. Formerly ARC 11,0841; Perf.386;
S & C 2174; ARC 11,191; Perf.386a; S& C 2174a)

The lift an a number of airfoil sections mostly of 2-
inch chord has been determined over a wide range
of angle of attack and Mach number by measuring the
pressures on the walls of the 20-by 8-inch high-
speed tunnel.


N-26852*


SCOMPAIO OTF c CO ME HGD BOF ALCU-
LATING WING LOADING WITH ALLOWANCE FOR
COMPRESSIBILITY. V. M. Falkner. With
appendix: NOTE ON FALKNER'S METHOD FOR
CALCULATING COMPRESSIBIL~ITY EFFECTS OF
WING LOADING. W. P. Jones. 1953. 53p.
di grs. t1abe.C 2 R erM52068. FoMFrlyr

12,650; ARC 12,147; Perf. 530; FM 1335; 4 C 2302)

The report gives the results of a comparison by two
different methods of the aerodynamic loading of a
tapered V wing of aspect ratio 5.8 and 415o sareep
back at M = 0.8 based on the Prandtl-Glauert.
factor or linear perturbation theory; the first meth-
od, associated particularly with vortex-lattice theory,
deals with changes in Mach number by preseerving the


of knot holes and encased knots, together with
light roughness and woolliness of the surface, re-
duced the finished boards to a low grade-


N-26844'

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)
THE AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF
FLAPS. A. D. Young. 1953. 55p. dlagrs.'
2 tabs. (ARC R s M 2622; ARC 10,766. Formerly
RAE Aero 2185)

This report collects and summarizes the results of
work that has been done both in thie and other
countries on the aerodynamic characteristics of flape
prior to and during the period of the war. The re-
port presents charts and tables which will enable de-
signers to predict with acceptable accuracy the
characteristics of any particular flap arrangement.
In season 2, a brief description of the various flaps
considered is given. Section 3 is devoted to a dis-
cussion of the defimutlons of the lift, drag, and
pitching-moment increments, based on the normal
and on the effective (extended or reduced) wing
chords. Section 4 deals In some detail with split and
plain flaps, while section 5 is devoted to the simple
slotted flaps of the Handley Page and NACA types,
A large variety of flape classified as high-lift flaps
araep onsdedreed i secto 6. Nhs si edaed a le-
slotted flaps, single and double Blackburn flaps,
Blackburn flape with flap leading-edge slots,
Blackburn flaps wilth inset slots, Blackburn flaps
with deflected shrouded, and Venitron-blind flaprs.
The effect of wing-body interference on the drag and
lift increments of split and slotted flaps is discussed
In section 7, while section 8 summarizes the aero-
dynamic effects of wing leading-edge slots. The
effect of flaps on induced drag is dealt with in
section 9. A discussion of the characteristics of
nose flaps, with particular reference to the type de-
veloped and tested by Kruger in Germany Is given in
section 10. A brief discussion on brake flaps Is
given in section II, while the allied subject of dive
recovery flaps is examined an section 12. Such in-
formation as is available on the characteristics of
flaps on sweptback wrings is summarized in section
13. Section 14 is devoted to a summary of the main
formulas and conclusions developed in the report,


N-26846,

Ae~r nu cal R~es aRch Co ncl OCtG Brit T LAE
WITH UNIFORM SUCTION. J. M. Kay. 1953
28p. diagrs. (ARC R &M2628. Formerly "
ARC 11,476; AC 137; FM 1244; Perf. 474
ARC 12,193; FM 1244a; Perf. 474a)

:1.rmetshae ube n maidono ad tenaine the elc
trolling and stabilizing the flow in a boundary layer.
Good agreement has been obtained between the meas-
ured velocity profiles and the theoretical ex-
panential form. The variation with rate of suction of
the total effective drag of a flat plate has been inv~ea-
tigated. In turbulent flow distributed suction pro-
vides an effective method of thinning a turbulent
boundary layer.






NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO.53

plan of the wing and using special tables of downwash,
while the second used the solution for Mach number 0
on a wing with the lateral dimensions reduced by a
specified factor. Examples of the apphcation of the
theory are also given for a delta wing, for a straight
tapered wing without sweep, and for a tapered wanB
with 28. 4o sweepback. It is possible to give a gen-
eral and reasonable explanation of the nature of the
variations of load grading and local aerodynamic
center which occur with increasing Mach number,
and with the information given, there should be no
difficulty in the prediction of Mach number effects on
a wide range of plan forms.


N-26855

Aeronautical Research Council (G. Brit.)
SOME TESTS ON COMPRESSOR CASCADES OF
RELATED AEROFOILS HAVING DIFFERENT
POSITIONS OF MAXIMUM CAMBER. A. D. S.
Carter. 1953. 17p. diagrs., photos., 2 tabs.
(ARC R & M 2694; ARC 12,324. Formerly NGTE
R. 47)

One of the major variables defining the shape of any
blade is its positron of maximum camber, and there
are several indications that its choice considerably
effects the performance of the cascade. Tests have
therefore been carried out on a series of aero-
dynamrcally equivalent cascades in which the positron
of maximum camber was varied systematically.
The tests covered a full mealdence range up to
choking.

N-26856,

Aeronaulteal Research Council (GL. Brit.)
THE CALCULATION OF WHIRLING SPEEDS OF A
SYSTEM OF ROTORS KEYED TO CO-AXIAL
BHAFTS. T. S. Wilson. 1953. 2p. diagrs.
(ARC R&r M 2709; ARC 12,266)

The calculation of wrhlrling speeds of a "semirgid.
system is brought within the scope of the iterative
technique of Duncan and Collar. It re demonstrated
by theory and example that problems Involving large
numbers of degrees of freedom may thereby be
efficiently dealt with. An additional refinement of
procedure allows two or more modes to be extracted
more or less simultaneously from an iterallon which
is converging slowly. Only rotors having axal
symmetry as regards mass are dealt with.


N-26857'

Aeronautical Research Council IGt. Brit. )
THE CALCULATION OF LIFT TAKING ACCOUNT
OF THE BOUNDARY LAYER. J. H. Preston.
1953. 40p. diagre., 2tabs. (ARCR &M 2725.
Formerly ARC 12,747; FM 1397; Perf. 609;
S & C 2351)

The purpose of this paper is to find a sound approach
to the problem of the theoretical prediction of sec-
tional characteristics taking account of the boundary
layer. Attention is mainly concentrated on the lift,
since it is on the accuracy of this calculation that the
accuracy of calculations for other characteristics
such as pressure distribution and moments must de-
pend. Calculations of the lift and of the velocity at
the edge of the boundary layer near the trailing edge


have been made for two dissimilar symmetrical
airfoils at an incidence of 6o, using boundary-
layer data taken from experiment. The method of
calculation satisfies the fundamental theorem that no
net vorticity is discharged into the wake at the trail-
ing edge and in contrast to the earlier calculations
of R&P M 1996, full account is now taken of the effect
of the boundary layer on the velocity fIeld outside the
boundary layer, so that the empiricism of that report
Is avoided. The present calculations harmonize the
two different methods of approach which have been
used in the past, namely, the one in which the Loss of
lift below the Joukowaki value was attributed entirely
to the incidence and camber effects of the boundary
layer, and the other in which the vorticity theorem
was satisfied, but boundary-layer camber effects
were ignored.


N-26860 *

Aeronautical Research Council (Gt. Brit.)I
AERODYNAMIC FORCES ON BICONVEX AERO-
FOILS OSCILLATING IN A SUPERSONIC AIR-
STREAM. W. P. Jones and Sylvia W. Skan.
EFFECT OF THICKNESS ON THE AERODYNAMIC
FORCES ON BICONVEX AEROFOILS OSCILLATING
IN A SUPERSONIC AIRSTREAM, AND CALCULA-
TION OF FORCES FOR AEROFOIL WITH FLAP.
Sylyta W. Skan. 1953. 34p. diagrs., 5 abs.
(ARC R& M 2749. Formerly ARC 13,162; FM 1443;
0.873; SSc C 2401; ARC 14,217; 0.954)

In the first part of this report, a method for the cal-
culation of the aerodynamic forces on an oscillating
airfoil which allows for the effect of thickness Is
developed. Aerodynamic lift and pitching-moment
derivatives for a 5-percent-thick, symmetrical,
circular-are airfoil at Mach numbers of 1.4, 1.5 and
2. O are given for a range of frequencies and com-
pared with values obtained on the baels of the flat
plate theory. In the second part, the ft distribution
and the aerodynamic force coefficients are calculated
for a 7.5-percent-thick symmetrical circular-are
airfoil at Mach numbers of 2.0, 1.7 and 1.5 for a
range of frequencies. These results are compared
with those given in the first part for a 5-pertcent-
thick airfoil, and with the values derived on the basis
of flat plate theory.



N-26864*'

Aeronautical Research Councl (Gt. Brit. )
EXPERIMENTS WITH STATIC TUBES IN A SUPER-
SONIC AIRSTREAM. PARTS IAND II. D. W.
fielder, R. J. North and A. Channeck. 1953. 14p.
diagrs., photos., 2 tabs. (ARC R M 2782.
Formerly ARC 13,268; TP 309; FM 1463;
ARC 13,269; TP 310; FM 1464)

Part I presents results of systematic tests made at
a Mach number of 1.6 on a family of statac tubes.
The variables which were Investigated are the shape
of the nose, the distance of the holes downstream,
and the Inchnation of the tube to the flow. Pressure
measurements were also made in the vicinity of a
shock wave and close to a wall. Part II presents the
results of tests made of a family of flat-nosed pitat
tubes at Mach numbers of 1.6 and 1.8. At both Mach
numbers at was found that no change of reading could
be detected when the ratio of the external diameter to
the bore was varied from 2 to 16.





NACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO.53

NACA TN 3036

Errata No. 1 on "THE FLOW ABOUT A SECTIOYOP
A FINITE-ASPECT-RATIO NACA 0015 AIRFOIL. 011
A TRANSONIC BUMP. Jack A. Mellenthin.
October 1953.


UNPUBLISHED PAPERS


N-12074

National Bureau of Standards.
TABLE OF THE FIRST MOMENT OF RANKED
EXTREMES. September20, 1951. (i), 6p.
(National Bureau of Standards. Rept. 1167)

This tabulation of the first moment of ranked ex-
tremes is one item of a project aimed at the im-
proved application of the theory of extreme values
to the analysis of gust loads of airplanes,

N-25272~

Advisory Group for Aeronautical Research and
Development. SOME3 APPLICATIONS OF STRAIN
GAGES IN AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH. Ira H.
Abbott. FLIGHT TEST APPLICATIONS OF STRAIN
GAGES. Walter K. Rickert. (Presented at Rome
AGARD conference, December 12-19, 1952) 53p.
diagrs., photos. (Advisory Group for Aeronautical
Research and Development. AG2,.'M1)

The purpose of this report is to give information on
the state of the art of strain-gage measurement of
flight test quantities in the U. S. The applications
made by the NACA of strain gages to aeronautical
research are classified into three categories. First,
the direct measurement of strain and stress in
structures worth reference to high-temperature appil-
cations is discussed. Secondly, the use of strain
gages to measure the aerodynamic: loads on aircraft
in flight as experienced by the NACA is described.
Thirdly, the use of strain gages in instrumentation is
presented. The application of strain gages to wind
tunnel balances is discussed in some detail. Appli-
cation of strain gages to aircraft flight testing is
considered, and their future use in the problem of
servo operated control systems for aircraft is
predicted.


N-25704 *

California U., Los Angeles.
SPECTRAL EMISSION TRANSIENTS IN COM~BUS-
e er S So MS. Bruc 5R.. Mead, Loren Varner and
photos. (California U., Los Angeles.
Rept. 53-16)

The combustion process Is considered with respect
to extinguishment of flames by chemical action. An
apparatus has been developed for measuring the
quantities of energy that are present in tranalent
spectral lines in flames which occur during initiation
and extinguishment periods of combustion. These
lines are associated with specific molecular group-
ings and provide means for quantitatively evaluating
paths of energy release that are active during
initiation and extinguishment periods of combustion.


N-26956'

Ministry of Supply (Gt. Brit. )
DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNIQUE FOR METALLIC
INERT ARC WEDING. (Fanal report) March
1953. 19p. diagrs., photos. (MOBS &TM 2 53;
Bristol Aeroplane Co., Ltd. )

T purpose of this Invstihgation was tonaecertbain if

metallic inerr are automatic welding machine for
welding magneslum-zirconium alloys compared with
a fixed tungsten electrode for the same purpose, the
are rn the latter case being struck between the fixed
electrode and the workpiece, the filler rod being
automatically fed to the weld pool*


N-26957*

National Ga Tlurbine Establishment (GL. Brit. )
SOME TESTS ON A HIGH EFFICIENCY AIR
CLEANER. D. R. Whittet. Juy1953. 22p.
dagrs. (NGE R. 189

Some tests have been conducted on a special form of
Corttrell precipitator in which a moving film of
water forms the receiving electrode. Thle per-
formance of the cleaner at differing conditions of air
velocity, apphed voltage, wire diameter, tube dia-
meter, and tube length was exained. The teasts
were made in an effort to find a cleaner for use in
reducing the rate of blade fouig in axidal com.
pressors where they operate in indutral atmos-
pheres.


N-27000

National Gas Turbine Establishment (Gt. Brit. )
THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TH1E CREEP AND
TENSILE PROPERTIES AT ELEVATED TEMPERA-
TURE OF NIMONIC 80 II. K. F. A. Walles and
A. Grahamr. June 195S3. 25p. diagrs., 3 tabs.
(NGTE R. 137)

The results of a few experiments on creep recovery
enable the arguments of Report No. R. 100 to bte ex-
tended. A nwform of time-temperature variable is
proposed which, without change of constants, satis-
factorily coordinates N. P. L. and Mond-Nickel
long-time creep data on Nimonic 80, N. G.T. E.
short-time ereep tests on Nimonic 80 drawn from
store, and Mond-Nickel long-time data for an early
heat of Nimonic80A. Apart from this improvement,
the situation previously reported is not affected.
Support is given for the Andrade formula for creep.


MISCELLANEOUS


NACA TN 2968

Errata No. 1 on "PROPELLER-NOISE CHARTS FOR
TRANSOR AIRPLANES. Harvey H.. Hubbard.
Jun 1953.






NAGA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO.53

N-25854*

Advisory Group for Aeronautical Research and
Development. METHODS USED BY NACA O3R
DATA REDUCTION. Ira H. Abbott. (Presented at
Home AGARD conference, December 12-19, 1952)
17p. diagrs., photos. (Advisory Group for Aeronau-
tical Research and Development. AG3/M2)

This paper is a survey of various methods of data
reduction used by the NACA Laboratories.



DECLASSIFIED NACA REPORTS


NACA RM A7110

INVETITGATION OF WING CHARACTERISTICS AT A
MACH NUMBER OF 1.53. I TRIANGULAR WINGS
OF ASPECT RATIO 2. Walter G. Vincenti, Jack N.
Nielsen and Frederick H. Matteson. December 19,
1947. 83p. diagre., photos., lab. (NACA RM A7110)
(Declassified from Confidential, 10/5/53)

Measurements of lift, drag, and pitching moment at
Md = 1.53 are described for three sharp-edged wing
models having a triangular plan form of aspect ratio
2 and a common thickness ratio of 5 percent but
varying in thickness distribution and camber. The
experimental techniques are discussed and the re-
sults compared with the predictions of the Uinear
theory.


NACA RM A8EO5

INVESTIGATION OF WING CHARACTERISTICS AT
A MACH NUMBER OF 1.53. II SWEPT WINGS OF
TAPER RATIO 0.5. Walter G. Vincenti, Milton D.
Van Dyke and Frederick H. Matteson. June 28,
1948. 56p. diagrs., photos., 2 tabs. (NACA
RM A8EO5) (Declassified from Confidential,
10/5/53)

Measured values of lift, drag, and pitching moment at
MoI = I.53 are presented for seven wings varying in
sweep angle from 60o sweepforward to 60o e"'"p"
back. All wings had a cambered, double-wedge sec-
tion 5-percent thick and a common taper ratio of 0.5-
The experimental results are compared with the
predictions of the linear theory.


NACA RM A8EO6

INVESTIGATION OF WING CHARACTERISflCS AT A
MACH NUMBER OF 1.53. EI UNSWEPT WINGS
OF DIFFERING ASPECT RATIO AND TAPER RATIO.
Jack N. Nielsen, Frederick H. Matteson and Walter
G. Vincents. June21, 1948. 64p. diagrs., photoo.,
tab. (NACA RM A8E06) (Declassified from
Confidential, 10 '5/53)

Measured values of lift, drag, and pitching moment at
M = 1.53 are presented for seven unswept winged
varying an aspect ratio from I to 6 and In taper ratio
from 0 to 1. All wings had an isosceles-triangle
section 5-percent thick. The experimental results
are compared with the predictions of linear theory.


NACA RM L6J01a

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECTS OF SWEEP
ON THE CHARACTERISTICS OF A HIGH-ASPECTZ-
RATIO WING IN THE LANGLEY 8-FO(10 HIGH-
SPEED TUNNEL. Richard T. Whitcomb.
February 14, 1947. 74p. diagrs., photos., 4 tabs.
(NACA RM L6J01a) (Declassified from Restricted,
8/14/'53)

An untwisted wing, which when unswept has an NACA
65-210 section, an aspect ratio of 9.0 and a taper
ratio of 2.5:1.0, has been tested with no sweep, and
),Oo and 45 oh uniepbackend swee foneadlin con-
from 0.60 to 0.96 at angles of attack generally be-
tween -2o and 100 in the Langley 8-foot high-speed
tunnel. Sweep was obtained by rotating the wring
semispans about a point in the plane of symmetry.
The normal-force, pitching-moment, profile-drag,
and loading characteristics for the wings have been
obtained from pressure measurements and wake
surveys.

NACA RM L6J16

DRAG CHARACTERISTICS OF RECTANGULAR AND
SWEPT-BACK NACA 65-000 AIRFOHB~ HAVING
ASPECT RATIOS OF 1.5 AND 2.7 AS DETERMINED
BY FLIGHT TESTS AT SUPERSONIC SPEEDS.
Sidney R. Alexander and Ellis Kats. February 24,
1947. 19p, diagrs., photos. (NACA RM L6Jl6)
(Declassified from Confidential, 10/21/53)

Tests were conducted to determine the effect of
sweepback angle and aspect ratio on the drag of an
NACA 65-000 airfoil at sup~ersonic speeds. The data
were obtained by tracking rocket-propelled bodies
carrying wings of various plan forms. The following
wing arrangements were investigated: (a) aspect
ratio of 1.5, sweepback angles of 00, 34o, 450, and
52o, and (b) aspect ratio of 2.7, sweepback angles of
00, 34o, and 450


NACA RM L6J16a

FLIGHT TESTS TO DETERMINE THE EFFECT OF
LENGTH OF A CONICAL WINDSHIELD ON THE
DRAG OF A BLUFF BODY AT SUPERSONIC
SPEEDS. Sidney R. Alexander and Ellis Katz.
January 29, 1947. 13p. diagrs., photo. (NACA
RML L6J16a) (Declassified from Confidential,
10/21/'53)

Flight tests have been conducted to determine the
effect of length of a conical windshield on the drag of
a bluff body moving at supersonic speeds. A
comparison is made between results thus obtained
(for a 3-inch windshield) and the results of previous
drag tests of body-windshield combinations (for
windshields of 0, 1-inch, and 10-inch length).


NACA RM L6K08a

RESULTS OF TESTS TO DETERMINE THE EFFECT
OF A CONICAL WINDSHIELD ON THE DRAG OF A
BLUFF BODY AT SUPERSONIC SPEEDS. Sidney R.
Alexander. January 14, 1947. 12p. diagre.,
photos. (NACA RM L6KOBa) (Declassified from
Confidential, 10/21,'53)







SNACA
RESEARCH ABSTRACTS NO.ga

NACA RM LTD21

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE LATERAL-CONTROL
CHARACTERISTICS OF SPOILERS ON A HIGH-
ASPECT -RATIO WING OF NACA 65-210 SECTION
IN THE LANGLEY 8-FO(YI HIGH-8PEED TUNNEL.
Arvo A.Luoma. June 24, 1947. 1pQ. diare.,
photos., 2 tabs. (NACA RM LTD21) (DeclassifMe
from Restricted, 10/21/53)

A three-dimensional lateral-control investigation was
made of 3- and 6-percent-chord spoilers projecting
on the upper surface of a wing of high-aspect ratio.
The spoilers were located ahead of conventional 0.20-
chord straight-sided-profile plain allerons and tests
were made with the spoilers at the 60- and 70-
percent-chord locations. Ailerons and spoilers had
the same span of 37I.5-percent wing semispan. Span-
wiee loadings and moments and rolling-moment
coefficients were determined from pressure distribu-
tion measurements. Hinge-moment data for the
conventional aileron were obtained by an electrical
strain gage. Data were obtained for Mach numbers
up to 0.925.

NACA RM LTIl5

HIGH -SPE ED WIND -T UNNE L INVESTIGATION OF
THE LATERAL CONTROL CHARACTERIBTEICB OF
PLAIN AILERONS ON A WING WIH VARIOUS
AMOUNTS OF SWEEP. Arvo A. Luoma, Ralph P.
Blelat and Richard T. Whitcomb. December 19,
1594. 67p. diargra., tabs. (NACA RM LTI5)
(Declassified from Restricted, 10/2a1/53)

Rolling-moment, wing normal-force, wing pitching-
moment, and aileron hinge-moment coefficients are
presented from tests of straight-sided profile plain
allerons on a wing with 300 and 450 of sweepback an
sweeplorward for allleron deflections from -100 to
100 at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 0.96. In general,
300 of sweep reduced the large changes of rolling-
and aileron hinge-moment coefficients observed on an
unswept wing and delayed the speed at which such
changes occurred. With 4150 of sweep, these a ~-
acterletice were not materially changed over the
peed range covered.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


8 3 126 0815 25 9
Tests have been conducted to determine the effect of
a conical windshield on the drag of a bluff body at
supersonic speeds. The following configuration
were Investigated: a sharp-nose fuselage with
stabihizing fins, a blunt-nose fuselage obtained by
rounding off the sharp nose to a hemispherical
shape, and a blunt-nose fuselage with a conical
piet irwindsh ied having dhrusame nose angle
same position.

NACA RM L7Bl2

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE DOWNWASH AT THE
PROBABLE TAI LOCATION BEHIND A HIGH-
ASPECT-RATIO WING IN THE LANGLEY 8-FOOT
HIGH-SPEED TUNNEL. Richard T. Whitcomb.
April 22, 1947. 12p. diagrs. (NACA RM L7B12)
(Declassified from Restricted, 10. 21 53)

Downwash angles have been measured behind a model
of a high-aspect-ratio wing at points near the proba-
ble tail location at Mach numbers up to 0.89 in the
Langley 8-foot high-speed tunnel. The model has an
NACA 65-210 section, an aspect ratio of 0.0, a
taper ratio of 2.5:1, no twist, dihedral, or sweep-
back.

NACA RM L7Bl9

RESULTS OF FLIGHT TESTS AT SUPERSONIC
SPEEDS TO DETERMINE THE EFFECT OF BODY
NOSE FINENESS RATIO ON BODY AND WING DRAG.
Ellis R. Katz. June 26, 1947. 14lp. diagrs., photo.
(NACA RM L7Bl9) (Declasedied from Confidential,
10 /21, 53)

Flight tests of rocket-powered models at supersonic
speeds have been made to determine the effect of
nose fineness ratio of winged bodies on total and
component drag at high Mach numbers. Wingless
models of three nose fineness ratios and winged
models of twoe nose fineness ration were flown
through a Mach number range up to 1.4,

NACA RM L7DO2

FREE-FLIGHT INVESTIGATION OF CONTROL
EFFECTIVENESS OF FULL-SPAN 0. 2-CHORD
PLAIN AILERONS AT HIGH SUBSONIC, TRANSONIC,
AND SUPERSONIC SPEEDS TO DETERMINE SOME
EFFECTS OF SECTION THICKNESS AND WING
SWEEPBACK. Carl A. Sandahl and Alfred A.
Marino. May 29, 1947. 14p. diagra., photos., tab.
(NACA RM LTD02) (Declassified form Confidential,
10/21 53)

A rocket-propelled test vehicle to be need in an
experimental investigation of aerodynamic control
effectiveness at high subsonic, transonic, and super-
sonic speeds has been developed. The test vehicle
(RM-5) and the Instrumentation are described and
the first data obtained are presented. These data
indicate some of the effects of section thickness
ratio and wing aweepback on the rolling effectiveness
of plain full-span 0.2-chord ailerons deflected 5o


'NACA-Langley 28-2-58 6M




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ED7V4VF44_97WFH3 INGEST_TIME 2012-03-02T22:16:36Z PACKAGE AA00009235_00014
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES