National apprenticeship standards : photoengravers, commercial establishments

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Material Information

Title:
National apprenticeship standards : photoengravers, commercial establishments
Physical Description:
25 p. : ; 20 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
American Photoengravers Association
International Photo Engravers' Union of North America
Publisher:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Edition:
1953 ed.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Apprentices -- United States   ( lcsh )
Photoengraving -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
Statement of Responsibility:
Formulated by the American Photoengravers Association and the International Photoengravers' Union of North America in cooperation with U.S. Dept of Labor, Bureau of Apprenticeship.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004975555
oclc - 26734321
lccn - l 53000162
System ID:
AA00009222:00001


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4. COMMERCIAL Bss


FORMULATED BY THE AMERICAN PHOTOENGRAVERS ASSOCIATION AND THE
INTERNATIONAL PHOTO-ENGRAVERS' UNION OF NORTH AMERICA
in cooperation with
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR BUREAU OF APPRENTICESHIP WASHINGTON, D. C.


1953 Edition

















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UNIV. OF FL Lia.
DOCUEN8 DEPT

MAR 5 -


U.S. DEPOdlTORY


Executive Council Interna-
tional Photo-Engravers'
Union of North America
EDWARD J. VOLz, President
MATTHEw WOLL, ist Vice President
FRED R. BALLBACH, 2d V'ice President
FRANK D. SMIT'H, jd Vice Presidelt
WILF;RID T. CONN ELL, 4th V'ice President
WILLIAhI H. GRAF, 5thi Vice President
HENRY F. SCHMIALL, Secretary-Treasurrer
JUNE IO, 1949


Americarn Photoengravers
Association


W. K. JAMIES, President
D. H. MURNIK, Ist V'ice President
PETER SCHOTANUS, 2d V'ice President
C. G. ROHRICH, SecrePtarr-Treasur~er
FRANK J. SCHRl BE R, Executivle Secretary
Execurtive Committee M~embers:
JOSEPH ROSENBERG
RICHARD DANZ
R. C. WALKER
EVERETT BIERMIAN
A. P. REGITZ
JUNE IO, I949


Program registered as incorporating
the basic standards of the
FEDERAL COMMITTEE ON APPRENTICESHIP


U. S. Department of Labor
MLARnN P. DURKIN, Secr~etary
Bureau of Apprenticeship
W. F. PATTERSON, DireOto


APPROVED BY








































Digitized by the Inlernel Archive
in 2011 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries with support from LYRASIS and the Sloan Foundation


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FOREWORD

In view of the high quality workmanship required in the photoen-
graving industry and the necessity to maintain at all times an adequate
force of thoroughly trained craftsmen, the national standards of appren-
ticeship jointly sponsored and formulated by the American Photoen-
gravers Association and the International Photo-Engravers Union of
North America should meet a long-felt need.
The comprehensive, carefully planned standards adopted, which
are based on the long experience of employers and labor in training
apprentices in the wide variety of operations in the craft, should prove
indispensable as a pattern in every locality in establishing uniform, well
organized apprenticeship programs. The expansion of apprentice
training activities resulting will, I am sure, be invaluable to the photo-
engraving industry in building up and maintaining an ample supply of
competent, versatile craftsmen; and will provide opportunities for
careers in a highly skilled occupation to the young men selected for the
thorough training assured under the programs established.


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A GUIDE IN ESTABLISHING
LOCAL APPRENTICESHIP SYSTEMS

The Art Preservative of All Arts-Printing-requires, among other
processes, photoengraving. This important part of allowing the people
to see as well as read requires workmen of the greatest skills. These
skills have been acquired and passed on from one workman to another
over the years. This method of acquainting new people in the industry
with the intricacies of the photoengraving trade is called apprenticeship.
The need for closer attention to the apprenticeship within the photo-
engraving industry is recognized by the memberships of the American
Photoengravers Association and the International Photo-Engravers'
Union of North America. Consequently, these two organizations have
joined cooperatively in the development of these National Standards of
Apprenticeship.
It is the intent of the organizations that this document be recognized
and used as a guide in the development of highly skilled journeymen
through the methods of apprenticeship in local communities.
It is hoped this system and basic fundamentals can be followed in all.
communities. This is suggested with recognition that each and every
community is different and each and every plant is somewhat different.
Adjustments to meet local conditions can readily be made by a Joint
Apprenticeship Committee of employees and employers who are famil-
iar with such conditions.












NATIONAL APPRENTICESHIP STANDARDS

for COMMERCIAL ESTABLISHMENTS in

THE PHOTOENGRAVING INDUSTRY



DEFINITIONS

The term "Employer" shall mean any employer who subscribes to
the terms and conditions of standards prescribed by the Local Joint
Apprenticeship Committee and who has the facilities and equipment
to properly train apprentices.
The term "Union" shall mean any Local Union of the International
Photo-Engravers' Union of North America.
The term "Apprentice" shall mean a person who has signed an
Apprenticeship Agreement with an employer to learn the photo-
engraving trade as outlined in these standards.
The term "Apprenticeship Agreement" shall mean a written agree-
ment between an employer and the person employed as an apprentice,
which agreement shall be registered by the Registration Agency.
The term "Committee" shall mean the Local Joint Apprenticeship
Committee usually composed of three members representing the em-
ployer and three members representing the Union, plus one alternate
member from each group to act in the absence of a regular member
and the alternate shall be privileged to attend all meetings of the Com-
mittee.
The term "Registration Agency" shall mean the State Apprenticeship
Council, or in States where there are no councils, the Bureau of
Apprenticeship, United States Department of Labor.
The term "Standards" shall mean the Apprenticeship Training
System.

ORGANIZATION OF THE COMMITTEE

The Committee shall determine the time and place of regular meet-
ings, or meet on call of the Chairman, who shall be required to issue
such call upon request of any two members of the Committee.







The Committee shall establish such rules and policies governing its
administrative procedure as are required.
Consultants-The Committee will utilize the services of individuals
and representatives of agencies or organizations specializing in appren-
ticeship.
DUTIES OF THE COMMITTEE

A. To determine the shop facilities available for acquiring the neces-
sary experience on the job.
B. To establish minimum standards required for shop experience and
related instruction for apprentices.
C. To establish standards for appraisals to determine progress of ap-
prentices in manipulative skills and technical knowledge.
D. To establish standards for examination of apprentices, and upon ap-
prentices passing such examination to recommend to the Registra-
tion Agency that Certificates of Completion of Apprenticeship be
awarded.
E. To prepare standards and agreements for submission to the Regis-
tration Agency.
F. To maintain a record-keeping system showing the progress of each
apprentice at his work on the job and in his related instruction, and
any other records that the Committee shall decide to keep.
G. In general, to be responsible for the successful operation of photo-
engraving apprenticeship under these standards, by performing the
duties listed above, by cooperating with public and private agencies
which can be of assistance, by obtaining publicity in order to develop
the support and interest of the public in apprenticeship and by keep-
ing in touch with all parties concerned.

QUALIFICATIONS FOR APPRENTICESHIP

Applicants for a photoengraving apprenticeship, not heretofore con-
nected with the trade, must be at least 18 years of age; provided, the
Committee may make exceptions to this age limit in exceptional and
unusual cases.
Education: Each applicant should have a high school education or
its equivalent; provided, the Committee may make exceptions to this
requirement for applicants who are war veterans, those with unusual
aptitude, previous experience, or other qualifications acceptable to the
Committee. The applicant should furnish the employer and the Com-
mittee a transcript of his high school courses and grades, if available,
for review.
Physical examination: Each applicant shall furnish the Committee
evidence of having passed an examination of physical fitness.






Applicants having experience in the trade may be admitted to ad-
vanced standing when they demonstrate their qualifications for such
credit in a manner satisfactory to the Committee.

TERM\I OF APPRENTICESHIP

The term of apprenticeship shall not be less than 5 years.

PROBATIONARY PERIOD

Apprentices shall be subject to a probationary period not exceeding 3
months of employment. During this probationary period cancellation
of the apprenticeship agreement will be made by the Committee upon
request of either party, but due notice shall be given the Registration
Agency.
CONTINUITY OF EMPLOYMENT

It shall be the duty and responsibility of the employer to provide,
insofar as possible, continuous employment for all apprentices.

APPRENTICESHIP AGREEMENT

All accepted applicants for apprenticeship shall sign an apprenticeship
agreement (countersigned by parent or guardian if a minor), which
shall also be signed by the employer and others if so decided by the
Joint Apprenticeship Committee. Every apprenticeship agreement
entered into under an apprenticeship should contain a clause making
the standards a part of the agreement with the same force and effect
as if written therein. For this reason every interested party shall be
furnished with a copy of the standards and given an opportunity to
read them before the agreement is signed. The number of copies of
an agreement to be signed shall be determined by the Joint Apprentice- ;i
ship Comm~ittee who shall also decide how they are to be distributed.

IDENTIFICATION OF APPRENTICES

Each apprentice, upon signing an apprenticeship agreement, shall be
furnished with an identification card.

WORK EXPERIENCE
During his apprenticeship the apprentice shall receive such instruc-
tion and experience in the photoengraving process as is necessary to
develop a practical and skilled craftsman, versed in the theory and







practices of the craft. He shall also perform such other duties as are
commonly related to a photoengraving apprenticeship. The apprentice
shall have the right to appeal to the Committee if, in his opinion, he is
being given insufficient or improper training. It shall be the duty of
the Committee to arrange such adjustments as it deems necessary.
The agreement form furnished by the Registration Agency may be used
and shall include the schedule of processes.
The trade of Photoengraving embraces separate branches, any and
all of which are recognized as apprenticeable and require a minimum
of 5 years to learn. These apprenticeship standards take within their
scope these branches which are as follows: Photographing, stripping,
etching-copper and zinc, finishing, routing, blocking, proofing, tint-
laying, masking, and such other branches of work as may be employed.
Apprentices under agreement to learn any one of the above branches
of the trade will be taught how to perform all phases of work inI that
branch as well as a theoretical knowledge of the other branches suf-
ficient to enable the apprentice to understand then.
Following is a break-down of the work processes that come within
the scope of each branch. The apprentice shall receive instruction in
all phases of the trade sufficient to insure him of becoming a competent
craftsman at the completion of his apprenticeship. Howrever, in de-
veloping work processes, consideration should be given to the type of
work being done and the facilities available for training. The follow-
ing work processes will be taught apprentices but not necessarily in.
this order:
PHOTOGRAPHER


Work experiences to be learned
on the job
Camera operation.
Camera preparation.
Copy preparation.
Preparation of sheet film and roll film.
Light adjustments.
Camera adjustments.
Making of line and halftone negatives
using film, wet plate and dry plate.
Use of screens and filters.
Mixing and use of chemicals.
Use of light meters.
Dark-room developing.
Care and handling of film and nega-
tives.
Making color process negatives--from
Kodachrome, Carbro prints, and Illus-
Vtraons.
Drop-out and stunt photography.
Making highlight overlays and masks.
Reworking poor and damaged negatives.


Related instrction in and outc
of plant
General fundamental knowledge of all
processes in all branches of photoen-
graving.
Study of manufacturers' manuals and
data on camera, film, emulsionrs, and
plates.
Studying formulas anrd proper mixing
of chiemicals. Camera adjustments
and finished results.
Length of expsure and development.
Types of films used
Types of screens used.
Care of screens.
Types of filters.
Care of art work and copy.
Knowledge of copy and color values.


253071 "---533 --2






PHOTOGRAPHER--ContinUCCI


W~ork experiences to be learned
on the job
Rudiments of stripping, printing, and
etching.


Related instruction in and out
of plant
Working with journeymen in these
branches to evaluate a keener sense of
photo-mechanical science.


STRIPPER-PRINTER


Use of printing frames.
Use of arc lamps.
Use of plate wvhirler.
Preparation of wret plate, emulsion, and
film.
Setting up nonstrip film.
Cutting and squaring of negatives.
Stripping straight flats.
Stripping combinations.
Stripping for double prints or surprints.
Stripping to register with ov~erlay~s or
blue prints.
ia~king blue prints.
Opaquing for drop-outs.
Opaquing for color separation.
Mixing enamnels and ink print solutions.
Preparation of copper and zinc for
coating.
Coating and whirling metals.
Printing straight flats.
Printing double prints and printing-in
tmnts.
Developing of exposed zinc and copper
plates.
Drying and burning of coatings.
Contact printing of glass negatives on
metal.
Rudiments of photography, copper
etching, and zinc etching.


General fundamental knowledge of all
processes in all branches of photo-
engraving.
Study~ of manufacturers' manuals and
data on lamps, whirler, printing
frames, films and plates.


Study of basic characteristics of copper
and zinc.
Use and care of opaquing brushes and
solutions.

Knowledge of arc lamps.
Length of: exposure time and results.
Knowledge of enamels and printing
sol utions.
Methods of cleaning glass and metals.


Working with journeymen in
branches to evaluate a keener
of photo-mechanical science.


these
sense


ZINC ETCHER


Judging negatives.
Preparation of plate for etching.
Preparation of: acid for etching.
Checking prints to determine satisfac-
tory for etching.
Painting up solids and dead metal.
Application of topping powYder.
Burning in, painting, and cooling of
zinc plates.
Use of etching machines.
Etching in tub and machine--line, half-
tone, and Ben Day.
Scum removal.
Polishing plates.
Painting up for drop-outs.


Fundamnental knowledge of all branches
of photoengraving and all processes.
Study manufacturers' manuals and data
on metals and etching solutions.


Judging tonal values of tints and
highlights.
Problems of shrinkage and undercutting
and reasons to avoid.



Basic knowledge of painting solutions.
Information on methods of saving plates
partially etched.







ZINC ETCHER -ontinued


Work experiences to be learned
on the job
Re-etching.
Making zinc halftones.
Burning in and etching combination
copper plates.
Rudiments of photography, stripping,
printing, and finishing.


Related instrruction in and out
of plant

Safety information.


Working with journeymen in these
branches to evaluate a keener sense of
photo-mechanical science.


COPPER ETCHER


Analyzing print on metal for the proper
etching for tone and depth,
Cleaning plates.
Preparation of plates for etching, remov-
ing scum, etc.
Staging.
Spotting and retouching.
Use of hydrometer.
Judgment of negatives.
Care and use of electric etching ma-
chines.
Preparation of etching solutions.
Stopping-out unetched portions of plates.
Flat etching for depth and tone.
Dipping plates.
Brushing plates.
Action of chemicals and acids.
Determine time needed in solution.
Determine proper depth and size of dot.
Burning in enamels.
Removal of shoulders.
Use of magnesium chalk to determine
tonal value.
Staging for tone values and tone sepa-
ration.
Use of crayon.
Blending edges.
Burning-in of enamels.
Use of chalk remover solution.
Short etch bath.
Fine etching of highlights.
Etching for proper color values of color
process plates.
Rolling up plates for re-etching.
Rudiments of photography, stripping,
printing, and proofing.


Knowledge of various types of plates,
sizes and gage.
Study of manufacturers' manuals and
data on copper and etching machines.
Knowledge of chemical formulas and
uses.
Causes of scum and elimination.




Etching solutions, their characteristics
and graded strength.
Etching by multiple bath.
Measuring instruments and their use.






Proper use and care of staging brushes.
Proper use of crayon to produce hard
and soft effects.
Study' of plates relative to copy.
Judging for tonal value, highlights, and
color value.






Working with journeymen in these
branches to evaluate a keener sense
of photo-mechanical science.


FINISHER


General knowledge of all processes in
all branches of photoengraving.
Methods of sharpening tools and how
to properly care for them.


Care and sharpening of tools.
Selection of proper tool.
Checking etched plates with
copy.


original '







FINISHER --ontinued


Worle experinces to be learned
on the job
Trimming line plates.
Repairing damaged plates.
Removing imperfections from halftone
plates,
Trimming copper plates.
.Burnishing.
Removal of enamel from plates.
Outlining.
Draw tooling and ruling.
Use of screen tools and cross liners.
VTignetting.
Transferring and cutting for register.
Re-engraving.
Finishing color process plates to various
publication standards.
Rudiments of photography, etching and
proofing.


Related insturuction in and out
of plant


Operation of hand press for transferring
and cutting.
Study information on all types of metal
used in plant.

Publication specifications and color se-
quences.






Working with journeymen in these
branches to evaluate a keener sense of
photo-mechanical science.


TINT LAYER (Ben Day)


Use and care of Ben Day screens.
Cleaning and preparation for mechanical
dot application.
Checking prints with copy.
Painting in.
Gumming and opaquing.
Tint layling.
Tint removing.
Analysis of tonal values to be applied
to plate for best practical printing
results.
Applying Ben Day screens and other
shading mediums to secure tone
values required.
Care and use of rollers used in inking
screen.
Further skill in application of Ben Day
screens and other shading mediums
for faster operation.
Ben Day tint laying on proper angle in
two or more colors.
Reversing prints.
Rudiments of stripping, printing and
proofing.


Knowledge of Ben Day screens and pos-
sible uses.
Knowledge of tone values and their
relations.
Knowledge of color values and best
uses.

Types and proper use of brushes and
inks for painting up.







Fundamental knowledge of all processes
of all branches of photoengraving.




Working with journeymen in these
branches to evaluate a keener sense of
photo-mechanical science.


ROUTER AND BLQCKER


Knowledge of all types of
machines, planers, saws,
machines and cutting tools.


Operation and care of equipment.
Sharpening and resetting tools.
Routing zinc.


rou ting
beveling







ROUTER AND~I BLOCKER--CO Onllned


WEork exper-iencPs to be learned
on the job
Beveling and lining plates.
Making tint blocks.
Routine copper, brass and other alloys.
Patching various plates.
Soldering and welding.
Mounting line and halltone plates.
Assembling plates on blocks.
Registering color plates on blocks.
Squaring and trimming blocks planing
for tylpe high.
Soldering and patching.


Rudiments of etching and finishing.


Related inslruction in and outr
of plant
Knowledge of zinc and working qual-
ities.
Kinow\ledge of metals used and welding
qualities.

Study requirements of different mechan-
ical standards by publications.
Study of manufacturers' manuals on
machines and metals.
Types of nailing machines.
Types of woods and care in handling
and storage.
Study of other types of mounting.
Working wsith journeymen in these
branches to evaluate a keener sense of
photo-mechanical science.


PROOFER
Study of manufacturers' manuals on
presses, paper, and inks.
Tytpes of inks and paper.
Publication specifications.
Proper packing for press.


Operation and care of presses.
Care of rollers and printing inks.
Use of overlays and underlays.
Checking proofs with copy'.
Single color proofing.


Color proofing and ink sequences.
Registering plates on and off the block.
Marking proofs for re-etching and addi-
tional finishing.
Mixing and matching colors.
Proofing of process color plates--mount-
ed and unmounted with bearers.
Making and use of friskets and masks.



Rudiments of etching, finishing and
final printing.


Relation of various papers and various
types of ink.
Transparent and opaque printing inks.


Study of color and color values.
Amount and ty'pe of inks for best results.
Specifications and color sequences for
wet and dry proofs.
Study and full observance of publication
standards.
Working with journeymen in these
branches to evaluate a keener sense of
photo-mlechanical science.


RE LAT ED I INSTRUCTION

Where possible and practical, provision shall be made for schoolroom
instruction of apprentices. Each apprentice shall enroll and atterid
classes not less than '44 hours per year. Time spent in related instruc-
tion shall not be classed as hours of work.
Where no suitable classroom instruction is available or where the
number of apprentices is not adequate, the necessary technical instruc-
tion will be provided apprentices on the job during the term of
apprenticeship.






The Committee shall cooperate upon request with educational au-
thorities in working out courses of study for the apprentices.
The most recent technical publication on photoengraving is Modern
Photoengraving by Flader and Mertle, both of whom are well known
in the industry. In this book there is reference to a number of other
publications dealing with the technical phases of photoengraving.
The use of all such publications will be found useful for text and
reference material for those engaged in the photoengraving industry.
The local standards should provide:
In case of failure on the part of any apprentice to fulfill his obliga-
tions as to school attendance, the Committee may suspend or cancel his
agreement; and
The employer agrees to carry out the instructions of the Committee
in this respect, and the apprentice and his parent or guardian agree to
abide by any such determination of said Committee; and
Each apprentice shall be requested to present his registration and
school attendance record as evidence of faithful performance of duty.
This record shall be presented to the Committee before each promotion
period.
INSTRUCTORS

Apprentices shall be supervised at school by such staff as the educa-
tional authorities may provide for them.
The Committee shall recommend the names of men who, in their
opinion, are qualified to instruct the apprentice classes, as a means of
assisting in the selection of an instructor.

PERIODIC EXAMIIINATIONS

An examination of apprentices shall be given at such times as are
determined by the Committee. In these examinations consideration
shall be given to school attendance and daily employment records of
the apprentice.
HOURS OF WORK

Work hours for apprentices shall be the same as for the journeymen
of the craft who are employed in the shop, and they shall be subject
to the other general conditions of employment applicable to journey-
men.
WNAGE RATES

Apprentice wage rates shall be in accostlance with collective bargain-
ing agreements where such apply. In other instances apprentice wage
rates shall be in accordance with standards prevailing in the industry
in the particular section involved.






RATIO OF APPRENTICES TO JOURNEYMEN

In establishments covered by bargaining agreements the apprentice
ratio contained therein shall apply; in other cases the Commlittee shall
determine the ratio in accordance with that generally recognized in
the locality involved.

SUPERVISION

The Committee and the employer shall cooperate in designating a
particular person (this may be shop superintendent, foreman, or a
journeyman) to be known as Supervisor of Apprentices. H-e shall be
responsible for carrying out the apprenticeship and, in collaboration
with the foreman, shall arrange for apprentices to be moved from one
process to another so they may be given all-around work experience.

GRANTING OF CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION OF
APPRENTICESHIP

The Committee will request the Registration Agency to award Cer-
tificates of Completion of Apprenticeship to apprentices who success-
fully complete the apprenticeship, pass all tests and otherwise fulfill
the requirements of these standards.

ADJ USTM\IENIT OF; DIFFERENCES

Any disagreement between the parties hereto shall be referred to the
Committee whose decision shall be final and conclusive. It is under-
stood this provision applies to apprenticeship problems only.

MODIFICATION OF STANDARDS

These standards may be modified at any time by action of the Com-
mittee, subject to approval by participating parties. Such modifications
shall not alter apprenticeship agreements in effect at the time of the
change without the express consent of the parties to such agreements.
Such modifications are to be approved by the Registration Agency.

BARGAINING AGREEMENT

These standards are signed with the understanding that if any dif-
ference with the bargaining agreement and these standards should
arise, the bargaining agreement shall be pa amount.







APPRENTICESHIP AGREEMENT veteran: Yes ...... No ...
V. A. No ................
Between Apprentice and Employer P. L. 16 .... P. L. 346 ...
Married .... Single ....
(Front View) Number of dependents .....

THIS AGREEM~ENT, entered into this ........ day of .............., 19....
between .. ... .. .. .. ... .. .. .., hereinafter termed the EMPLOYER, and
(Name of employer)
.... .... .... ... ...., born ................................, hereinafter
(Name of appren rice) (Mlonth) (Day) (Year)
termed the APPRENTICE, and (if a minor), .. .............
(Name of parent or guardian)
hereinafter referred to as the GUARDIAN.
WITNESSETH THAT: The EMPLOYER agrees to employ and train the APPREN-
TICE, and the APPRENTICE agrees to apply himself diligently and faithfully to
the work of the trade named herein during the period of apprenticeship, in ac-
cordance with the terms and conditions of the. ................... ...........
(Name of Apprenticeship Standards)
incorporated in and made a part of this agreement; or, as covered by the terms and
conditions on the reverse side of this agreement.
Trade ........................... ,Term of apprenticeship.........
(Hours or years)
Credit for previous trade training or experience .. .. ... Apprenticeship remain-
(Hours or years)
;ng ......... Explanation, if any, of credit granted: ............
(Hours or years)
This agreement may be canceled at any time by either party thereto, by filing
notice of such cancellation and the reason therefor with the Registration Agency
named below.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereunto set their hands and seals:
... ... ... .. ... ... .... SEAL] ............................ [SEAL]
(Apprentice) (Name of employer-company)

(Address) (Address)
... ... ... ... ... ... ... [SEAL] ................... ......... IBBAL]
(Parent or guardian) (Authorized official)
Date ...................... Date. ............... ......
Approved by ............................ Joint Apprenticeship Committee, on
Date ................... by ... .. ..... ..........[SBAL]
(Chairman or secretary)
Registered by . .. .. .. .. .. .., on
(Name of Registration Agency)
Date ................... by .. . .. .. SBAL]

(Title)







APPRENTICESHIP AGREEMENT

Between Apprentice and Employer
(Back View)

TERMS AND CONDITIONS
1. Term of Apprenticeship and Period of Probation:
(a) Total term ...... calendar years, or (b) Probationary period,
...... hours ... months, or ... hours
2. Work of the Trade in Which the Appren tice Is To Recei ve Adequa tely Supervised
Instruction and Experience, of Which a Record Will Be Kept:
(a) LIST HERE: (b) LIST HEBRE:
Major processes, branches, or phase of Approximate time, in hosts, months, or
the trade to be taught apprientice: peren of apprenticeship:




3. Progressively Increasing Wage Scale To Be Paid the Apprentice:
(Scale may be expressed in money or percent dof ornya's rate)
1st 1,000 hours (6 months) ....... 7th 1,000 hours (6 months) ......
2d 1,000 hours (6 months) ....... 8th. 1,000 hours (6 months) ....,..
3d 1,000 hours (6 months) ......-. 9th 1,000 hours (6 months) .......
4th 1,000 hours (6 months) ....... 10th 1,000 hours (6 months) ..,.....
5th 1,000 hours (6 months) .,...... 11th 1,000 hours (6 months) .......
6th 1,000 hours (6 months) ....... 12th 1,00 hours (6 months) ,.......
Journeyman's rate as of .......... ................... .......... is $..,....
4. Number of Hours per Week or pe Day To Be Worked by thpe Apprentice :
(Actual overtime hours, if any, to be credited torar apprniehip term)
(a) Hours per week ....,........... (bi) H~ours per day ........
5. Number of Hours of Related Classroom Instruction:
(144 hours per year--4 hours per wee during regular school year, is normally considered
necessary. Where classes are not available through the local school, other trade, in-
dustrial, or correspondence core of equivalent value may be substituted)
(a) ........ week ........ year (b) School or course...........
6. Other Provisions:
(A Certificate of Completion wi'll be granted the apprentice by the Registration Agency
upon satisfactory completion of the apprenticeship, in accordance with standards
covered herein)








APPRENTICESHIP AGREEMENT

Between Apprentice and Joint Apprenticeship Committee

(Front View)

THIS AGREEMENT, entered into this ........ day of ............., 19...
between the parties to ............................ ... represented by the
(Name of local apprenticeship standards)
Joint Apprenticeship Committee, hereinafter referred to as the COMMITTEE, and
............ ...born ......... ............., hereinafter referred to as
(Name of apprentice) (Month) (Dayr) (Year)
thaeAPPRENTICE, and (if a minor) .. .. .. .. .. ...., herein after referred
(Name of parent or guardian)
to as his GUARDIAN.
WITNESSETH THA9T:
The Committee agrees to be responsible for the placement and training fsi
apprentice in the trade of .. .. .... .. .. as work is available, and in con
sideration said apprentice agrees diligently and faithfully to perform the work in-
cidental to the said trade during the period of apprenticeship, in accordance with
the regulations of the Committee. The Apprenticeship Standards referred to
herein are hereby incorporated in and made a part of this agreement.
Credit for previous experience Hours. .prni-si l~ig. ~ Hours.
at trade, if any........... ~Years. Years.
O their conditions . . . .


In witness whereof the parties hereunto set their hands and seals:
... ... ... ... ... ... ... [SEAL] ............ .... ........... [SEAL]
(Apprentice) (Representative ofJoint Appren-
.... ...... .... ...... ...ticeship Committee)
(Add ress) . .
........................... [snAx.] (Title)
(Parent or guardian) .. ..........
(Representative ofJoint Appren-
ticeship Committee)
....... ... ... ... ... ... [sEAL3
(Ti tle)
Registered by the . . . .
(Name of registration agency)
By ................ Title ................ Date ...................., 19...
Available through Bureau of Apprenticeship, U. S. Department of L~abor,
Washington, D. C.








APPRENTICESHIP AGREEMENT

Between Apprentice and joint Apprenticeship Committee

(Back View)
The undersigned agrees to provide employment and training in accordance with
standards named herein.

(Eployer)




(Address)

(Employer)

(Address)

(Employer)

(Address)


'15


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completed their tlainlng, 1I1e issrred by the Siate aPpret2ticeship agency or the Brrrerlu
of Apprenriceship in States in ruhich no such"agency is established.




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D. H MURNIK, FlrJlI 'Int-PrU,
PETER SCHlOTAUSur Stron drt.l mPMS
C. G. RoHPalon, Secy.-Trea.


A M ERICAN PHOTOENGRAVERS ASSOCIATION
CENERAL OFFICES 166 WEST VAN BUREN STREET CHIC~co 4 ILLIIYoss
w. K. JAMZs, Pridessl
29 North Such Stree
Phlldadlphia 6 Pa.




TO ALL EMPLOYERS IN THE PHOTOENGRAVING INDUSTRY:

The American Photoengravers Association has collabo-
rated with the International Photoengravers' Union
of North knerica in preparing National Standards of
Apprenticeship for the Commercial Photoengraving In-
dustry. The purpose of these National Standards is
to bring about some uniformity within the industry
on this important matter. It is anticipated that
these standards, as a guide, will be of assistance
to everybody concerned in the development of compe-
tent craftsmen to staff our plants.

Ours is an industry which involves, now more than
ever before, considerable investment in expensive
machinery, equipment and materials, and one in which
technological advancements are constantly taking
place. So that we mary operate our plants profitably
we must have proficient craftsmen to perform the
high skills of the trade. It is essential that both
employers and craftsmen keep abreast of the trends
in the industry so that we may uniformally produce
the high quality products demanded of us and requir-
ed by our customers.

We are convinced that a sound apprenticeship system
is necessary for our continued success and that the
establishment of such a system as outlined herein
will redound to the benefit of the Comrmercial Photo-
engraving Industry and every person employed in the
production of photoongravings for letterpress print-
ing.

Very truly yours,




Wallaston K., James, President




















EDWA~RD J. VOLE. Pnegroue
FItANK D SMIITH. asD WICE.PHEA.
WILFRID T. CONNLl..F. amo trIC.PMB.
WILLICM H1 GRAF. 471 Yres.PMLa.
NAJ AltTPHU REHAGE BTM( vic.Puag.
rrr~p710,HENRY F. SCHMAL. acC'V-THRAL


I gAl OFFICE OF PRESIDENT
292 MADISON AVENUE 0 e NEW YORK 17, N. V,
Og TELEPHONE LEXINGTON 2-4203


DRGANIZED DCT. 22. 1000


To Officers and Members of Local Unions,
International Photo-Engraversl Union of N.A.

Greetings:

May I again call attention to the NATIONAL APPRENITICESHIP
STANDAR~DB for the COMMGERCIAL BRANCHl of the PHIOTO-ENGRIAVING
INDUSTRY. These Standards were jointly fonaulated by the
Executive Commnittee of the American Photo Engravers Associ-
ation and the Executive Council of this International Union
in cooperation with the Bureau of Apprenticeship of the
United States Department of Labor, which has given its ap-
proval .

These are basic Standards and subject to modification thr~-
ough local agreement. They are presented for consideration
by local unions and employer groups in the industry inter-
ested in the adoption of joint apprentice-training programs.
Likewise in instances where previously accepted Standards
are to be reconsidered or revised.

The Standards as subrmitted, will where adopted prove a sound
and progressive procedure for apprentice training.

With best dishes, I remain

Fraternally yours,





Eduard J. Volz, President
EJV:MD' INERNEiATIONAL PHIOTO-ENGRiAVERtSI UNION OF N. A.
OEIU
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20


REGIONAL OFFICES
BU REAU OF A PPR ENTI CES HI'P
U. 5. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

For information regarding the services of field representatives of the Bureau of
Apprenticeship in the establishment of apprenticeship systems communicate with
the nearest office listed below:


REGION I
(Maine, New Ha mpsh ire, Vermont,
Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Con-
necticut)
Joseph E. Johnson, Regional Director,
Room 5or, I8 Oliver Street,
Boston Io, Mass.

REGION II
(New Y7uork, New Jersey)
Richard L. O'Hara, Regional Director,
Room r3 r8, 270 Broadway,
New York *;, N. Y.

REGION 1Ill

(Pennsyllvania, Delaware)
Thomas P. K~enney, Regional Director,
Room Sox, Lafayette Building,
437 Chestnut Street,
Philadelphia 6, Pa.

REGION IV
(Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia,
North Carolina, District of Columbia
Robert F. Handleyr, Regional Director,
101-I05 South Fifth Street,
Richmond, Va.

REGION V
(South Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia,
Mississippi, Florida, Alabama)
Charles N. Conner, Regional Director,
Room 657, Peachtree and Seventh Street
Building,
50 Seventh Street,
Atlanta 3, Ga.


REGION VI

(Ohio, Michigan, Kentucky)
John R. Newland, Regional Director,
Room 506, Ninth, Chester Building,
Cleveland I4, Ohio.

REGION VII

(Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin)
Cecil L. Utterback, Regional Director,
looo Bankers' Building,
lo5 West Adams Street,
Chicago 3, Ill.

REGION VII

(North Dakota, South Dakota, Minne-
sota, Montana)
John F. Barrett, Regional Director,
410 Northwestern Federal Building,
730 Hennepin Avenue,
Minneapolis 3, Minn.

REGION IX
(Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa)
Taylor F. Custer, Regional Director,
Room 1509, Federal Office Building,
91I Walnut Street,
Kansas City 6, Mo.

REGION X

(Louisiana, Texas, Oklahoma,
+ Arkansas)
Travis J. Lewis, Regional Director,
Room 520, Fidelity Building,
Dallas 2, Tex.







REGION XI


(Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, New
Mexico)

Clifford B. Noxon, Regional Director,
Room 4I2, N~ew Custom H-ouse,
19th and Stout Streets,
Denver 2, Colo.


(Arizona, Nevada, California)

Bronce R. Mathis, Regional Director,
Room 74o, Flood Building,
870 Market Street,
San Francisco 2, Calif.


Alaska:
Eugene W. Norton,
P. O. Box 322,
Anchorage, Alaska.


Hawaii:
Bernard P. NIrey,
339 Federal Building,
H~onolulu, T. HE-.


NATIONAL CONSULTANT ON
APPRENTICESHIP IN PHOTOENG;RAVING INDUSTRY

EDW. E. GOSHEN, Depu~ty Director
BUREAU OF" APPRENTICESHIP
U. S. Department of Labor
Washington, D). C.


REGION XII


REGION XIII

(Idaho, Wiashington, Oregon)

Walter E. Griffin, Regional Director,
Roomn 608, Federal Office Building,
Ist and Mtarion Streets,
Seattle 4, Wash.


TERRITORIAL REPRESENTATIVES

Bureau of Apprenticeship










John T. Weir, Secretary,
Arizona Apprenticeship Council,
Room 406, State Capitol Building,
Phoenix, Ariz.#
Archie J. Muooney, Chief,
Division of Apprenticeship Standards,
Department of Industrial Relations,
69 Ninth Street,
San Francisco, Calif.*
Thomas Yoczik, Chief,
Apprentice Training Division,
Department of Labor,
92 Farmington Avenue,
Hartford, Conn.
Gino Simi, Director,
D. C. Apprenticeship Council,
Room 4 16, Library Administration
Building,
Washington, D. C.*
R. G. Phifer, Executive Secretary,
Florida Apprenticeship Council,
Industrial Commission,
r 16 Caldwvell Building,
Tallahassee, Fla.*
Abner Deane,
Director of Apprenticeship,
Department of Labor and Industrial
Relations,
825 M~ililani Street,
Honolulu, T. H.#
M. L. Gilbert, Secretary,
lowa Apprenticeship Council,
Bureau of Labor,
State House,
Des Mioines, lowYa.
Leonard Williams, Acting Secretary,
Kansas Apprenticeship Council,
4ol Topeka Boulevard,
Topeka, Kans.
Edwin C. Willis, Chairman,
Kentucky Apprenticeship Council,

*State apprenticeship law enacted.


Department of Industrial Relations,
Frankfort, Ky.*
R. I. Conran,
Director of Apprenticeship,
Depa-rtment of Labor,
State Capitol,
Baton Rouge, La.#
Carl T. Russell, Secretary,
Main Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor and Industry.
VTickery~ and Hill Building,
Augusta, Maine.#
Hubert L. Connor, Director,
Division of Apprentice Training,
Department of Labor and Industries,
Roomn 3I2, 41 Tremont Street,
Boston, Mass.*
Frank G. Mlusala, Director,
Division of voluntary y Apprenticeship,
Department of Labor and Industry,
137 State Office Building,
St. Paul, M~inn.*
James F. O'Brien, Chairman,
Mlontana Apprenticeship Council,
Carpenters' Hall,
W~est Granite Street,
Butte, Mont.*
John H. Symonds, Chairman,
New Hampshire Apprenticeship
Cou ncil,
15 Chestnut Court,
Concord, N. H.#
C. W. Burrell,
Director of Apprenticeship,
New Mlexico Apprenticeship Council,
Santa Fe, N. Mex.#
David Greelis,
Director of Apprenticeship,
Department of Labor,
40 Howard Seree,
Albany, N. Y.#


.22


STATE AND TERRITORIAL APPRENTICESHIP AGENCIES








D. W. Everett, Secretary,
Nevada Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor,
Capitol Annex,
Carson City, Nev.*
C. L. Beddingfield, Director,
Division of Apprenticeship Training,
Department of Labor,
Raleigh, N. C.*
John F. Kostyo, Executive Secretary,
Ohio Apprenticeship Council,
815 State Office Building,
Columbus, Ohio
A. C. Hoggan, Director,
Oregon Apprenticeship Council,
Bureau of Labor,
136 State Office Building,
1400 SW. Fifth Avenue,
Portland I, Oreg.*
James A. Sipe, Secretary,
Pennsylvania Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor and Industry,
305-A South Office Building,
Harrisburg, Pa.
Luis Saldana Fonollosa, Acting Director,
Apprenticeship Division,
Insular Department of Labor,
San Juan 8, P. R.*

*State apprenticeship law enacted.


Cl-arence E. Sherman, Chairman,
Rhode Island Apprenticeship Council,
Providence Public Library,
220 Washington Street,
Providence, R. I.
Arlene R. Smith, Acting Director,
Utah Apprenticeship Council,
Industrial Commission,
Salt Lake City, Utah.*
Albert Frazer, Secretary,
Vermont Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Industrial Relations,
Montpelier, Vt.*
Robert H. Wilson, Director,
Virginia Apprenticeship Council,
P. O. Box 1814,
Main Street Office Building,
12th and Main Streets,
Richmond, Va.*
John E. Vance,
Supervisor of Apprenticeship,
Department of Labor and Industries.
313 New Field Artillery Armory,
305 Harrison Street,
Seattle 9, Wash.*
Walter F. Simon, Director,
Apprenticeship Department,
Wisconsin Industrial Commission,
i West Wilson Street,
Madison, Wis.*


23






OTHER PUBLICATIONS AVAILABLE
Copies of any of the following publications may be obtained by writing to the
nearest regional office listed in this pamphlet, or to Bureau of Apprenticeship,
U. S. Department of Labor, Washington 25, D. C.
NATIONAL APPRENTICESHIP STANDARDS FOR PHOTO-
ENGRAVERS IN THE NEWSPAPER PUBLISHING BUSINESS:
28-page booklet containing national apprenticeship standards for the
guidance of employers and labor in the newspaper publishing business
in establishing and conducting systems of apprentice training. In-
cludes provisions of an apprenticeship program, and functions of local
joint apprenticeship committees.
THE NATIONAL APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM: 1953 Edi-
tion. Review of development of apprenticeship in this country, with
a list of skilled occupations in which apprentice training is given.
Explanation of functions of Bureau of Apprenticeship, Federal
Committee on Apprenticeship, State apprenticeship agencies, National,
State, and local apprenticeship committees.
APPRENTICESHIP PAYS DIVIDENDS: A brief pamphlet,
especially designed for employers-reading time 3 minutes-giving
ten ways in which apprenticeship nets worthwhile profits.
LOOKING AHEAD BY WAY OF APPRENTICESHIP: A
simply expressed explanation of apprentice training and its advantages
to young men in equipping them for careers as craftsmen in the
skilled trades. Also explains the functions of joint management-labor
apprenticeship committees, Bureau of Apprenticeship and State
apprenticeship agencies.
APPRENTICESHIP-WHAT IT IS AND WHAT IT OFFERS:
Comprehensive explanation of what apprentice training is, the quali-
fications for employment as apprentices, importance of apprenticeship
in development of skilled manpower for defense production and the
trades in which there are the greatest opportunities. Reprinted from
OCCUPATIONAL TRENDS.

Technical Bulletins

LABOR-MANAGEMENT PARTICIPATION IN AREA-WIDE
APPRENTICESHIP SYSTEMS (Technical Bulletin No. T-I36,
April 1953).
REGISTERED APPRENTICES IN THE UNITED STATES:
Detailed Occupational Distribution, June, 1952-(Technical Bulletin
T-134).
APPRENTICE COMPLETION? OR CANCELLATION?
(Technical Bulletin T-13o).
AGE AND VETERAN STATUS OF APPRENTICES (Tech-
nical Bulletin No. T-i33) Nov., 1951.


24






Obtainable Through Superintendent of Documents

The following booklet may be obtained by writing to the Superin-
tendent of Documents, United States Government Printing Office,
Washington 25, D. C.
APPRENTICESHIP PAST AND PRESENT-A STORY OF
APPRENTICE TRAINING IN THE SKILLED TRADES SINCE
COLONIAL DAYS: A 28-page, illustrated, popularly written booklet
describing the development of apprentice training procedures and
systems since Colonial days. It contrasts the antiquated methods of
the past with those adopted today by employers and labor throughout
American industry. Cited for comparison with present-day ap-
prenticeship agreements are apprentice indentures dated 1640, 1832,
1869, and 1883. Described in the booklet are the experiences of
Benjamin Franklin as an apprentice in 1716 and of apprentices in
subsequent years. 15 cents a copy.


25









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