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You can get that job!
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00009194/00001
 Material Information
Title: You can get that job! Maturity is an asset
Physical Description: 10 p. : ; 15 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Dept. of Labor
Publisher: Dept. of Labor
Place of Publication: Washington, D.C
Publication Date: 1957
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Age and employment   ( lcsh )
Discrimination in employment   ( lcsh )
Employment interviewing   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 004969335
oclc - 20638662
System ID: AA00009194:00001

Full Text
2-. 2- 7/


CAN GET THAT JOB!




maturity Ds an asset

















The "How To" ideas in this folder have
been tested, and they work. Use them all, and
you'll have a good chance of succeeding in your
search-because they have been used with good
results by thousands of job seekers over 35.






YOU CAN GET THAT JOB!
Be determined, be persistent-and remember that every day more employers are
discovering that people past 35, 50, or 65 are often not only just as good but better
than younger workers, in ability, productivity, loyalty and many other important
traits.
As a mature worker, you have experience that gives you an edge over anyone
who has had less.
But you'll need to convince the employer that he will gain by hiring you-so
follow the plan laid out here, to convince him.

E STOCK OF YOUR ABILITIES
best way to start on any successful job hunt is first of all to take stock of
If-sit down and size yourself up.
will pay you to prepare a sheet showing your strong points and your weak
Be realistic-make this a "cold turkey" study of yourself. Use the "self-
Ssheet" in this folder, if you wish. No one else needs to read this sheet, and
Throw it away when it has served its purpose.


2~





SELF-INVENTORY


ABILITIES


EDUCATION &
TRAINING


SPARE-TIME
ACTIVITIES
& HOBBIES


PHYSICAL
CAPACITIES


PERSONAL
QUALITIES


JOB
PREFERENCES






cOl I U L-UUI


COMPANY


UN VVUJNr


ADDRESS


TELEPHONE


WHOM TO SEE


*1 ~*' .


/4'








List your experience and abilities-not just your regular work skills, but any
talents you have found through hobbies, part-time jobs, or giving volunteer help to
some organization.
List your education and training briefly, and the particular job skills they have
given you. List your physical capabilities as well as any physical limitations you
have.
Consider your personal qualities and the kinds of work that interest you most.
After you've prepared this sheet you will find it a lot easier to make a sensible job,:
search, without wasting your own time or that of any possible employer. You'll:
have a pretty good idea about the kinds of jobs you can handle, and which ones toW.
avoid. You'll know what jobs probably would interest you, and what ones you;
would find dull and hard to carry out.
If you need further help in deciding what kind of work to look for, ask to so&
the counselor in your nearest public employment office.








FIND A MARKET FOR YOUR SKILLS


You can find job leads in a lot of ways. Your local office of the State Employ-
ment Service will help; your school or college may have a placement service to help
you; your union or professional association may provide leads. Ask your friends,
relatives and neighbors about possible jobs they may know about. Look at the
"want ads." Check the classified telephone directory for names of firms in the fields
plan to seek work in.
soon as you have decided where to go for your first try for a job, try to learn
IYance as much as you can about the firm to which you are applying. You can
~better job of selling your services with that knowledge.
-Think through your qualifications for the particular job for which you will be
Skewed, and have the facts arranged in your mind so that you can answer ques-
dlearly and briefly.






PUT YOUR BEST FOOT FORWARD


This checklist will help you with your interview:

'-:; ..' *4";
Take with you a summary of past experience and education, with names, places '
and dates.


Have ready a list of three to six people or firms (with names, addresses, an
telephone numbers) which may be used as references.


Take your Social Security card.


Don't take anyone with you to the interview.


Be on time for your interview, not even one minute late.


Dress well, but not gaudily. Be clean and neat. If you are a woman, do
not use flashy makeup or excessive jewelry; if you are a man, avoid sports
clothes.






Even if you feel tired or a little unwell, sit up and look alert. Don't yawn,
slouch or show signs of nervousness.

Answer all the employer's questions frankly, honestly, and briefly. Don't
boast, but speak with confidence.

If you are asked to fill out a number of forms or to take various tests, do
so cheerfully and do as well as you can.

When you are asked, point out the value of your past experience, especially
as it applies to the job you are seeking.


Don't let yourself argue with the person interviewing you.

!,:*; Do not criticize others, including your past employers or associates.

Keep your personal, domestic or financial problems out of the conversation.
The employer only wants to know what you can do and how well you can
do it-he isn't interested in your troubles.

Be polite. Show courtesy and respect for the person interviewing you.








If the employer offers suggestions about other jobs or types of work, but will
not hire you for the one you visited him about, listen to what he has to say. He
may provide you with just the lead or advice you need to secure another job.
If you feel you were not able to give a good impression in your first interview,
because of nervousness or other reasons, don't let that worry you unduly. Your
experience with that interview will help you handle the next one.



TAKE ADVANTAGE OF HELP AVAILABLE

You can get useful help at your nearest public employment office. It will assist'
you in an analysis of your experience and abilities, in counseling, and in finding jof.-
openings. When you register with this office (which is open to everyone), youKr3i
interviewer will study your record and ask key questions to help find occupatioratl
classifications into which your experience best fits.









If you have already made a personal analysis, as suggested above, you will be

better able to give the Employment Service interviewer or counselor the right infor-

mation, and to benefit from questions and suggestions. Special problems in your job

hunting will get special consideration.

Your Employment Service may also be able to help you find training you need to

bring your skills up to date, or to adapt your skills to some new type of work.

Keep your registration with the public employment service up to date until you

o 'yqur twa search ing too, of course, but if the Service calls you for an
Sntie, tae: advantage of it as soon as you possibly can. If you 'find

ntiyyo Emloymient Service so that it can use the time to find


-;e4i..,mJtznvisi he nearest local office of the State Employment

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3 126III 0I85 921III
3 1262 08858 9261


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SEE YOUR
STATE EMPLOYMENT SM|

UNITED STATES EMPLOYMEmT TERa

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