Planned training

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Title:
Planned training your future security
Physical Description:
8 p. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Apprentices -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

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General Note:
Cover title.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004966826
oclc - 32480202
System ID:
AA00009176:00001


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PLANNED TRAINING YOUR

FUTURE SECURITY

-/ A job-any job-that will give you
a1 feeling of independence, money to
*pay your board, and some left over,
looks good when you are just out of
t. high school.
You work at the job several years.
Time flies. You get married; have a
family. Comes the time when your
pay check, which once seemed plenty,
just doesn't seem to go so far; when
trivial wants have been replaced by
absolute necessities.
That will be the time-when it may be difficult for you to change
to a job that offers training and a real future-you realize that try-
ing to build a career on a poor foundation is risky business.
True, some successful careers have been so built, but they are the
exceptions. Luck plays a minor role in the industrial or the busi-
ness world. If you are really to get ahead, you must prepare your-
self now to do those things that the untrained cannot do.

He Stays in School
The smart young fellow of today stays in school as long as he can.
If he goes on to college, he chooses a school that will give him well-
rounded training in his chosen profession. If he goes to work, he
looks for a job that offers the most training-a job with a future-
rather than the one that pays the most money to start. If he plans a
career in one of the skilled trades, he enters apprenticeship, and stays
on the job until his training is completed.
"But why," you ask, "should I serve an apprenticeship when I can
get a job that pays more money at the start?"
The answer is that to progress in the stiff competition of today's
industry, you must be able to do jobs requiring more than a few






weeks' or a few months' experience. You'll face a lot of competition
in jobs that can easily be learned. Your likelihood of promotion
to better-paying jobs is not good; and when you look for another
job you'll find you have little to sell.

Training is Good Insurance
Training in the skilled trades is good insurance. In addition to
opportunities for promotion and steady employment, it gives you
something that no one can take away from you-a life-long increased
earning capacity which will enable you to hold down a well-paying
job in your home town or anywhere else in the country. Skilled
hands give the owner a greater feeling of security, in some ways, than
money in the bank.
If you like to tinker with the family automobile or fix things
around the house; like to make things or see how they are made;
enjoy reading about new inventions, you probably have some me-
chanical ability, and should consider entering the skilled trades.

Choosing a Trade
If you are thinking about becoming
a craftsman in one of the skilled trades,
here are some of the points you should
consider:
I. Choosing a trade means taking the
Measure of a big field. There are
more than 90 different apprenticeable
trades from which to choose. A wise
choice will pay rich dividends in later
years. A list of skilled trades in which
apprenticeship is given, together with
the customary length of training in
each, appears on page 6.
In choosing a trade, you have access to a variety of occupational
material developed by educational institutions, industrial organiza-
tions, and government to assist you inemaking an intelligent choice.
In many communities, vocational counseling is Available through pub-
lic employment offices or the school system. Aptitude tests are also






available in local employment offices and, in many localities, in the
public school system, to help you determine your greatest potentialities.
Discuss the selection of a trade with your parents and those of your
friends already working in the various trades and occupations. De-
termine the opportunities and problems of various trades and weigh
them against your own abilities and shortcomings. The advice of
someone who knows both you and something about the various
trades is important. Discuss the problem of selecting your life's
vocation thoroughly.
Once you have decided on the trade you wish to enter, it is im-
portant that you get well-rounded training on the job, as well as
related technical knowledge pertaining to the trade. It's not enough
today to have only one of the many different skills required in a
trade. Today's industrial worker must have the ability to adjust
to changes in production techniques which are taking place and
which undoubtedly will continue to take place for a long time to
come. The craftsman has all the skills of a trade. If you develop
only a single skill of the many that are required in any trade, you
are likely to discover some day that the march of progress has passed
you by; that your single skill is no longer needed. A carpenter who
can use only a hammer is no carpenter.
Once you've decided on a trade, you will, of course, wish to obtain
the best training possible.
Here are some facts about
apprenticeship, the method
used by modern industry to
train its craftsmen. Big mass
production firms as well as 7ct
small contractors hire skilled
workers. Apprenticeship is a
businesslike system that will
give you thorough training
and experience, both on and
off the job, in the work of a -
skilled trade. It's the way to
become a craftsman, with rea-
sonable job security, good pay, and community respect and prestige.






If you are accepted for apprenticeship, you become a part of the
paid work force the first day you are employed. The skills of the
trade will be passed along to you by master craftsmen, and you will
receive related classroom instruction tied in with the job on which
you are working. Together, they will give you a mastery of the
trade.

Regular Wage Increases
Your wages will be advanced at regular intervals, usually every 6
months, as you advance from one step of your training to another.
Since wages paid apprentices are based on a percentage of those paid
craftsmen in a particular trade and locality, they vary with different
trades and localities. Your wages, when you complete your training,
are the same as those of craftsmen in your trade.

Program Carefully Planned

---Your apprentice training
program in any of the trades
is carefully planned. It iden-
tifies the basic skills of the
trade; establishes your term of
apprenticeship; sets forth your
wage rate during each period
of your training; specifies the
necessary instruction in trade
theory; and provides for pub-
,I-- lic recognition of the satisfac-
tory completion of your train-
ing.
On completing your training, you will be a recognized craftsman.
If the program under which you have served your apprenticeship is
registered with the U. S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Appren-
ticeship and Training or a recognized State apprenticeship agency,
you will, on recommendation of the industry, be issued a Certificate
of Completion of Apprenticeship, attesing to your all-around training.
As a craftsman, you will be called upon to help work out a wide
variety of problems of the trade. This is where your mastery of all






the skills of the trade will come into play. Your work will be of
a constantly challenging nature.

What Lies Beyond Apprenticeship
Apprenticeship lays a foundation on which you can build accord-
ing to your own ability and your determination to get ahead. Many
of the key men in today's industry started as apprentices.

Qualifications for Apprenticeship
To qualify for apprenticeship in any of the skilled trades you must
be able to make judgments and have more-than-ordinary ability to
work with your hands. To be successful, you must exercise per-
severance, ambition, and initiative. Most program sponsors prefer
high school graduates.
Since selection and entrance requirements are exacting, you should
have above average aptitude and physical fitness for the trade. In-
creasingly, emphasis is being placed on the need to complete high
school mathematics and science courses.
Usually, beginning apprentices are between 16 and 24 years of age.

Where to Apply
Whatever trade you have in mind, it would be helpful to consult
an employer, an employers association, or a labor union in that trade
for information on wage rates, employment opportunities, and job
openings. You can also obtain such information at the nearest State
Employment Service Office. When discussing your future with the
interviewer be sure to keep in mind that you want a job that offers
sound training-a job with a future.









SKILLED TRADES

Following is a partial list of skilled trades in which apprentices are
employed. The number of years generally required to complete
training in each is indicated. Years

Aircraft Fabricator ................... .................... ..... 3-4
Airplane Mechanic ................................... ......... 3-4
Automotive Body Builder-Repairman ................................ 3-4
Automotive Mechanic ........................................... 3-4


Boilermaker .............
Bricklayer ...............
Butcher-Meat Cutter.......
Cabinetmaker-Millman ....
Carpenter ...............
Cement Mason............
Designer ................
Draftsman ..... .........
Electrical Worker........
Electrotyper .............
Engraver ................
Farm-Equipmen! Mechanic.
Floor Coverer............
Foundryman .............
Glazier-Glass Worker......
Heat Treater.............
Iron Worker.............
Jeweler ................
Lather ..................
Leather Worker..........
Lithographer ..........
Machinist ..............
Maintenance Mechanic-Repai
M illwright ..............
Model Maker.............
Musical-Instrument Mechani
Operating Engineer........
Optical Technician........
Orthopedic-Prosthetic Technic
Painter-and-Decorator.....
Patternmaker ............
Photoengraver ...........
Plasterer ................
Plumber-Pipe Fitter.......
Printer .................
Printing Pressman.........
Sheet-Metal Worker.......
Sign-and-Pictorial Painter..
Stationary Engineer......
Stereotyper .............
Telephone Worker........
Terrazzo Worker.........
Tool-and-Die Maker.......


. ............... .............. 4


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3
3
3-4
4
3
5
3-4
4-5
5-6
4-5
3-4
3-4
3-4
3
4
3-4
3-4
2
3-4
4-5
4
3-4
4
4
3-4
3-4
4
3-4
3
5
5
4
5
5-6
5
3-4
3-4
3-4
5-6
4
3
4-5







Regional Offices Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training


Region I
(Maine, N. H., Vt., Mass., R. I.,
Conn.)
Room 501, 18 Oliver St.,
Boston io, Mass.
Region II
(N. Y., N. J.)
Room 903, 341 Ninth Ave.,
New York I, N. Y.
Regions III-IV
(Pa., Del., Va., Md., W. Va., N. C.,
D. C.)
Room 321,
Professional Arts Bldg.,
Chambersburg, Pa.

Region V
(S. C., Tenn., Ga., Miss., Fla., Ala.)
Room 525, 1371 Peachtree Bldg.,
17th & Peachtree St. NE.,
Atlanta 9, Ga.
Region VI
(Ohio, Mich., Ky.)
Room io08, Engineers' Bldg.,
1365 Ontario St.,
Cleveland 14, Ohio.

Region VII
(I11., Ind., Wis.)
Room iooo, Bankers Bldg.,
105 West Adams St.,
Chicago 3, Ill.


Region VIII
(N. Dak.. S. Dak., Minn., Mont.)
Room o16, Federal Bldg.,
11 oS. Fourth St.,
Minneapolis 8, Minn.

Region IX
(Mo., Kans., Nebr., Iowa)
Room 2811, Federal Office Bldg.,
911 Walnut St.,
Kansas City 6, Mo.

Region X
(La., Tex., Okla., Ark.)
Room 212, 1114 Commerce St.,
Dallas 2, Tex.

Region XI
(Utah, Wyo., Colo., N. Mex.)
Room 832, Equitable Bldg.,
730-17th St.,
Denver 2, Colo.
Region XII
(Ariz., Nev., Calif., Hawaii)
Room xo8, Appraisers' Bldg..
630 Sansome St.,
San Francisco II, Calif.
Region XIII
(Alaska, Idaho, Wash., Oreg.)
1809 Smith Tower,
506 Second Avenue,
Seattle, Wash.







State Apprenticeship Agencies


Arizona Apprenticeship Council,
I623-B West Adams,
Phoenix, Ariz.*
Division of Apprenticeship Standards,
Department of Industrial Relations,
San Francisco, Calif.*
Colorado Apprenticeship Council,
% Industrial Commission,
748 State Capitol Annex,
Denver, Colo.*
Apprentice Training Division.
Department of Labor,
Hartford, Conn.*
District of Columbia Apprenticeship
Council,
1145 19th St. NW.,
Washington, D. C.*
Department of Apprenticeship,
Florida Industrial Commission,
Tallahassee, Fla.*
Apprenticeship Division,
Department of Labor and Indust. Re-
lations,
Honolulu, Hawaii*
Iowa Apprenticeship Council,
Bureau of Labor,
State House,
Des Moines, Iowa
Kansas Apprenticeship Council.
Department of Labor,
Topeka, Kans.
Kentucky State Apprenticeship Council.
Department of Industrial Relations,
Frankfort, Ky.*
Division of Apprenticeship,
Department of Labor,
Baton Rouge, La.*
Maine Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor and Industry,
Augusta, Maine*
Division of Apprenticeship Training,
Department of Labor and Industries,
Boston, Mass.*
Division of Voluntary Apprenticeship,
Department of Labor and Industry,
St. Paul, Minn.*
Montana Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor and Industry,
Helena, Mont.*


*State apprenticeship law enacted.


Nevada Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor,
Carson City, Nev.*
New Hampshire Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor,
Concord, N. H.*
New Mexico Apprenticeship Council,
Labor and Industrial Commission,
Santa Fe, N. Mex.*
New York State Apprenticeship
Council,
Department of Labor,
Albany, N. Y.*
Division of Apprenticeship Training,
Department of Labor,
Raleigh, N. C.*
Ohio State Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Industrial Relations,
Columbus, Ohio*
Oregon Apprenticeship Council.
Bureau of Labor,
Portland, Oreg.*
Pennsylvania Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor and Industry,
Harrisburg, Pa.*
Apprenticeship Division,
Insular Department of Labor,
San Juan 8, P. R.*
Rhode Island Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor,
Providence Public Library,
Providence, R. I.
Utah Apprenticeship Council,
Industrial Commission,
Salt Lake City, Utah*
Vermont Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Industrial Relations,
Montpelier, Vt.*
Division of Apprentice Training
Department of Labor and Industry,
Richmond, Va.*
Washington Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Labor and Industries.
Seattle, Wash.*
Apprenticeship Division,
Wisconsin Industrial Commission,
Madison, Wis.*
Virgin Islands Apprenticeship Council,
Department of Agriculture and Labor,
Christiansted,
St. Croix, Virgin Islands.*


* U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1963 0-680424
























Available to You ..
THE NATIONAL APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM, a booklet explaining in non-
technical language the national apprenticeship program, its aims and organiza-
tion and how it operates, may be obtained free of charge by writing to the Bureau
of Apprenticeship and Training, U. S. Department of Labor, Washington 25,
D. C., or to the nearest regional office listed in this pamphlet.
APPRENTICESHIP PAST AND PRESENT-A STORY OF APPRENTICESHIP
IN THE SKILLED TRADES SINCE COLONIAL DAYS. a 31-page, illustrated,
popularly written booklet describing the development of apprenticeship pro-
cedures and systems since Colonial days, may be obtained for 20 cents by writ-
ing to the Superintendent of Documents, United States Government Printing
Office, Washington 25, D. C.
Publications relating to apprenticeship in specific trades may be obtained on
request, free of charge, by writing to the Bureau of Apprenticeship and Train-
ing, U. S. Department of Labor, Washington 25, D. C.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

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