Rural youth, what kind of work would you like to do?

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Material Information

Title:
Rural youth, what kind of work would you like to do?
Physical Description:
8 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States Employment Service
United States -- Bureau of Employment Security
United States -- Dept. of Labor. -- Manpower Administration
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Labor, Manpower Administration
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Rural youth -- Employment -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (p. 8).
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
"This pamphlet was developed by the United States Employment Service affiliated with your State Employment Service, Bureau of Employment Security United States Department of Labor 1967."--T.p. verso.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004969346
oclc - 58564810
System ID:
AA00009171:00001


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Full Text
L7.a2


rural
youth
WHAT KIND
OF WORK
WOULD YOU
LIKE TO DO?


11.1







This 9amphlt 9 wa ade.eloped by
-T-e UniteS tate-sE l eS ei ce
Afflate. witCh yC.tateEmplomt Service
Burea. 9f 99ployment a ecurity
a.ited States Department a f Lab9r

1967





WHAT KIND OF WORK
WOULD YOU LIKE TO DO?

Selecting the kind of work you would like to do,
perhaps for the rest of your life, is a big job.
But a little planning and preparation ahead of
time will make it easier.

What are your interests? Put them down on
paper where you can see them. Money is impor-
tant, but it is more important to work at a job
which gives you a sense of personal accom-
plishment.

What are your abilities? To be an engineer, you
must be good with numbers; to write profes-
sionally, you must be good with words; to be a
chemist, you must spend long years in school
learning your profession. Balance your present
and potential abilities against your interests.

What are your opportunities? In today's world,
they should be what you make them. But your
level of education will increase or decrease your
possibilities, as will your willingness to work
hard toward objectives you set for yourself,
whether you are in a rural area or a big city.






SHOULD YOU
LEAVE THE FARM?

Maybe yes, maybe no.... Here are some facts:
The number of farms in the U. S. has been
declining since 1935. New farm machinery,
improved chemical products, and advanced
techniques have allowed the farmer to raise
increasingly large crops. But machine power
and chemical power now do much of the work,
not human power.

This means that today there are fewer farm
owners and unskilled farm workers than there
were even a few short years ago.
But it also means that there are more jobs for
skilled farm-machine operators and mainte-
nance men, more jobs for trained professionals
to develop new equipment and agricultural
products.

There are also more jobs for individuals to
package, transport and get them to market.


Much of farming is now big business. And
there can be a future in it for those young
people who prepare themselves to meet its
challenges.







I -


MANY OTHER
FIELDS OF WORK

Jobs related to agriculture are found in almost
every type of employment. This includes for-
estry, construction, manufacturing, transporta-
tion, communications, electric, gas, and sanitary
services; wholesale and retail trade; finance,
insurance, real estate, and government.

Some jobs are tied directly to farming. These
include jobs in feed mills, fertilizer plants, farm
machinery industries, farm supply stores, food
processing plants, and many other businesses
that process, distribute, or transport farm prod-
ucts and farm supplies.

Others are indirectly dependent upon farming
activity, such as the jobs in research with gov-
ernment agencies, colleges, agricultural experi-
ment stations, cooperatives, and the private
businesses that buy from, sell to, or serve
farmers.

Teaching, writing, television, radio, conserva-
tion, farmer organizations and trade associa-
tions, and government regulatory and inspection
agencies are also important sources of employ-
ment for people with rural backgrounds.






MANY KINDS OF JOBS
UTILIZE RURAL BACKGROUND


College or Graduate
Degree Required
Agronomist
Animal Husbandman
Dairy Bacteriologist
Farm Management Consultant
Food Chemist
Forest Entomologist
Human Nutritionist

High School or Special
Training Required
Combine Operator
Conservation Aide
Custom-Feed Mill Operator
Farm Equipment Mechanic
Farm Implements Salesman
Feed Blender
Grain Inspector


College or Graduate
Degree Required
Irrigation Engineer
Labor Economist
Market Research Analyst
Plant Pathologist
Rural Sociologist
Soil Scientist
Veterinary Parasitologist
Vocational Agricultural Teacher

High School or Special
Training Required
Home Demonstration Agent
Home Economist
Insecticide Salesman
Nurseryman
Packing Foreman
Plant Breeder
Poultry Buyer
Soil Tester

And many, many others....






WHAT TO DO
TO GET THE JOB YOU WANT

Learn all you can about the field of work in
which you are most interested. Find out what
the qualifications are, and plan to continue
your schooling until you have at least obtained
the minimum qualifications. Learn something
about present working conditions, and about
what the future would hold for you in this line
of work.

Talk about it. Talk to as many people as you
can who are employed in this work. They know
best the good and bad points. Talk to your
school counselor, your parents, teachers, 4-H
leader. Ask them to advise you in planning
your future.

Visit a place where this kind of work is done
(first make an appointment) and see it actually
being performed.

Try to get a summer job in this field, to test
your own personal interest in it.

Read about it. A starter list of reading materials
appears later. These, and others, are available
at most libraries, and at your State Employment
Service office.






WHEN YOU
ARE READY...

When you are ready to start looking for a job,
ask your school principal when the State
employment service representative will be com-
ing to your school. Or visit the nearest office of
your State employment service.

There you will be able to get:
Information on jobs available.
Assistance in finding the kind of job you want
and will be qualified for when you are through
with school.
Counseling and testing help, if you need further
guidance in selecting a field of work.
Information on ways to get training, if the job
you want calls for it, and if you qualify.




,


Now you're on your own. This little pamphlet
is only meant to start you thinking and planning.

Will you stay in a rural area? Although unskilled
farm jobs have declined, the number of farm-
related skilled and professional jobs has never
been greater. Boys and girls brought up in the
country have an edge on city youth for many
of these jobs.

Will you move to the city? Your rural back-
ground may also benefit you in some urban
jobs. However, all types of jobs are available
in cities. For most of them your education,
training, and/or experience are the things which
will get you on the payroll.


Country or city, there are plenty of opportunities
for those with the necessary education and
training.
What kind of work would you like to do?

The decision is yours!


A
FINAL WORD






A LIST OF READING MATERIAL
TO HELP YOU SELECT THE KIND OF
WORK YOU WOULD LIKE TO DO

I've Found My Future in Agriculture,
available at State Agricultural Colleges

There Is A Future In Your Farm Background,
National Sales Executive, Inc.
630 3rd Ave., New York, New York

Jobs in Outdoor Work,
Science Research Associates, Inc.,
259 E. Erie Street, Chicago, Illinois 60611

Occupational Outlook Handbook,
Government Printing Office,
Washington, D. C. 20402, $5.00

Helping Rural Youth Choose Careers,
Government Printing Office,
Washington, D. C. 20402, $.05

Job Guide for Young Workers,
Government Printing Office,
Washington, D. C. 20402, $.45

Career Guide for Demand Occupations,
Government Printing Office,
Washington, D. C. 20402, $.30

How to Get and Hold the Right Job,
Government Printing Office,
Washington, D. C. 20402 ,$.10

Choosing Your Occupation,
Government Printing Office,
Washington, D. C. 20402, $.15

Careers in Agribusiness and Industry,
by Archie A. Stone
The Interstate Printers & Publishers, Inc.,
Danville, IIl. 1965 (285 pages)


U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 197 0 261-440







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
I ll 11111111111111111II Ill 111111111111111111
V 3 1262 08858 9451
SU.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Manpower Administration




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