United States foreign trade

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Portion of title:
Export and import merchandise trade
Physical Description:
3 v. : ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Creation Date:
March 1969
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Imports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Exports -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 1968-Dec. 1970.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"Summary report FT 900."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004691746
oclc - 01294077
lccn - sn 92034185
issn - 0566-7941
Classification:
ddc - 382
System ID:
AA00009169:00011

Related Items

Preceded by:
United States foreign trade. Total import trade
Preceded by:
United States foreign trade. Total export trade
Succeeded by:
U.S. foreign trade. FT900, Export and import merchandise


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Full Text

5. iWt U iou/. oF F LLl. -


IU.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Maurice H. Stans, Secretary
United States Rocco C. Siciliano, Under Secretary
U.. -EP TC,, William H. Chartener,
Foreign I rode Assistant Secretary for Economic Affairs
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
A. Ross Eckler, Director
SUMMARY REPORT AL 10 FOR RELEASE
FT 900 March 19 7 April 28, 1969

EXPORT AND IMPORT MERCHANDISE TRADE

Note: Overall export and import totals and Schedules A and B commodity section totals for 1968 and 1969
have been revised to reflect new seasonal adjustmenl factors effective with this issue of FT 900. In
addition overall totals for 1966 and 1967 have been similarly revised. An explanation of the methodology
applicable to the development of the new factors is available on request to the Bureau of the Census,
Washington, D.C. 20233.


The Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce,
announced today a seasonally adjusted March 1969 export
total of $3,196.0 million excluding Departmentof Defense
/DOD] Military Assistance Program Grant-Aid ship-
ments and a seasonally adjusted general import total
for March of $2,980.7 million.' 2 Comparable
seasonally adjusted totals for February were $2,296.7
million for exports and $2,655.3 million for imports.' 2 3 4

The Bureau noted that the March totals probably
reflect "above-normal" vessel activity at East and Gulf
Coast ports following the settlement of the dock strike
which began December 20, 1968 and ended at different
ports on different dates between February 14 and April 2,
1969. The Bureau does not, however, have adequate
information to enable it to measure precisely the
influence of the strike on the statistics.1 2 3 4

For the first 3 months of 1969, exportson a seasonally
adjusted basis were at an annual rate of $30,344 million
-"about 1 percent below the calendar year 1968 total of
$34,087 million. Imports were at an annual rate of
$30,616 million [about 8 percent below the calendar year
1968 total of $33.252 million. For the 4-month period,


December 1968-March 1969, seasonally adjusted exports
averaged $2,641.3 million per month, a level about 10
percent less than the $2,945.7 million average reported
for the preceding 4-month period August-November 1968.
Imports averaged $2,644.7 million for the current
4-month period, a level about 8 percentbelow the $2,862.1
million average reported for the preceding 4-month
period. *
Seasonally a and import totals for
selected Sc e 'rodity sections and
divisions ta Sd 5.3 [Unlike the
overall t commodity ents for exports
exclude f merchandise an e Department of
Defense P Military a t program Grant-

Expor d for season ge and excluding
Military nce Program Gr r d shipments, in-
creased f j 44.7 million j ruary to $3,366.7
million in 1 ith M' distance Program
Grant-Aid ships rose from $2,179.1
million in Feb .0 million in March.
Unadjusted general im amounted to $2,993.0 million
in March compared to $2,401.4 million in February.


1Adjusted for seasonal and working-day variation, but not for price level.
"Normal" working-day and seasonal adjustment factors used in adjusting export and import data are not strictly appli-
cable to periods of abnormal port activity such as those before, during, and after strikes. This is particularly true of
the "lojrking-dzy" component of the adjustment process since the period is abnormal as to both overtime and number of
"working" days. Users should take note of this limited applicability when making comparisons involving the seasonally
adjusted data jor December 1968-March 1969.
3Begirnning in January 1969, the coverage of tIe export arnd import, aercuandaise trade statirticst Lms reWO v.e to incu.ae
data on silver ares, ease bullion (incl dirg. suweplngs, w~ate, and scrap), anr, re/fned bullion. hie I ;: .-iur-s
presented in tables I, ', and J have beer, revised accordirili, out 1966 data ji taolles 4 'id 5 k'oe 'idt t,..e r-is.ci l.o'
to processing dljj'iculties. Further inrooracionr or, the iaidlrrn. o a silver ar the nercha.diare trale zt2llatica .
available in a special announcement appearing in tne Februare 1j969 issue of Report i" 9C., Hi ql.li o.i L'. x, or& Jan
Import Trade, or upon request to the Bureau of tie Cenius, 'rashinlorn, D.C. o?'jj.
Ckrumulations of data ouer at least J- or 4-%crnth periods are de7iratle to tdernt.lif underlun.ar trern.. Mor,, o--,,,t~ai
changes in, exports import, 2ind Zimtl2r SerLes often reflect p-imarilr irregular m .'eer'.ts ReFint, r .-ti.-.:,-l-. r, .--
cent changes in tne overall seasonally adjusted export .2nd import series are presented i c-: r : ,llov'i 1. t2t,' it', 2t3-r-
age percent monah-to-m'iont rise and decline ouer lo'.er periods sitowr. 'or co'.ararlori T;se averar.;e 'a: Id lc.' e .-I,-
ures exclude percentage changes .for: () the periods December 1962-?frc1 1963 %.j i D-.ecmter loa-':-Mi. l-r. t.ecar. a i -
nor'alities in the daJa due to e.-'/ectJ o.; strike. and 12) periods wue ne li~Jel .'i7e;: es |'e.. i' er-.,:er.'t le
level a; exports.' "ports occurred.
Montrn-io-monrth A'.rae m:.r ld,' r Tis_ ..r .,r~

Series Avera.e Averge :r tr .
Fet..-1ar. Jan.-Fb. 1':. 1969- Nov. -rc. re lerre rv. .r ,
rie Ic: r.e r,:. I"' !hrct ^j-
1969 i9t9 Jan. 169 1968 1963-196 19 -'r_ rl-r 1' "-

Export. .... +39.2% *9.. -.29.% 0.2' .;.' -;3.l .Pi.t *. t
Imports .... 12.3% .31 .60 -31.0L .l.( -3.i1 -3.1. .. .

For al b) he Bureau uI thL C-nr : Wh:hirnlon D C 2Ij23. PI.:e ifit pei .:ct
Anur, al subc,'~Ilor, I FTIOU. Q', 85 and Q86 co.rabnd. ; 0ui)









EXPLANATION OF STATISTICS


Import Statistics

General imports are a combination of entries for
immediate consumption and entries into bonded ware-
houses. Imports for consumption are a combination of
entries for immediate consumption and withdrawals
from warehouses for consumption.

The dollar value shown in the import statistics is
defined generally as the market value in the foreign
country and therefore excludes U.S. import duties,
freight charges from the foreign country to the United
States, and insurance. Value information is required
to be reported on import entries in accordance with
Sections 402 and 402a of the Tariff Act of 1930, as
amended. None of the values have been adjusted for
changes in price level.

It is the objective of the compiling procedures to
include shipments, insofar as practicable, in the statistics
for the month of import, which is based on the filing data
of the import entry or warehouse withdrawal document. '
However, because of processing problems, there has
always been a carryover of a small percentage of items
from the actual month of importation to a subsequent
month, usually the suce edg por. The c-arryover
should have little effgd(on r oizb- to-Month comparisons
of overall totals, siice the carry6ar' 'of the previous
month should com .alee roughly for that of the following
month.

Sport Statistics

Exports of domestic merchandise include commodities
which are grown, rdiouced, or manufacrired irthe Lnited
States, and commodities of foreign origin4hih have been
changed in the United Slates Jrq the forrp in which they
were imported, or which bave been'e.lumced in value b)
further manufacture in the'UnitedrStates. Exports of
foreign merchandise include commodities of foreign
origin which have entered the United States as imports
and which, at the time of exportation, are in substanta lly
the same condition as when imported.

The dollar value shown in the export statistics is
defined generally as the f.a.s. value at the U.S. port of
exportation. These values have not been adjusted for
changes in price level.

In general, compiling procedures provide for the
inclusion of shipments in the statistics for the month of
export? However, as indicated above for imports,
because of processing problems there has always been
a carryover of a small percentage of shipments from
their actual month of shipment to a subsequent month,
usually the following month. The statement above
regarding the effect of the import carryover generally
applies to exports also.


Revisions to the Statistics

Revisions are carried into the statistics on a periodic
basis. Data for 1968 and 1969 appearing in the 1969
monthly issues of this report are presented as follows:

1969 Statistics

a. January through November 1969 issues: figures
are as originally issued, except as noted below.

b. December 1969 issue: figures reflect revisions
for prior months of the year issued with December
1969 statistics.

1968 Statistics

a. January through May 1969 issues: figures reflect
revisions issued with December 1968 statistics or
earlier.

b. June through December 1969 issues: figures
reflect revisions to 1968 data issued with June
1969 statistics.

In addition to the revisions which are made on a
periodic basis, instances may occur whe re a significant
error in the statistics for a month of the current year
is discovered after the statistics for that month are
compiled. If the error is of sufficient importance to
require correction prior to the time that the regular
revisions are carried, the correction is made and so
noted in this report.

Sources of Further Information About
Foreign Trade Statistics

Additional information regarding coverage, valuation,
etc., is contained in the following publications: Report
FT 990, Highlights of U.S. Export and Import Trade;
FT 135, U.S. Imports, GeneralandConsumption, Schedule
A Commodity and Country; FT 410, U.S. E exports, Schedule
B Commodity and Country; and the Guide to Foreign
Trade Statistics. Information regarding additional
sources of statistics, the methodology used in seasonally
adjusting the data, and other matters relating to foreign
trade statistics may be obtained from the Bureau of the
Census, Washington, D.C. 20233.

For shipents by vessel, merchandise Ts ~it ncl'ded
in the statistics prior to he date of fo-.il ecr.tance of
the vessel (i.e., the date of the inward .'ur- s raniifest
for the vessel).
2i-th minor ex -et i.s, the date of export for ship-
ments other thr -y mai is the date vhen the shipent
leaves the United States, or, in the case of vessel or
air shiaents, the date when the carrier departs (or is
cleared) fra the port of export. For mail shi ments, the
date of export is considered to be the date of mailing.








3

U.S. Exports, General Imports, and Merchandise Trade Balance, Adjusted For Seasonal and Working-Day Variation:
January 1964 to March 1969

(In millions of dollars)


I


Seasonally adjusted data ---
4-month moving overage of
seasonally adjusted data'


EXPORTS'
(MCD moving average 4 term)













GENERAL IMPORTS
(MCD moving average 4 term)




^^--^/


j\
Ii



t
it








r



i


'I


/A

-%


I.1 .. I.1.


MERCHANDISE TRADE BALANCE'


.... I, .


.1.. I


p 11


It 5





.1.. I.I.


- I
lj
Ii
I'
'I

.1.


1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969


'Abnormal fluctuations in the data for December 1964-May 1965, March 1968, and December 1968-March 1969 are due to effects
of dock strikes. Represents exports of domestic and foreign merchandise excluding Department of Defense (DOD) Military
Assistance Program Grant-Aid shipments. 3Defined as exports (see footnote 2, above) minus general .ports.



Table 1. U.S. Exports, General Imports, and Merchandise Trade Balance, Adjusted for Seasonal and Working-Day
Variation, by Month: January 1968 to March 1969

(In millions of dollars)


Period and January- january Feb- Mrch April
series March ruara

1968

Exports .......... 8,028.4 2,814.3 2,775.3 2,438.8 2,855.8 2,7
Imports........... 7,867.3 2,687.0 2,591.6 2,588.7 2,603.9 2,7
Merchandise trade
balance2 ......... +161.1 +127.3 +183.7 -149.9 +251.9 -

1969

Exports .......... 7,586.0 2,093.3 2,296.7 3,196.0
Imports............ 7,654.1 2,018.1 2,655.3 2,980.7
t r rir, L trade
t,.n-,.: ....... -68.1 +75.2 -358.6 +215.3

h r: r, r: c frl. ci. --:,.1 ar. .. r-i r .-. -':ru. s : ..,i r u
shipments.
'Defined as exports (see footnote 1, above) minus general imports.


'41.6
'54.8

13.2


ay June uly August Sepm Octobere Novem- Decem-
____ _ber I o ber ber


2,870.6
2,791.9

-78.7


S+133.5
+133.5


2,949.3
2,870.8

+78.5


3,224.7
2,953.5

+271.2


it.-.-:ri' C D .- Utrr- '-r, ;,:- 'a F,. r r :


2,634.1
2,738.4

-104.3


2,974.5
2,885.8

+88.7


2,979.2
2,924.8

+54.4


Ratio scale

- 3,500

3,000

2,500


2,000



Ratio scale

3,500

3,000

2,500


2,000



1,500



Arithmetic
scale

750


500


250



-0


-250











Table 2. U.S. Exports ol Merchamdse Showing Deparnent of Defense (DOD) Military Assistance Program
Grant-Aid Shipments, by Month: Jauary 1968 to March 1969

n al-liisa of dollars. UadZ us-ed totals represent s of unro-ed figures hence may vary slshtly frre sa of orfnded arso os)


EIports exclxintg S. -
rant-Aid L- -_:

x I a -.- -. -m. r I- : :-I -, n


. : |-


Janua_-.-, -
January- ... ....... ........ ..
January ....................... ......
February..............................
Marc ................ .................
April .................................

uay.. ...................................

J u ....................................
uepte..e...............................
Seteber..................................
Nsvoeer..... ..........................
Noe ber .................................
De ember...............................

1969




January.................................
Febrary.................................
Mrch.................................
April...............................
- _ay .... ... .. .
Jte................... .............
July.................................


DOcober..................................
November... ....................
December................................


2,814.








S... -
7,-5 .






7,586.0

2 .T -.


S,.:-..


2,690.0




3,0-.51
2,675.8
2,803.5
2,959.5


3,047.5


7,568.1


." -


7,450.8


2,016.8
'


2,738.2
2,749.3
2,681.7
3,000.4



2,734.9
. ,- .- .


3,195.8
3,096.6




7,708.4


:,.i-. -


...' '

, I



1,1 .








7,591.1

2,071.5
^,li;.-
:.3'..?


DOD rant-Aid2



---------~


-.









? .'
t.,J


n.i
5.




I_ .


-4.-




57.9

24.5
12.1
21.2


'Data reflect adjust eans for seasonal and vworg-day variation a do no necessarily add annual adjusted totals. See note front
page of thi s ero- .
'2sta .:':'~ r I r those released in Departaent of Defense r: r-. ouse of a difference in statistical definiticms. For a further explana-
tion, see footnote 2, table E-l, Report FT 990, Highlights of .. L ad Ipr Trade.





Tale 3. U.S. Imports of Merchandise, by Moth: Jauary 1968 to March 1969

(In villas of dollars. Unadjused totals represent su of unrouded fires beace may vary slightly fra sum of rounded amounts)


1968



- .5


January-e- r .
Ja uary-..c............... ...........

Janargy..................................
Ferury....... ....................

April....................................
way


July.....................................
Aungust...................................
Septeber...............................
Otctber................................
November................................
tecenber................................


7,867.3














2,92.P


1969

- _r- I ----- ------


'-^r^'~ I^J *^ -


.1;


.. ::- 7
7,764.2

-










v.


-in
2 YZ .s: .1.,


7,420.2


7,462.9

"a. ^ .1


Ita reflect adjustaents for seasncal~ and working-day variatii an do not necessarily add t annal u aljadsted totals. See note on front
page of ths rept.


.. r .I. .












Table 4. U.S. Exports of Domestic Merchandise Including Department of Defense (DOD) Military Assistance Program.Grant-Aid Shipments--
Schedule B Sections and Selected Divisions, Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusted, by Month: January 1968 to March 1969
(In millions of dollars. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures hence may vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Schedule B sections and selected divisions1
Period
0 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 72 71 72 73 8 9

Seasonally adjusted'
19684
January-December.......... 3,890.4 704.6 3,501.8 1,056.8 (5) 3,288.5 3,748.1 14,500.7 6,337.4 2,287.4 5,873.1 2,146.4 (5)
January-March............. 1,054.0 173.7 866.9 261.2 (5) 747.9 797.3 3,378.9 1,482.0 536.8 1,351.4 510.2 (5)
January ................... 367.4 59.2 285.9 90.9 (5) 263.8 284.0 1,257.7 533.8 185.2 520.7 183.4 (5)
February.................. 358.0 66.5 285.0 84.3 (5) 249.9 275.3 1,163.1 514.3 180.7 469.4 169.7 (5)
March..................... 328.6 48.0 296.0 86.0 (5) 234.2 238.0 958.1 433.9 170.9 361.3 157.1 (5)
April..................... 324.0 55.6 318.7 89.7 (5) 280.5 297.4 1,177.7 533.5 190.3 443.7 176.2 (5)
May ...................... 299.8 61.0 286.1 87.1 (5) 262.5 298.0 1,148.7 499.9 181.7 478.1 174.7 (5)
June................... 307.0 65.9 261.8 83.4 (5) 267.5 309.4 1,234.9 525.1 195.4 517.0 174.3 (5)
July...................... 316.3 58.1 295.6 89.8 (5) 276.3 318.0 1,205.6 525.3 190.9 499.0 179.5 (')
August .................... 334.2 70.4 301.2 88.2 (5) 291.1 327.6 1 ?1.? 558.3 202.0 484.4 195.7 (5)
September ................. 308.7 65.8 335.5 95.0 (5) 349.9 406.0 1 :,. '' 606.3 209.7 519.4 188.6 (5)
October................... 266.4 36.8 260.9 70.3 (5) 253.3 304.7 1,222.6 513.0 194.8 499.4 180.6 (5)
November.................. 304.8 59.0 288.3 89.2 (5) 275.6 348.4 1,346.5 566.1 194.1 583.3 190.4 (5)
December.................. 375.2 58.3 286.8 102.9 (5) 283.9 341.3 1,226.8 527.9 191.7 497.4 176.2 (5)

1969
January-March............. 616.7 103.6 611.2 247.0 (5) 660.8 870.0 3,678.9 1,488.0 590.5 1,596.7 556.6 (5)

January................... 130.8 17.3 135.8 85.1 (5) 181.5 226.9 1,154.3 409.6 163.0 565.2 157.9 (5)
February.................. 176.8 16.4 179.9 76.1 (5) 198.0 263.0 1,111.0 445.3 181.9 482.8 168.9 (5)
March ..................... 309.1 69.9 295.5 85.8 (5) 281.3 380.1 1,413.6 633.1 245.6 548.7 229.8 (5)
April..................
May.......................
June......................
July......................
August..................
September ................
October.................
November..................
December.................

Unadjusted

19684
January-December........... 3,889.6- 702.5. 3,494.6- 1,055.6- 274.5- 3,288.9' 3,738.6- 14,462.0 6,320.3 2,286.0-5,855.6- 2,146.3- 929.2
January-March............. 1,059.9 134.4 884.6 225.6 66.1 732.1 790.6 3,397.6 1,488.9 534.4 1,374.4 505.9 229.4
January ................... 352.8 44.5 285.0 76.5 15.6 235.9 261.8 1,160.5 493.1 182.2 485.2 168.9 95.2
February.................. 353.5 52.9 290.7 70.5 26.2 238.4 264.7 1,162.9 505.4 173.4 484.1 166.6 68.6
March..................... 353.6 37.0 308.9 78.6 24.3 257.8 264.1 1,074.2 490.4 178.8 405.1 170.4 65.6
April...................... 334.7 46.5 313.0 89.6 23.1 292.5 318.6 1,273.2 584.1 200.7 488.4 188.2 65.8
May ....................... 313.9 52.6 302.9 92.8 20.9 287.5 326.0 1,272.4 572.5 197.3 502.7 190.2 71.2
June...................... 287.7 55.2 245.3 87.0 29.3 260.2 307.2 1,237.1 518.4 193.3 525.4 168.9 81.0
July ...................... 297.0 48.5 271.6 90.4 20.2 278.8 298.6 1,118.6 511.9 180.8 426.0 170.2 70.8
August.................... 326.0 73.0 264.7 102.4 20.3 304.3 320.6 1,123.0 515.6 190.3 417.1 190.5 78.0
September ................. 289.5 88.1 266.0 106.5 25.0 334.9 379.2 1,199.4 537.8 196.5 465.2 181.8 80.5
October ................... 278.2 45.6 280.8 78.2 21.2 249.3 313.9 ,.1 '.- 504.3 199.5 475.6 183.5 87.8
November ................. 336.3 82.5 348.6 92.4 20.1 272.8 351.2 1, '-.- 562.7 199.0 622.6 192.9 69.3
December................... 366.3 76.1 317.1 90.7 28.5 276.5 332.8 1,276.9 524.2 194.4 558.4 174.1 95.6

1969
January-March............. 620.6 78.2 614.6 211.1 51.6 648.9 868.2 3,706.5 1,504.7 583.1 1,618.7 550.3 241.1

January................... 129.5 13.5 139.1 73.8 14.0 166.6 214.9 1,095.6 389.2 165.2 541.2 149.5 75.0
February.................. 168.2 12.6 176.8 61.3 15.3 181.8 243.9 1,071.2 421.6 168.7 481.0 159.6 :r.1
March..................... 322.9 52.2 298.7 76.1 22.2 300.5 409.4 1,539.6 693.9 249.2 596.5 241.2 i,
April....................
May. .....................
June......................
July.....................
August ...................
September .............
October...................
November..................
December.................

'Schedule B section and selected division descriptions are as follows:
0. Food and live animals 7. Machinery and transport equipment
1. Beverages and tobacco 71. ri~eraz- r. other than electric
2. .- t .,a. -.-ii: inedible, except fuels 72. E L-:'.vc machinery, apparatus, and appliances
3. r, rlt !.1i:, Lubricants, and related materials 73. Transport equipment
4. Animal and vegetable oils and fats 8. Miscellaneous manufactured articles, n.e.c.
5. Chemicals 9. Commodities and transactions not classified according to kind
6. Manufactured goods classified chiefly by material
2Seasonally adjusted figures for section 7 may differ slightly from the sum of divisions 71, 72, and 73 since each is independently adjusted.
Data reflect 3- iztmnpt-s for seasonal and working-day variation and do not necessarily add to annual unadjusted totals. The adjusted section
totals in this ,rm r.i1 "re adjusted overall monthly totals in tables 1 and 2 were developed independently. See noteon front ;.-- :C this report.
4Excludes information on shipments of silver ore, base bullion (including sweepings, waste, and scrap), and refined bullion .-: footnote 3
on front page of this report.
5For technical reasons, data are not presented for this section.









Table 5. U.S. General Imports--Schedule A Sections, Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusted
by Month: January 1968 to March 1969
(In millions of dollars. Unadjusted totals represent sum of unrounded figures hence my vary slightly from sum of rounded amounts)

Schedule A sections'
Period
0 1 2 3 41 5 6 7 8 9

Seasonally adjusted2

19683
January-December .................. 4,571.2 806.2 3,281.0 2,521.0 8) 1,131.7 8,043.9 7,976.9 3,320.1
January-March.................... 1,077.8 193.9 776.3 605.9 (4) 263.0 2,052.2 1,759.6 765.8 (4)
January........................... 374.9 68.9 255.8 197.7 (4) 88.5 676.0 633.0 259.4 14(
February.......................... 372.5 .66.1 252.9 199.2 (4) 84.8 666.1 592.7 246.9 '1
March............................. 330.4 58.9 267.6 209.0 (") 89.7 710.1 533.9 259.5 .'1
April............................. 370.5 52.0 257.3 189.7 (4) 88.8 707.0 584.8 261.7 .*
May................................ 390.9 57.1 278.3 190.2 (') 95.4 670.6 657.5 281.7 I1
June.............................. 384.9 61.7 277.3 220.0 (4) 91.2 671.7 686.3 283.2 '1
July.......................... 392.8 73.3 272.3 221.6 (4) 99.7 608.1 611.1 282.0 I
August............................ 431.3 111.8 273.5 203.5 (4) 102.0 737.6 667.7 288.3 *
September......................... 410.0 85.5 309.5 235.1 (4) 101.6 676.9 750.0 288.8 .*
October........................... 326.8 52.5 276.4 222.1 (4) 90.8 619.7 745.1 280.8 i8)
November.......................... 411.3 52.7 280.6 223.2 (4) 99.3 640.1 761.6 286.4 (4)
December.......................... 374.9 65.7 279.5 209.7 (4) 99.9 660.0 753.2 301.4 (4)
1969

January-March..................... 920.6 113.9 796.5 658.5 (4) 259.0 1,678.2 1,979.6 865.0 (4)
January........................... 176.1 23.1 205.5 210.1 (4) 70.8 401.7 585.5 217.5 L 1'
February.......................... 313.6 30.8 274.8 236.9 (4) 85.2 609.3 695.5 305.5 (')
March............................. 430.9 60.0 316.2 211.5 (4) 103.0 667.2 698.6 342.0 (4)
April.............................
May...............................
June./..........................
July.............................
August...........................
September........................
October..........................
November.........................
December..........................

Unadjusted

19683
January-December.................. 4,577.4 786.3 3,297.4 2,528.6 158.2 1,134.7 8,073.2 7,991.1 3,346.7 1,220.5
January-March ..................... 1,056.8 200.2 737.2 661.9 37.7 270.2 1,977.6 1,834.8 697.7 J2.'.j.
January............ ............... 366.5 74.2 254.7 237.5 13.8 89.1 681.1 671.4 247.3 2.t
February.......................... 356.9 64.2 225.3 204.1 14.7 85.4 610.0 586.2 213.5 .?.7
March............................. 333.4 61.8 257.2 220.3 9.2 95.7 686.5 577.2 236.9 n.i
April............................. 393.8 61.5 260.3 193.9 11.3 102.5 760.1 609.6 246.6 107.2
May ............................... 396.1 55.2 296.3 178.0 13.4 103.9 718.9 699.4 262.7 I,' .5
June.............................. 353.8 47.6 281.4 202.8 15.4 81.6 647.0 664.9 261.1 ..0
July.............................. 403.3 54.4 287.1 228.5 17.4 94.7 654.1 630.6 332.5 1 '.
August............................ 403.1 80.8 288.9 187.1 8.5 101.3 "'.". 547.6 315.5 .7
September........................ 408.9 80.1 302.0 220.7 14.8 95.2 -- 5 663.3 312.2 105.8
October.......................... 368.2 67.2 292.2 226.6 12.7 88.6 648.5 788.4 325.3 1'..4
November.......................... 396.8 61.8 264.3 195.0 10.3 94.0 629.3 744.3 291.7 I0?.-
December.......................... 396.6 77.5 287.7 234.0 16.6 102.7 662.3 808.2 301.6 130.2



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